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0601-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Jun 16, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Wren Schultz
THEME: Marks at Intersections
Today’s themed answers are all diacritical marks. The clue references answers that use said mark in the grid. The marks are the intersection of across- and down-answers that use the mark:
45A. Mark in the intersection of 19-Across and 11-Down : CIRCUMFLEX
19A. ___ de la Cité : ÎLE
11D. Restaurant V.I.P. : MAÎTRE D’

62A. Mark in the intersection of 17-Across and 1-Down : UMLAUT
17A. Rock's Blue ___ Cult : ÖYSTER
1D. One-named singer from Iceland : BJÖRK

7D. Mark in the intersection of 58-Across and 43-Down : CEDILLA
58A. French waiter : GARÇON
43D. Neighbor of Aruba : CURAÇAO

22D. Mark in the intersection of 56-Across and 38-Down : TILDE
56A. 12 meses : AÑO
38D. Opposite of "No way, José!"? : SI, SEÑOR
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME:6m 25s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

7. Early 10th-century year : CMIX
CMIX = 909 in Roman numerals.

14. Dickinson with a modeling agency : JANICE
Janice Dickinson is one of several women sometimes described as the world’s first “supermodel”. Dickinson was at the height of her modeling career in the 1970s and 1980s. She regained national attention starting in 2003 when she became a judge of the reality TV show “America’s Next Top Model”.

17. Rock's Blue ___ Cult : ÖYSTER
Blue Öyster Cult is a rock band from Long Island, New York. I may be alone in labeling Blue Öyster Cult as a “one-hit wonder”, but I always associate the band with the marvelous 1976 song “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper”.

18. Scott in 1857 news : DRED
Famously, the slave Dred Scott was unsuccessful in suing for his freedom in St. Louis, Missouri in 1857.

19. ___ de la Cité : ÎLE
There are two famous islands in the middle of the River Seine in Paris, one being the Île de la Cité, and the other Île Saint-Louis. Île de la Cité is the most renowned of the two, as it is home to the cathedral of Notre Dame.

20. Triple Crown stat : RBI
In baseball, a player can earn the Triple Crown when he is the leader in three specific statistics. The pitching Triple Crown includes wins, strikeouts and earned run average (ERA). The batting Triple Crown includes home runs, runs batted in (RBI) and batting average.

23. Orch. section : STR
Strings (str.)

24. Supreme Court justice who replaced Stevens : KAGAN
Elena Kagan was the Solicitor General of the United States who replaced Justice John Paul Stevens on the US Supreme Court. That made Justice Kagan the first female US Solicitor General and the fourth female US Supreme Court justice. I hear she is a fan of Jane Austen, and used to reread "Pride and Prejudice" once a year. Not a bad thing to do, I'd say ...

John Paul Stevens retired as an associate justice on the US Supreme Court in 2010 after having served for over 34 years. That made him the third longest serving justice in the history of the court. Stevens had been nominated by President Gerald Ford to replace Justice William O. Douglas, who had been the longest serving justice in the court (at over 36 years).

26. U.N. agcy. that promotes "decent work for all women and men" : ILO
The ILO (International Labour Organization) is an agency now administered by the UN which was established by the League of Nations after WWI. The ILO deals with important issues such as health and safety, discrimination, child labor and forced labor. The organization was recognized for its work in 1969 when it was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

27. ___ Islands (autonomous part of Denmark) : FAROE
The Faroe Islands (also Faeroe Islands) are a group of islands lying halfway between Scotland and Iceland. The Faroe Islands are part of the Kingdom of Denmark and were granted the power of self-governance in 1948.

29. G.O.P. org. : RNC
National leadership of the Republican Party is provided by the Republican National Committee (RNC). Only one chairperson of the RNC has been elected to the office of US president, and that is George H. W. Bush.

The Republican Party has had the nickname Grand Old Party (GOP) since 1875. That said, the phrase was coined in the “Congressional Record” as “this gallant old party”. The moniker was changed to “grand old party” in 1876 in an article in the “Cincinnati Commercial”. The Republican Party’s elephant mascot dates back to an 1874 cartoon drawn by Thomas Nast for “Harper’s Weekly”. The Democrat’s donkey was already an established symbol. Nast drew a donkey clothed in a lion’s skin scaring away the other animals. One of the scared animals was an elephant, which Nast labeled “The Republican Vote”.

32. Erik of "CHiPs" : ESTRADA
Actor Erik Estrada got his big break in the movie "Airport 1975", before playing motorcycle police officer Poncherello on the television show “CHiPs” from 1977-81.

37. Odin's realm : ASGARD
Asgard is one of the Nine Worlds of Norse religions. It is where the Norse gods live, and is also home to Valhalla, the enormous hall ruled over by the god Odin.

41. Muscle builder for Popeye : SPINACH
Popeye first appeared in 1929 in a comic strip called "Thimble Theatre". The strip, created by E. C. Segar, ran for ten years before Popeye made an appearance. Popeye received such a great welcome from readers that he soon "took over" the strip, and eventually even hogged the strip's title. Before Popeye turned up Olive Oyl was the main character.

45. Mark in the intersection of 19-Across and 11-Down : CIRCUMFLEX
A circumflex is a diacritic mark used routinely in some languages, such as French. For example, there’s a circumflex over the first “e” in “être”, the French for “to be”.

47. Coffeehouse combo, often : DUO
I guess the reference is to a musical duo that might play in a coffeehouse.

48. Lightning Bolt : USAIN
Usain Bolt is a Jamaican sprinter who won the 100m and 200m race gold medals in both the 2008 and 2012 Olympic Games. Back in Jamaica, Bolt was really into cricket and probably would have been a very successful fast bowler had he not hit the track instead.

49. "Footloose" hero ___ McCormack : REN
The 1984 musical drama “Footloose” tells the story of a Chicago teen (played by Kevin Bacon) who moves to a small town in which dancing and rock music has been banned. The storyline is loosely based on real events in the Oklahoma City of Elmore. Dancing was banned in Elmore for almost 100 years, with the ban eventually being lifted in 1980.

52. Denouement : END
The “denouement” is the final resolution of a dramatic plot. The term is French, and derives from the Old French for “untying”, an “unknotting” as it were.

55. Tempe sch. : ASU
Arizona State University (ASU) has a long history, founded as the Tempe Normal School for the Arizona Territory in 1885. The athletic teams of ASU used to be known as the Normals, then the Bulldogs, and since 1946 they’ve been called the Sun Devils.

56. 12 meses : AÑO
In Spanish, there are twelve “meses” (months) in an “año” (year).

58. French waiter : GARÇON
“Garçon” is the French word for “boy”, and may be applied to a waiter in a restaurant.

60. E-guffaw : LOL
Laugh out loud (LOL, in text-speak)

62. Mark in the intersection of 17-Across and 1-Down : UMLAUT
An “umlaut” (also “diaeresis”) is a diacritical mark consisting of two horizontal dots placed over a letter, usually a vowel. Here in the West, we are perhaps most familiar with umlauts in German, as in “schön”, meaning “beautiful”.

63. Part of a financial portfolio, for short : IRA
Individual Retirement Account (IRA)

65. "___ Fables" : AESOP’S
Aesop is remembered today for his famous fables. Aesop lived in Ancient Greece, probably around the sixth century BC. Supposedly he was born a slave, somehow became a free man, but then met with a sorry end. Aesop was sent to the city of Delphi on a diplomatic mission but instead insulted the Delphians. He was tried on a trumped-up charge of stealing from a temple, sentenced to death and was thrown off a cliff.

Down
1. One-named singer from Iceland : BJÖRK
Björk is a rather eccentric singer-songwriter from Iceland who is a big hit in the UK in particular. Björk is the daughter of a nationally-recognized union leader in her home country.

3. Midshipmen, after commission : ENSIGNS
Ensign is (usually) the most junior rank of commissioned officer in the armed forces. The name comes from the tradition that the junior officer would be given the task of carrying the ensign flag.

6. Migratory seabird : TERN
Terns are seabirds that are found all over the world. The Arctic Tern makes a very long-distance migration. One Arctic Tern that was tagged as a chick in Great Britain in the summer of 1982, was spotted in Melbourne, Australia just three months later. The bird had traveled over 14,000 miles in over those three months, an average of about 150 miles a day. Remarkable …

7. Mark in the intersection of 58-Across and 43-Down : CEDILLA
A cedilla is the diacritical mark found under the letter C in many French words, as in the word “garçon”.

8. Rocky Mountains rodent : MARMOT
Marmots are large ground squirrels. Included in the genus is the famous groundhog, but not the prairie dog.

11. Restaurant V.I.P. : MAÎTRE D’
The full name of a “maître d'” is "maître d’hôtel", which means "master of the hotel".

12. Frontman of the "Welcome to the Jungle" band : AXL ROSE
Axl Rose is the lead vocalist of the American rock band, Guns N' Roses.

Guns N' Roses is a hard rock band founded in 1985 that is still going strong. The group was pulled together by Axl Rose, the lead vocalist. The lead-guitar player back then was Tracii Guns, and it was the combination of Axl and Tracii's "family" names that led to the band being called Guns N' Roses.

22. Mark in the intersection of 56-Across and 38-Down : TILDE
As in say, piñata.

23. "Elephant Boy" boy : SABU
The 1937 British film "Elephant Boy" starred a young Indian elephant driver called Sabu Dastagir. Sabu (he was often known just by the one name) made more British films over the next few years, including "The Thief of Baghdad" in 1940 and the 1942 version of "The Jungle book". Sabu moved to Hollywood and became a US citizen in 1944. He joined the US Army Air Forces and served as a tail gunner in the Pacific, eventually winning the Distinguished Flying Cross for valor and bravery. Sadly, in 1963 Sabu died of a heart attack at only 39 years of age.

28. Alf and Mork, for short : ETS
“ALF” is a sitcom that aired in the late eighties. ALF is a hand-puppet, supposedly an alien from the planet Melmac that crash-landed in a suburban neighborhood. “ALF” stands for “alien life form”.

"Mork & Mindy" was broadcast from 1978 to 1982. We were first introduced to Mork (played by Robin Williams) in a special episode of "Happy Days". The particular episode in question has a bizarre storyline culminating in Fonzie and Mork having a thumb-to-finger duel. Eventually Richie wakes up in bed, and alien Mork was just part of a dream! Oh, and "Nanu Nanu" means both "hello" and "goodbye" back on the planet Ork. "I am Mork from Ork, Nanu Nanu". Great stuff ...

