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0630-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Jun 16, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Jonathan M. Kaye
THEME: Top Off
We have themed clues again today. Each clue is a seemingly meaningless string of numbers and letters. If we draw a horizontal line through that string of numbers, and then ignore the TOP half, the bottom half gives us our clue:
38. With 39-Across, refill to capacity ... or a hint to interpreting the clues at 17-, 27-, 46- and 61-Across : TOP
39. See 38-Across : OFF

17. B0B : DEFECTIVE BULLET (take the top off B0B to get DUD)
27. TB8L : ADORED SUPERSTAR (take the top off TB8L to get IDOL)
46. 8V8TB : SHAPED LIKE AN EGG (take the top off 8V8TB to get OVOID)
61. VMB : BRIGHTLY-COLORED (take the top off VMB to get VIVID)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 13m 44s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

9. Thin air : ETHER
The Greek philosopher Empedocles proposed that there are four elements that made up the universe, namely earth, water, air and fire. Aristotle later proposed a fifth element which he called aether (also "ether"). Aether was the divine substance that made up the stars and planets.

14. Electrified bit of sports equipment : EPEE
The French word for sword is “épée”. In competitive fencing the épée is connected to a system that records an electrical signal when legal contact is made on an opponent’s body.

15. Caligula's love : AMOR
“Amor” is Latin for “love”.

Caligula was emperor of Rome after Tiberius, and before Claudius. “Caligula” was actually a nickname for Gaius Germanicus. Gaius’s father was a successful general in the Roman army and his soldiers called young Gaius "Caligula", meaning “little soldier’s boot”.

16. Light violet : MAUVE
The name given to the light violet color that we know as “mauve” comes via French from the Latin “malva”. The Latin term translates as “mallow”, the common name of several species of plants, many of which have mauve-colored flowers.

20. Christensen of "Parenthood" : ERIKA
Actress Erika Christensen is probably best known for playing a young cocaine addict in the film “Traffic” (2000), and the youngest daughter of the Braverman family on the TV show “Parenthood”.

21. City whose name, appropriately, rhymes with "casino" : RENO
The city of Reno’s economy took off when open gambling was legalized in Nevada in 1931. Within a short time, a syndicate had built the Bank Club in Reno, which was the largest casino in the whole world at the time.

22. Ingredient in old-time cookie recipes : LARD
Fat, when extracted from the carcass of an animal, is called "suet". Untreated suet decomposes at room temperature quite easily so it has to be "rendered" or purified to make it stable. Rendered fat from pigs is what we call "lard". Rendered beef or mutton fat is known as "tallow".

23. Record co. excoriated in a Sex Pistols song : EMI
EMI was a British music company, with the abbreviation standing for Electric and Musical Industries.

The Sex Pistols were the group that introduced the punk movement to the UK, back in 1975. The Sex Pistols were very vocal in their opposition to the social norms of the time. One of their most famous singles is “God Save the Queen”, from 1977. The lyrics were considered so offensive that workers at the plant where the record was being pressed came out on strike rather than be associated with the song. When it was eventually released, the BBC went as far as banning the record, not something that happens very often.

34. Tout's stock-in-trade : TIPS
A “tout” (mainly in the British Isles) is someone who checks out racehorses and sells information gained to people placing bets.

35. Fuzz : NAP
A “nap” is a soft and perhaps fuzzy surface on cloth, leather, a carpet and even a tennis ball.

36. "And thereby hangs ___" : A TALE
“And thereby hangs a tale” is a line from William Shakespeare’s play “As You Like It”, and is an idiom that we use today meaning “there’s a story connected with this”.

37. Many a numerator : ONE
In a fraction, the number above the line is the numerator, and the number below the line is the denominator. A common numerator is the number one, as in ½, ¼, ⅓ etc.

44. Actor Mineo : SAL
The actor Sal Mineo’s most famous role was John “Plato” Crawford, the kid who was in awe of the James Dean character in “Rebel Without a Cause”. Sadly, Mineo was murdered in 1976 when he was just 37 years old. He was attacked in the alley behind his Los Angeles apartment and stabbed through the heart. When an arrest was made it was discovered that the murderer had no idea that his victim was a celebrity, and that his plan was just to rob anyone who came along.

45. Novelist O'Brien : EDNA
Edna O’Brien is an Irish novelist and playwright who is known for her works that shine a light on the problems of women relating to men and society in general. O’Brien’s first novel, “The Country Girls”, was banned, burned and denounced by the Roman Catholic Church in Ireland. As a result, O’Brien left the country and now lives in London.

50. Baseball great Buck : O’NEIL
Buck O’Neil was a first baseman and manager with the Kansas City Monarchs, a team in the Negro American League.

55. Actor Lugosi : BELA
Bela Lugosi was a Hungarian stage and screen actor, best known for playing the title role in the 1931 film “Dracula” and for playing the same role on Broadway. Lugosi found himself typecast for the rest of his career and almost always played the role of the villain, often in horror movies. When he passed away in 1956, his wife had him buried in the costume he wore playing Count Dracula on Broadway.

57. "My Fair Lady" lady : ELIZA
Eliza Doolittle is Professor Henry Higgins' speech student in George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion". "Pygmalion" was adapted by Lerner and Loewe to become the Broadway musical "My Fair Lady". The musical spun off the wonderful 1964 film of the same name starring Audrey Hepburn and Rex Harrison. To cockney Eliza Doolittle, Professor Henry Higgins was "'Enry 'Iggins".

69. Book of Mormon prophet : ENOS
According to the Book of Mormon, Enos was a son of Jacob, and the author of the Book of Enos.

Down
4. Positions in Quidditch : SEEKERS
Quidditch is a game that is famously played in the “Harry Potter” series of books and films. The game is contended by two teams of seven wizards or witches flying on broomsticks. The are four animated balls and six ring-shaped goals floating in mid-air. One of the balls is the Golden Snitch, and one of the players is the Seeker. It is the Seeker’s sole purpose to capture the Golden Snitch and thereby end the game.

5. Result of needling someone? : TAT
The word "tattoo" (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word "tatau" into our "tattoo".

6. Arabian prince : EMIR
In English, emir can also be written as emeer, amir and ameer (watch out for those spellings in crosswords!).

8. Possible hitch to getting hitched : PRENUP
Prenuptial agreement (prenup)

9. One of the 10-Down birds in the world : EMU
10. See 9-Down : TALLEST
The tallest living bird is the ostrich, which can reach over nine feet in height.

11. Kind of skirt : HULA
The hula skirt is a grass skirt.

13. Like many a capt. or gen. : RETD
Retired (retd.)

19. Gun measure : BORE
The gauge of a gun is the inside diameter of the weapon’s barrel, the width of the bore.

26. Navratilova rival : GRAF
Steffi Graf is a former World No. 1 professional tennis player from Germany. Graf won 22 Grand Slam singles titles, more than any other man or woman other than Margaret Court. She is married to another former World No. 1, namely Andre Agassi.

Martina Navratilova is a retired tennis player who is thought by many to have been the greatest player of all time. Navratilova won the Wimbledon singles title a record nine times, which is one of many records that she holds. She was born in Czechoslovakia but asked for political asylum in the US in 1975 at 18 years of age. Navratilova was granted temporary residency in the US and as a result was stripped of her Czech citizenship. That Czech citizenship was restored in 2008, making her a dual citizen.

28. 1956 jazz/blues album with an exclamation point : DINAH!
Dinah Washington was the stage name of the blues and jazz singer Ruth Lee Jones. Apparently when she was once performing at the famed London Palladium she announced (with Queen Elizabeth II sitting in the Royal Box), “There is but one Heaven, one Hell, one queen, and your Elizabeth is an impostor.” That would have created a bit of a stir …

29. "Porgy and Bess," e.g. : OPERA
“Porgy and Bess” is an opera with music by George Gershwin, lyrics by Ira Gershwin, and libretto by DuBose Heyward. The storyline of the opera is based on the novel “Porgy” written by DuBose Heyward and and wife Dorothy. “Porgy and Bess” was first performed in 1935, in New York City, but really wasn’t accepted as legitimate opera until 1976 after a landmark production by the Houston Grand Opera. The most famous song from the piece is probably the wonderful aria “Summertime”.

30. Person taken for a fool : SAP
“Sap” is slang for a fool, someone easily scammed. The term arose in the early 1800s in Britain when it was used in “saphead” and “sapskull”. All these words derive from “sapwood”, which is the soft wood found in tree trunks between the bark and the heartwood at the center.

31. Afternoon, to Alejandro : TARDE
“Tarde” is Spanish for “afternoon”.

39. Royal ___ (Detroit suburb) : OAK
The Detroit suburb of Royal Oak was incorporated as a village in 1891. The name was given to the area in 1819 by former US Secretary of State Lewis Cass when he was Governor of the Michigan Territory. He saw there a large oak tree that reminded him of the Royal Oak in which King Charles II of England escaped after the Battle of Worcester.

48. Avoid the limelight : LIE LOW
Limelight was an early form of stage lighting that was also known as Drummond Light. The illumination came from the burning of quicklime (calcium hydroxide), hence the name. Although limelights are a thing of the past, the term “in the limelight” is still used when describing someone in the public eye.

49. Biblical anagram of 55-Across : ABEL
(55. Actor Lugosi : BELA)
In the story of Cain and Abel in the Book of Genesis, Cain murders his brother Abel. Subsequently, God asks Cain, “Where is Abel thy brother?” Cain replies, “I do not know. Am I my brother's keeper?”

53. Bailiwick : AREA
Bailiwick is a word dating back to the mid-1600s, and originally meant the "district of a bailiff".

60. Some sources of vitamin C : ADES
The essential nutrient referred to as vitamin C is also called L-ascorbic acid or ascorbate. A lack of vitamin C causes the disease scurvy.

62. Artery: Abbr. : HWY
Highway (hwy.)

63. Walk-___ : ONS
A “walk-on” is a small part in a play, usually one without any lines.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. They may get into a jam : CARS
5. Sub : TEMP
9. Thin air : ETHER
14. Electrified bit of sports equipment : EPEE
15. Caligula's love : AMOR
16. Light violet : MAUVE
17. B0B : DEFECTIVE BULLET (take the top off B0B to get DUD)
20. Christensen of "Parenthood" : ERIKA
21. City whose name, appropriately, rhymes with "casino" : RENO
22. Ingredient in old-time cookie recipes : LARD
23. Record co. excoriated in a Sex Pistols song : EMI
25. Electrical anomaly : SURGE
27. TB8L : ADORED SUPERSTAR (take the top off TB8L to get IDOL)
34. Tout's stock-in-trade : TIPS
35. Fuzz : NAP
36. "And thereby hangs ___" : A TALE
37. Many a numerator : ONE
38. With 39-Across, refill to capacity ... or a hint to interpreting the clues at 17-, 27-, 46- and 61-Across : TOP
39. See 38-Across : OFF
41. Nonsense : ROT
42. Reed section? : MARSH
44. Actor Mineo : SAL
45. Novelist O'Brien : EDNA
46. 8V8TB : SHAPED LIKE AN EGG (take the top off 8V8TB to get OVOID)
50. Baseball great Buck : O’NEIL
51. Start of a familiar run : ABC ...
52. Realize : EARN
55. Actor Lugosi : BELA
57. "My Fair Lady" lady : ELIZA
61. VMB : BRIGHTLY-COLORED (take the top off VMB to get VIVID)
64. Moisten, in a way : BEDEW
65. Gathering clouds, e.g. : OMEN
66. Ticked : SORE
67. Saying "Talk to the hand 'cause the face don't care," say : SASSY
68. Unites : WEDS
69. Book of Mormon prophet : ENOS

