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0731-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Jul 16, Sunday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Ruth Bloomfield Margolin
THEME: Make that a Double
We have a rebus puzzle today. The letters IT appear twice in each of the themed answers. For every occurrence of the letters IT we KEEP them TOGETHER, writing the letters in the same square:
118A. Stay cool ... or a hint to this puzzle's theme : KEEP IT TOGETHER

22A. Flip-flop : SWITCH POSITIONS
31A. Question asked at the cash register : CREDIT OR DEBIT
59A. Occasion to learn a secret handshake : INITIATION RITE
80A. Fib : LITTLE WHITE LIE
107A. Way to get to know a father in law? : PATERNITY SUIT
16D. Landlord's request : SECURITY DEPOSIT
20D. Activity-tracking devices : FITBITS
58D. Climber in a children's rhyme : ITSY BITSY SPIDER
103D. Dummies : NITWITS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 26m 20s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

8. Person in handcuffs, for short : PERP
Perpetrator (perp.)

12. The Fonz, for one : GREASER
Fonzie is a character in the sitcom “Happy Days” that was originally aired from 1974 to 1984. The Fonz was written as a secondary character, but eventually took over the show. Fonzie is of course played by Henry Winkler.

25. Times for many Tours tours : ETES
In French, “été” (summer) is “la saison chaude” (the warm season).

Tours is the largest city in the Centre region of France. It is said that the people of Tours speak the "purest" form of French in the whole country, and when spoken by a local it is also said to be free of any accent.

29. Mentalist Geller : URI
Uri Geller's most famous performance is perhaps his uncomfortable failure on "The Tonight Show" with Johnny Carson in 1973. Carson "hijacked" Geller on live television by providing him with spoons to bend and watches to start, none of which had been available to Geller before the show aired. Clever!

30. ___ Tamid (synagogue lamp) : NER
“Ner tamid” is the Hebrew term for a sanctuary lamp, although it is often referred to in English as “eternal flame”.

39. Ed of "Up" : ASNER
"Up" is the tenth movie released by Pixar studios, featuring wonderful animation as we have come to expect from Pixar. The film earned itself two Academy Awards. The main voice actor is Ed Asner, whose animated persona as Carl Fredricksen was created to resemble Spencer Tracy, as Tracy appeared in his last film, “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner”.

44. It may require a password : WI-FI
“Wi-Fi” is nothing more than a trademark, a trademark registered by an association of manufacturers of equipment that use wireless LAN (Local Area Network) technology. A device labeled with “Wi-Fi” has to meet certain defined technical standards, basically meaning that the devices can talk to each other. The name “Wi-Fi” suggests “Wireless Fidelity”, although apparently the term was never intended to mean anything at all.

53. Some email attachments : PDFS
Portable Document Format (PDF) is a file format introduced by Adobe Systems in 1993. PDF documents can be shared between users and read using many different applications, making them more universally accessible than documents saved by one particular program.

56. Travis who sang "The Whiskey Ain't Workin'" : TRITT
Travis Tritt is a country singer from Marietta, Georgia.

64. Man of morals : AESOP
Aesop is remembered today for his famous fables. Aesop lived in Ancient Greece, probably around the sixth century BC. Supposedly he was born a slave, somehow became a free man, but then met with a sorry end. Aesop was sent to the city of Delphi on a diplomatic mission but instead insulted the Delphians. He was tried on a trumped-up charge of stealing from a temple, sentenced to death and was thrown off a cliff.

68. Spot for vaccinations, for short? : PSA
Public service announcement (PSA)

69. Chest organs : THYMUSES
The thymus is an organ located behind the breastbone. It is within the thymus that T cells mature. T cells are a group of white blood cells that are essential components of the body’s immune system. T cells are so called because they mature in the thymus. Animal thymic tissue can be offered on a restaurant's menu, where it is described as “sweetbread”.

71. Q neighbors : RST
The letters RST follow the letter Q in the alphabet.

74. Q neighbor : TAB
Like most features on our computer keyboards, the tab key is a hangover from the days of typewriters. When using a typewriter, making entries into a table was very tedious, involving lots of tapping on the spacebar and backspace key. So, a lever was added to typewriters that allowed the operator to “jump” across the page to positions that could be set by hand. Later this was simplified to a tab key which could be depressed, causing the carriage to jump to the next tab stop in much the same way that the modern tab key works on a computer.

75. Apartment ad abbr. : RMS
Room (rms.)

78. Q preceder, in song : SUSIE
The song “Susie Q” was written by, and originally released by, Dale Hawkins in 1957. It was covered By Creedence Clearwater Revival (as “Suzie Q”) in 1968.

79. Passing note? : OBIT
“Obituary” comes from the Latin “obituaris”, originally the record of the death of a person, although the literal meaning is “pertaining to death”.

83. Romance writers' awards : RITAS
The RITA Awards are presented by Romance Writers of America (RWA) to authors exhibiting excellence in the genre of romantic fiction. The RITA is named for the RWA’s first president, Rita Clay Estrada.

84. ___ buco : OSSO
“Osso” is the Italian word for bone as in the name of the dish Osso Buco: braised veal shanks.

86. "Amazing Grace" verse ender : … I SEE
“Amazing Grace” is a very, very famous hymn, with words written by John Newton in 1779. The words have been set to a number of different melodies, and what we are used to hearing today is music from a tune called “New Britain”.

87. Bush campaigns? : SAFARIS
“Safari” is a Swahili word, meaning “journey” or “expedition”.

91. Pet cause, in brief : SPCA
Unlike in most developed countries, there is no "umbrella" organization in the US with the goal of preventing cruelty to animals. Instead there are independent organizations set up all over the nation using the name SPCA. Having said that, there is an organization called the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) that was originally intended to operate across the country, but really it now focuses its efforts in New York City.

94. French city known for its porcelain : LIMOGES
Limoges is a city in west-central France that is the capital of the Limousin region. Limoges is famous for its production of vitreous enamel, hard-paste porcelain and oak barrels used in making Cognac and Bordeaux wines.

101. Powerhouse in women's b-ball : UCONN
The University of Connecticut (UConn) was founded in 1881 as the Storrs Agricultural School, taking its name from the Storrs brothers who donated the land and provided initial funding.

106. Trophies for Tiger Woods and LeBron James : ESPYS
Awards ceremony since 1993 : ESPYS. The ESPY Awards are a creation of the ESPN sports television network. One difference with similarly named awards in the entertainment industry is that ESPY winners are chosen solely based on viewer votes.