30. The N.C.A.A.'s Aggies, informally : A AND M
Texas A&M is the seventh largest university in the country, and was the first public higher education institute in the state when it accepted its first students in 1876. The full name of the school was the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas and its primary mission used to be the education of males in the techniques of farming and military warfare. That's quite a combination! Because of the agricultural connection, the college's sports teams use the moniker "Aggies".

31. DNA strand shape : HELIX
Francis Crick and James Watson discovered that DNA had a double-helix, chain-like structure, and published their results in Cambridge in 1953. To this day the discovery is mired in controversy, as some crucial results collected by fellow researcher Rosalind Franklin were used without her permission or even knowledge.

33. Any airing of "Friends," now : RERUN
The six title characters in the sitcom “Friends” met each other in the Central Perk coffeehouse from the very first episode. There is now a Central Perk franchise in the reality, with locations all around the globe. The Central Perk in Dubai was opened by actor James Michael Tyler, who played the coffeehouse manager Gunther on the show.

37. Prefix with pressure : ACU-
Acupressure and acupuncture are related alternative medical techniques. Both aim to clear blockages in the flow of life energy through the body’s meridians. The treatment is given by stimulating “acupoints’ in the body, by applying pressure in the case of acupressure, and by applying needles in the case of acupuncture.

39. What may be in a breakfast bar : GRANOLA
The name “Granola” (and “Granula”) were trademarked back in the late 1800s for whole-grain foods that were crumbled and baked until crisp. Granola was created in Dansville, New York in 1894.

40. Pepto-Bismol target : ACID
Pepto-Bismol was originally marketed as a remedy for infant diarrhea, and sold under the name “Bismosol: Mixture Cholera Infantum”.

42. Hoopla : ADO
The word “hoopla” means “boisterous excitement”. The term probably comes from “houp-là”, something the French say instead of “upsy-daisy”. Then again, “upsy-daisy” probably isn’t something said very often here in the US …

43. Neighbor of Aruba : CURAÇAO
Curaçao is one of the so-called ABC Islands. "ABC Islands" is the nickname given to the three westernmost islands of the Leeward Antilles in the Caribbean. The nickname comes from the first letters of the island names: Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao. All three of the ABC Islands are part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

46. Champagne's place : FRANCE
Champagne is a historic province in the northeast of France, famous of course for its sparkling white wine.

51. Em and Polly, in literature : AUNTS
In “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz”, Dorothy lives with her Aunt Em and Uncle Henry.

Early in the story of “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer”, young Tom is punished by his Aunt Polly for dirtying his clothes in a fight. He is made to whitewash the fence surrounding the house.

54. Contents of un lago : AGUA
In Spanish, a lake (un lago) contains water (agua).

56. Boxing's "Louisville Lip" : ALI
Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr. was born in 1942 in Louisville, Kentucky. Clay changed his name to Muhammad Ali when he converted to Islam in 1964. Who can forget Muhammad Ali lighting the Olympic flame for the 1996 games in Atlanta? Ali was presented with a gold medal during those '96 Games, a replacement for the medal he won at the 1960 Olympics. He had thrown the original into the Ohio River as a gesture of disgust after being refused service at a "whites only" restaurant.

57. Backboard attachment : RIM
That would be in basketball.

59. "Treasure Island" monogram : RLS
Robert Louis Stevenson's (RLS) most celebrated work I'd say is "Treasure Island", originally written as a series for a children's magazine in 1881. I remember "Treasure Island" as the first "real" novel I read as a youngster ...

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Screwed up big-time : BLEW IT
7. Early 10th-century year : CMIX
11. Fit to be tied : MAD
14. Dickinson with a modeling agency : JANICE
15. Leisure : EASE
16. Fire truck accessory : AXE
17. Rock's Blue ___ Cult : ÖYSTER
18. Scott in 1857 news : DRED
19. ___ de la Cité : ÎLE
20. Triple Crown stat : RBI
21. Eventually : IN TIME
23. Orch. section : STR
24. Supreme Court justice who replaced Stevens : KAGAN
26. U.N. agcy. that promotes "decent work for all women and men" : ILO
27. ___ Islands (autonomous part of Denmark) : FAROE
29. G.O.P. org. : RNC
30. Well-wisher's wish : ALL THE BEST
32. Erik of "CHiPs" : ESTRADA
34. Gives the slip : ELUDES
35. Ariz.-to-Kan. direction : ENE
36. ___-mo replay : SLO
37. Odin's realm : ASGARD
41. Muscle builder for Popeye : SPINACH
45. Mark in the intersection of 19-Across and 11-Down : CIRCUMFLEX
47. Coffeehouse combo, often : DUO
48. Lightning Bolt : USAIN
49. "Footloose" hero ___ McCormack : REN
50. To a degree, informally : SORTA
52. Denouement : END
53. Awaited a tongue depressor, maybe : SAID AH
55. Tempe sch. : ASU
56. 12 meses : AÑO
57. "You ___?" (butler's line) : RANG
58. French waiter : GARÇON
60. E-guffaw : LOL
61. Advance slowly : INCH
62. Mark in the intersection of 17-Across and 1-Down : UMLAUT
63. Part of a financial portfolio, for short : IRA
64. Greet's partner : MEET
65. "___ Fables" : AESOP’S

Down
1. One-named singer from Iceland : BJÖRK
2. Expose for all to see : LAY BARE
3. Midshipmen, after commission : ENSIGNS
4. Jokester : WIT
5. Strand at a ski lodge, maybe : ICE IN
6. Migratory seabird : TERN
7. Mark in the intersection of 58-Across and 43-Down : CEDILLA
8. Rocky Mountains rodent : MARMOT
9. "Gotcha" : I SEE
10. Struck (out) : XED
11. Restaurant V.I.P. : MAÎTRE D’
12. Frontman of the "Welcome to the Jungle" band : AXL ROSE
13. Poor grade : DEE
22. Mark in the intersection of 56-Across and 38-Down : TILDE
23. "Elephant Boy" boy : SABU
25. Don't just sit there : ACT
27. Arsonist, e.g. : FELON
28. Alf and Mork, for short : ETS
30. The N.C.A.A.'s Aggies, informally : A AND M
31. DNA strand shape : HELIX
33. Any airing of "Friends," now : RERUN
36. Pass, as time : SPEND
37. Prefix with pressure : ACU-
38. Opposite of "No way, José!"? : SI, SEÑOR
39. What may be in a breakfast bar : GRANOLA
40. Pepto-Bismol target : ACID
41. Deceptive dexterity : SLEIGHT
42. Hoopla : ADO
43. Neighbor of Aruba : CURAÇAO
44. Steaming bowlful : HOT SOUP
46. Champagne's place : FRANCE
50. "Tsk, tsk!" : SHAME!
51. Em and Polly, in literature : AUNTS
53. Mentally together : SANE
54. Contents of un lago : AGUA
56. Boxing's "Louisville Lip" : ALI
57. Backboard attachment : RIM
59. "Treasure Island" monogram : RLS


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0531-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 May 16, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Sarah Keller
THEME: E-I-E-I-O
Today’s sequence of themed answers starts with the single letters E-I-E-I-O, which is the refrain to “Old McDonald Had a Farm”.
69A. Children's song refrain found at the starts of 17-, 26-, 35-, 50- and 57-Across : E-I-E-I-O
17A. Bruce Springsteen's group : E STREET BAND
26A. Offensive football lineup : I-FORMATION
35A. Phrase on the back of a buck : E PLURIBUS UNUM
50A. Cole Porter classic from "Can-Can" : I LOVE PARIS
57A. Surprise ending, as in "The Gift of the Magi" : O'HENRY TWIST
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME:6m 42s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. Cretan peak: Abbr. : MT IDA
There are two peaks called Mount Ida that are sacred according to Greek mythology. Mount Ida in Crete is the island's highest point, and is where one can find the cave in which Zeus was reared. Mount Ida in Asia Minor (located in modern-day Turkey) is where Ganymede was swept up by Zeus in the form of an eagle that took him to Olympus where he served as cupbearer to the gods.

11. Home of George W. Bush's library, for short : SMU
Southern Methodist University (SMU) is located in University Park, Texas (part of Dallas), and was founded in 1911. SMU is home to the George W. Bush Presidential Library.

17. Bruce Springsteen's group : E STREET BAND
The E Street Band is the backing group for Bruce Springsteen. The band came together in 1972 but didn't take a formal name until two years later. The keyboard player in the original line up was David Sancious, and his mother allowed the group to rehearse at her home. That home was on E Street in Belmar, New Jersey, and that's where the band got their name.

19. Sheepskin boot name : UGG
Uggs are sheepskin boots that originated in Australia and New Zealand. Uggs have sheepskin fleece on the inside for comfort and insulation, with a tanned leather surface on the outside for durability. Ugg is a generic term down under, although it’s a brand name here in the US.

22. Vodka brand : SKYY
Skyy Vodka is produced in the US, although the operation is owned by the Campari Group headquartered in Italy. Skyy first hit the shelves in 1992 when it was created by an entrepreneur from San Francisco, California.

32. Longtime New York Times film critic : AO SCOTT
A. O. Scott is the chief film critic, a role he shares with Manohla Dargis. Scott also filled in many times for Roger Ebert on the TV show “Ebert & Roeper”, while Ebert was ill.

33. Adele song with the lyric "I must have called a thousand times" : HELLO
Adele is the stage name of English singer Adele Adkins. Adele’s debut album is “19”, named after the age she was during the album’s production. Her second album was even more successful than the first. Called “21”, the second album was released three years after the first, when Adele was three years older. More recently, her third studio album “25”, released in 2015, broke the first-week sales records in both the UK and the US.

34. Letters associated with a rainbow flag : LGBT
Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT)

The best-known rainbow flag is the one representing gay pride. Such usage of the rainbow flag was popularized in 1978 by artist Gilbert Baker. The varying colors of the flag represent the diversity of the gay community.

35. Phrase on the back of a buck : E PLURIBUS UNUM
From 1776, "E pluribus unum" was the unofficial motto of the United States. “E pluribus unum” is Latin for “Out of many, one”. It was pushed aside in 1956 when an Act of Congress designated "In God We Trust" as the country's official motto.