Down
1. Give up : CEDE
2. Parodist, e.g. : APER
3. Bank offering, briefly : REFI
4. Positions in Quidditch : SEEKERS
5. Result of needling someone? : TAT
6. Arabian prince : EMIR
7. Gets promoted : MOVES UP
8. Possible hitch to getting hitched : PRENUP
9. One of the 10-Down birds in the world : EMU
10. See 9-Down : TALLEST
11. Kind of skirt : HULA
12. At any juncture : EVER
13. Like many a capt. or gen. : RETD
18. Showed : CAME
19. Gun measure : BORE
24. Prisoner's assignment: Abbr. : ID NO
26. Navratilova rival : GRAF
27. Subjects in quantum mechanics : ATOMS
28. 1956 jazz/blues album with an exclamation point : DINAH!
29. "Porgy and Bess," e.g. : OPERA
30. Person taken for a fool : SAP
31. Afternoon, to Alejandro : TARDE
32. As a companion : ALONG
33. Mark down, maybe : RETAG
38. After that : THEN
39. Royal ___ (Detroit suburb) : OAK
40. One having a small bite? : FLEA
43. Heavy drinkers, informally : SPONGES
44. "Gosh, what was I thinking?!" : SILLY ME!
45. Pen : ENCLOSE
47. Student woe : DEBT
48. Avoid the limelight : LIE LOW
49. Biblical anagram of 55-Across : ABEL
52. Falls back : EBBS
53. Bailiwick : AREA
54. Purges : RIDS
56. Nailed : ACED
58. Weights, so to speak : IRON
59. Loser, informally : ZERO
60. Some sources of vitamin C : ADES
62. Artery: Abbr. : HWY
63. Walk-___ : ONS


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0629-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Jun 16, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: John Lampkin
THEME: There’s No Need to Pay
We have themed clues in this puzzle, as opposed to the usual themed answers. Today’s themed clues are all phrases used to mean “There’s no need to pay”. But, each of those phrases has been interpreted more literally in the answer:
19A. It's on the house : WEATHERVANE
53A. It carries no charge : DEAD BATTERY
10D. It's complimentary : RAVE REVIEW
27D. It's free : EMPTY CHAIR
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 51s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

8. 100 points, to a jeweler : CARAT
A carat is a unit of mass used to measure gemstones and pearls. There are one hundred points in a carat, each equal to 2 milligrams. So a carat is equal to 200 milligrams.

13. Who sings "A Little Brains, A Little Talent" in "Damn Yankees" : LOLA
In the musical show “Damn Yankees”, the title refers to the New York Yankees baseball team that dominated the sport in the fifties. That said, the show tells the story of the a man who sells his soul to help his beloved Washington Senators team beat the Yankees and win the pennant. So, "Damn Yankees" is yet another version of the classic German legend of "Faust". The show was written by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross, a production that turned out to be a very successful follow-up to their prior hit, "The Pajama Game". The future was looking really rosy for Adler and Ross but, sadly, Jerry Ross died of an obstructive lung disease only a few weeks after "Damn Yankees" opened on Broadway in 1955. He was just 29 years old.

14. Fuel economy org. : EPA
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

15. Unhung paintings : MURALS
A “mural” is a painting that is applied directly to a wall or a ceiling. The term comes from the Latin “murus” meaning “wall”.

18. ___ night (bar attraction) : TRIVIA
Trivia are things of little consequence. “Trivia” is the plural of the Latin word “trivium” which means “a place where three roads meet”. Now that’s what I call a trivial fact …

21. Mr. Potato Head piece : EAR
Mr. Potato Head is an enduring popular toy that has been around since its invention by George Lerner in 1949. In its original form, the toy was a collection of eyes, ears, and other facial features, that were designed to be stuck into a real potato. Mr. Potato Head also has the distinction of being the first toy ever to be advertised on television.

22. Objects of religious veneration in ancient Egypt : IBISES
The ibis is a wading bird that was revered in ancient Egypt. “Ibis” is an interesting word grammatically speaking. You can have one “ibis” or two “ibises”, and then again one has a flock of “ibis”. And if you want to go with the classical plural, instead of two “ibises” you would have two “ibides”!

25. "That's all ___ wrote" : SHE
No one seems to be very certain of the origin of the phrase “that’s all she wrote”. One popular story though is that it stems from the unfortunate “Dear John” letters that some soldiers received during WWII.

The expression “Dear John letter” originated in WWII among American troops who were serving abroad. The servicemen highly valued letters from girlfriends and wives back home, and almost invariably those missives started out with “Dearest”, or “My Darling” or some other expression of affection. A curt, “Dear John” set the tone for a letter which was likely to contain news of a new love interest in the life of the girlfriend or wife. The contemporary equivalent missive from a male to a female is a “Dear Jane letter”.

28. Thomas Gray's "___ on the Spring" : ODE
Here’s the first verse of Thomas Gray's poem “Ode on the Spring”.
Lo! where the rosy-bosom'd Hours,
Fair Venus' train appear,
Disclose the long-expecting flowers,
And wake the purple year!
The Attic warbler pours her throat,
Responsive to the cuckoo's note,
The untaught harmony of spring:
While whisp'ring pleasure as they fly,
Cool zephyrs thro' the clear blue sky
Their gather'd fragrance fling.

Thomas Gray was an 18th-century poet from England. Gray’s most famous work is his “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard”, which is the source of many oft-quoted phrases, including:
- Celestial fire
- Far from the Madding Crowd
- Kindred spirit


29. Emerson or Dickinson : COLLEGE
Emerson College, located in Boston’s Washington Street Theater District, offers degree programs focused on Arts and Communication. The school was founded in 1880 by Charles Wesley Emerson as the Boston Conservatory of Elocution, Oratory and Dramatic Art.

Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania was founded 1773 as Carlisle Grammar School by Benjamin Rush, one of the signatories on the US Declaration of Independence. Dickinson was chartered by the Pennsylvania legislature in 1783, just six days after signing of the Treaty of Paris that ended the American Revolution. That makes Dickinson the first college to be chartered in the United States.

33. Brand once billed as "the soap of beautiful women" : CAMAY
Camay is a brand of soap produced by Procter & Gamble since 1926. Camay was introduced as a “white, pure soap for women”.

36. Some sound equipment : AMPS
An electric guitar, for example, needs an amplifier (amp) to take the weak signal created by the vibration of the strings and turn it into a signal powerful enough for a loudspeaker.

39. Fodder's place, but not a mudder's : SILO
“Silo” is a Spanish word that we absorbed into English, originally coming from the Greek word "siros" that described a pit in which one kept corn.

“Fodder”, meaning “animal feed”, is an Old English word for “food”.

A mudder is a racehorse, one that runs well on a wet or muddy track.

40. Call inadvertently, in a way : BUTT DIAL
“Butt dialing” is an alternative name for “pocket dialing”, the accidental placing of a call while a phone is in one’s pocket or purse.

44. Blanc who voiced Daffy Duck : MEL
Daffy Duck first appeared on the screen in “Porky’s Duck Hunt” in 1937. In the original cartoon, Daffy was just meant to have a small role, but he was a big hit as he had so much sass. Even back then, Daffy was voiced by the ubiquitous Mel Blanc.

48. Some New Zealanders : MAORIS
The Māori are the indigenous people of New Zealand. The Māori are eastern Polynesian in origin and began arriving in New Zealand relatively recently, starting sometime in the late 13th century. The word "māori" simply means "normal", distinguishing the mortal human being from spiritual entities.

65. Actor Beatty : NED
Actor Ned Beatty is probably best remembered for the rather disturbing “squeal like a pig” scene in the movie “Deliverance”. Beatty also earned an Academy Award nomination as Best Supporting Actor for his performance in the 1976 movie “Network”.

Down
3. Opposite of baja : ALTA
In Spanish, “baja” is “low” and “alta” is “high”.

4. Half of Hispaniola : HAITI
Hispaniola is an island in the Greater Antilles, and is the second largest island in the Caribbean after Cuba. The island is shared by the Dominican Republic and Haiti. Hispaniola was home to the first European settlement in the whole of the Americas, founded by Christopher Columbus in 1492. Columbus named the island La Isla Española, which evolved to “Hispaniola”.

5. Work in which Dido died : AENEID
Aeneas was a Trojan who traveled to Italy and became the ancestor of all Romans. Aeneas’s story is told in Virgil’s epic poem “The Aeneid”.

Dido was the founder of Carthage, and the city's first queen.

8. Panacea : CURE-ALL
Panacea was the Greek goddess of healing. She lent her name to the term “panacea” that was used by alchemists to describe the beguiling remedy that could cure all diseases and prolong life indefinitely.

9. Cardinals, in stats : ARI
The Arizona Cardinals were founded in 1898 as the Chicago Cardinals. That makes the Cardinals the oldest, continuously-run professional football team in the whole country.

12. Despised figure in "Fiddler on the Roof" : TSAR
The enduring musical “Fiddler on the Roof” is based on a collection of stories by Sholem Aleichem about Tevye, a milkman living in Tsarist Russia. The musical version of the tales first opened on Broadway in 1964. “Fiddler on the Roof” had such a long run that it became the first musical to reach 3,000 performances.

15. Abbr. in cartography : MTN
Mountain (mtn.)

Cartography is the art of producing maps.

20. Natty neckwear : ASCOT
An Ascot tie is a horrible-looking (I think!) wide tie that narrows at the neck, which these days is only really worn at weddings. The tie takes its name from the Royal Ascot horse race at which punters still turn up in formal wear at Ascot Racecourse in England.

26. Overplay : HAM UP
The word "ham", describing a performer who overacts, is apparently a shortened form of "hamfatter" and dates back to the late 1800s. "Hamfatter" comes from a song in old minstrel shows called "The Ham-Fat Man". It seems that a poorly performing actor was deemed to have the "acting" qualities of a minstrel made up in blackface.

31. Hair goop : GELEE
Gelee is a hair styling product, apparently. I wouldn’t know …

34. "___ Boy" (1960s cartoon series) : ASTRO
“Astro Boy” is a manga cartoon series that appeared in print in the fifties and sixties. It was adapted for television starting in 1963, making it the first Japanese TV series in the genre now known as “anime”.

35. Neighbor of Peru: Abbr. : BOL
Bolivia is a landlocked country in South America, bordered by Brazil, Paraguay, Chile, Peru and Argentina. The land now occupied by Bolivia was originally part of the Inca Empire. The country declared independence from Spain in 1809, which led to 16 years of war. When the Republic was finally named, “Bolivia” was chosen in honor of the Venezuelan-born revolutionary leader, Simón Bolívar.

38. Soft rock? : MAGMA
Magma is the molten material below the Earth’s surface. When magma cools, it forms igneous rock. “Magma” is a Greek term used for a thick ointment.

44. Cellphone, to a Brit : MOBILE
What we mostly call a cellphone in North America is more usually referred to as a mobile phone in Europe. In German, it’s referred to casually as a “Handy”.

49. Worker at Omnicom Group : ADMAN
Omnicom Group is an advertising group headquartered in New York City.

51. Range of the von Trapp singers : ALPS
"The Sound of Music" is a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical, made into a celebrated movie in 1965 starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer. The musical is based on "The Story of the Trapp Family Singers", a memoir by Maria von Trapp. The von Trapp family ended up in Stowe, Vermont after the war, and one family descended from the Vermont von Trapps lives here in the same town in which I live in California.