110. Home of the N.C.A.A.'s Cyclones : ISU
Iowa State University of Science and Technology (ISU) is located in Ames, Iowa. Among many other notable events, ISU created the country’s first school of veterinary medicine, in 1879. The sports teams of ISU are known as the Cyclones.

111. King of Portugal : REI
“Rei” is the Portuguese word for “king”.

113. Actor Bremner of "Black Hawk Down" : EWEN
Scottish actor Ewen Bremner played the character “Spud” Murphy in the 1996 film “Trainspotting”, and SPC Shawn Nelson in “Black Hawk Down”.

114. One side of the Bosporus strait : ASIA
The Dardanelles and Bosphorus (also “Bosporus”) are two straits in Turkey. The Bosphorus and the Dardanelles lie either side of the Sea of Marmara, allowing continuous navigation from the Aegean Sea to the Black Sea. The Turkish Straits also form the boundary between Europe and Asia.

115. Lead-up to mating : ENDGAME
In the game of chess, when the king is under immediate threat of capture it is said to be "in check". If the king cannot escape from check, then the game ends in "checkmate" and the player in check loses. In the original Sanskrit game of chess, the king could actually be captured. Then a rule was introduced requiring that a warning be given if capture was imminent (today we announce "check!") so that an accidental and early ending to the game doesn't occur.

123. It might land you in a trap : TEE SHOT
That would be in the sport of golf.

124. Singer with an eponymous 1956 #1 album : ELVIS
Elvis Aron Presley (aka “the King”) was the younger of two identical twins. His brother was stillborn, delivered 35 minutes before Elvis. The brother was named Jesse Garon Presley. So, although born a twin, Elvis was raised as an only child.

125. Persona non grata : OUTCAST
A “persona non grata” (plural “personae non gratae”) is someone who is not welcome. The phrase is Latin for “an unacceptable person”.

127. Fossey who was "in the mist" : DIAN
Dian Fossey carried out her famous study of gorilla populations in the mountain forests of Rwanda (NB: it was Jane Goodall that worked with chimpanzees). Sadly, Fossey was found dead in her cabin in Rwanda in 1986, murdered in her bedroom, her skull split open by a machete. The crime was never solved.

Down
1. What gets As in chemistry? : ARSENIC
Arsenic is element #33 in the periodic table, and has the chemical symbol “As”. Because of arsenic’s toxicity, it was very commonly used in pesticides. These compounds are getting banned over time, but it seems there is a long way to go. Arsenic in aquifers continues to be a problem around the world, including here in the US. China has introduced limits to the amounts of arsenic permitted in food as well as water, mainly as the Chinese staple rice is particularly good at accumulating arsenic from groundwater.

4. Ozone destroyers, for short : CFCS
Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are the propellants that were once used in aerosols. CFCs make their way up into the ozone layer and trigger a chain reaction that converts ozone (O3) into regular oxygen (O2). That conversion creates “holes” in the ozone layer. Regular O2 is good stuff, but we need O3 to absorb harmful UV radiation raining down on us. CFC is not good stuff ...

7. Reproduction unit : SPORE
Spores are produced by many bacteria, fungi and non-flowering plants. A spore is a reproductive body encased in a protective shell that is highly resistant to damage, and resistant to heat in particular.

8. Cause of Romeo's death : POISON
William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” doesn’t end well for the title characters. Juliet takes a potion as a ruse to fool her parents, to trick them into thinking she is dead. The potion puts her in a death-like coma for 24 hours, after which Juliet plans to awaken and run off with Romeo. Juliet’s sends a message to Romeo apprising him of the plan, but the message fails to arrive. Romeo hears of Juliet’s “death”, and grief-stricken he takes his own life by drinking poison. Juliet awakens from the coma, only to find her lover dead beside her. She picks up a dagger and commits suicide. And nobody lives happily ever after …

9. "Xanadu" group, for short : ELO
The title song of the 1980 movie “Xanadu” was performed by the Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) and Olivia Newton-John (who starred in the film). Despite the popularity of ELO around the world, the song “Xanadu” was the band’s only number one hit back in their homeland of the UK.

10. ___ Tin Tin : RIN
The original Rin Tin Tin was a real-life dog, a puppy discovered by a GI in a bombed-out kennel in France during WWI. The soldier named the pup Rin Tin Tin, the same name as a puppet given to American soldiers for luck. On returning to the US, “Rinty” was trained by his owner and was spotted doing tricks by a film producer. Rinty featured in some films, eventually getting his first starring role in 1923 in the silent movie “Where the North Begins”. Legend has it that this first Rin Tin Tin died in the arms of actress Jean Harlow. Not a bad way to go …

11. Group surrounding a star : POSSE
A rap star’s entourage is usually called his or her “posse”.

Our word “posse” comes from an Anglo-Latin term from the early 15th century “posse comitatus” meaning “the force of the county”.

12. Curling stone stone : GRANITE
I think curling is such a cool game (pun!). It’s somewhat like bowls, but played on a sheet of ice. The sport was supposedly invented in medieval Scotland, and is called curling because of the action of the granite stone is it moves across the ice. A player can make the stone take a curved path (“curl”) by causing it to slowly rotate as it slides.

14. Keebler baker : ELF
The famous Keebler Elves have been appearing in ads for Keebler since 1968. The original head of the elves was J. J. Keebler, but he was toppled from power by Ernest J. Keebler in 1970.

17. Something with two sides? : ENTREE
"Entrée" means "entry" in French. An entrée can be something that helps one get “a way in", an interview for example perhaps helped along by a recommendation letter. In Europe, even in English-speaking countries, the entrée is the name for the "entry" to the meal, the first course. I found it very confusing to order meals when I first came to America!

20. Activity-tracking devices : FITBITS
Fitbits are wearable activity trackers that are mainly used to track the number of steps walked. Fitbit Inc. was founded in 2007 in San Francisco.

28. Newswoman Soledad : O'BRIEN
Broadcast journalist Soledad O’Brien is most famous for her work with CNN, but also appears on HBO and Al Jazeera America.

31. End of geologic time? : -CENE
For example, the Pleistocene, Holocene and Pliocene epochs.

32. "The Evil Dead" director : RAIMI
Sam Raimi is a very successful director and producer, responsible for the "Spider-Man" series of films among others, and TV series' such as "Xena: Warrior Princess".