44. Gourd-shaped rattles : MARACAS
Maracas are percussion instruments native to Latin America. They are constructed from a dried shell, like that of a coconut, to which a handle is attached. The shell is filled with dried seeds or beans, and shaken.

A gourd is a plant in the same family as the cucumber. The hollow, dried out shell of the fruit is large and rounded, and used for a number of purposes. Gourds make fine bottles and bowls, and resonating chambers as part of musical instruments ... and drums.

48. Respectful term for a conductor : MAESTRO
“Maestro” is often used to address a musical conductor. “Maestro” (plural “maestri”) is the Italian word for “master, teacher”. The plural in English is usually “maestros”.

50. Cole Porter classic from "Can-Can" : I LOVE PARIS
The Cole Porter musical "Can-Can" was first produced on Broadway, in 1953, where it ran for two years. There was a very successful film adaptation (which I saw recently ... it's good stuff) released in 1960, starring Shirley MacLaine, Frank Sinatra and Maurice Chevalier. During filming, the Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev visited the set as part of a tour of 20th Century Fox studios. He made a big splash in the media at the time describing what he saw as "depraved" and "pornographic".

54. Folkie Phil : OCHS
Phil Ochs was an American protest singer who was active in the days of the Vietnam War. Sadly, the singer’s mental health declined at the very time the war was winding down. Saigon fell in 1975, and Ochs committed suicide in 1976.

57. Surprise ending, as in "The Gift of the Magi" : O. HENRY TWIST
O. Henry was the pen name of writer William Sydney Porter from Greensboro, North Carolina. O. Henry is famous for his witty short stories that have a clever twist in the tail.

O’Henry’s short story called "The Gift of the Magi" was first published in 1905. It tells of relatively poor, newly-married couple who want to buy each other a gift for Christmas. The wife’s pride and joy is her long blonde hair, while the husband’s most treasured possession is his grandfather’s gold pocket watch. The wife sells her hair to buy her gift, and the husband sells his watch to buy his gift for his spouse. The wife is given a set of combs, hair accessories that are useless now that her hair is short. The husband gets a platinum fob chain for the watch that he no longer owns.

64. 11-Down that made "King Kong" : RKO
(11D. Where to find a soundstage : STUDIO)
When RKO released the 1933 movie “King Kong”, the promotional material listed the ape’s height as 50 feet. During filming, a bust was created for a 40-foot ape, as well as a full-size hand that went with a 70-foot Kong.

65. Picture book character lost in a crowd : WALDO
The reference is to the series of children's illustrated books called "Where's Waldo?", originally titled "Where's Wally?" in Britain where the books originated. The book contains page after page of illustrations with crowds of people surrounding famous landmarks from around the world. The challenge is to find Waldo/Wally, who is hidden in the crowd.

67. Frodo's best friend : SAM
Samwise Gamgee is the sidekick to Frodo Baggins in Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings”.

Frodo Baggins is a principal character in J. R. R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings". Frodo is a Hobbit, and is charged with the quest of destroying Sauron's Ring in the fires of Mount Doom.

69. Children's song refrain found at the starts of 17-, 26-, 35-, 50- and 57-Across : E-I-E-I-O
There was an American version of the English children's song "Old MacDonald Had a Farm" (E-I-E-I-O), that was around in the days of WWI. The first line of the US version goes "Old MacDougal had a farm, in Ohio-i-o".

Down
1. ___ Palace (Elsa's hide-out in "Frozen") : ICE
“Frozen” is a 2013 animated feature from Walt Disney Studios that is based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale “The Snow Queen”.

2. "___ Doubtfire" : MRS
The 1993 comedy “Mrs. Doubtfire” is based on a 1987 novel called “Madame Doubtfire” by Anne Fine. The movie is set and was filmed in San Francisco. The title role is played by Robin Williams who spent most of the movie dressed as the female Mrs. Doubtfire. Perhaps not surprisingly, the movie won the Oscar for Best Makeup.

4. New Deal prez : FDR
“The New Deal” was the series of economic programs championed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in response to the Great Depression. The New Deal was focused on three objectives, the “3 Rs”:
- Relief for the unemployed and poor
- Recovery of the economy to normal levels
- Reform of the financial system to prevent a repeat depression

7. No-no : TABOO
The word "taboo" was introduced into English by Captain Cook in his book "A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean". Cook described "tabu" (likely imitative of a Tongan word that he had heard) as something that was both consecrated and forbidden.

8. Glass of "This American Life" : IRA
Ira Glass is a greatly-respected presenter on American Public Radio, most noted for his show "This American Life". I was interested to learn that one of my favorite composers, Philip Glass, is Ira's first cousin.

18. Buffalo's county : ERIE
Buffalo is the second most-populous city in the state of New York. The city takes its name from Buffalo Creek that runs through the metropolis (although the waterway is called Buffalo River within the city). The source of the name Buffalo Creek is the subject of much speculation, but one thing is clear, there were never any bison in the area.

22. Globe shape: Abbr. : SPH
Sphere (sph.)

23. "Red Balloon" painter Paul : KLEE
The artist Paul Klee was born in Switzerland, but studied art in Munich in Germany. You can see many of Klee's works in the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. If you get to Bern in Switzerland, even more of them can be seen at the Zentrum Paul Klee that was opened in 2005.

24. App with restaurant reviews : YELP
yelp.com is a website that provides a local business directory and reviews of services. The site is sort of like Yellow Pages on steroids, and the term “yelp” is derived from “yel-low p-ages”. I have a young neighbor here who used to work for yelp ...

27. Prego alternative : RAGU
The Ragú brand of pasta sauce is owned by Unilever. The name " Ragù" is the Italian word for a sauce used to dress pasta, however the spelling is off a little. In Italian the word is "Ragù" with a grave accent over the "u", but if you look at a jar of the sauce on the supermarket shelf it is spelled "Ragú" on the label, with an acute accent. Sometimes I think we just don't try ...

The Prego brand of pasta sauce is owned by the Campbell Soup Company. It is actually based on the family recipe of one of the company's chefs. "Prego" literally means "I pray" in Italian, but it translates in English best as "you're welcome" when it is used after a "thank you" ("grazie", in Italian).

34. Corp. takeover : LBO
A leveraged buyout (LBO) is a transaction in which an investor acquires a controlling volume of stock in a company, but buys that stock with borrowed funds (hence "leveraged"). Often the assets of the acquired company are used as collateral for the borrowed money. There is a special form of LBO known as a management buyout (MBO) in which the company's own management team purchases the controlling interest.

37. Ingrid Bergman's "Casablanca" role : ILSA
Ilsa Lund was played by Ingrid Bergman in the 1942 movie "Casablanca". I love the words of one critic describing the chemistry between Bogart and Bergman in this film: "she paints his face with her eyes". Wow ...

38. Snack : NOSH
Our word "nosh" has been around since the late fifties, when it was imported from the Yiddish word "nashn" meaning "to nibble".

40. Joan of art : MIRO
Joan Miro was a Spanish artist. Miro immersed himself in Surrealism, so much so that Andre Breton, the founder of the movement, said that Miro was "the most Surrealist of us all".

43. Bobby : U.K. :: ___ : U.S. : COP
“To cop” was northern British dialect for “to seize, catch”. This verb evolved in the noun “copper”, describing a policeman, someone who catches criminals. “Copper” is often shortened to “cop”.

Police officers in the UK are sometimes called "bobbies" (and used to be called "peelers"). The name refers back to Sir Robert Peel who, when Home Secretary, created the modern police force.

44. Scrooge types : MISERS
The classic 1843 novella "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens has left us with a few famous phrases and words. Firstly, it led to popular use of the phrase "Merry Christmas", and secondly it gave us the word "scrooge" meaning a miserly person. And thirdly, everyone knows that Ebenezer Scrooge uttered the words "Bah! Humbug!".

45. U.S. state closest to the International Date Line : ALASKA
The International Date Line (IDL) is an imaginary line that runs north-south along the 180-degree line of latitude (with a few deviations). The IDL is located on the opposite side of the Earth to the Prime Meridian, which runs through Greenwich, England. A person flying non-stop around the world from east to west loses one hour each time he or she crosses a time zone. When that person arrives back at his or her starting point, she would have lost 24 hours in total, a full day. So, the traveller has to compensate by moving the calendar forward 24 hours, by adding a day. By convention, this change of date is made when crossing the IDL.

46. "My Big Fat Greek Wedding" or "When Harry Met Sally ..." : ROMCOM
Not only is the delightful Nia Vardalos the star of the 2002 hit movie "My Big Fat Greek Wedding", she also wrote the screenplay. The film never made it to number one at the box office, but it still pulled in more money than any other movie in history that didn't make it to number one. That record I think reflects the fact that the film wasn't a blockbuster but rather a so-called "sleeper hit", a movie that people went to see based on referrals from friends. The big fat mistake came when a spin-off TV show was launched, "My Big Fat Greek Life". It ran for only 7 episodes. The 2016 sequel “My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2” had better luck in theaters.

“When Harry Met Sally... “ is a 1989 romantic comedy starring Billy Crystal and Meg Ryan in the title roles. This marvelous film was written by the late Nora Ephron and directed by Rob Reiner.

47. "___ Maria" : AVE
"Ave Maria" ("Hail Mary" in English) is the prayer at the core of the Roman Catholic Rosary, which itself is a set of prayers asking for the assistance of the Virgin Mary. Much of the text of the "Hail Mary" comes from the Gospel of Luke. The words in Latin are:
AVE MARIA, gratia plena, Dominus tecum. Benedicta tu in mulieribus, et benedictus fructus ventris tui, Iesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc, et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.
The prayer has been adapted as a hymn. The two most famous musical versions of “Ave Maria” are by Charles Gounod (based on a piece by Bach) and by Franz Schubert.

48. One-millionth of a meter : MICRON
The measurement of length called a “micron” is more correctly referred to a micrometer (or “micrometre”). It is equivalent to one millionth of a meter.

49. Like a barbecue pit : ASHY
It is believed that our word “barbecue” (BBQ) comes from the Taíno people of the Caribbean in whose language “barbacoa” means “sacred fire pit”.