55. Eggshell shade : ECRU
The shade called ecru is a grayish, yellowish brown. The word “ecru” comes from French and means “raw, unbleached”. “Ecru” has the same roots as our word “crude”.

57. Trees with red berrylike fruit : YEWS
The family of trees known as yews propagate by producing a seed surrounded by soft, sweet and brightly colored aril. Birds eat the fruit and then disperse the seed in their droppings. The birds leave the seed undamaged, and so are unharmed by the potent poisons taxine and taxol that are found within the seed. The seeds are highly toxic to humans.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Opposite of exciting : BLAH
5. Jerk : ASS
8. 100 points, to a jeweler : CARAT
13. Who sings "A Little Brains, A Little Talent" in "Damn Yankees" : LOLA
14. Fuel economy org. : EPA
15. Unhung paintings : MURALS
16. Not required : OPTIONAL
18. ___ night (bar attraction) : TRIVIA
19. It's on the house : WEATHERVANE
21. Mr. Potato Head piece : EAR
22. Objects of religious veneration in ancient Egypt : IBISES
23. Outer space's lack : AIR
25. "That's all ___ wrote" : SHE
28. Thomas Gray's "___ on the Spring" : ODE
29. Emerson or Dickinson : COLLEGE
33. Brand once billed as "the soap of beautiful women" : CAMAY
35. Flabbergast : BOWL OVER
36. Some sound equipment : AMPS
37. Overplay : EMOTE
39. Fodder's place, but not a mudder's : SILO
40. Call inadvertently, in a way : BUTT DIAL
42. Part of many a general's statue : STEED
43. Clandestine network : SPY RING
44. Blanc who voiced Daffy Duck : MEL
46. Itsy-bitsy : WEE
47. Tooth that turns : COG
48. Some New Zealanders : MAORIS
51. Fire residue : ASH
53. It carries no charge : DEAD BATTERY
58. Like feet after a long trek : LEADEN
60. Drop the ball onstage : MISS A CUE
61. Evincing discomfort : PAINED
62. Pub offering : ALE
63. Pub offering : BREW
64. Book bag part : STRAP
65. Actor Beatty : NED
66. Pub offering : SUDS

Down
1. Serious punch : BLOW
2. Easy gait : LOPE
3. Opposite of baja : ALTA
4. Half of Hispaniola : HAITI
5. Work in which Dido died : AENEID
6. Thinly distributed : SPARSE
7. Balm : SALVE
8. Panacea : CURE-ALL
9. Cardinals, in stats : ARI
10. It's complimentary : RAVE REVIEW
11. Et ___ (and others) : ALIA
12. Despised figure in "Fiddler on the Roof" : TSAR
15. Abbr. in cartography : MTN
17. "What fun!" : OH BOY!
20. Natty neckwear : ASCOT
24. "You beat me" : I LOST
25. Signs of healing : SCABS
26. Overplay : HAM UP
27. It's free : EMPTY CHAIR
30. Have bills : OWE
31. Hair goop : GELEE
32. Weaken, as confidence : ERODE
34. "___ Boy" (1960s cartoon series) : ASTRO
35. Neighbor of Peru: Abbr. : BOL
37. ___ bisschen (not much: Ger.) : EIN
38. Soft rock? : MAGMA
41. Try one's utmost : DIG DEEP
42. Some vents : SLITS
44. Cellphone, to a Brit : MOBILE
45. Deleted : ERASED
49. Worker at Omnicom Group : ADMAN
50. Wild guesses : STABS
51. Range of the von Trapp singers : ALPS
52. Usher's destination : SEAT
54. Goal : END
55. Eggshell shade : ECRU
56. Regretted : RUED
57. Trees with red berrylike fruit : YEWS
59. Modern aid in anthropology : DNA


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0628-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Jun 16, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Alex Vratsanos
THEME: Eight Legs
Today’s grid reminds us of a spider. We have four spidery answers defining the creature’s body at the center of the grid, and eight radiating LEGS shown by the circled letters:
29A. Spider's class : ARACHNIDA
48A. Things spiders leave : BITE MARKS
22D. Spider of children's literature : CHARLOTTE
23D. Spider's web-producing organ : SPINNERET
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 59s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … GALEN (Salen), KRESGE (Kresse)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. World of Warcraft enthusiast, e.g. : GAMER
“World of Warcraft” is an online role-playing game. My son informs me that itis not that great. Like I would know …

6. Enemy org. in many a spy thriller : KGB
The Komitet gosudarstvennoy bezopasnosti (KGB) was the national security agency of the Soviet Union until 1991. The KGB was dissolved after the agency’s chairman led a failed attempt at a coup d’état designed to depose President Mikhail Gorbachev.

9. North Carolina fort : BRAGG
Fort Bragg in North Carolina is a very large Army installation that covers over 250 square miles. The base is named for General Braxton Bragg, the native North Carolinian who commanded the Confederate Army forces during the Civil War.

Braxton Bragg was a US Army officer from Warrenton, North Carolina who became a general in the Confederate States Army during the Civil War. After Bragg’s forces were routed at the Battles for Chattanooga, Bragg was recalled in 1864 to Richmond where he served as military adviser to Confederate President Jefferson Davis. After the war, Bragg worked at the New Orleans waterworks, supervised the work at the harbor in Mobile, Alabama and worked on the railroad in Texas.

14. Prefix with transmitter : NEURO-
A neurotransmitter is a chemical substance that transmits signals from one nerve cell to another nerve cell, or to a gland or muscle cell.

16. Mathematician whose name sounds like a ship : EULER
“Euler” sounds like “oiler”.

Leonhard Euler was a brilliant Swiss mathematician and physicist, a pioneer in the fields of logarithms and graph theory.

An “oiler” is an oil tanker, an ocean-going vessel used to transport crude oil.

17. City in SE France : ARLES
Quite a few years ago now, I had the privilege of living just a short car-ride from the beautiful city of Arles in the South of France. Although Arles has a long and colorful history, the Romans had a prevailing influence over the city's design. Arles has a spectacular Roman amphitheater, arch, circus as well as old walls that surround the center of the city. In more modern times, it was a place Vincent van Gogh often visited, and where he painted his famous "Cafe Terrace at Night", as well as "Bedroom in Arles".

19. Airline whose main hub is in Atlanta : DELTA
Delta was the world's largest airline for a while (after merging with Northwest Airlines in 2008) and is also the oldest airline still operating in the US. Delta's roots go back to 1924 before it started carrying passengers and was called Huff Daland Dusters, a crop dusting company based in Macon, Georgia. The name Delta Air Service was introduced in 1928.

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport is the world’s busiest airport, as measured by passenger traffic. Atlanta has had that distinction since 1998, and was the world’s busiest in terms of take-offs and landings from 2005 until 2013. Over 50% of Atlanta’s traffic comes from Delta Airlines.

20. "___ 'em!" : SIC
“Sic ’em” is an attack order given to a dog, instructing the animal to growl, bark or even bite. The term dates back to the 1830s, with “sic” being a variation of “seek”.

24. Grp. holding quadrennial competitions : IOC
The International Olympic Committee (IOC) was founded in 1894, and has its headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland.

27. Not gendered, as a noun : EPICENE
An epicene noun is one that can be assigned to either gender, or to both. For example, the noun “cousin” is an epicene noun as it can refer to either gender. The nouns “brother” and “sister” are gender specific.

29. Spider's class : ARACHNIDA
Arachnids are creatures with eight jointed legs. The name of the class Arachnida comes from the Greek “aráchnē” meaning “spider”.

35. Mens ___ (guilty mind) : REA
"Mens rea" is Latin for "guilty mind" and is a central concept in criminal law. The concept is expanded to "actus non facit reum nisi mens sit rea" meaning "the act does not make a person guilty unless the mind be also guilty". In other words, a someone should not be deemed guilty of an act, unless he or she had a "guilty mind", intended to do wrong.

36. Cloud in space : NEBULA
In astronomical terms, a nebula is a cloud of dust and ionized gases (“nebula” is the Latin for “cloud”). Many nebulae form as gases collapse in on themselves under the influence of enormous gravitational forces. Ultimately these collapses can result in the creation of new stars.

40. Neuter, as a stallion : GELD
We can use the verb “to geld” to mean “to weaken, deprive of strength”. The term comes from the act of gelding an animal, castration of the male. “Geld” comes from the Old Norse word “gelda” meaning “castrate”.

41. Sophia of "Marriage Italian-Style" : LOREN
Sophia Loren certainly has earned her exalted position in the world of movies. In 1962 Loren won an Oscar for Best Actress for her role in the Italian film “Two Women”, the first actress to win an Academy Award for a non-English speaking performance. She received a second nomination for Best Actress for her role in “Marriage Italian-Style”, another Italian-language movie, released in 1964.

43. Designer Cassini : OLEG
Oleg Cassini, the French-born American fashion designer, had two big names particularly associated with his designs. In the sixties he produced the state wardrobe for First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, and he was also the exclusive designer for Hollywood's Gene Tierney, who was Cassini's second wife.

44. Japanese martial art that emphasizes not injuring the attacker : AIKIDO
Aikido is a Japanese martial art that only dates back to the 1920s and 1930s. It was developed by Morihei Ueshiba, who is often referred to as “the Founder” or “Great Teacher”.

47. Melville's second novel : OMOO
Herman Melville mined his own experiences when writing his novels. Melville sailed from New Bedford, Massachusetts in 1841 on a whaler heading into the Pacific Ocean (a source for "Moby-Dick"). Melville ended up deserting his ship 18 months later and lived with natives on a South Pacific Island for three weeks (a source for "Typee"). He picked up another whaler and headed for Hawaii, where he joined the crew of a US navy frigate that was bound for Boston (a source for "Omoo").

51. Actress Angela of "American Horror Story" : BASSETT
Angela Bassett is an actress from New York who is best known for playing Tina Turner in the film about her life “What’s Love Got to Do with It”.

“American Horror Story" is a TV series. I saw the word “horror”, so avoided it …

54. Antarctic volcano named for a place in the underworld : EREBUS
Erebus was one of the Primordial deities of Greek mythology, meaning he was one of first beings to come into existence. “Erebus” is also used in ancient Greek literature as a region in the underworld where the dead pass to immediately after dying.

Mount Erebus is a volcano in Antarctica, located on Ross Island. Erebus is the second-highest on the continent, after Mount Sidley. It was discovered in 1841 by Sir James Clark Ross, along with the companion volcano Mount Terror. Ross named the peaks for the ships used on his voyage: HMS Erebus and HMS Terror.

58. Child-care expert LeShan : EDA
Eda LeShan wrote “When Your Child Drives You Crazy”, and was host of the PBS television show “How Do Your Children Grow?”

59. Moniker for German chancellor Konrad Adenauer : DER ALTE
Konrad Adenauer was the first Chancellor of West Germany after WWII, taking office in 1949 at the age of 73. Adenauer was 87 years old when he left office. Understandably perhaps, his nickname was “Der Alte”, German for “the old man”. Adenauer spent much of WWII in prison, courtesy of Herr Hitler.

62. The "e" of i.e. : EST
“Id est” is Latin for “that is”, and is often abbreviated to “i.e.” when used in English.

65. Rumble in the Jungle participant : ALI
The Rumble in the Jungle was the celebrated 1974 fight between Muhammad Ali and George Foreman that took place in Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of the Congo). The fight was set in Zaire because of financial arrangements between promoter Don King and Zaire’s President Mobutu Seko. Ali coined the term “Rope-a-dope” to describe his incredibly successful strategy in the contest. From the second round onwards, Ali adopted a protected stance on the ropes letting Foreman pound him with blows to the body and head, with Ali using his arms to dissipate the power of the punches. He kept this up until the eighth round and then opened up and downed the exhausted Foreman with a left-right combination. I hate boxing but I have to say, that was an fascinating fight.