“The Evil Dead” is a horror movie franchise that includes video games and comic books, all derived from a series of three films: “The Evil Dead” (1981), “Evil Dead II” (1987) and “Army of Darkness” (1992). I don’t “do” horror, so I can’t tell you anything about them ...

35. Flight board abbr. : ARR
Arrival (arr.)

36. Oscar-winning Hanks role : GUMP
The epic 1994 movie “Forrest Gump” is based on a 1986 novel of the same name by Winston Groom. Groom said that he had envisioned John Goodman playing the title role, and not Tom Hanks.

38. Beat it : TOM-TOM
A tom-tom is a drum with no snares. The name “tom-tom” came from the Hindi name “tam-tam”, which in turn was likely imitative of the sound made by the instrument.

41. What a star may denote : CAPITAL
A capital city on map is often denoted with a star to distinguish it from other cities.

48. Hummus holders : PITAS
Pita is a lovely bread in Middle-Eastern and Mediterranean cuisines. Pita is usually round, and has a "pocket" in the center. The pocket is created by steam that puffs up the dough during cooking leaving a void when the bread cools.

The lovely dip/spread called hummus usually contains mashed chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, salt and garlic. The name “hummus” is an Arabic word for “chickpeas”.

50. Lawyer who defended Leopold and Loeb : DARROW
Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb were two well-heeled students at the University of Chicago who famously murdered a 14-year-old boy, apparently just on a whim, to show that they could commit the perfect crime. The crime turned out to be not quite so perfect and the pair were caught and put on trial for the murder in 1924. The trial was big news, especially after the defendants engaged high-profile attorney Clarence Darrow to represent them. In fact, the court proceedings were dubbed “The Trial of the Century”. The crime itself was the inspiration for the 1929 play called “Rope” by Patrick Hamilton, which in turn was the inspiration for the 1948 Hitchcock film of the same name.

54. Tissue surrounding a muscle : FASCIA
If you’ve seen pieces of meat that are cut relatively roughly, you’ll have noticed thin sheets of whitish, fibrous connective tissue that surrounds muscles, blood vessels etc., basically holding everything in place in the body. That connective tissue is called fascia.

56. Something hard to get off your chest? : TATTOO
The word "tattoo" (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word "tatau" into our "tattoo". Tattoos are also sometimes referred to as “ink”.

58. Climber in a children's rhyme : ITSY BITSY SPIDER
The Itsy Bitsy Spider crawled up the water spout.
Down came the rain, and washed the spider out.
Out came the sun, and dried up all the rain,
And the Itsy Bitsy Spider went up the spout again.

60. N.Y.U.'s ___ School of the Arts : TISCH
New York University (NYU) is comprised of fifteen schools, one of which it the Tisch School of the Arts. The Tisch is famous for its acting program, with notable alumni such as Debra Messing, Christopher Guest and Josh Radnor.

61. Senses : INTUITS
“To intuit” is a verb, formed from the noun "intuition", meaning "to know intuitively".

62. Terminal info, for short : ETDS
Estimated time of departure (ETD)

65. It's a stitch : PURL
As all of us knitters know, the purl stitch and knit stitch are very similar, one being sort of the inverse of the other. Yes, I’ve knitted a few sweaters in my day …

70. Striking down : SMITING
“To smite” is to strike with a firm blow. The term can also mean to strike down and slay.

72. Baby whale : CALF
Male whales are referred to as “bulls”, females are “cows”, and the young are “calves”.

76. Private transportation? : JEEP
The Jeep is the original off-road vehicle. It was developed by the American Bantam Car Company in 1940 at the request of the US government who recognized the upcoming need for the armed forces as American involvement in WWII loomed. The Bantam Company was too small to cope with demand, so the government gave the designs to competing car companies. The design and brand eventually ended up with AMC in the seventies and eighties.

81. Anne Rice antihero : LESTAT
Anne Rice is an American author of erotic and Gothic novels. Rice was born Howard Allen O’Brien (no wonder she changed her name!). Her famous series of novels “The Vampire Chronicles” centers on her character Lestat de Lioncourt, a French nobleman who was turned into a vampire in the 18th century. One of the stories, “Interview with the Vampire”, was adapted for the big screen in 1994 and features Tom Cruise, Brad Pitt and others in a star-studded cast. Not my kind of movie though, as I don’t do vampires …

82. "It was you," à la Verdi : ERI TU
Every crossword constructors’ favorite aria "Eri tu" is from Verdi's opera "Un ballo in maschera" (A Masked Ball). The opera tells the story of the assassination of King Gustav III of Sweden during a masked ball.

85. Like Cheerios : OATY
Cheerios breakfast cereal has the distinction of being the first oat-based cereal introduced into the market, hitting the grocery store shelves in 1941. Back then, “Cheerios” were known as CheeriOats.

88. Paintball cry : I'M HIT!
The “paint” in paintball isn’t actually paint, but rather a mix of gelatin and food coloring.

90. "I wish I ___ [sic] homeward bound": Paul Simon : WAS
I guess the lyric would have to be “I wish I were homeward bound”, to be grammatically correct.

“Homeward Bound” is a song recorded in 1965 by Simon & Garfunkel. It was written by Simon while he was away from his American girlfriend and working in London.

93. Horizontal: Abbr. : ACR
Across (acr.)

95. Kimono-clad hostesses : GEISHAS
The Japanese term “geisha” best translates as “artist” or “performing artist”.

The lovely Japanese kimono is a garment worn by men, women and children. The word “kimono” translates simply as “thing to wear”, with “ki” meaning “wear” and “mono” meaning “thing”.

96. Like Monday crosswords : EASIEST
Personally, I’m a fan of the non-themed Saturday crosswords.

97. English royal family : STUARTS
The Royal House of Stewart (also Stuart) came to power in Scotland in the late 14th century, starting with Robert II of Scotland. The Stewarts extended their power to England and Ireland when the Tudor line became extinct as Queen Elizabeth I died without issue. James VI of Scotland became James I of England at that time. The last Stuart monarch was Anne, Queen of Great Britain who also died without issue, despite going through seventeen pregnancies. Assuming Prince William, Duke of Cambridge becomes the British Monarch one day, then there will be a Stewart descendant on the throne again. William is the son of Diana, Princess of Wales, and Diana was descended from the Stewart monarchs.