51. Last movement of a sonata : RONDO
A rondo was often chosen by composers in the classical period for the last movement of a sonata (or symphony or concerto, for that matter). In rondo form there is a principal theme that alternates with a contrasting theme(s). So, the original theme anchors the whole piece in between secondary digressions.

57. Part of B.Y.O.B. : OWN
Bring Your Own Beer/Bottle/Booze (BYOB)

60. Rival of Xbox : WII
The Wii is the biggest-selling game console in the world.

The XBox line of video game consoles is made by Microsoft. The original XBox platform was followed by XBox 360 and most recently by XBox One. Microsoft’s XBox competes directly with Sony’s PlayStation and Nintendo’s Wii.

61. "I Like ___" (old campaign slogan) : IKE
“I Like Ike” was a political slogan that originated with the grassroots movement to get Dwight D. Eisenhower to run for president in the 1952 presidential election.

62. Due x tre : SEI
In Italian, “due” (two) times “tre” (three) is “sei” (six).

63. Chinese menu general : TSO
General Tso's chicken is an American creation, often found on the menu of a Chinese restaurant. The name General Tso may be a reference to General Zuo Zongtang of the Qing Dynasty, but there is no clear link.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "Gotta run!" : I’M OFF!
6. Cretan peak: Abbr. : MT IDA
11. Home of George W. Bush's library, for short : SMU
14. Potty-mouthed : CRUDE
15. Rowed : OARED
16. ___ and feather : TAR
17. Bruce Springsteen's group : E STREET BAND
19. Sheepskin boot name : UGG
20. Jazz combo, often : TRIO
21. Advantage : EDGE
22. Vodka brand : SKYY
26. Offensive football lineup : I-FORMATION
30. Makes happy : PLEASES
32. Longtime New York Times film critic : AO SCOTT
33. Adele song with the lyric "I must have called a thousand times" : HELLO
34. Letters associated with a rainbow flag : LGBT
35. Phrase on the back of a buck : E PLURIBUS UNUM
41. Move, in real-estate lingo : RELO
42. Subject of discussion : TOPIC
44. Gourd-shaped rattles : MARACAS
48. Respectful term for a conductor : MAESTRO
50. Cole Porter classic from "Can-Can" : I LOVE PARIS
52. Earring shape : HOOP
53. "___ here!" : SAME
54. Folkie Phil : OCHS
56. Top-left button on most keyboards : ESC
57. Surprise ending, as in "The Gift of the Magi" : O. HENRY TWIST
64. 11-Down that made "King Kong" : RKO
65. Picture book character lost in a crowd : WALDO
66. "Oh no!" : YIKES!
67. Frodo's best friend : SAM
68. Fishline material : NYLON
69. Children's song refrain found at the starts of 17-, 26-, 35-, 50- and 57-Across : E-I-E-I-O

Down
1. ___ Palace (Elsa's hide-out in "Frozen") : ICE
2. "___ Doubtfire" : MRS
3. Publicly 34-Across : OUT
4. New Deal prez : FDR
5. Pedicure targets : FEET
6. Recurring musical ideas : MOTIFS
7. No-no : TABOO
8. Glass of "This American Life" : IRA
9. Lion's hide-out : DEN
10. Stir in : ADD
11. Where to find a soundstage : STUDIO
12. Housefly larva : MAGGOT
13. Subject heading for an important email : URGENT
18. Buffalo's county : ERIE
21. "Yadda, yadda, yadda" : ETC
22. Globe shape: Abbr. : SPH
23. "Red Balloon" painter Paul : KLEE
24. App with restaurant reviews : YELP
25. Informal pronoun : Y’ALL
27. Prego alternative : RAGU
28. Unruly crowds : MOBS
29. Quick on the uptake : ASTUTE
31. Reporter's contact : SOURCE
34. Corp. takeover : LBO
36. Gather what's been sown : REAP
37. Ingrid Bergman's "Casablanca" role : ILSA
38. Snack : NOSH
39. "What've you been ___?" : UP TO
40. Joan of art : MIRO
43. Bobby : U.K. :: ___ : U.S. : COP
44. Scrooge types : MISERS
45. U.S. state closest to the International Date Line : ALASKA
46. "My Big Fat Greek Wedding" or "When Harry Met Sally ..." : ROMCOM
47. "___ Maria" : AVE
48. One-millionth of a meter : MICRON
49. Like a barbecue pit : ASHY
51. Last movement of a sonata : RONDO
55. Eye irritation : STYE
57. Part of B.Y.O.B. : OWN
58. Cushion material for some horse-drawn rides : HAY
59. Building wing : ELL
60. Rival of Xbox : WII
61. "I Like ___" (old campaign slogan) : IKE
62. Due x tre : SEI
63. Chinese menu general : TSO


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0530-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Mar 16, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: David Woolf
THEME: Tossed Salad
Each of today’s themed answers contains a string of letters that are circled in my grid. These letters are S-A-L-A-D, but the order has been TOSSED around, rearranged:
62A. Common first course ... or what's literally contained in 17-, 23-, 32-, 44- and 49-Across? : TOSSED SALAD

17A. Tropical drinks often served with umbrellas : PINA COLADAS
23A. Spicy ballroom activity? : SALSA DANCING
32A. Finishing eighth out of eight, say : DEAD LAST
44A. Application to highways before a winter storm : ROAD SALT
49A. "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" author : DOUGLAS ADAMS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME:5m 59s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Funny Groucho or Harpo : MARX
Groucho Marx's real name was Julius Henry Marx. By the time Groucho started his successful, post-Hollywood career hosting the quiz show "You Bet Your Life", he was sporting a real mustache. For all his movies, his mustache had been painted on with greasepaint.

Harpo Marx was the second oldest of the Marx brothers. Harpo’s real name was Adolph, and he earned his nickname because he played the harp. Famously he didn’t speak on screen, a routine he developed after reading a review that he performed really well when he just didn’t speak!

5. Lover of Tristan, in legend : ISOLDE
According to Arthurian legend, Iseult (also “Isolde”) was the adulterous lover of Sir Tristan, one of the Knights of the Round Table. Iseult was an Irish Princess who fell in love with Tristan who had been sent to win Iseult’s hand in marriage for King Mark of Cornwall. The tale was used as the basis for Richard Wagner’s celebrated opera “Tristan und Isolde”.

11. Place with R.V. hookups : KOA
Kampgrounds of America (KOA) was founded in 1962 by Montana businessman Dave Drum, who opened up his first property along the Yellowstone River. His strategy was to offer a rich package of services including hot showers, restrooms and a store, which he hoped would attract people used to camping in the rough. The original campground was an immediate hit and Drum took on two partners and sold franchises all over the country. There are about 500 KOA sites today.

15. GoDaddy purchase : DOMAIN
GoDaddy is a domain registrar and web hosting company. A domain registrar is an entity that manages the reservation of Internet domain names. In fact, I use to GoDaddy to maintain my registration of the LAXCrossword.com and NYTCrossword.com domain names. The other side of GoDaddy’s business is web hosting. This means that GoDaddy provides space on servers where websites (like this one) are maintained, and also provides Internet connectivity so that the website is accessible via the World Wide Web.

17. Tropical drinks often served with umbrellas : PINA COLADAS
“Piña colada” is a Spanish term which translates into "strained pineapple". The Piña colada cocktail was introduced in the Caribe Hilton San Juan in 1954, and since 1978 it has been the official beverage of Puerto Rico. Yum ...

19. ___ Period (time in Japanese history) : EDO
Edo is the former name of the Japanese city of Tokyo. Edo was the seat of the Tokugawa shogunate, a feudal regime that ruled from 1603 until 1868. The shogun lived in the magnificent Edo castle. Some parts of the original castle remain and today's Tokyo Imperial Palace, the residence of the Emperor of Japan, was built on its grounds.

20. Lustful deity of myth : SATYR
The satyrs of Greek mythology came with a very high sex drive. They are the "rude" male subjects drawn on the side of old Greek vases. The nubile maidens known as nymphs were often an object of attention for the satyrs.

23. Spicy ballroom activity? : SALSA DANCING
The genre of music called salsa is a modern interpretation of various Cuban traditional music styles.

27. Communication for the deaf, in brief : ASL
It's really quite unfortunate that American Sign Language (ASL) and British Sign Language (BSL) are very different, and someone who has learned to sign in one cannot understand someone signing in the other.

31. Baseball Hall-of-Famer Mel : OTT
At 5' 9", Mel Ott weighed just 170 lb (I don't think he took steroids!) and yet he was the first National League player to hit over 500 home runs. Sadly, Ott died in a car accident in New Orleans in 1958 when he was only 49 years old.

47. Actress Thurman : UMA
Robert Thurman was the first westerner to be ordained a Tibetan Buddhist monk. Robert raised his children in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition and called his daughter "Uma" as it is a phonetic spelling of the Buddhist name "Dbuma". Uma’s big break in movies came with her starring role in Quentin Tarantino’s 1994 hit “Pulp Fiction”. My favorite Uma Thurman film is the wonderful 1996 romantic comedy “The Truth About Cats and Dogs”.

48. Zodiac lion : LEO
Leo is the fifth astrological sign of the Zodiac. People born from July 23 to August 22 are Leos.

49. "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" author : DOUGLAS ADAMS
The English writer and dramatist Douglas Adams is best known for "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy". "The Hitchhiker's Guide ..." started out life as a comedy series on BBC radio in 1978, but it certainly had legs. It was adapted into stage shows, five books, a television series, computer game and a 2005 film.

55. Boleyn, Brontë or Bancroft : ANNE
Anne Boleyn was the second wife of Henry VIII of England. Anne was found guilty of high treason after about a thousand days of marriage to Henry, accused of adultery and incest (probably trumped-up charges). She was executed, but perhaps her legacy lived on in her only child, as her daughter reigned for 45 very prosperous years as Queen Elizabeth I.

Anne was the youngest of the three sisters in the literary Brontë family. Her older sisters wrote novels that are more recognized, but Anne's two novels do have a following. "Agnes Grey" is based on her own experiences working as a governess. Her other novel, "The Tenant of Wildfell Hall" is written as a long letter from a young man describing the events leading up to his first meeting with his wife-to-be. Anne Brontë's writing career was cut short in 1849, when she died of pulmonary tuberculosis, at only 29 years of age.