66. Conductor Georg whose name consists of two musical notes : SOLTI
Sir Georg Solti was a great Hungarian-British conductor, who spent 22 years as music director of the Chicago Symphony, one of many prestigious positions he held in the world of classical music and opera. Solti was awarded 31 Grammy Awards, the most won by any individual in any genre of music. I think it’s kind of cool that Solti’s name comprises two notes in the solfa scale: sol-ti ...

68. Niece's counterpart, in French : NEVEU
“Nièce et neveu” is French for “niece and nephew”.

69. Blue on an electoral map: Abbr. : DEM
On political maps, red states are usually Republican and blue states usually Democrat. The designation of red and blue states is a very recent concept, only introduced in the 2000 presidential election by TV journalist, the late Tim Russert. In retrospect, the choice of colors is surprising, as in other democracies around the world red is usually used to describe left-leaning socialist parties (the reds under the bed!), and blue is used for conservative right-wing parties. In election cycles, swing/battleground states are often depicted in purple.

70. Ancient Greek physician : GALEN
Galen of Pergamum was a physician of Ancient Rome (of Greek ethnicity). He mainly worked on monkeys, dissecting their bodies to learn about physiology as it was not permitted to dissect human bodies in his day.

72. Psyche part : EGO
Sigmund Freud created a structural model of the human psyche, breaking it into three parts: the id, the ego, and the super-ego. The id is that part of the psyche containing the basic instinctual drives. The ego seeks to please the id by causing realistic behavior that benefits the individual. The super-ego almost has a parental role, contradicting the id by introducing critical thinking and morals to behavioral choices.

Down
3. Soil enricher : MULCH
Mulch is a layer of material applied by gardeners over the top of soil. The intent can be to retain moisture, to add nutrients, to reduce weed growth, or just to improve the look of the garden.

6. Swiss-German artist Paul : KLEE
The artist Paul Klee was born in Switzerland, but studied art in Munich in Germany. You can see many of Klee's works in the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. If you get to Bern in Switzerland, even more of them can be seen at the Zentrum Paul Klee that was opened in 2005.

7. Murray ___-Mann, Physics Nobelist who coined the term "quark" : GELL
Quarks are elementary atomic particles that combine to make composite particles called “hadrons”. I’m really only familiar with the really stable hadrons i.e. protons and neutrons. There are six types of quarks (referred to as “flavors”). These flavors are up, down, strange, charm, bottom and top. The term “quark” was borrowed from James Joyce’s book “Finnegans Wake”, by physicist Murray Gell-Mann. However, the word coined by Joyce is pronounced “kwark”, and the particle’s name is pronounced “kwork”.

8. Whalebone : BALEEN
Our word “baleen” meaning “whalebone” comes from the Latin “balleana”, which in turn comes from the Greek “phallaina”, the word for a “whale”. “Phallaina” is apparently related the Greek “phallos” meaning “swollen penis”, a reference to the shape of a whale.

11. 1980s TV's "Kate & ___" : ALLIE
"Kate & Allie" ran from 1984 to 1989, starring Susan Saint James as Kate, and Jane Curtin as Allie. Jane Curtin won two Emmy awards for her work on the series, while Susan Saint James ... did not.

13. Blessing before a meal : GRACE
A “grace” is a short prayer recited before or after a meal.

22. Spider of children's literature : CHARLOTTE
“Charlotte’s Web” is a children’s novel by author E. B. White. Charlotte is a barn spider, who manages to save the life of a pig named Wilbur. Wilbur is a pet pig, owned by the farmer’s daughter, Fern Arable. The story also includes a gluttonous rat named Templeton who provides some light and comical moments.

23. Spider's web-producing organ : SPINNERET
The silk that makes up a web is a protein fiber that is spun by a spider. Spider silk is about one sixth of the density of steel, but has a comparable tensile strength.

26. Staked a claim : HAD DIBS
The phrase “to have dibs on” expresses a claim on something. Apparently, the term “dibs” is a contraction of “dibstone”, which was a knucklebone or jack used in a children’s game.

28. Last car : CABOOSE
The word “caboose” originally came from Middle Dutch and was the word for a ship’s galley. When the last car in a train in North America was given a stove for the comfort of the crew, it took on the name “caboose”. The term has also become slang for a person’s backside.

30. One who might have a corner office, for short : CEO
Chief executive officer (CEO)

31. Decidedly nonfeminist women's group : HAREM
“Harem” is a Turkish word, derived from the Arabic for “forbidden place”. Traditionally a harem was the female quarters in a household in which a man had more than one wife. Not only wives (and concubines) would use the harem, but also young children and other female relatives. The main point was that no men were allowed in the area.

32. Links org. : PGA
The Professional Golfers’ Association (PGA) was founded in 1916 and today has its headquarters (unsurprisingly) in Florida, where so many golfers live. Back in 1916, the PGA was based in New York City.

33. Use for flowers in Hawaii : LEI
"Lei" is the Hawaiian word for "garland, wreath", although in more general terms a "lei" is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

34. Antlered beast : ELK
The elk (also known as the wapiti) is the one of the largest species of deer in the world, with only the moose being bigger. Early European settlers were familiar with the smaller red deer back in their homelands, so when they saw the “huge” wapiti they assumed it was a moose, and incorrectly gave it the European name for a moose, namely “elk”. The more correct name for the beast is “wapiti”, which means “white rump” in Shawnee. It’s all very confusing …

37. City where Einstein was born : ULM
Ulm is in the south of Germany and sits on the River Danube. Ulm is famous as home to the tallest church in the world, Ulm Minster, a Gothic building with a steeple that is 530 feet tall, with 768 steps to climb. Ulm is also the birthplace of Albert Einstein, and is where the entire Austrian army surrendered to Napoleon after the Battle of Ulm in 1805.

38. Obama, astrologically : LEO
Despite rumors to the contrary, I am pretty sure that Barack Hussein Obama II was indeed born in Hawaii. President Obama was born on August 4, 1961 at Kapi’olani Maternity & Gynecological Hospital in Honolulu, Hawaii.

42. Mrs. Perón : EVA
Eva Perón was the second wife of President Juan Perón who was in office from 1946 to 1955. The Argentine First Lady was known affectionately by the people as “Evita”, the Spanish language diminutive of “Eva”. "Evita" was also the follow-up musical to "Jesus Christ Superstar" for Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice, and was based on the life of Eva Perón.

49. Charles Schwab rival : E*TRADE
E*Trade is mainly an online discount brokerage. It was founded in 1982 in Palo Alto, California, and I used to drive by its headquarters almost every day. The company is now run out of New York City. E*Trade produces those famous Super Bowl ads with the talking babies staring into a webcam.

50. Source of the "K" in Kmart : KRESGE
Kmart is the third largest discount store chain in the world, behind Wal-Mart and Target. The company was founded by S. S. Kresge in 1899, with the first outlets known as S. S. Kresge stores. The first “Kmart” stores opened in 1962. Kmart is famous for its promotions known as “blue light specials”, a program first introduced in 1965 and discontinued in 1991. I remember being in a Kmart store soon after coming to live in the US. That evening an employee installed a light stand an aisle away from me, switched on a flashing blue light and there was some unintelligible announcement over the loudspeaker system. I had no idea what was going on …

52. Freud contemporary Alfred : ADLER
Alfred Adler was one of the group of medical professionals that founded the psychoanalytic movement. Today Adler is less famous than his colleague, Sigmund Freud.

55. Casus ___ (cause of war) : BELLI
“Casus belli” is Latin for “a case of war”. The expression refers to an act that provokes or justifies a war. The related phrase “casus foederis” (a case for the alliance) refers to a threat against an ally that triggers a war.

56. Hwy. through Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan : US-TEN
US Route 10 is a highway formed in 1926 that ran from Detroit, Michigan to Seattle, Washington, although much of its length now is taken up by interstate highway. US Route 10 notably is in two distinct sections, with a ferry providing continuity across Lake Michigan from Ludington, Michigan and Manitowoc, Wisconsin.

60. Words after break or shake : A LEG
There are many, many colorful theories for the origins of the expression “break a leg”, used in the world of theater to mean “good luck”. Regardless of the origin, what is clear is that using the phrase “good luck” is considered to be very “bad luck”.

61. Long way to go? : LIMO
The word “limousine” actually derives from the French city of Limoges. The area around Limoges is called the Limousin, and it gave its name to a cloak hood worn by local shepherds. In early motor cars, a driver would sit outside in the weather while the passengers would sit in the covered compartment. The driver would often wear a limousin-style protective hood, giving rise to that type of transportation being called a “limousine”. Well, that’s how the story goes anyway …

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. World of Warcraft enthusiast, e.g. : GAMER
6. Enemy org. in many a spy thriller : KGB
9. North Carolina fort : BRAGG
14. Prefix with transmitter : NEURO-
15. Meadow : LEA
16. Mathematician whose name sounds like a ship : EULER
17. City in SE France : ARLES
18. Architectural add-on : ELL
19. Airline whose main hub is in Atlanta : DELTA
20. "___ 'em!" : SIC
21. Not slippery at all, as a winter road : ICELESS
24. Grp. holding quadrennial competitions : IOC
25. Sneaky laugh : HEH HEH
27. Not gendered, as a noun : EPICENE
29. Spider's class : ARACHNIDA
32. Begged : PLED
35. Mens ___ (guilty mind) : REA
36. Cloud in space : NEBULA
40. Neuter, as a stallion : GELD
41. Sophia of "Marriage Italian-Style" : LOREN
43. Designer Cassini : OLEG
44. Japanese martial art that emphasizes not injuring the attacker : AIKIDO
46. Night before : EVE
47. Melville's second novel : OMOO
48. Things spiders leave : BITE MARKS
51. Actress Angela of "American Horror Story" : BASSETT
54. Antarctic volcano named for a place in the underworld : EREBUS
58. Child-care expert LeShan : EDA
59. Moniker for German chancellor Konrad Adenauer : DER ALTE
62. The "e" of i.e. : EST
63. Volunteer's phrase : I'LL GO
65. Rumble in the Jungle participant : ALI
66. Conductor Georg whose name consists of two musical notes : SOLTI
68. Niece's counterpart, in French : NEVEU
69. Blue on an electoral map: Abbr. : DEM
70. Ancient Greek physician : GALEN
71. Open the door for : GREET
72. Psyche part : EGO
73. Scraping (by) : EKING

Down
1. Grind, as the teeth : GNASH
2. Eagle's residence : AERIE
3. Soil enricher : MULCH
4. Poet's "before" : ERE
5. More optimistic : ROSIER
6. Swiss-German artist Paul : KLEE
7. Murray ___-Mann, Physics Nobelist who coined the term "quark" : GELL
8. Whalebone : BALEEN
9. Night stand locale : BEDSIDE
10. ___ the day : RUE
11. 1980s TV's "Kate & ___" : ALLIE
12. Board, as a plane : GET ON
13. Blessing before a meal : GRACE
22. Spider of children's literature : CHARLOTTE
23. Spider's web-producing organ : SPINNERET
26. Staked a claim : HAD DIBS
28. Last car : CABOOSE
30. One who might have a corner office, for short : CEO
31. Decidedly nonfeminist women's group : HAREM
32. Links org. : PGA
33. Use for flowers in Hawaii : LEI
34. Antlered beast : ELK
37. City where Einstein was born : ULM
38. Obama, astrologically : LEO
39. In days of yore : AGO
42. Mrs. Perón : EVA
45. Went extinct : DIED OUT
49. Charles Schwab rival : E*TRADE
50. Source of the "K" in Kmart : KRESGE
51. Organism : BEING
52. Freud contemporary Alfred : ADLER
53. Healing ointment : SALVE
55. Casus ___ (cause of war) : BELLI
56. Hwy. through Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan : US-TEN
57. Police setup : STING
60. Words after break or shake : A LEG
61. Long way to go? : LIMO
64. "No kidding!" : GEE!
67. Sturdy tree : OAK


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0627-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Jun 16, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Kevan Choset
THEME: Lives of Ease
Today’s themed answers are celebrities whose names use the letter E, but no other vowel:
59A. Carefree existences ... or, punnily, what 17-, 27- and 45-Across have : LIVES OF EASE
(or “Lives of Es”)
17A. 1940s-'50s Dodgers great who lent support to Jackie Robinson : PEE WEE REESE
27A. Comedian who hosted the 2014 Oscars : ELLEN DEGENERES
45A. Actress with the classic line "You had me at hello" : RENEE ZELLWEGER
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 47s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Spanish red wine : RIOJA
Rioja wines come from the province of La Rioja in Northern Spain. In my days living back in Europe, Rioja wines were noted for their heavy oaky flavors and it wasn’t uncommon to order a “rough Rioja” when out for dinner of an evening.