99. Early online forum : USENET
Remember the good old days, when you read messages online in “newsgroups”? Well, that system of aggregating public messages is known as Usenet, and it’s still around today. Usenet started operating in 1980, some ten years before the World Wide Web was introduced (which system has displaced Usenet in terms of popularity). Usenet definitely played a significant part in the history of the Internet. For instance, the terms “FAQ” and “spam” were both born on Usenet.

102. The first to go on a strike, usually : ONE-PIN
Bowling has been around for an awfully long time. The oldest known reference to the game is in Egypt, where pins and balls were found in an ancient tomb that is over 5,000 years old. The first form of the game to come to America was nine-pin bowling, which had been very popular in Europe for centuries. In 1841 in Connecticut, nine-pin bowling was banned due to its association with gambling. Supposedly, an additional pin was added to get around the ban, and ten-pin bowling was born.

104. Duma dissent : NYET
“Nyet” is Russian for “no”, and “da” is Russian for “yes”.

A Duma is a representative assembly in Russia. The word “dumat” in Russian means “to think, consider”.

108. Took a hit : TOKED
“Toke” is a slang term for a puff on a marijuana cigarette or on a pipe containing the drug.

109. Hoity-toity sort : SNOOT
"Snoot" is a variant of "snout" and is a word that originated in Scotland. The idea is that someone who is “snooty”, or snouty, tends to look down his or her nose at the rest of the world.

112. Patron god of ancient Thebes : AMON
Amun (also Amon, Amen and "Amun-Ra") was a god in Egyptian mythology. Amun lends his name to our word "ammonia". This is because the Romans called the ammonium chloride that they collected near the Temple of Jupiter Amun, "sal ammoniacus" (salt of Amun).

114. Record label for Cream and Sonny & Cher : ATCO
Atco Records is an American record label founded in 1955, taking its name from the parent company Atlantic Corporation.

Cream were a “supergroup” from Britain, meaning the band was comprised of musicians from other successful groups. The band’s members were Eric Clapton (from the Yardbirds), and Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker (both from the Graham Bond Organisation).

The famous duo Sonny & Cher started out in the mid-1960s as backing singer working with Phil Spector. The couple married in 1964, and the next year released their breakthrough numbers “Baby Don’t Go” and “I Got You Babe”. Sonny and Cher divorced in 1975, and dissolved their act that same year. Cher moved onto a successful solo career that continues to this day. Sonny Bono was elected as a US Congressman for California in 1995. Sadly, he didn’t finish his term in the House as he died from injuries sustained in a skiing accident in 1998.

116. Federal management org. : GSA
The US Government’s General Services Administration (GSA), as the name suggests, provides general services to other federal agencies. So for example, the GSA manages office space for the other agencies, and transportation.

117. Tuna type : AHI
Yellowfin and bigeye tuna are usually marketed as "ahi", the Hawaiian name. They are both big fish, with yellowfish tuna often weighing over 300 pounds, and bigeye tuna getting up to 400 pounds.

119. Giant Manning : ELI
Eli Manning plays as quarterback for the New York Giants. Eli’s brother Peyton Manning is quarterback for the Denver Broncos. Eli and Peyton’s father is Archie Manning, who was also a successful NFL quarterback.

120. Señora Perón : EVA
Eva Perón was the second wife of President Juan Perón who was in office from 1946 to 1955. The Argentine First Lady was known affectionately by the people as “Evita”, the Spanish language diminutive of “Eva”. "Evita" was also the follow-up musical to "Jesus Christ Superstar" for Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice, and was based on the life of Eva Perón.

121. Statehouse resident, informally : GUV
“Guv” is an informal word replacing “governor”, used in the UK. It is usually a friendly address to a man, sort of like our “Mac” or “Dad”.

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. What an urgent message may be in : ALL CAPS
8. Person in handcuffs, for short : PERP
12. The Fonz, for one : GREASER
19. Dish site, maybe : ROOFTOP
20. Leaf : FOLIO
21. Stuffed, in Mexican cuisine : RELLENO
22. Flip-flop : SWITCH POSITIONS
24. Puts on : AFFECTS
25. Times for many Tours tours : ETES
26. Holds up : ROBS
27. Juniors : SONS
29. Mentalist Geller : URI
30. ___ Tamid (synagogue lamp) : NER
31. Question asked at the cash register : CREDIT OR DEBIT?
35. Match : AGREE
37. Drink with mint or lemon : ICE TEA
39. Ed of "Up" : ASNER
40. See 46-Across : RECRUITER
42. Persistent : CHRONIC
44. It may require a password : WI-FI
46. With 40-Across, visitor on high-school career day : ARMY
47. Spot for a shopping list : MEMO PAD
51. Collect : REAP
53. Some email attachments : PDFS
56. Travis who sang "The Whiskey Ain't Workin'" : TRITT
59. Occasion to learn a secret handshake : INITIATION RITE
63. Opposite of fast : EAT
64. Man of morals : AESOP
66. Blackening : TARRING
67. Tangle of hair : MAT
68. Spot for vaccinations, for short? : PSA
69. Chest organs : THYMUSES
71. Q neighbors : RST
72. Knock unconscious : COLD-COCK
74. Q neighbor : TAB
75. Apartment ad abbr. : RMS
76. Playful : JOCULAR
78. Q preceder, in song : SUSIE
79. Passing note? : OBIT
80. Fib : LITTLE WHITE LIE
83. Romance writers' awards : RITAS
84. ___ buco : OSSO
86. "Amazing Grace" verse ender : … I SEE
87. Bush campaigns? : SAFARIS
89. Ho-hum response : YAWN
91. Pet cause, in brief : SPCA
94. French city known for its porcelain : LIMOGES
98. Laugh uproariously : BUST A GUT
101. Powerhouse in women's b-ball : UCONN
105. "... or I quit!," e.g. : THREAT
106. Trophies for Tiger Woods and LeBron James : ESPYS
107. Way to get to know a father in law? : PATERNITY SUIT
110. Home of the N.C.A.A.'s Cyclones : ISU
111. King of Portugal : REI
112. Regarding : AS TO
113. Actor Bremner of "Black Hawk Down" : EWEN
114. One side of the Bosporus strait : ASIA
115. Lead-up to mating : ENDGAME
118. Stay cool ... or a hint to this puzzle's theme : KEEP IT TOGETHER
123. It might land you in a trap : TEE SHOT
124. Singer with an eponymous 1956 #1 album : ELVIS
125. Persona non grata : OUTCAST
126. Melodic passages : STRAINS
127. Fossey who was "in the mist" : DIAN
128. Ones who say "We'll be right back" : TV HOSTS