The lovely actress Anne Bancroft was born Anna Italiano in the the Bronx, New York. Bancroft was probably best known for her performances in the 1962 movie “The Miracle Worker” (for which she won a Best Actress Oscar) and in the 1967 movie “The Graduate”. She was married for 40 years to Mel Brooks, right up till her passing in 2005.

56. Prof helpers : TAS
Teaching assistant (TA)

61. 2012 #1 album for Taylor Swift : RED
Singer Taylor Swift had one of her first gigs at the US Open tennis tournament when she was in her early teens. There she sang the national anthem and received a lot of favorable attention for the performance.

65. Maker of the Optima and Sorento : KIA
The Kia Optima was sold for a while in Canada and Europe as the Kia Magentis.

The Kia Sorento is an SUV.

70. The Ugly Duckling, actually : SWAN
Hans Christian Andersen's tale "The Ugly Duckling" has to be one of the most endearing ever written. Unlike so many "fairy tales", "The Ugly Duckling" isn't based on any folklore and simply a product of Andersen's imagination. It is speculated that Andersen was the illegitimate son of the Crown Prince of Denmark, and that he wrote the story of the ugly duckling that turned into a beautiful swan as a metaphor for the secret royal lineage that was within Andersen himself.

Down
1. Rand McNally items : MAPS
Rand McNally is a company long associated with the city of Chicago. Its roots go back to 1856 when William Rand opened a printing shop in the city. Two years later he hired an Irish immigrant named Andrew McNally and the pair turned to printing tickets and timetables for the railroad industry. They diversified into "railroad guides" in 1870, a precursor of what was to be their big success, the road atlas. When automobile travel started to become significant, Rand and McNally turned their attention to roads and they published their first road map, of New York City in 1904. Rand and McNally really popularized the use of highway numbers, and indeed erected many roadside highway signs themselves, long before the state and federal authorities adopted the idea.

2. Big name in running shoes : AVIA
The Avia brand name for athletic shoes was chosen as "avia" is the Latin word for "to fly", and suggests the concept of aviation. Avia was founded in Oregon in 1979.

3. $2,000 for Boardwalk, with a hotel : RENT
Boardwalk is a property sitting right beside the GO corner in the game of Monopoly.

The street names in the US version of Monopoly are locations in or around Atlantic City, New Jersey.

4. Penetrating looks? : X-RAYS
X-rays were first studied comprehensively by the German physicist Wilhelm Röntgen (also "Roentgen"), and it was he who gave the name "X-rays" to this particular type of radiation. Paradoxically, in Röntgen's native language of German, X-rays are routinely referred to as "Röntgen rays". In 1901 Röntgen won the first Nobel Prize in Physics that was ever awarded, recognition for his work on X-rays.

6. Note between fa and la : SOL
The solfa syllables are: do, re, mi, fa, sol, la & ti.

7. Warren Buffet, the Oracle of ___ : OMAHA
Warren Buffett is one of my heroes, a man with the nicknames “Wizard of Omaha” and “Oracle of Omaha”. Despite being one of the wealthiest men in the world, Buffet lives a relatively frugal and modest life. Buffett also has a very Jeffersonian attitude towards the role his wealth plays within his family. He has set up his estate so that his children get enough money to be independent, but the vast majority of his assets are going to charity, both before and after he dies.

9. Singer Ross with the Supremes : DIANA
The Supremes were the most successful vocal group in US history, based on number one hits. The group started out in 1959 as a four-member lineup called the Primettes. The name was changed to the Supremes in 1961. One member dropped out in 1962, leaving the Supremes as a trio. Lead singer Diana Ross began to garner much of the attention, which eventually led to a further name change, to Diana Ross & the Supremes.

10. Coast Guard rank: Abbr. : ENS
Ensign (ens.)

26. Thanksgiving's mo. : NOV
Thanksgiving Day was observed on different dates in different states for many years, until Abraham Lincoln fixed the date for the whole country in 1863. Lincoln’s presidential proclamation set that date as the last Thursday in November. In 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt moved the holiday to the fourth Thursday in November, arguing that the earlier date would give the economy a much-needed boost.

34. Paver's supply : TAR
The terms “Tarmac” and “macadam” are short for "tarmacadam". In the 1800s, Scotsman John Loudon McAdam developed a style of road known as "macadam". Macadam had a top-layer of crushed stone and gravel laid over larger stones. The macadam also had a convex cross-section so that water tended to drain to the sides. In 1901, a significant improvement was made by English engineer Edgar Purnell Hooley who introduced tar into the macadam, improving the resistance to water damage and practically eliminating dust. The "tar-penetration macadam" is the basis of what we now call Tarmac.

35. Target of a decade-long manhunt, informally : OSAMA
Osama bin Laden founded his militant Islamist group called al-Qaeda in the late eighties. “Al-Qaeda” translates as “the base”, and can refer to a military base. It was originally the name of a training camp set up for mujahedin fighters opposing the Russians who occupied Afghanistan at the time.

37. Germany's ___ von Bismarck : OTTO
Germany first became a country of her own in 1871 when the Princes of the various independent German states met at Versailles outside Paris to proclaim Wilhelm of Prussia as the Emperor of the German Empire. The man behind this historic development was Wilhelm’s Ministerpräsident, Otto von Bismarck. Von Bismarck was a powerful figure in Prussia and indeed on the world stage, earning him the nickname of the “Iron Chancellor”.

50. Longtime NBC newsman Roger : O’NEIL
Roger O’Neil is a news reporter who has worked for NBC for over 30 years.

52. An Obama girl : SASHA
Sasha is the younger of the two Obama children, born in 2001. She is the youngest child to reside in the White House since John F. Kennedy, Jr. moved in with his parents as a small infant. Sasha's Secret Service codename is "Rosebud", and her older sister Malia has the codename "Radiance".

59. What a volcano erupts : LAVA
Our word “volcano” comes from “Vulcano”, the name of a volcanic island off the coast of Italy. The island’s name comes from Vulcan, the Roman god of fire. The Romans believed that the island of Vulcano was the chimney of the forge belonging to the god Vulcan. The Romans also believed that the eruptions on Mount Etna in Sicily were caused by Vulcan getting angry and working his forge so hard that sparks and smoke flew out of the top of the volcano.

60. Biblical garden : EDEN
According to the Book of Genesis, Adam and Eve lived in a garden "in" Eden, with Eden being geographically located by reference to four rivers including the Tigris and the Euphrates. Some scholars hypothesize that Eden was located in Mesopotamia, which encompasses much of modern-day Iraq.

62. Dickens's Tiny ___ : TIM
Tiny Tim is the nickname of Timothy Cratchit, the little disabled boy in the Charles Dickens novella "A Christmas Carol". “A Christmas Carol” is such a popular book that it has not been out of print since its first publication in December 1843.

64. Showtime's serial killer protagonist, familiarly : DEX
"Dexter" is a crime show that airs on Showtime. The title character works for the Miami Police Department as an expert in blood spatter patterns by day, but is a serial killer by night. The original series was based on the "Dexter" novels written by Jeff Lindsay. I haven’t seen this show myself, but my eldest son really enjoys it …

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Funny Groucho or Harpo : MARX
5. Lover of Tristan, in legend : ISOLDE
11. Place with R.V. hookups : KOA
14. Swear : AVER
15. GoDaddy purchase : DOMAIN
16. 90° bend : ELL
17. Tropical drinks often served with umbrellas : PINA COLADAS
19. ___ Period (time in Japanese history) : EDO
20. Lustful deity of myth : SATYR
21. Rooster's mate : HEN
22. Store sign during business hours : OPEN
23. Spicy ballroom activity? : SALSA DANCING
27. Communication for the deaf, in brief : ASL
30. Try to win, as a lover : WOO
31. Baseball Hall-of-Famer Mel : OTT
32. Finishing eighth out of eight, say : DEAD LAST
35. Strain the body too much : OVERDO
38. Stupefy : DAZE
39. Baby horses : FOALS
41. Nipple : TEAT
42. Rococo and Postmodernism : STYLES
44. Application to highways before a winter storm : ROAD SALT
46. Take to court : SUE
47. Actress Thurman : UMA
48. Zodiac lion : LEO
49. "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" author : DOUGLAS ADAMS
55. Boleyn, Brontë or Bancroft : ANNE
56. Prof helpers : TAS
57. Earl or baron : NOBLE
61. 2012 #1 album for Taylor Swift : RED
62. Common first course ... or what's literally contained in 17-, 23-, 32-, 44- and 49-Across? : TOSSED SALAD
65. Maker of the Optima and Sorento : KIA
66. "Hey!," from someone who's hiding : IN HERE!
67. Wander : ROVE
68. Foxy : SLY
69. Butcher's implement : MEAT AX
70. The Ugly Duckling, actually : SWAN

Down
1. Rand McNally items : MAPS
2. Big name in running shoes : AVIA
3. $2,000 for Boardwalk, with a hotel : RENT
4. Penetrating looks? : X-RAYS
5. Declaration made with a raised right hand : I DO
6. Note between fa and la : SOL
7. Warren Buffet, the Oracle of ___ : OMAHA
8. Stowed on board : LADED
9. Singer Ross with the Supremes : DIANA
10. Coast Guard rank: Abbr. : ENS
11. Stay authentic, colloquially : KEEP IT REAL
12. Of yore : OLDEN
13. See 18-Down : ALONG
18. With 13-Down, move at a snail's place : CRAWL
22. Groups of eight : OCTETS
24. Hangs around and does nothing : LOAFS
25. Just all right : SO-SO
26. Thanksgiving's mo. : NOV
27. Does sums : ADDS
28. Bench or chair : SEAT
29. Relaxing time after church, say : LAZY SUNDAY
33. Downpour : DELUGE
34. Paver's supply : TAR
35. Target of a decade-long manhunt, informally : OSAMA
36. Over hill and ___ : DALE
37. Germany's ___ von Bismarck : OTTO
40. Eardrum-busting : LOUD
43. Squirmy fish : EEL
45. Curses : DAMNS
49. Opposite of whites, laundrywise : DARKS
50. Longtime NBC newsman Roger : O’NEIL
51. Do penance (for) : ATONE
52. An Obama girl : SASHA
53. Thing in the plus column : ASSET
54. Goes way, way up : SOARS
58. Erupt : BLOW
59. What a volcano erupts : LAVA
60. Biblical garden : EDEN
62. Dickens's Tiny ___ : TIM
63. Long, long time : ERA
64. Showtime's serial killer protagonist, familiarly : DEX