6. Taters : SPUDS
The word “spud” is used as a slang term for a potato and was first recorded in the mid-1800s, in New Zealand would you believe?

11. Insult, slangily : DIS
“Dis” is a slang term meaning “insult” that originated in the eighties. It is a shortened form of “disrespect” or “dismiss”.

14. Actor Ed who voiced Carl Fredricksen in "Up" : ASNER
"Up" is the tenth movie released by Pixar studios, featuring wonderful animation as we have come to expect from Pixar. The film earned itself two Academy Awards. The main voice actor is Ed Asner, whose animated persona as Carl Fredricksen was created to resemble Spencer Tracy, as Tracy appeared in his last film, “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner”.

15. Tim ___, N.F.L. player known for kneeling in prayer : TEBOW
Tim Tebow is a former quarterback who played mainly for the Denver Broncos and New York Jets. Tebow’s relatively short professional career followed a very successful college career during which he became the first sophomore to win the Heisman Trophy.

17. 1940s-'50s Dodgers great who lent support to Jackie Robinson : PEE WEE REESE
Pee Wee Reese was a shortstop who played his professional career with the Brooklyn and LA Dodgers. Reese is remembered not only for his skill on the field, but for his very visible support for teammate Jackie Robinson, who famously struggled to be accepted as the first African-American player in the majors. As he was an outstanding marbles player as a child, Reese was given the nickname “pee wee” after the name for a small marble.

21. Teri ___, Best Supporting Actress nominee for "Tootsie" : GARR
The lovely Teri Garr had a whole host of minor roles in her youth, including appearances in nine Elvis movies. Garr’s big break came with the role of Inga in “Young Frankenstein”, and her supporting role in “Tootsie” earned Garr an Academy Award nomination. Sadly, Teri Garr suffers from multiple sclerosis. She is a National Ambassador for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

“Tootsie” is a hilarious 1982 comedy starring Dustin Hoffman in the title role, a male actor who adopts a female identity in order to land an acting job. Jessica Lange won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her performance in the film. “Tootsie” was also provided Geena Davis with her first movie role.

22. "Dallas" family name : EWING
The TV soap "Dallas" revolved around the Ewings family. The series that ran for 13 years was originally intended as a five-part mini-series, with the main characters being newlyweds Bobby and Pam Ewing. But, the devious character in the piece, Bobby's brother J. R., became so popular with audiences that the series as extended with J. R. at the center of the story. The original show ran from 1978 to 1991, and a revival was made starting in 2012. The new version of “Dallas” included some of the old characters, such as Bobby and Pam Ewing, as well as J.R. Larry Hagman, who played J.R. Ewing, passed away at the end of 2012.

26. Australian gem export : OPAL
97% of the world’s opals come from Australia, so it’s no surprise perhaps that the opal is the national gemstone of the country. The state of South Australia provides the bulk of the world’s production, about 80%.

27. Comedian who hosted the 2014 Oscars : ELLEN DEGENERES
Ellen DeGeneres is a very, very successful TV personality, having parlayed her career in stand-up comedy into lucrative gigs as an actress and talk show host. Back in 1997 DeGeneres chose the “Oprah Winfrey Show” to announce that she was a lesbian. Her character on “The Ellen Show” also came out as a lesbian in a scene with her therapist, who was played by Oprah Winfrey. Nice twist!

33. Egypt's capital : CAIRO
Cairo is the capital city of Egypt. It is the largest city on the continent of Africa and is nicknamed “The City of a Thousand Minarets” because of its impressive skyline replete with Islamic architecture. The name “Cairo” is a European corruption of the city’s original name in Arabic, “Al-Qahira”.

34. Sent back to a lower court : REMANDED
“To remand” is to send back. In the law, the term can mean to send back into custody, or to send back a case to a lower court.

36. "The Addams Family" cousin : ITT
In the television sitcom "The Addams Family", the family had a frequent visitor called Cousin Itt. Itt is a short man with long hair that runs from his head to the floor. Cousin Itt was played by Italian actor Felix Silla.
They're creepy and they're kooky,
Mysterious and spooky,
They're altogether ooky,
The Addams Family.

39. I, to a psychologist : EGO
Sigmund Freud created a structural model of the human psyche, breaking it into three parts: the id, the ego, and the super-ego. The id is that part of the psyche containing the basic instinctual drives. The ego seeks to please the id by causing realistic behavior that benefits the individual. The super-ego almost has a parental role, contradicting the id by introducing critical thinking and morals to behavioral choices.

45. Actress with the classic line "You had me at hello" : RENEE ZELLWEGER
Renée Zellweger’s big break came in the 1996 movie “Jerry Maguire”. A few years later, Zellweger followed that up with a string of successes in “Bridget Jones Diary” (2001), “Chicago” (2002) and “Cold Mountain” (2003). My wife and I love watching her play Bridget Jones, and as someone coming from the British Isles, I have to say that Zellweger does a remarkable job with the accent. She worked hard to perfect that accent, and of course she had a voice coach. She also went “undercover” and worked as a temp in an office for three weeks fine-tuning her skills.

"Jerry Maguire" is a 1996 film starring Tom Cruise, Cuba Gooding, Jr. and Renée Zellweger. The title character is played by Cruise, and is a sports agent. There are several lines oft quoted from “Jerry Maguire” including:
- “Show me the money!”
- “You complete me”
- “You had me at ‘hello’”

49. News anchor Lester : HOLT
Lester Holt is a television journalist. Holt is anchor for the weekend editions of the shows “Today” and “Nightly News” on NBC, as well as the show “Dateline NBC”.

50. "___ español?" : HABLA
“Habla español?” is Spanish for “Do you speak Spanish?”

52. ___ Spring (2010s movement) : ARAB
The term “Arab Spring” has been applied to the wave of protests, riots and civil wars that impacted the Arab world for 2010 to 2012. The uprisings were sparked by the Tunisian Revolution at the end of 2010 that led to the ouster of the longtime president and the institution of democratic elections. The period of instability that followed in some Arab League countries has been dubbed the “Arab Winter”.

58. Wed. follower : THU
In Norse mythology, Thor was the son of Odin. Thor wielded a mighty hammer and was the god of thunder, lightning and storms. Our contemporary word “Thursday” comes from “Thor’s Day”.

“Wotan” is an alternative (High German) spelling of the name Woden, the Anglo-Saxon version of the Norse god Odin. Wotan is the head god in the pagan tradition, but as paganism was gradually replaced by Christianity in the 7th and 8th centuries, Wotan moved from his place in religion and into the realm of folklore. Indeed, he is a precursor of our modern day Father Christmas. Wotan (Woden) also gave his name to Wednesday, Woden's Day ...

63. "The Faerie Queene" woman whose name means "peace" : IRENA
"The Faerie Queene" is an epic poem by Edmund Spenser, one of the longest poems written in the English language. Spenser dedicated the work to Queen Elizabeth I, who is represented as the Faerie Queene Gloriana. In return, Queen Elizabeth I granted Spenser a pension of 50 pounds a year for life.

64. Gossip, from the Yiddish : YENTA
Yenta (also "Yente") is actually a female Yiddish name. In Yiddish theater "yenta" came to mean a busybody.

65. "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood" airer : PBS
The “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” TV show starred Fred Rogers. It was the second-longest running series on PBS television after that other iconic children’s show “Sesame Street”.

66. Ohio city where Goodyear is headquartered : AKRON
For part of the 1800s, the Ohio city of Akron was the fasting growing city in the country, feeding off the industrial boom of that era. The city was founded in 1825 and its location, along the Ohio and Erie canal connecting Lake Erie with the Ohio River, helped to fuel Akron’s growth. Akron sits at the highest point of the canal and the name “Akron” comes from the Greek word meaning “summit”. Indeed, Akron is the county seat of Summit County.

The Goodyear tire company was founded in 1898. The company was named for Charles Goodyear, the man who invented vulcanized rubber in 1839. Despite the Goodyear name, Charles Goodyear himself had no connection with the company.

Down
3. First-year law student : ONE L
“One L” is a name used in general for first year law students.

6. Attack from a low-flying plane : STRAFE
We’ve been using “strafe” to mean an attack on a ground position from low-flying aircraft since WWII. Prior to that, the word was used by British soldiers to mean any form of attack. It was picked up from the German word for “punish” as it was used in “Gott strafe England” meaning, “May God punish England”.

8. Lyft competitor : UBER
Uber is a ridesharing service that was founded in 2009 and is based in San Francisco. The service is somewhat controversial and has been described as an illegal taxicab operation. Central to Uber’s service is the company’s mobile app, which can use the client’s GPS location to help find the nearest available ride. Uber’s main competitor is Lyft. Personally, I love the service and have only had good experiences ...

9. Uno + uno : DOS
In Spanish, two times “uno” (one) is “dos” (two).

10. Popeye's son : SWEE’PEA
Originally Popeye used the nickname "Swee'pea" to address his girlfriend Olive Oyl. Then along comes a baby, found on Popeye's doorstep. Popeye adopts the little guy and raises him, calling him "Swee'Pea".

11. Hors d'oeuvre often topped with paprika : DEVILED EGG
Deviled eggs are hard-boiled eggs that have been shelled and sliced in two. The egg’s yolk is mixed with primarily mayonnaise and mustard, and then spooned into the hard-boiled egg white. The eggs are then sprinkled with paprika and served cold. Some people make deviled eggs on Halloween, dropping an olive slice in the middle so that the whole thing resembles an eyeball! The term “deviled” has been used for zesty or spicy foods since the 1700s.

13. Spotify selection : SONG
Spotify is a popular music-streaming service that was launched in Sweden in 2008.

25. Musician Yoko : ONO
Yoko Ono was born into a prosperous Japanese family, and is actually a descendant of one of the emperors of Japan. Her father moved around the world for work, and she lived the first few years of her life in San Francisco. The family returned to Japan, before moving on to New York, Hanoi and back to Japan just before WWII, in time to live through the great fire-bombing of Tokyo in 1945. Immediately after the war the family was far from prosperous. While Yoko's father was being held in a prison camp in Vietnam, her mother had to resort to begging and bartering to feed her children. When her father was repatriated, life started to return to normal and Yoko was able to attend university. She was the first woman to be accepted into the philosophy program of Gakushuin University.