Down
1. What gets As in chemistry? : ARSENIC
2. Hardly electronic wizardry : LOW-TECH
3. One who's outstanding? : LOITERER
4. Ozone destroyers, for short : CFCS
5. Phys ed dept. : ATH
6. Carbonated drink : POP
7. Reproduction unit : SPORE
8. Cause of Romeo's death : POISON
9. "Xanadu" group, for short : ELO
10. ___ Tin Tin : RIN
11. Group surrounding a star : POSSE
12. Curling stone stone : GRANITE
13. Makes the calls : REFS
14. Keebler baker : ELF
15. Carbonated drink : ALE
16. Landlord's request : SECURITY DEPOSIT
17. Something with two sides? : ENTREE
18. More promising : ROSIER
20. Activity-tracking devices : FITBITS
23. Carbonated drink : SODA
28. Newswoman Soledad : O'BRIEN
31. End of geologic time? : -CENE
32. "The Evil Dead" director : RAIMI
34. Wash'n ___ (towelette brand) : DRI
35. Flight board abbr. : ARR
36. Oscar-winning Hanks role : GUMP
38. Beat it : TOM-TOM
41. What a star may denote : CAPITAL
43. Doesn't accept, say : CONTESTS
45. Throat problem : FROG
48. Hummus holders : PITAS
49. Cause of inflation? : AIR
50. Lawyer who defended Leopold and Loeb : DARROW
52. Relating to heraldry : ARMORIAL
54. Tissue surrounding a muscle : FASCIA
55. What's at risk : STAKES
56. Something hard to get off your chest? : TATTOO
57. Places to get clean : REHABS
58. Climber in a children's rhyme : ITSY BITSY SPIDER
60. N.Y.U.'s ___ School of the Arts : TISCH
61. Senses : INTUITS
62. Terminal info, for short : ETDS
65. It's a stitch : PURL
70. Striking down : SMITING
72. Baby whale : CALF
73. Arrow on a screen : CURSOR
76. Private transportation? : JEEP
77. Shepherd's place : LEA
81. Anne Rice antihero : LESTAT
82. "It was you," à la Verdi : ERI TU
85. Like Cheerios : OATY
88. Paintball cry : I'M HIT!
90. "I wish I ___ [sic] homeward bound": Paul Simon : WAS
92. Signal : CUE
93. Horizontal: Abbr. : ACR
95. Kimono-clad hostesses : GEISHAS
96. Like Monday crosswords : EASIEST
97. English royal family : STUARTS
98. Hats for artistes : BERETS
99. Early online forum : USENET
100. Overturns : UPSETS
102. The first to go on a strike, usually : ONE-PIN
103. Dummies : NITWITS
104. Duma dissent : NYET
108. Took a hit : TOKED
109. Hoity-toity sort : SNOOT
112. Patron god of ancient Thebes : AMON
114. Record label for Cream and Sonny & Cher : ATCO
116. Federal management org. : GSA
117. Tuna type : AHI
119. Giant Manning : ELI
120. Señora Perón : EVA
121. Statehouse resident, informally : GUV
122. Archaic verb ending : -ETH


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0730-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Jul 16, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Lily Silverstein
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 12m 43s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

16. Something John Adams and John Quincy Adams each had : ONE TERM
John Adams was the second President of the United States. I must admit that I learned much of what I know about President Adams in the excellent, excellent HBO series “John Adams”. Having said that, I have also visited his home in Quincy, Massachusetts several times. He was clearly a great man with a great intellect …

John Quincy Adams, the son of John Adams, was the 6th President. Like his father, John Quincy worked for many years as a diplomat representing the young United States. After leaving office, Adams served in Congress as Representative from Massachusetts, becoming the only president ever to enter the House after leaving the office as President.

18. "Mean Girls" screenwriter : TINA FEY
“Mean Girls” is a teen comedy movie released in 2004 starring Lindsay Lohan. Tina Fey also puts in an appearance, which isn’t really surprising as she wrote the screenplay.

21. Means of communication since 1817, in brief : ASL
It's really quite unfortunate that American Sign Language (ASL) and British Sign Language (BSL) are very different, and someone who has learned to sign in one cannot understand someone signing in the other.

29. Charles who created murals for Harlem Hospital and the American Museum of Natural History : ALSTON
Charles Alston was an artist from Charlotte, North Carolina who was active during the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s. Some of Alston’s most famous works are murals, notably those at the Harlem Hospital and the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, the Golden State Mutual Headquarters in Los Angeles.

34. 1922 Kafka short story : A HUNGER ARTIST
“A Hunger Artist” (also “A Fasting Artist”) is a short story by Franz Kafka that was first published in 1922. The protagonist of the work is a performance artist who fasts in public for many days in a cage.

35. Hematologist's measure : PLATELET COUNT
Platelets are cell-like structures in the blood, although they have no nucleus nor any DNA. When bleeding occurs, the wall of the damaged blood vessel is covered with a clot made up of platelets enmeshed in a protein called fibrin.

36. Pioneer in New Journalism in the 1960s-'70s : TALESE
Gay Talese is an American author, famous as a journalist in the sixties at “The New York Times”. His 1981 book “Thy Neighbor’s Wife” is a study of sexuality in America in the early fifties. Apparently, as research for the book, Talese had sexual relations with his own neighbor’s wife for several months at a sexuality resort in Southern California called Sandstone Retreat.

37. Author who shares his name with a German state : HESSE
Hermann Hesse was not only a novelist, but also a poet and a painter. Hesse’s best-known work is probably his 1927 novel "Steppenwolf".

Hesse is a German state. The capital of Hesse is Wiesbaden, although the largest city in the state is Frankfurt.

39. Pet name meaning "faithful" : FIDO
"Fido", the name for many a dog, is Latin for "I trust".

40. Michael Moore offering, for short : DOC
Michael Moore is a documentary filmmaker, famously from Flint, Michigan. Moore is known for several documentaries that have performed well at the box office, especially “Fahrenheit 9/11” (2004), “Bowling for columbine” (2002) and “Sicko” (2007).