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0529-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 May 16, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Kevin G. Der
THEME: Best Picture Adaptations
Today’s themed answers are BEST PICTURE Oscar winners. But, they have been ADAPTED to suit the clue, just by changing one letter in the title:
21A. Best Picture adaptation about ... a search for the perfect brew, with "The"? : BEER HUNTER (from “The Deer Hunter”)
24A. ... inaudible metrical poetry, with "The"? : SILENCE OF THE IAMBS (from “The Silence of the Lambs”)
37A. ... a fat Eastern monarch? : THE VAST EMPEROR (from “The Last Emperor”)
50A. ... fools accompanying a pack of wild animals? : DUNCES WITH WOLVES (from “Dances with Wolves”)
67A. ... a reed and percussion duet? : GONG WITH THE WIND (from “Gone with the Wind”)
84A. ... an éclair or crème brûlée, with "The"? : FRENCH CONFECTION (from “The French Connection”)
99A. ... gorgeous fur? : A BEAUTIFUL MINK (from “A Beautiful Mind”)
113A. ... cooties from hugs and kisses? : GERMS OF ENDEARMENT (from “Terms of Endearment”)
122A. ... a salon woman I go to? : MY HAIR LADY (from “My Fair Lady”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME:20m 36s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. 2013 Best Picture nominee in which a main character isn't human : HER
2003’s “Her” is a rather unusual film. It stars Joaquin Phoenix as a man who develops a relationship with a computer operating system called “Samantha”, which is voiced by Scarlett Johansson.

9. "Hairspray" mom usually played by a man : EDNA
In the musical "Hairspray", Edna Turnblad is one of the main characters, a female usually played by a male. "Hairspray" was originally a John Waters movie, from 1988. In that film Edna was played by Divine, a famous drag queen who featured in many Waters films. In the stage musical that opened in 2002, the original Broadway cast featured Harvey Fierstein as Edna. The 2007 movie adaptation of the musical had John Travolta in the role.

13. Leg presses work them : QUADS
The quadriceps femoris is the muscle group at the front of the thigh. It is the strongest muscle in the human body, and is also the leanest. The “quads” are actually a group of four muscles in the upper leg, hence the use of the prefix “quad-”.

18. 60 minuti : ORA
In Italian, there are “sessanta minuti” (sixty minutes) in an “”ora” (hour).

19. Successors to Cutlasses : ALEROS
The Oldsmobile Alero was the last car made under the Oldsmobile brand. The Alero was produced from 1999 to 2004.

Oldsmobile made the Cutlass Ciera from 1982 to 1996. The Ciera was the brand name's most successful model.

21. Best Picture adaptation about ... a search for the perfect brew, with "The"? : BEER HUNTER (from “The Deer Hunter”)
“The Deer Hunter” is a disturbing 1978 movie about three Russian Americans from Pennsylvania, and their time in the military during the Vietnam War. The “game” of Russian Roulette features prominently in the film’s storyline. According to director Michael Cimino, Robert de Niro requested that a live cartridge be loaded in the gun during the main Russian Roulette scene, to heighten the intensity of the atmosphere. Cimino agreed, although he was quite obsessive about ensuring that the bullet wasn’t next in the chamber for each take.

23. Disney Channel's "___ and Maddie" : LIV
“Liv and Maddie” is a Disney Channel sitcom starring Dove Cameron as a pair of identical twins with very different personalities.

24. ... inaudible metrical poetry, with "The"? : SILENCE OF THE IAMBS (from “The Silence of the Lambs”)
An iamb is a metrical foot containing an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable. Robert Frost's "Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening" consists of lines made up of four sequential iambs e.g. "Whose woods / these are / I think / I know". With a sequence of four iambs, the poem's structure is described as iambic tetrameter.

“The Silence of the Lambs” is a 1991 psychological drama based on a novel of the same name by Thomas Harris. Jodie Foster plays FBI trainee Clarice Starling, and Anthony Hopkins plays the creepy cannibalistic serial killer Hannibal Lecter. “The Silence of the Lambs” swept the Big Five Oscars (Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay) for that year, being only the third movie ever to do so. The other two so honored were “It Happened One Night” (1934) and “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975).

26. Northeast Corridor train : ACELA
The Acela Express is the fastest train routinely running in the US, getting up to 150 mph at times. The service runs between Boston and Washington D.C. via Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York. The brand name "Acela" was created to evoke "acceleration" and "excellence".

29. River islet : AIT
Aits are little islands found in a river. Aits aren't formed by erosion, but by the deposition of silt over time. As a result, aits often have a long and narrow shape running parallel to the banks as the sediment builds up with the flow of the water. Many of the islands in the River Thames in England have been given the name "Ait", like Raven's Ait in Kingston-upon-Thames, and Lot's Ait in Brentford.

30. 1988 chart-topping country album : REBA
Reba McEntire is a country music singer and television actress. McEntire starred in her own sitcom called "Reba" that aired on the WB and the CW cable channels from 2001 to 2007.

32. Game for bankers? : POOL
In games like pool and billiards, a “bank shot” is one in which the object ball is bounced off one or more cushions prior to being pocketed.

37. ... a fat Eastern monarch? : THE VAST EMPEROR (from “The Last Emperor”)
“The Last Emperor” is a 1987 biographical film about Puyi, the last Emperor of China. “The Last Emperor” was unique in that it was the first time the Chinese government allowed filming in the Forbidden City in Beijing. In fact, Queen Elizabeth II was on a state visit to China the same time that filming was taking place, and the Chinese government gave priority to filming, so the British royal party could not visit the Forbidden City.

49. Sea urchin, at a sushi bar : UNI
Sea urchins are globular, spiny creatures found just about everywhere in the ocean. The “roe” of a sea urchin is eaten as a delicacy in several cuisines around the world. In a sushi restaurant, the sea urchin roe is called “uni”. The term “roe” normally means “fish eggs”, but in the case of the sea urchin it refers to the gonads of both the male and female.

50. ... fools accompanying a pack of wild animals? : DUNCES WITH WOLVES (from “Dances with Wolves”)
“Dances with Wolves” is a Western movie released in 1999 that was produced by, directed by and starred Kevin Costner. The film is based on a novel of the same name by Michael Blake. Costner had been involved in the “Dances with Wolves” project when Blake only had the bare bones of a script, and it was Costner who suggested the script be turned into a novel. Costner then bought the rights to the book, and ended up investing three million dollars of his own money to finish shooting the film.

59. Chance occurrence, old-style : HAP
“Hap” means “fortune, chance”.

67. ... a reed and percussion duet? : GONG WITH THE WIND (from “Gone with the Wind”)
As casting proceeded for the movie version of "Gone With the Wind", Clark Gable was a shoo-in from day one. The role of Scarlett was considered very desirable in the acting community, with Bette Davis on the short list, and Katherine Hepburn demanding an appointment with producer David O. Selznick to discuss the role. Vivien Leigh was an unlikely contender, an English actress for the definitive Southern belle role. Selznick was adamant though, and stuck by his choice despite a lot of protests.

75. They rank below marquises : EARLS
In the ranking of nobles, an earl comes above a viscount and below a marquess. The rank of earl is used in the British peerage system and is equivalent to the rank of count in other countries. Other British ranks have female forms (e.g. marquess and marchioness, viscount and viscountess), but there isn’t a female word for the rank of earl. A female given the same rank as an earl is known as a countess.

80. O.T. book before Jeremiah : ISA
The Book of Isaiah is part of the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament. Isaiah is not mentioned in the Qur’an, but many Muslim scholars consider Isaiah a prophet.

84. ... an éclair or crème brûlée, with "The"? : FRENCH CONFECTION (from “The French Connection”)
New York cop Eddie Egan was responsible for breaking up an organized crime ring in the city in 1961, and the seizing of a record amount of heroin (112 pounds). His exploits were chronicled in a book by Robin Moore, which in turn was the basis of the movie "The French Connection" released in 1971. Gene Hackman played Popeye Doyle in the movie, the character based on Egan. Paradoxically, when Egan retired from the police force he started acting and played small roles in 22 movies and television shows.

The name for the pastry known as an “éclair” is clearly French in origin. The French word for lightning is “éclair”, but no one seems to be too sure how it came to be used for the rather delicious bakery item.

Crème brûlée is a classic French dessert consisting of a rich custard topped with a crusty layer of caramelized sugar. The name “crème brûlée” translates from French as “burnt cream”.

90. Previously : NEE
"Née" is the French word for "born" when referring to a female. The male equivalent is "né".

91. Spork part : TINE
“Spork” is the more common name for the utensil that is a hybrid between a spoon and a fork. It is less commonly referred to as a "foon".

92. Daughter in E. M. Forster's "Howards End" : EVIE
"Howards End" is a novel by E. M. Forster. Emma Thompson won an Oscar for playing Margaret Schlegel in the excellent 1992 film adaptation.

93. Neighbor of Irkutsk on a Risk board : MONGOLIA
Risk is a fabulous board game, first sold in France in 1957. Risk was invented by a very successful French director of short films called Albert Lamorisse. Lamorisse called his new game "La Conquête du Monde", which translates into English as "The Conquest of the World". A game of Risk is a must during the holidays in our house ...

96. Badger : HARASS
“To badger” is to harass. The term comes from the cruel practice of “badger-baiting”, which dates back to medieval times. Badger-baiting is a blood sport in which a dog is used as “bait” for a badger in its den, to draw him out into the open. The den is an artificial structure built to resemble a natural badgers’ den, complete with a tunnel entrance. The dog is sent down the tunnel causing the badger and dog to lock their jaws on each other. The badger and dog are then removed from the den by pulling on the dog’s tale. I am ashamed to say that badger-baiting is still practiced (illegally) in Ireland, with ten convictions in the courts over the past 20 years.

99. ... gorgeous fur? : A BEAUTIFUL MINK (from “A Beautiful Mind”)
There are two species of mink extant, the European Mink and the American Mink. There used to be a Sea Mink which was much larger than its two cousins, but it was hunted to extinction (for its fur) in the late 1800s. American Minks are farmed over in Europe for fur, and animal rights activists have released many of these animals into the wild when raiding mink farms. As a result the European Mink population has declined due to the presence of its larger and more adaptable American cousin.