27. Vaping need, informally : E-CIG
An electronic cigarette (also called an “e-cigarette”) is a battery-powered device that resembles a real cigarette. The e-cigarette vaporizes a solution that contains nicotine, forming a vapor that resembles smoke. The vapor is inhaled, delivering the nicotine into the body. The assumption is that an e-cigarette is healthier than a regular cigarette as the inhaled vapor is less harmful than inhaled smoke. But, that may not be so …

32. "Speaking of which ...," for example : SEGUE
A “segue” is a transition from one topic to the next. "Segue" is an Italian word that literally means "now follows". It was first used in musical scores directing the performer to play into the next movement without a break.

38. The New Yorker cartoonist Chast : ROZ
Roz Chast had her first cartoon published in "The New Yorker" in 1978, and has had more than 800 published since then.

41. ___-retentive : ANAL
The use of the word “anal” to mean “stiffly conventional” is an abbreviated form of “anal-retentive”, a term derived from Freudian psychology. Regardless, I’m not a big fan of the term ...

46. From the capital of Tibet : LHASAN
Lhasa is the capital city of Tibet, and the name “Lhasa” translates as “place of the gods”. However, Lhasa used to be called Rasa, a name that translates into the less auspicious “goat’s place”. Lhasa was also once called the “Forbidden City” due to its inaccessible location high in the Himalayas and a traditional hostility exhibited by residents to outsiders. The “forbidden” nature of the city has been reinforced since the Chinese took over Tibet in the early 1950s as it has been difficult for foreigners to get permission to visit Lhasa.

47. Timber wolf : LOBO
The timber wolf is also known as the gray wolf, tundra wolf or lobo.

50. URL starter : HTTP
"http" are the first letters in most Internet links. “http” stands for HyperText Transfer Protocol.

Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

51. "Moby-Dick" captain : AHAB
Captain Ahab is the obsessed and far from friendly captain of the Pequod in Herman Melville’s “Moby-Dick”. The role of Captain Ahab was played by Gregory Peck in the 1956 John Huston film adaptation. Patrick Stewart played Ahab in a 1998 miniseries in which Peck made another appearance, as Father Mapple.

53. Cabinet member who once appeared beside her impersonator on "S.N.L." : RENO
Janet Reno was Attorney General of the US from 1993 to 2001. Reno was the person to hold the office second longest, and was our first female Attorney General. In 2002, Reno ran for Governor of Florida but failed to win the Democratic nomination. Janet Reno was impersonated by Will Ferrell on “Saturday Night Live”, primarily in a recurring sketch called “Janet Reno’s Dance Party”. That sketch appeared for the last time in 2001, and Janet Reno herself turned up for the party.

55. Prince in "Frozen" : HANS
“Frozen” is a 2013 animated feature from Walt Disney Studios that is based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale “The Snow Queen”.

61. "This might be of interest ...," for short : FYI ...
FYI (for your information)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Spanish red wine : RIOJA
6. Taters : SPUDS
11. Insult, slangily : DIS
14. Actor Ed who voiced Carl Fredricksen in "Up" : ASNER
15. Tim ___, N.F.L. player known for kneeling in prayer : TEBOW
16. Environmental prefix : ECO-
17. 1940s-'50s Dodgers great who lent support to Jackie Robinson : PEE WEE REESE
19. Moving day vehicle : VAN
20. Prefix with vision or market : TELE-
21. Teri ___, Best Supporting Actress nominee for "Tootsie" : GARR
22. "Dallas" family name : EWING
24. Bread unit : LOAF
26. Australian gem export : OPAL
27. Comedian who hosted the 2014 Oscars : ELLEN DEGENERES
33. Egypt's capital : CAIRO
34. Sent back to a lower court : REMANDED
36. "The Addams Family" cousin : ITT
37. Tot's three-wheeler : TRIKE
39. I, to a psychologist : EGO
40. Admonishment for public displays of affection : GET A ROOM!
43. Verbally spar : ARGUE
45. Actress with the classic line "You had me at hello" : RENEE ZELLWEGER
48. Tatters : RAGS
49. News anchor Lester : HOLT
50. "___ español?" : HABLA
52. ___ Spring (2010s movement) : ARAB
54. Impact sound in the comics : WHAM!
58. Wed. follower : THU
59. Carefree existences ... or, punnily, what 17-, 27- and 45-Across have : LIVES OF EASE
62. Shout before "You're it!" : TAG!
63. "The Faerie Queene" woman whose name means "peace" : IRENA
64. Gossip, from the Yiddish : YENTA
65. "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood" airer : PBS
66. Ohio city where Goodyear is headquartered : AKRON
67. Cry when accepting a challenge : IT'S ON!

Down
1. In awe : RAPT
2. "Aha!" : I SEE!
3. First-year law student : ONE L
4. Dealer in diamonds : JEWELER
5. "All bets ___ off" : ARE
6. Attack from a low-flying plane : STRAFE
7. Jury member : PEER
8. Lyft competitor : UBER
9. Uno + uno : DOS
10. Popeye's son : SWEE’PEA
11. Hors d'oeuvre often topped with paprika : DEVILED EGG
12. Words of confidence : I CAN
13. Spotify selection : SONG
18. "Yipe!" : EGAD!
23. Alert : WARN
25. Musician Yoko : ONO
26. "This one's ___" : ON ME
27. Vaping need, informally : E-CIG
28. "Catch you on the flip side" : LATER
29. Ones eschewing trash cans : LITTERBUGS
30. Dirty coating : GRIME
31. Cartoon shriek : EEK!
32. "Speaking of which ...," for example : SEGUE
35. Active person : DOER
37. Pedicurists work on them : TOES
38. The New Yorker cartoonist Chast : ROZ
41. ___-retentive : ANAL
42. Crown, scepter, etc. : REGALIA
43. Leather punch : AWL
44. Share with one's followers, in a way : RETWEET
46. From the capital of Tibet : LHASAN
47. Timber wolf : LOBO
50. URL starter : HTTP
51. "Moby-Dick" captain : AHAB
52. State definitively : AVER
53. Cabinet member who once appeared beside her impersonator on "S.N.L." : RENO
55. Prince in "Frozen" : HANS
56. Regarding : AS TO
57. Not nice : MEAN
60. Bother : IRK
61. "This might be of interest ...," for short : FYI ...


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0626-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 Jun 16, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Priscilla Clark & Jeff Chen
THEME: Sports Page Headlines
Today’s themed answers could easily be headlines on a sports page, references to matchups of baseball teams. However, the clues makes reference to alternative interpretations of the same phrases:
23A. Conflict at sea : MARINERS BATTLE PIRATES
47A. Parenting problem at a zoo : TIGERS CAN’T HANDLE CUBS
69A. Cold War synopsis : YANKEES DEFEAT REDS
94A. Show of respect at the Vatican : PADRES BOW TO CARDINALS
120A. Overthrow of a monarchy : NATIONALS TOPPLE ROYALS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 20m 07s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Foyer fixture : COATRACK
“Foyer”, meaning “lobby”, is a French word that we’ve imported into English. In French, "foyer" is used for what we would call a "green room", a place where actors can gather when not on stage or on set.

9. Paratroopers' gear : CHUTES
The term “parachute” was coined by Frenchman François Blanchard, from “para-” meaning “defence against” and “chute” meaning “a fall”.

15. Building material for an 80-Across (in two different ways?) : ADOBE
(80A. See 15-Across : ABODE)
“Adobe” is a building material that might be used to construct an “abode”, and the letters in the word “adobe” are used to make the word “abode”.

21. Warhol's "Campbell's Tomato Juice Box," e.g. : POP ART
Andy Warhol went through a period of painting iconic American products, including Coca-Cola bottles and Campbell's tomato soup cans. In 1964 he participated in a gallery show called "The American Supermarket". Along with other pop artists he contributed works including a painting of a can of Campbell's tomato soup. He priced the painting at $1,500, and sold autographed cans of soup for $6 a piece.

22. Italian vessel? : CRUET
A cruet is a small glass bottle for holding a condiment or perhaps a dressing. The word "cruet" comes from the Old French word for an earthen pot.

Don’t try asking for Italian dressing in Italy, as it’s a North American invention. Italians are fond of dressing their salads with olive oil, vinegar, salt and maybe some black pepper. Try it!

26. Asia's ___ Sea : ARAL
The Aral Sea is a great example of how humans can have a devastating effect on their environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad ...

27. Geological flat top : MESA
“Mesa” is the Spanish for “table”, which gives rise to our English usage of “mesa” to describe a geographic feature.

28. Staple at a luau : POI
The corm of some taro plants is used to make poi, the traditional Hawaiian dish (that I think tastes horrible). When a taro plant is grown as an ornamental, it is often called Elephant Ears due to the shape of its large leaves.

29. Orange Pixar character : NEMO
"Finding Nemo" is a 2003 animated blockbuster from Pixar. The film was the winner of the Oscar that year for Best Animated Feature. Believe it or not, "Finding Nemo" is the best-selling DVD of all time and, until 2010's "Toy Story 3", it was the highest-grossing, G-rated movie at the box office.

30. Main character in Kafka's "The Metamorphosis" : SAMSA
"The Metamorphosis" is a famous novella by Franz Kafka, regarded by many as one of the greatest pieces of short fiction written in the 20th century. The story tells of the metamorphosis of Gregor Samsa into a gigantic insect. His sister, Grete Samsa, becomes his caregiver.

32. River ___ (tributary of the Thames) : LEA
The River Lea is a major waterway that meets up with the River Thames within the city of London. There have been persistent rumors over the past few years that a large predator lives in the Lea, as witnesses have seen Canada geese and other birds dragged vertically underwater. A favorite explanation from the tabloid press is that there is a crocodile lurking in the area, something that has been strenuously denied by the authorities.

44. Dura ___ (brain membrane) : MATER
The three membranes that envelop the brain and spinal cord are referred to as the meninges. From the inside to the outside, these membranes are known as:

- the pia mater (“tender mother” in Latin)
- the arachnoid mater (“spider-like mother”)
- the dura mater (“tough mother”)


46. "That's more than I want to know!" : TMI
Too much information! (TMI)

52. Luke Skywalker's landspeeder, e.g. : HOVERCAR
When the original “Star Wars” movie was in development, the lead character was called “Anakin Starkiller”. The character was also a gnarly, old war hero, and then a younger female. Eventually that character developed into Luke Skywalker.

54. "The Governator" : ARNIE
The body-builder, actor and politician Arnold Schwarzenegger was born in Graz in Austria, the son of the local police chief. Schwarzenegger’s family name translates into the more prosaic "black plough man". In his bodybuilding days, he was often referred to as the Austrian Oak. When he was Governor of California he was called “the Governator”, a play on his role in the “The Terminator” series of movies.

55. Focus of study for Niels Bohr : ATOM
Niels Bohr was a Danish physicist, who won his 1922 Nobel Prize for his work on quantum mechanics and atomic structure. Later in his life, Bohr was part of the team working on the Manhattan Project that developed the first atomic bomb. Niels Bohr and Albert Einstein had a series of public debates and disputes in the twenties and thirties. Although the two respected each other very highly, they held very different views on quantum theory, different views on the laws of physics at the atomic level. The passage of time has shown that Bohr won out in those debates.

59. Winter Palace resident : TSAR
The Winter Palace is a magnificent building in St. Petersburg in Russia, home to the Russian tsars (and tsarinas). The Winter Palace houses the famous Hermitage Museum. I was lucky enough to visit the Palace and museum some years ago, and I have to say that I have rarely been more impressed by a historical building.