43. Sea ___ : URCHIN
Sea urchins are globular, spiny creatures found just about everywhere in the ocean. The “roe” of a sea urchin is eaten as a delicacy in several cuisines around the world. In a sushi restaurant, the sea urchin roe is called “uni”. The term “roe” normally means “fish eggs”, but in the case of the sea urchin it refers to the gonads of both the male and female.

47. Part of a hit 1940s-'50s film trio : LAMOUR
The actress Dorothy Lamour is best known for co-starring in the “Road to …” series of films with Bing Crosby and Bob Hope. Lamour was born Mary Slaton in New Orleans, and was crowned Miss New Orleans in 1931. She moved to Hollywood in 1936, and starred in her first “Road to …” movie in 1940.

53. It doesn't have much to say : BIT PART
A walk-on role in a performance is one in which the actor makes an appearance on stage or on set, but has no dialog. One line of dialog elevates the role to a “bit part”.

54. Armful for Moses : TABLETS
According to the Book of Exodus, God inscribed the Ten Commandments on two stone tablets and gave them to Moses on Mount Sinai.

55. Slide presentations? : AMOEBAS
An ameba (or “amoeba”, as we spell it back in Ireland) is a single-celled microorganism. The name comes from the Greek “amoibe”, meaning change. The name is quite apt, as the cell changes shape readily as the ameba moves, eats and reproduces.

56. Hedge fund employee : ANALYST
Originally, a “hedge fund” was a fund that paired long and short positions in a strategy designed to “hedge” market risk, to avoid major losses. That’s far from the case today, as hedge funds are now relatively high risk/reward investments that are not available to the general public as they avoid or partially avoid regulatory oversight.

Down
1. Santa ___ : MARIA
When Columbus made his famous voyage of discovery, the largest of his three ships was the Santa Maria. The Santa Maria ran aground on the coast of Hispaniola on Christmas Day in 1492 and was lost. 39 of Columbus’s men were left behind with the permission of the locals. These men stripped the timbers from the Santa Maria and used them to build a settlement they called La Navidad (Spanish for “Christmas”). La Navidad is now the modern town of Môle-Saint-Nicolas in the Republic of Haiti.

3. Feature of CNN or Fox News : CRAWL
A news ticker, or “crawler”, is a text-based graphic that runs across the bottom of the screen providing perhaps news headlines or continuous stock quotes.

4. Hindu goddess often portrayed with her husband Shiva : KALI
Kali is a Hindu goddess, the consort of Lord Shiva. The name “Kali” translates as “the black one”.

5. Work on a lead, maybe : EDIT
An editor might work on the lead story.

6. Part of a square : RIGHT ANGLE
In geometry, there are several classes of angles:
acute (< 90 degrees)
right (= 90 degrees)
obtuse (> 90 degrees and < 180 degrees)
straight (180 degrees)
reflex (> 180 degrees)

9. Wife in Jonathan Franzen's "The Corrections" : ENID
The author Jonathan Franzen’s most famous work is his 2001 novel “The Corrections”, which won a National Book Award. Franzen got into a little dispute with Oprah Winfrey after she listed “The Corrections” as an Oprah Winfrey’s Book Club selection in 2001. After initially welcoming the selection, Franzen publicly expressed concern that the listing might dissuade men from reading the book. These comments led to Winfrey rescinding an invitation to appear on the show and “unlisted” the novel.

11. It adds stress: Abbr. : ITAL
Italic type leans to the right, and is often used to provide emphasis in text. The style is known as “italic” because the stylized calligraphic form of writing originated in Italy, probably in the Vatican.

13. Emily Dickinson's "Ended, ___ it begun" : ERE
Emily Dickinson wrote nearly 1800 poems in her lifetime, with less than a dozen published before she died in 1886. Emily’s younger sister discovered the enormous collection, and it was published in batches over the coming decades. Here is one of her poems:
Ended, ere it begun —
The Title was scarcely told
When the Preface perished from Consciousness
The Story, unrevealed —

14. Writer Sedaris : AMY
The actress, author and comedian Amy Sedaris plays a character called Jerri Blank on the television series "Strangers with Candy". Amy is the younger sister of the humorist and author David Sedaris.

23. Host : EMCEE
The term “emcee” comes from “MC”, an initialism standing for Master or Mistress of Ceremonies.

27. Ladder's counterpart : CHUTE
The game of “Snakes and Ladders” is usually sold as “Chutes and Ladders” in the US. Milton Bradley introduced “chutes” instead of “snakes” in 1943 as children weren’t too fond of snakes back then. Snakes/Chutes and Ladders is based on a an ancient Indian game.

30. "___ pray" : LET US
“Let us pray” (“Oremus” in Latin) is a phrase oft used in the Roman Catholic and some other Christian traditions.

31. Author of the "Mostly Ghostly" book series : STINE
The author R. L. Stine is sometimes referred to as the Stephen King of children’s literature as he writes horror stories for young people.

33. Sprayed, in a way : MACED
“Mace” is actually a brand name, originally introduced by Lake Erie Chemical when they started to manufacture “Chemical Mace”, with the name being a play on the club-like weapon from days of old. Mace was originally a form of tear gas, but Mace today uses a formula that is actually a pepper spray, a different formulation.

34. Start of a Hamlet monologue : ALAS
In Shakespeare’s “Hamlet”, there is a scene when Prince Hamlet holds in his hand the skull of the deceased court jester Yorick. Hamlet starts into a famous monologue at this point:
Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy; he hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is …
The opening line is often misquoted as “Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him well.”

35. Child support, for short? : PTA
Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

45. Zodiac symbol : CRAB
Cancer is the fourth astrological sign of the zodiac, and is associated with the constellation named Cancer. The zodiac symbol for Cancer is the crab, and “cancer” is the Latin word for “crab”.

46. One sitting on a celestial throne : HERA
In Greek mythology, Hera was the wife of Zeus and was noted for her jealous and vengeful nature, particularly against those who vied for the affections of her husband. The equivalent character to Hera in Roman mythology was Juno. Hera was the daughter of Cronus and Rhea.

48. Goya's "Duchess of ___" : ALBA
María Cayetana de Silva was the 13th duchess of Alba. She was a favorite subject of the Spanish painter Francisco Goya. The duchess is the subject in the famous portraits known as “La maja desnuda” (The Nude Maja) and “La maja vestida” (The Clothed Maja). “Maja” translates from Spanish as “beautiful lady”.

50. Legal org. : ABA
The American Bar Association (ABA)

51. Kind of card : SIM
Most cell phones have SIM cards these days. SIM cards hold the personal information of the subscriber, with the acronym being short for Subscriber Identity Module.