The wonderful 2001 movie "A Beautiful Mind" is based on a true story, but it is also a screenplay adapted from a very successful book of the same name written by Sylvia Nasar. Both book and film tell the life story of John Nash (played by Russell Crowe on the big screen). Nash is a mathematician and Nobel Laureate who struggles with paranoid schizophrenia.

105. Lit ___ : CRIT
Literary studies, also called literary criticism (lit. crit.), is the evaluation and interpretation of literature.

106. Safari sight? : LINK
Safari is Apple's flagship Internet browser, mainly used on its Mac line of computers. Personally, I use Google Chrome …

107. Singer DiFranco : ANI
Ani DiFranco is a folk-rock singer and songwriter. DiFranco has also been labeled a "feminist icon", and in 2006 won the "Woman of Courage Award" from National Organization of Women.

110. Winnower : SIEVE
We use the verb “to winnow” in a figurative sense to describe the separation of something good from a collection of worthless things. The more literal meaning is the freeing of grain from the lighter chaff by blowing on the mixture, or by throwing it in the air.

113. ... cooties from hugs and kisses? : GERMS OF ENDEARMENT (from “Terms of Endearment”)
“Terms of Endearment” is a 1983 big-screen adaptation of Larry McMurtry's novel of the same name. There are a lot of laughs in this film, and a lot of tears. Heading the cast are Shirley MacLaine, Debra Winger and Jack Nicholson. There was a sequel called “The Evening Star” released in 1996. Despite MacLaine and Nicholson reprising their roles, “The Evening Star” was a big flop.

Cooties is WWI British slang for body lice. Ugh ...

122. ... a salon woman I go to? : MY HAIR LADY (from “My Fair Lady”)
The George Bernard Shaw play "Pygmalion" was adapted by Lerner and Loewe to become the Broadway musical "My Fair Lady". The musical spun off the wonderful 1964 film of the same name starring Audrey Hepburn and Rex Harrison. To cockney Eliza Doolittle, Professor Henry Higgins was "'Enry 'Iggins".

123. Tush : HEINIE
The slang term “heinie”, meaning “rear end”, is probably a contraction of “hind end”.

“Tush” is a slang term for the backside, an abbreviation of “tochus” that comes from the Yiddish “tokhes”.

124. Set of anecdotes : ANA
An ana (plural “anas”) is a collection, perhaps of literature, that represents the character of a particular place or a person. Ana can be used as a noun or as a suffix (e.g. Americana).

126. Olympian with a bow : EROS
Eros, the Greek god of love, was also known as Amor.

127. Jet similar to a 747 : DC-TEN
The McDonnell Douglas DC-10 is a very recognizable passenger aircraft, with one engine under either wing and a third incorporated into the base of the vertical stabilizer at the rear of the plane. The DC-10 made its last commercial passenger flight in 2014, but it remains in service as a cargo plane, particularly with FedEx Express.

128. Benedictine title : DOM
The word “Dom” is used in the Roman Catholic Church as a title for some monks, including those in the Benedictine order.

Down
1. Chihuahua greeting : HOLA
Chihuahua is a state in northern Mexico that shares a border with Texas and New Mexico. Chihuahua is the largest state in the country, so has the nickname "El Estado Grande". The state takes its name from the Chihuahuan Desert which lies largely within its borders. And of course the Chihuahua breed of dog takes its name from the state.

2. Country singer Church : ERIC
Eric Church is a country singer/songwriter from Granite Falls, North Carolina. In fact, Church’s second album is called “Carolina”.

4. Honeydew cousins : CASABAS
A casaba is type of honeydew melon. The casaba takes its name from the Turkish city of Kasaba, from where the fruit was imported into America in the late 1800s.

5. U.S. women's soccer star Krieger : ALI
Ali Krieger was a member of the 2015 Women’s World Cup-winning US soccer team. Krieger lived for five years in Germany, playing for FFC Frankfurt.

6. Volume measure : BEL
In the world of acoustics, one bel is equal to ten decibels. The bel is named in honor of the inventor of the telephone, Alexander Graham Bell.

9. Jet : EBON
Ebony is another word for the color black (often shortened to "ebon" in poetry). Ebony is a dark black wood that is very dense, one of the few types of wood that sinks in water. Ebony has been in high demand so the species of trees yielding the wood are now considered threatened. It is in such short supply that unscrupulous vendors have been known to darken lighter woods with shoe polish to look like ebony, so be warned ...

The color “jet black” takes its name from the minor gemstone known as jet. The gemstone and the material it is made of takes its English name from the French name: “jaiet”.

12. Enlightened Buddhist : ARHAT
“Arhat” is a Sanskrit word, the exact translation of which is somewhat disputed, with the various Buddhist traditions assuming different meanings. Translations vary from "worthy one" to "vanquisher of enemies".

14. "___ voce poco fa" (Rossini aria) : UNA
"Una voce poco fa" (A voice a little while ago) is an aria from Rossini’s opera “The Barber of Seville”.

Rossini’s opera “The Barber of Seville” was first performed in 1816 in Rome. It was one of the first Italian operas to be performed in the US, premiering at the Park Theater in New York City in 1825.

17. G.R.E. takers: Abbr. : SRS
Passing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is usually a requirement for entry into graduate school here in the US.

25. Writer ___ Stanley Gardner : ERLE
I must have read all of the Perry Mason books when I was in college. I think they kept me sane when I was facing the pressure of exams. Author Erle Stanley Gardner was himself a lawyer, although he didn't get into the profession the easy way. Gardner went to law school, but got himself suspended after a month. So, he became a self-taught attorney and opened his own law office in Merced, California. Understandably, he gave up the law once his novels became successful.

27. 1880s-'90s veep ___ P. Morton : LEVI
Levi P. Morton served as US Vice President under President Benjamin Harrison, from 1889 to 1893. Morton lived to the ripe old age of 96 years, making him the second longest-lived of all US Vice Presidents. Only John Nance Garner lived longer, passing away just a few days shy of his 99th birthday.

32. Half of a Vegas show duo : PENN
Penn Jillette is one half of the duo of magicians known as Penn & Teller (Penn is the one who talks). Penn teamed up with Teller on stage in 1981, having met him through a friend back in 1974. As well as being talkative onstage, Penn is very vocal offstage when it comes his causes and beliefs. He is a devout atheist, a libertarian and a supporter of free-market capitalism.

35. ___ Drive (street where Harry Potter grew up) : PRIVET
J. K. Rowling’s character “Harry Potter” grew up in the fictitious town of Little Whinging in the county of Surrey. Harry lived with his aunt and uncle at No. 4, Privet Drive.

36. Dweller along the Mandeb Strait : YEMENI
The Bab-el-Mandeb is a strait lying between Yemen in the Middle East and Eritrea and and Djibouti in the Horn of Africa. Also known as Mandeb Strait, “Bab-el-Mandeb” translates as “Gate of Tears”. The somewhat terrifying name is a reference to the dangers of navigating the narrow strait.

40. Like carpaccio or crudités : RAW
Carpaccio can be meat or fish. It is sliced very thinly, or may be pounded until it is thin, and then served raw. Carpaccio is a relatively contemporary dish, first served in 1950 to a countess in Venice, Italy. The lady informed the restaurant owner that her doctor had advised her to eat only raw meat, so she was served thin slices of uncooked beef in a mustard sauce. The owner of the restaurant thought that the colors of the dish reminded him of paintings by Vittore Carpaccio, so he gave it the name "Carpaccio". So the story goes anyway ...

Crudités are a French appetizer made up of sliced and whole raw vegetables that are dipped into a sauce. The French word “crudité” simply means a raw vegetable, and derives from the Latin word “crudus” meaning “raw”.

41. Geisha's accessory : OBI
The sash worn as part of traditional Japanese dress is known as an obi. The obi can be tied in what is called a butterfly knot.

44. Physicist Nathan who postulated wormholes : ROSEN
A wormhole is a theoretical shortcut that connecting two points in the space-time continuum. Got that …?

47. Attempt at a dunk tank : THROW
A “dunk tank” is a funfair attraction consisting of a large tank filled with water, over which a volunteer sits on a collapsing seat. Balls that are successfully thrown at a target cause the seat to collapse, and the poor volunteer gets dunked.

51. Spiced teas : CHAIS
Chai is a drink made from spiced black tea, honey and milk, with "chai" being the Hindi word for "tea". We often called tea "a cup of char" growing up in Ireland, with "char" being our slang word for tea, derived from "chai".

52. The White House's ___ Room : EAST
The magnificent East Room is the largest room in the White House. It was also one of the last rooms to be finished, so Abigail Adams hung laundry there when it was in its unfinished state. Nowadays of course the East Room is used for entertaining and formal ceremonies. I’ve never had the privilege of touring the White House, but I have been in a replica of the East Room that can be visited at the Nixon Presidential Library in Southern California.

53. Peeping Tom's spot : SPYHOLE
In the legend of Lady Godiva, a noblewoman rode naked through the streets of Coventry in England, basically as a dare from her husband in return for relieving the taxes of his tenants. Lady Godiva issued instructions that all the town’s inhabitants should stay indoors while she made her journey. However, a tailor in the town named Tom disobeyed the instructions by boring holes in the shutters on his windows, and “peeped”. As a result, Peeping Tom was struck blind, and the term “peeping Tom” has been in our language ever since.

54. Modern encyclopedia platform : WIKI
A wiki is a website in which users are allowed to create and edit content themselves. The term “wiki” comes from the name of the first such site, introduced in 1994 and called WikiWikiWeb. “Wiki” is a Hawaiian word for “quick”, and is used because comprehensive content is created very quickly a there are so many collaborators contributing to the site.

An encyclopedia is a compendium reference work containing summary information about a branch of knowledge, or about all knowledge. The word “encyclopedia” comes from the Greek “enkyklios paideia” meaning “general education”, or literally “general rearing of a child”.

57. Simon of the "Mission: Impossible" films : PEGG
Simon Pegg is an English actor and comedian who has hit the big time in Hollywood in the past few years. He played “Scotty” in a couple of “Star Trek” movies and tech wizard Benji Dunn in some of the “Mission: Impossible” films.