61. Particulars, in slang : DEETS
“Deets” is slang for “details”.

65. Eight days after the nones : IDES
There were three important days in each month of the old Roman calendar. These days originally depended on the cycles of the moon but were eventually "fixed" by law. "Kalendae" were the first days of each month, originally the days of the new moon. "Nonae" (nones) were originally the days of the half moon. And "idus" (the ides) was originally the day of the full moon, eventually fixed at the 15th day of a month. Well, actually the ides were the 15th day of March, May, July and October. For all other months, the ides fell on the 13th. Go figure ...

67. Choice word? : EENIE
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe,
Catch the tiger/monkey/baby by the toe.
If it hollers/screams let him go,
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe, you are it!

69. Cold War synopsis : YANKEES DEFEAT REDS
The phrase “cold war” was first used by the novelist George Orwell in a 1945 essay about the atomic bomb. Orwell described a world under threat of nuclear war as having a “peace that is no peace”, in a permanent state of “cold war”. The specific use of “cold war” to describe the tension between the Eastern bloc and the Western allies is attributed to a 1947 speech by Bernard Baruch.

74. Rimes with rhymes : LEANN
LeAnn Rimes has been a country music star since she was 13 years old. In 2008 she disclosed publicly that she suffered from the autoimmune disease psoriasis. She has been active since then in raising money to fight the disease and helping fund cancer research as well. So, not only did Rimes win three Grammy Awards in 1997, she also won a 2009 Humanitarian Award from the Academy of Country Music.

75. Othello, for one : MOOR
The most famous Moor in literature has to be Othello, the title character in William Shakespeare's tragedy "Othello, the Moor of Venice". The word "Moor" describes various peoples of North Africa, usually of the Muslim faith. At the height of their geographic influence the Moors occupied much of the Iberian peninsula, calling it Al Andalus (from which modern Andalusia gets its name).

88. Roger Bannister, notably : MILER
The 4-minute barrier for the mile run was first broken in 1954 by Roger Bannister, when he finished in just over 3m 59s. The record for males now stands at 3m 43s. If you plan on running a 4-minute mile, you should probably be warned that this means you have to run the whole race at an average speed of over 15 mph (do the math!).

89. Word repeated in James Brown's "It's a ___ ___ ___ World" : MAN’S
James Brown released the celebrated song “It’s a Man’s Man’s Man’s World” in 1966. The title is a play on the excellent comedy film “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World” that was released three years earlier.

94. Show of respect at the Vatican : PADRES BOW TO CARDINALS
Vatican City is a sovereign city-state that is walled off within the city of Rome. Vatican City is about 110 acres in area, and so is the smallest independent state in the world. With about 800 residents, it is also the smallest state in terms of population. Although the Holy See dates back to early Christianity, Vatican City only came into being in 1929. At that time, Prime Minister Benito Mussolini signed a treaty with the Holy See on behalf of the Kingdom of Italy that established the city-state.

99. Wood in Lucius Malfoy's wand : ELM
Lucius Malfoy is a character in the “Harry Potter” series of novels. Lucius is the father of Draco Malfoy, a cowardly bully who is in the same year as Harry in Hogwarts School of Witchcraft.

104. Incapacitate, in a way : TASE
“To tase” is to use a taser, a stun gun.

105. "Inside the N.B.A." airer : TNT
TNT stands for Turner Network Television. The TNT cable channel made a big splash in the eighties when it started to broadcast old MGM movies that had been “colorized”, not something that was a big hit with the public. In recent years, the TNT programming lineup is touted with the tagline “We Know Drama”, and includes shows like “Judging Amy”, “ER” and “Cold Case”.

106. Yemen, once : SHEBA
Sheba is referenced in the Bible several times. The “Queen of Sheba” is mentioned as someone who traveled to Jerusalem to behold the fame of King Solomon. No one knows for sure where the kingdom of Sheba was located, although there is evidence that it was actually the ancient Semitic civilization of Saba. The Sabeans lived in what today is Yemen, on the Arabian Peninsula.

111. Subj. for a radio astronomer : SETI
SETI is the name given to a number of projects that are searching for extraterrestrial life. The acronym stands for “search for extraterrestrial intelligence”. One of the main SETI activities is the monitoring of electromagnetic radiation (such as radio waves) reaching the Earth in the hope of finding a transmission from a civilization in another world.

113. One in a gray suit, for short : REB
During the Civil War, the personification of the Southern states was “Johnny Reb”. The northern equivalent was Billy Yank.

115. Most-applied-to sch. in the U.S. : UCLA
The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) gets more applications from students than any other university in the country. UCLA also has more students enrolled than any other university in the state.

126. Smart ___ : ALECK
Apparently the original "smart Alec" (sometimes “Aleck”) was Alec Hoag, a pimp, thief and confidence trickster who plied his trade in New York City in the 1840s.

127. Only guest host in the 21 years of Leno's "The Tonight Show" : COURIC
Katie Couric left NBC's "The Today Show" in 2006 and took over as news anchor for "CBS Evening News". In so doing she became the first solo female anchor of a broadcast network evening news program. Couric also has the honor of being the only person to guest-host on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno”. In fact she “swapped jobs” on that particular day, and Leno filled in for Couric on “The Today Show”. Since 2012, Couric has a hosted a daytime talk show called “Katie” on ABC.

129. City of Light, informally : PAREE
The French capital Paris is nicknamed “La Ville Lumière” (The City of Light). There are two justifications cited for the moniker. Firstly, the city played a leading role during Europe’s Age of Enlightenment, in the 18th century. In fact, the French refer to the era as “the Century of Lights”. Secondly, and more literally, Paris was one of the first cities in Europe to adopt widespread gas street lighting. There were about 56,000 gas lights illuminating the streets of Paris in the 1860s.

Down
2. John who wrote "Appointment in Samarra" : O’HARA
"Appointment in Samarra" was John O'Hara's first novel, published in 1934. Samarra is a city north of Baghdad in Iraq, although the story itself takes place in a fictional town in Pennsylvania. The novel deals with the last three days in the life of Julian English, describing how he destroys himself with a series compulsive acts leading up to his suicide. This one doesn't qualify as light reading for the plane ...

3. Hussein : Obama :: ___ : Garfield : ABRAM
President James Abram Garfield was born in Orange Township in Ohio, the youngest son of Abram Garfield. Abram had moved from New York to Ohio specifically to court his childhood sweetheart Mehitabel Ballou. When Abram arrived in Ohio, however, he found that Mehitabel had already married. Abram did manage to join the Ballou family though, as he eventually married Mehitabel’s sister Eliza.

Despite rumors to the contrary, I am pretty sure that Barack Hussein Obama II was indeed born in Hawaii. President Obama was born on August 4, 1961 at Kapi’olani Maternity & Gynecological Hospital in Honolulu, Hawaii.

4. "Through many dangers, ___ and snares I have already come" ("Amazing Grace" lyric) : TOILS
“Amazing Grace” is a very, very famous hymn, with words written by John Newton in 1779. The words have been set to a number of different melodies, and what we are used to hearing today is music from a tune called “New Britain”.

5. Burgundy of "Anchorman" : RON
Ron Burgundy is the title character in the movie “Anchorman” series of films. Burgundy is a news anchor played by comedian Will Ferrell. Apparently Burgundy loves a glass of scotch, poetry, and his dog Baxter.

8. Big name in headphones : KOSS
Koss is a manufacturer mainly of headphones based in Milwaukee. The company was founded in 1958 by John C. Koss, the inventor of the first stereo heasphone.

9. Number cruncher, for short : CPA
Certified public accountant (CPA)

10. Short shorts : HOT PANTS
Hot pants were quite the fad. They were introduced in fashion shows in the winter of 1970/71, and became a huge sensation in the summer of ’71. By the end of the year, hot pants were “gone”.

12. The Seal of Solomon and others : TALISMANS
The Seal of Solomon is a legendary signet ring that gave Solomon power over demons and genies, and the ability to speak with animals.

14. Letters on many a racecar : STP
STP is a brand name for automotive lubricants and additives. The name STP comes from “Scientifically Treated Petroleum”.

15. Part of a plot : ACRE
At one time, an acre was defined as the amount of land a yoke of oxen could plow in a day. This was more precisely defined as a strip of land “one furrow long” (i.e. one furlong) and one furlong wide. The length of one furlong was equal to 10 chains, or 40 rods. A area of one furlong times 10 rods was one rood.

18. Queen ___ : BEE
A queen bee has a stinger, just like worker bees. When a worker bee stings, it leaves it stinger in its victim. The worker bee dies after losing its stinger as the loss rips out part of its insides. However, a queen bee can sting with impunity as the stinger’s anatomy is different.

19. SAT org. : ETS
The Educational Testing Service (ETS) was founded in 1947, and produces standardized tests for students from kindergarten through college. Perhaps most famously, ETS operates the SAT testing process.

24. Raft material : BALSA
Balsa is a very fast growing tree that is native to parts of South America. Even though balsa wood is very soft, it is actually classified as a hardwood, the softest of all the hardwoods (go figure!). Balsa is light and strong, so is commonly used in making model airplanes. Amazingly, in WWII a full-size British plane, the de Havilland Mosquito, was built largely from balsa and plywood. No wonder they called it "The Wooden Wonder" and "The Timber Terror".

25. Pentium creator : INTEL
Intel is the world’s largest manufacturer of semiconductor chips. The company was founded in 1968, and the name “Intel” is a derived from the term "int(egrated) el(ectronics)". Recognition of the Intel brand has been greatly helped by the success of the “Intel Inside” campaign that started back in 1991.

35. Supercontinent of 200 million years ago : PANGAEA
Pangaea was a supercontinent that existed during the age of the dinosaurs, the late Paleozoic and early Mesozoic eras. Pangaea broke apart due to movement of tectonic plates in the Earth’s crust. All of today’s continents were once part of Pangaea.

38. Scope : AMBIT
An ambit is an outer boundary or limit, a circumference. The term can also be used to mean the sphere or scope of influence. “Ambit” comes from the Latin “ambire” meaning “to go around”.

41. World of Warcraft beast : ORC
“World of Warcraft” is an online role-playing game. My son informs me that the game is not that great. Like I would know …

42. Waver of a wand : TSA AGENT
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) was created in 2001, soon after the 9/11 attacks. TSA personnel carry out the baggage and body searches at US airports. The TSA has a Trusted Traveler program that allows certain passengers to move more quickly through security screening. These passengers pay the TSA a one-time fee that covers a background check after which successful applicants are issued a Known Traveler Number (KTN).

43. Bathroom tile shade : ECRU
The shade called ecru is a grayish, yellowish brown. The word “ecru” comes from French and means “raw, unbleached”. “Ecru” has the same roots as our word “crude”.

47. Cowardly Lion harasser : TOTO
Toto is Dorothy’s dog in the film “The Wizard of Oz”, and in the original book “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” by L. Frank Baum. Toto was played in the movie by a dog called Terry, but Terry’s name was soon changed to Toto in real life due to the success of the film.

48. Bathroom bar : IVORY
Ivory soap is one of Procter & Gamble's oldest products, introduced way back in 1879. Ivory soap is noted for its “purity” and also because of its property of floating in water. Despite urban myths to the contrary, the property of floating in water was developed deliberately by a chemist at the time Ivory was being formulated. The soap floats because the ingredients are mixed longer than necessary for homogenization, which introduces more air into the product.