52. Itinerary abbr. : ETA
Expected time of arrival (ETA)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Ridiculous imitation : MOCKERY
8. Basis of a patent : NEW IDEA
15. Traffic report source, often : AM RADIO
16. Something John Adams and John Quincy Adams each had : ONE TERM
17. Change, as allegiances : REALIGN
18. "Mean Girls" screenwriter : TINA FEY
19. Close to, colloquially : IN WITH
20. Sell : PEDDLE
21. Means of communication since 1817, in brief : ASL
22. Some receptions : TEAS
24. Wonder : AWE
27. Surgeon's tool : CLAMP
29. Charles who created murals for Harlem Hospital and the American Museum of Natural History : ALSTON
32. Start of many a romantic comedy : CHANCE MEETING
34. 1922 Kafka short story : A HUNGER ARTIST
35. Hematologist's measure : PLATELET COUNT
36. Pioneer in New Journalism in the 1960s-'70s : TALESE
37. Author who shares his name with a German state : HESSE
38. Fire away : ASK
39. Pet name meaning "faithful" : FIDO
40. Michael Moore offering, for short : DOC
43. Sea ___ : URCHIN
47. Part of a hit 1940s-'50s film trio : LAMOUR
50. Has dreams : ASPIRES
52. Completely surpass : ECLIPSE
53. It doesn't have much to say : BIT PART
54. Armful for Moses : TABLETS
55. Slide presentations? : AMOEBAS
56. Hedge fund employee : ANALYST

Down
1. Santa ___ : MARIA
2. They might be ill : OMENS
3. Feature of CNN or Fox News : CRAWL
4. Hindu goddess often portrayed with her husband Shiva : KALI
5. Work on a lead, maybe : EDIT
6. Part of a square : RIGHT ANGLE
7. That there : YON
8. F and G, but not H : NOTES
9. Wife in Jonathan Franzen's "The Corrections" : ENID
10. Meander : WEND
11. It adds stress: Abbr. : ITAL
12. "Glass half empty" sort : DEFEATIST
13. Emily Dickinson's "Ended, ___ it begun" : ERE
14. Writer Sedaris : AMY
20. Like motel walls, it often seems : PAPER-THIN
23. Host : EMCEE
25. Refuses to : WON’T
26. Grade sch. class : ENG
27. Ladder's counterpart : CHUTE
28. Track things : LANES
29. Sprayer : AEROSOL CAN
30. "___ pray" : LET US
31. Author of the "Mostly Ghostly" book series : STINE
32. Attribute as the cause of : CHALK UP TO
33. Sprayed, in a way : MACED
34. Start of a Hamlet monologue : ALAS
35. Child support, for short? : PTA
39. Sparring partners? : FISTS
40. Dull-witted : DOPEY
41. Boots : OUSTS
42. Peak : CREST
44. Ready : RIPE
45. Zodiac symbol : CRAB
46. One sitting on a celestial throne : HERA
48. Goya's "Duchess of ___" : ALBA
49. Grind down : MILL
50. Legal org. : ABA
51. Kind of card : SIM
52. Itinerary abbr. : ETA


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0729-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Jul 16, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: John Guzzetta
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 20m 36s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Order to go away : SCAT
Our word "scat", meaning “get lost!” comes from a 19th-century expression "quicker than s'cat", which meant "in a great hurry". The original phrase probably came from the words "hiss" and "cat".

14. Letters on a crucifix : INRI
The letters written on the cross on which Jesus died were “INRI”. INRI is an initialism for the Latin "Iesus Nazarenus, Rex Iudaeorum", which translates into English as "Jesus the Nazarene, King of the Jews".

15. Rabbit's friend : POOH
In A. A. Milne’s “Winnie-the-Pooh” collection of stories, Pooh has many friend in Hundred Acre Wood. Besides Christopher Robin, who doesn’t actually live in the wood, the list includes Piglet, Eeyore, Kanga, Roo, Rabbit, Tigger and Owl.

16. Grit : MOXIE
Back as far as 1876, Moxie was a brand name of a "medicine" peddled with the claim that it "built up your nerve". In 1924, Moxie was registered as a trademark for a bitter, non-alcoholic beverage (no more claims of nerve-building). And we've used the term "moxie" to mean “nerve” ever since …

20. 2001 fantasy/adventure film with three sequels : SPY KIDS
“Spy Kids” is a 2001 starring Alexa Vega and Daryl Sabara as the children of two rival spies. By the time the film is over, the kids have proven themselves as spies in their own right.

21. Many an étagère display : BAUBLES
An “étagère” is a piece of furniture with open shelves, often used to display small ornaments. The name is French, coming from “étage” meaning “shelf”. I can’t stand them …

23. Lab housing the world's largest machine : CERN
CERN is an acronym standing for “Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire” (European Council for Nuclear Research. CERN’s mission is to provide the largest particle physics lab in the world, and it does just that, having built several enormous particle accelerators. The CERN particle accelerator most in the news these days is the Large Hadron Collider located near Geneva.

The Large Hadron Collider is the world’s largest particle accelerator. It is located on the French-Swiss border near Geneva, in a tunnel that is a whopping 17 miles in circumference.

24. Luca who "sleeps with the fishes" : BRASI
Luca Brasi is one of Don Corleone’s most loyal “enforcers” in Mario Puzo’s novel “The Godfather”. Brasi comes to a violent end, garroted while his hand is pinned to a wooden bar with a knife. Famously, the Corleone family learn of his demise when they receive Brasi’s bulletproof vest wrapped around dead fish. The message is that he “sleeps with the fishes”. In the big screen adaptation of “The Godfather”, Luca Brasi is played by ex-wrestler and professional bodyguard Lenny Montana. The role launched a very successful television character-acting career for Montana.

33. "Frozen" princess : ANNA
“Frozen” is a 2013 animated feature from Walt Disney Studios that is based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale “The Snow Queen”.

34. Match makeup : SETS
That might be in tennis.

37. "Ellen's Design Challenge" airer : HGTV
“Ellen’s Design Challenge” is a reality competition show about furniture design. The “Ellen” in the show’s title is talk show host Ellen DeGeneres.

38. One of the eight points of contact in Muay Thai : KNEE
Muay Thai is a combat sport that originated in Thailand. It is also known as “the art of eight limbs”, a reference to the combined use of the fist, elbows, knees and shins.