58. It circles the globe : TROPIC
Lines of latitude are the imaginary horizontal lines surrounding the planet. The most "important" lines of latitude are, from north to south:
- Arctic Circle
- Tropic of Cancer
- Equator
- Tropic of Capricorn
- Antarctic Circle

63. Merino mother : EWE
The Merino breed of sheep is prized for the soft quality of its wool.

64. Stethoscope's place : CHEST
The word "stethoscope" comes from the Greek word for "chest examination". The stethoscope was invented back in 1816 in France by René Laennec, although back then it looked just like an ear trumpet, a wooden tube with flared ends.

65. War on Poverty agcy. : OEO
The Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) was created during the Lyndon Johnson administration. The agency was responsible for administering the War on Poverty programs that were part of the President Johnson's Great Society agenda. The OEO was shut down by President Nixon, although some of the office's programs were transferred to other agencies. A few of the OEO's programs are still around today, like Head Start for example.

66. Main ingredient in queso relleno : EDAM
The Mexican dish called “queso relleno” comes from the state of Yucatan. The name of the dish translates simply as “stuffed cheese” and it consists of a ball of Edam cheese that is hollowed out and stuffed with ground meat, raisins, capers and olives. The “queso relleno” is braised in chicken stock and served in slices in a sauce made from the stock.

70. Gillette razor name : TRAC
Gillette introduced the Trac II in 1971. The Trac II was the world's first twin-blade razor.

71. Liquor purchase : FIFTH
A “fifth” is an American unit of volume used for liquor. It used to be equal to one fifth of a US gallon. Since the seventies we’ve been using a “metric fifth” which is equal to 750 mL, the standard size for wine bottles around the world.

72. Ring around the collar? : LARIAT
Our word “lariat” comes from the Spanish “la reater” meaning “the rope”.

73. Chief Theban god : AMEN-RA
Amun (also Amon, Amen and "Amun-Ra") was a god in Egyptian mythology. Amun lends his name to our word "ammonia". This is because the Romans called the ammonium chloride that they collected near the Temple of Jupiter Amun, "sal ammoniacus" (salt of Amun).

86. Things zygotes come from : OVA
“Zygote” is the name given to the cell formed when (in the case of humans) a sperm fertilizes an egg. It is the earliest stage in the development of an embryo. The term “zygote” comes from the Greek for “joined, yoked”.

87. Penpoint : NIB
"Nib" is a Scottish variant of the Old English word "neb", with both meaning the beak of a bird. This usage of "nib" as a beak dates back to the 14th century, with "nib" meaning the tip of a pen or quill coming a little later, in the early 1600s.

95. Hilton alternative : OMNI
Conrad Hilton was a native of New Mexico, but he bought his first hotel in Cisco, Texas, in 1919. He did well on the deal and opened up hotels all over Texas in the following years, and built the first high-rise Hilton Hotel in Dallas. Hilton went on to build the world's first international hotel chain. Hilton was married three times, most famously to actress Zsa Zsa Gabor from 1942 to 1946.

98. Sancho Panza, e.g. : SENOR
Sancho Panza is Don Quixote's squire, a character who spouts out humorous comments called "sanchismos".

101. ___ Heep (Dickens villain) : URIAH
Uriah Heep is a sniveling insincere character in the novel "David Copperfield" by Charles Dickens. The character is such a "yes man" that today, if we know someone who behaves the same way, then we might call that person a "Uriah Heep".

111. Antipasto pairing : VINO
Antipasto is the first course of a meal in Italy. “Antipasto” translates as “before the meal”.

113. TV inits. since 1975 : GMA
“Good Morning America” (GMA) is ABC’s morning show, and has been since 1975. There was even a spinoff show called “Good Afternoon America”, although that only lasted for a few months in 2012.

120. Never, in Nikolaus : NIE
It looks this is a reference to a place called “Nikolaus” in Germany. I can’t seem to find it though. I wonder if the clue is meant to read "Never, to Nikolaus"...?

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. 2013 Best Picture nominee in which a main character isn't human : HER
4. Airplane part : CABIN
9. "Hairspray" mom usually played by a man : EDNA
13. Leg presses work them : QUADS
18. 60 minuti : ORA
19. Successors to Cutlasses : ALEROS
21. Best Picture adaptation about ... a search for the perfect brew, with "The"? : BEER HUNTER (from “The Deer Hunter”)
23. Disney Channel's "___ and Maddie" : LIV
24. ... inaudible metrical poetry, with "The"? : SILENCE OF THE IAMBS (from “The Silence of the Lambs”)
26. Northeast Corridor train : ACELA
28. Like groaners : CORNY
29. River islet : AIT
30. 1988 chart-topping country album : REBA
32. Game for bankers? : POOL
33. Psychedelic : TRIPPY
37. ... a fat Eastern monarch? : THE VAST EMPEROR (from “The Last Emperor”)
43. One in a no-blinking contest : STARER
45. Second draft : REVISION
46. Neighbor : ABUT
48. Extended rental? : LIMO
49. Sea urchin, at a sushi bar : UNI
50. ... fools accompanying a pack of wild animals? : DUNCES WITH WOLVES (from “Dances with Wolves”)
56. King's handful : SCEPTER
59. Chance occurrence, old-style : HAP
60. Bad sound in a changing room : RIP
61. Vegas-to-Denver dir. : ENE
62. Part of a city network : SEWER
63. "Relax" : EASY
64. Reusable part of a common thank-you gift : COOKIE TIN
67. ... a reed and percussion duet? : GONG WITH THE WIND (from “Gone with the Wind”)
71. Group standing at the U.N. : FLAGPOLES
74. Treat with a "Golden" variety : OREO
75. They rank below marquises : EARLS
79. Words before and after "what" : I AM
80. O.T. book before Jeremiah : ISA
81. Chorus line? : LAS
82. Obstacle in road repairs, maybe : GAS MAIN
84. ... an éclair or crème brûlée, with "The"? : FRENCH CONFECTION (from “The French Connection”)
90. Previously : NEE
91. Spork part : TINE
92. Daughter in E. M. Forster's "Howards End" : EVIE
93. Neighbor of Irkutsk on a Risk board : MONGOLIA
96. Badger : HARASS
99. ... gorgeous fur? : A BEAUTIFUL MINK (from “A Beautiful Mind”)
103. Shred : TATTER
105. Lit ___ : CRIT
106. Safari sight? : LINK
107. Singer DiFranco : ANI
108. Like a portrait that seems to be watching you : EERIE
110. Winnower : SIEVE
113. ... cooties from hugs and kisses? : GERMS OF ENDEARMENT (from “Terms of Endearment”)
121. Blender setting : MIX
122. ... a salon woman I go to? : MY HAIR LADY (from “My Fair Lady”)
123. Tush : HEINIE
124. Set of anecdotes : ANA
125. A while, in hyperbole : AEONS
126. Olympian with a bow : EROS
127. Jet similar to a 747 : DC-TEN
128. Benedictine title : DOM

Down
1. Chihuahua greeting : HOLA
2. Country singer Church : ERIC
3. * * * * : RAVE REVIEW
4. Honeydew cousins : CASABAS
5. U.S. women's soccer star Krieger : ALI
6. Volume measure : BEL
7. Cause of boiling over : IRE
8. Sarge, e.g. : NONCOM
9. Jet : EBON
10. Stand up to : DEFY
11. Bit of safari equipment : NET
12. Enlightened Buddhist : ARHAT
13. "Enough is enough!" : QUIT IT!
14. "___ voce poco fa" (Rossini aria) : UNA
15. PIN point : ATM
16. One having a ball? : DEB
17. G.R.E. takers: Abbr. : SRS
20. Ice cream order : SCOOP
22. Juniors, maybe : HEIRS
25. Writer ___ Stanley Gardner : ERLE
27. 1880s-'90s veep ___ P. Morton : LEVI
31. Step ___ : ASIDE
32. Half of a Vegas show duo : PENN
34. Shroud : PALL
35. ___ Drive (street where Harry Potter grew up) : PRIVET
36. Dweller along the Mandeb Strait : YEMENI
37. Bridge support : TRUSS
38. "As such ..." : HENCE ...
39. College campus offering : TOUR
40. Like carpaccio or crudités : RAW
41. Geisha's accessory : OBI
42. Metaphorical low point : RUT
44. Physicist Nathan who postulated wormholes : ROSEN
47. Attempt at a dunk tank : THROW
51. Spiced teas : CHAIS
52. The White House's ___ Room : EAST
53. Peeping Tom's spot : SPYHOLE
54. Modern encyclopedia platform : WIKI
55. Muses : OPINES
57. Simon of the "Mission: Impossible" films : PEGG
58. It circles the globe : TROPIC
63. Merino mother : EWE
64. Stethoscope's place : CHEST
65. War on Poverty agcy. : OEO
66. Main ingredient in queso relleno : EDAM
68. Bite : NOSH
69. Like candied apples : GLACE
70. Gillette razor name : TRAC
71. Liquor purchase : FIFTH
72. Ring around the collar? : LARIAT
73. Chief Theban god : AMEN-RA
76. Hightailed it : RAN LIKE MAD
77. Peaceful protest : LIE-IN
78. Apt anagram of SNAKE : SNEAK
82. Slip : GOOF
83. Quash : ANNUL
85. Peachy : NEAT
86. Things zygotes come from : OVA
87. Penpoint : NIB
88. Commission, e.g. : FEE
89. "You're stuck with me" : I’M IT
94. What stars do : GLISTEN
95. Hilton alternative : OMNI
97. Equilibrium : STASIS
98. Sancho Panza, e.g. : SENOR
100. About 3/4 of a football field : ACRE
101. ___ Heep (Dickens villain) : URIAH
102. Like some sponsorship packages : TIERED
104. One taking a long shot? : RIFLE
108. Prefix with spore : ENDO-
109. "Slow Churned" brand : EDY’S
111. Antipasto pairing : VINO
112. Reason for a class struggle? : EXAM
113. TV inits. since 1975 : GMA
114. Photographer's asset : EYE
115. Certain fraternity chapter : RHO
116. "Wowie!" : MAN!
117. Musician's asset : EAR
118. Lapel attachment : MIC
119. Suffix with subsist : -ENT
120. Never, in Nikolaus : NIE


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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