49. The Pink Panther, in "The Pink Panther" : GEM
A lot of people think that the Inspector Clouseau character (played originally by Peter Sellers) is “The Pink Panther”. It’s actually the jewel that was stolen in the original movie. Would you believe there are eleven “Pink Panther” movies in the whole series?

51. Seventh film in the "Rocky" series : CREED
“Creed” is a 2015 boxing movie, the seventh in the “Rocky” franchise. Sylvester Stallone returns as Rocky Balboa, but this time as a trainer. Rocky trains Apollo Creed’s son Adonis. Stallone was nominated for an Oscar for his supporting role in the film. It was the first Academy Award nomination he had received since the first “Rocky” film, which was released almost forty years earlier.

57. "___ the season ..." : ‘TIS
The music for the Christmas song “Deck the Halls” is a traditional Welsh tune that dates back to the 16th century. The same tune was used by Mozart for a violin and piano duet. The lyrics with which we are familiar (other than the “tra-la-la”) are American in origin, and were recorded in 19th century. “‘Tis the season to be jolly …”

60. Hardly original works : RETREADS
A retread tire is one that has been recycled, possibly more than once. The tread of the old tire is buffed away, and and new rubber tread is applied to the "bare" tire using some special process that seems to work really well. Retreads are a lot cheaper, and obviously are relatively friendly to the environment.

64. Police blotter letters : AKA
Also known as (aka)

A police blotter is (or used to be) a daily record of arrests made.

66. Fair-hiring inits. : EEO
Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) is a term that has been around since 1964 when the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) was set up by the Civil Rights Act. Title VII of the Act prohibits employers from discriminating against employees on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin or religion.

68. Org. with the Eddie Eagle safety program : NRA
The Eddie Eagle program was introduced by the National Rifle Association and is designed to train children to avoid causing harm if they encounter a firearm. The basic mantra of the program is “Stop, don’t touch, run away, tell a grown-up”.

70. Tree with catkins : ALDER
Alder trees are deciduous (i.e. not evergreen), and the fruit of the tree is called a “catkin”. The tree carries both male and female catkins that look very similar to each other, but the male catkin is longer than the female. Alders are pollinated by wind usually, although bees can play a role.

73. Delicacy usually eaten as an appetizer : SNAIL
In order to eat snails, apparently they have to be “purged” before killing them. That means starving them or feeding them on something “wholesome” for several days before cooking them up. Ugh …

79. Queen ___ (pop music nickname) : BEY
Beyoncé Knowles established herself in the entertainment industry as the lead singer with the R&B group Destiny's Child. She launched her solo singing career in 2003, two years after making her first appearance as an actor. In 2006 she played the lead in the very successful movie adaptation of the Broadway musical "Dreamgirls". Beyoncé is married to rap star Jay-Z. She is also referred to affectionately as “Queen Bey”, a play on the phrase “the queen bee”.

81. Deli roll : BIALY
“Bialy” is a Yiddish name for a small onion roll, which takes its name from Bialystok, a city in Poland.

82. Rubens or Raphael : OLD MASTER
Peter Paul Rubens was a Flemish painter who worked in the city of Antwerp in Belgium. Rubens was knighted by two monarchs: Philip IV of Spain, and Charles I of England. When Rubens was 53-years-old, four years after the death of his first wife, he married a 16-year-old girl. It was his young wife who inspired many of the voluptuous figures with whom Rubens became associated later in his career.

Raphael was an artist and architect from Central Italy. Raphael was active during the High Renaissance and is often considered alongside Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci who were active in the same timeframe in Italy,

90. Leave runny on the inside, say : SOFT-BOIL
That would be a soft-boiled egg.

96. Welcome to the fold? : BAA!
A “fold” is an enclosure for sheep, or an alternative name for a “flock”.

98. Go haywire : ACT UP
“Haywire” is wire used to bind bales of hay. Haywire is very springy, and coils of the wire are difficult to keep under control. That characteristic gives us informal meaning of “haywire”, namely “erratic, crazy”.

107. OutKast chart-topper : HEY YA!
OutKast is a hip hop duo comprising rappers André 3000 and Big Boi.

109. Southern beauty : BELLE
A “beau” is the boyfriend of a “belle”, a young lady. “Beau” and “belle” are the masculine and feminine forms of the French word for “handsome, beautiful”.

112. Take a hit : TOKE
“Toke” is a slang term for a puff on a marijuana cigarette or on a pipe containing the drug.

114. Sein : German :: ___ : French : ETRE
The verb “to be” is “sein” in German, and “être” in French.

116. Cotton or country follower : CLUB
The Cotton Club was a famous jazz club in Harlem in New York City that thrived during the days of prohibition. Although the stars on stage were mainly African-American, including Duke Ellington, Count Basie and Ella Fitzgerald, the club generally denied admission to African-American patrons.

117. Siberian river : LENA
The Lena River is in northern Russia, in Siberia, and empties into the Arctic Ocean.

121. ___ russe : A LA
When a meal is served “à la russe” (in the Russian style), courses are brought to the table sequentially. This contrasts with a meal served “à la française” (in the French style), in which all the courses are brought to the table at the same time.

123. Deli offering : LOX
Lox is a cured salmon fillet, finely sliced. The term "lox" comes into English via Yiddish, and derives from the German word for salmon, namely “Lachs”.

124. Alternatives to Macs : PCS
The original IBM Personal Computer is model number 5150, which was introduced to the world on August 12, 1981. The term “personal computer” was already in use, but the success of the IBM 5150 led to the term “PC” being used for all computer products compatible with the IBM platform.

125. What a constant hand-washer probably has, for short : OCD
Apparently obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is the fourth most commonly diagnosed mental disorder, making it about as common as asthma.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Foyer fixture : COATRACK
9. Paratroopers' gear : CHUTES
15. Building material for an 80-Across (in two different ways?) : ADOBE
20. Unsympathetic response to a complainer : OH BOOHOO
21. Warhol's "Campbell's Tomato Juice Box," e.g. : POP ART
22. Italian vessel? : CRUET
23. Conflict at sea : MARINERS BATTLE PIRATES
26. Asia's ___ Sea : ARAL
27. Geological flat top : MESA
28. Staple at a luau : POI
29. Orange Pixar character : NEMO
30. Main character in Kafka's "The Metamorphosis" : SAMSA
32. River ___ (tributary of the Thames) : LEA
34. Balls or fire preceder : SPIT
37. Way off : AFAR
40. Decides, in a way : VOTES ON
44. Dura ___ (brain membrane) : MATER
46. "That's more than I want to know!" : TMI
47. Parenting problem at a zoo : TIGERS CAN’T HANDLE CUBS
52. Luke Skywalker's landspeeder, e.g. : HOVERCAR
53. Spill one's secrets : SING
54. "The Governator" : ARNIE
55. Focus of study for Niels Bohr : ATOM
56. Lead-in to dealer or dialer : AUTO-
59. Winter Palace resident : TSAR
61. Particulars, in slang : DEETS
62. Logician's word : NOR
63. Show weariness : SAG
65. Eight days after the nones : IDES
67. Choice word? : EENIE
69. Cold War synopsis : YANKEES DEFEAT REDS
74. Rimes with rhymes : LEANN
75. Othello, for one : MOOR
76. "Kewl!" : RAD!
77. Catch : NAB
80. See 15-Across : ABODE
83. It may be recounted : TALE
85. Be highly esteemed : RATE
87. Not mad : SANE
88. Roger Bannister, notably : MILER
89. Word repeated in James Brown's "It's a ___ ___ ___ World" : MAN’S
91. "Please show some compassion!" : HAVE PITY!
94. Show of respect at the Vatican : PADRES BOW TO CARDINALS
99. Wood in Lucius Malfoy's wand : ELM
100. Dear one? : DIARY
101. Rapt : FOCUSED
102. Twosome : DYAD
104. Incapacitate, in a way : TASE
105. "Inside the N.B.A." airer : TNT
106. Yemen, once : SHEBA
111. Subj. for a radio astronomer : SETI
113. One in a gray suit, for short : REB
115. Most-applied-to sch. in the U.S. : UCLA
119. Split pair : EXES
120. Overthrow of a monarchy : NATIONALS TOPPLE ROYALS
126. Smart ___ : ALECK
127. Only guest host in the 21 years of Leno's "The Tonight Show" : COURIC
128. It requires a balancing act : UNICYCLE
129. City of Light, informally : PAREE
130. Gives the old heave-ho : EXPELS
131. Faulty connections? : BAD DATES

Down
1. Food ___ (feelings after big meals) : COMAS
2. John who wrote "Appointment in Samarra" : O’HARA
3. Hussein : Obama :: ___ : Garfield : ABRAM
4. "Through many dangers, ___ and snares I have already come" ("Amazing Grace" lyric) : TOILS
5. Burgundy of "Anchorman" : RON
6. "Pardon ..." : AHEM ...
7. Heart : CORE
8. Big name in headphones : KOSS
9. Number cruncher, for short : CPA
10. Short shorts : HOT PANTS
11. Until : UP TO
12. The Seal of Solomon and others : TALISMANS
13. Before, poetically : ERE
14. Letters on many a racecar : STP
15. Part of a plot : ACRE
16. ___ queen : DRAMA
17. Pitched poorly : OUT OF TUNE
18. Queen ___ : BEE
19. SAT org. : ETS
24. Raft material : BALSA
25. Pentium creator : INTEL
31. Profess : AVER
33. Long stretch : EON
35. Supercontinent of 200 million years ago : PANGAEA
36. "___ be my pleasure" : IT’D
38. Scope : AMBIT
39. Climbs : RISES
41. World of Warcraft beast : ORC
42. Waver of a wand : TSA AGENT
43. Bathroom tile shade : ECRU
45. Prepped : READIED
47. Cowardly Lion harasser : TOTO
48. Bathroom bar : IVORY
49. The Pink Panther, in "The Pink Panther" : GEM
50. Takes the place of, in batting : HITS FOR
51. Seventh film in the "Rocky" series : CREED
52. ___ characters (basic means of writing Chinese) : HAN
57. "___ the season ..." : ‘TIS
58. Leftover : ODDMENT
60. Hardly original works : RETREADS
63. Curled one's lip : SNEERED
64. Police blotter letters : AKA
66. Fair-hiring inits. : EEO
68. Org. with the Eddie Eagle safety program : NRA
70. Tree with catkins : ALDER
71. Charms : ENAMORS
72. Long stretch : ERA
73. Delicacy usually eaten as an appetizer : SNAIL
78. Marching band? : ANTS
79. Queen ___ (pop music nickname) : BEY
80. Stoked : AMPED
81. Deli roll : BIALY
82. Rubens or Raphael : OLD MASTER
84. Gets fitted for a suit? : LAWYERS UP
86. Drive-___ : THRU
87. Pool site : SPA
90. Leave runny on the inside, say : SOFT-BOIL
92. Compete : VIE
93. Leftovers : ENDS
95. Once-common campus event : SIT-IN
96. Welcome to the fold? : BAA!
97. Downside : CON
98. Go haywire : ACT UP
103. Clear for takeoff? : DEICE
107. OutKast chart-topper : HEY YA!
108. On the button : EXACT
109. Southern beauty : BELLE
110. Low mounts? : ASSES
112. Take a hit : TOKE
114. Sein : German :: ___ : French : ETRE
116. Cotton or country follower : CLUB
117. Siberian river : LENA
118. Dry : ARID
120. Time out? : NAP
121. ___ russe : A LA
122. A card? : ACE
123. Deli offering : LOX
124. Alternatives to Macs : PCS
125. What a constant hand-washer probably has, for short : OCD


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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