41. "Life of Pi" director : LEE
Taiwanese director Ang Lee sure has directed a mixed bag of films, mixed in terms of genre but not in terms of quality. He was at the helm for such classics as "Sense & Sensibility" (my personal favorite), "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon", "Hulk", "Brokeback Mountain" and "Life of Pi".

The 2012 movie “Life of Pi” is based on a 2001 novel of the same name by Yann Martel. The “Pi” in the title is an Indian boy named Pi Patel who finds himself adrift for 227 days in small boat with a Bengal tiger named Richard Parker.

46. R&B/pop singer Aubrey : O’DAY
The singer Aubrey O’Day is member of the duo band Dumblonde, and a former member of the girl group Danity Kane.

48. Therapist's image : INKBLOT
The Rorschach test is a psychological test in which a subject is asked to interpret a series of inkblots. The test was created by Swiss Freudian psychoanalyst Hermann Rorschach in the 1920s.

52. Some miniature hors d'oeuvres : QUICHES
The classic dish called quiche is made with eggs ("oeufs" in French). Even though the quiche is inextricably linked to French cuisine, the name "quiche" comes from the German word for cake, "Kuchen". The variant called “quiche lorraine” includes bits of smoked bacon as an ingredient.

An hors d’oeuvre is the first course in a meal. “Hors d’oeuvre” translates from French as “apart from the work”, really meaning “not the main course”.

56. Inuit for "house" : IGLOO
The Inuit word for “house” is “iglu”, which we usually write as “igloo”. The Greenlandic (yes, that’s a language) word for “house” is very similar, namely “igdlo”.

57. Simon of the stage : NEIL
Neil Simon is one of my favorite playwrights. Simon has written over thirty plays and about thirty screenplays. He has received more nominations for Oscars and Tony Awards than any other writer. My favorite play penned by Simon has to be “Brighton Beach Memoirs”, but the list of his great stage works seems endless and includes “Barefoot in the Park”, “The Odd Couple”, “Sweet Charity”, “Plaza Suite”, “California Suite”, “Biloxi Blues” and “The Goodbye Girl”.

60. Eponyms of the week? : GODS
The days of the week are named for celestial bodies and gods:
Sunday -- Sun’s Day
Monday -- Moon’s Day
Tuesday -- Tiu's day
Wednesday -- Woden's day
Thursday -- Thor's day
Friday -- Freya's day
Saturday -- Saturn's day

Down
2. Target of the Occupy movement : ONE PERCENT
“We are the 99%” is a slogan for the Occupy movement, the international protest against social and economic inequality. The ultimate source of the phrase was an article in “Rolling Stone” magazine that suggested the Occupy movement represented the 99%.

3. Brains : GRAY MATTER
Grey matter and white matter are the two component of the central nervous system. Grey matter is mainly made up of neurons, and white matter is largely made of axons, the projections of the neurons that form nerve fibers.

5. Figure in a dark suit : SPADE
I think the reference is to a deck of cards.

7. Sister co. of Verizon Wireless : AOL
AOL was a leading Internet Service Provider (ISP) in the 1980s and 1990s. The company does still provide dial-up access to the Internet for some subscribers, but most users now access AOL using faster, non-AOL ISPs.

8. "How Deep Is Your Love" Grammy winners : THE BEE GEES
The Brothers Gibb (hence, the name “The Bee Gees”) were born in England but grew up and started their musical careers in Australia. They moved back to Manchester in the north of England as youths, and there hit the big time.

11. Turn and a half on the ice : AXEL
An Axel is a forward take-off jump in figure skating. It was first performed by Norwegian Axel Paulsen at the 1882 World Figure Skating championships.

19. Rail hubs? : MARSHES
Rails are birds of the family Rallidae (hence their name). Outside of America, the name “rail” tends to be reserved for long-billed specie and the the term “crake” is used for short-billed species.

27. Like the Bahamas, Barbados and Belize : ANGLOPHONE
An anglophone is a speaker of English.

32. Like losers' looks : HANGDOG
“Hangdog” is an adjective that can mean shamefaced and guilty, or downcast and intimidated. The word derives from the concept of a lowlife (a “dog”) that is only fit for “hanging”.

48. Relative of a spoonbill : IBIS
The ibis is a wading bird that was revered in ancient Egypt. “Ibis” is an interesting word grammatically speaking. You can have one “ibis” or two “ibises”, and then again one has a flock of “ibis”. And if you want to go with the classical plural, instead of two “ibises” you would have two “ibides”!

50. African tree cultivated for its nuts : KOLA
The nut of the kola tree has a bitter taste, and is loaded with caffeine. Despite the taste, the nut is habitually chewed in some cultures, especially in West Africa where the tree is commonly found in the rainforest. Here in the US we best know the kola nut as a flavoring used in cola drinks.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Gets steamy, with "up" : FOGS
5. Order to go away : SCAT
9. Ever : AT ALL
14. Letters on a crucifix : INRI
15. Rabbit's friend : POOH
16. Grit : MOXIE
17. Teen's fender bender, maybe : TEACHABLE MOMENT
20. 2001 fantasy/adventure film with three sequels : SPY KIDS
21. Many an étagère display : BAUBLES
22. Gush : EMOTE
23. Lab housing the world's largest machine : CERN
24. Luca who "sleeps with the fishes" : BRASI
25. Symbol of virility : CHEST HAIR
30. Don't delay : ACT
31. However : THOUGH
33. "Frozen" princess : ANNA
34. Match makeup : SETS
36. Match : AGREE
37. "Ellen's Design Challenge" airer : HGTV
38. One of the eight points of contact in Muay Thai : KNEE
39. Least apt to offend : NICEST
41. "Life of Pi" director : LEE
42. Longest word in English containing only one vowel : STRENGTHS
44. Many gases lack them : ODORS
46. R&B/pop singer Aubrey : O’DAY
47. Readies for an operation : PREPS
48. Therapist's image : INKBLOT
52. Some miniature hors d'oeuvres : QUICHES
54. Concern in family planning : BIOLOGICAL CLOCK
56. Inuit for "house" : IGLOO
57. Simon of the stage : NEIL
58. Hostile to : ANTI
59. Roughhouse? : SHACK
60. Eponyms of the week? : GODS
61. 270° : WEST

Down
1. Goes on perfectly : FITS
2. Target of the Occupy movement : ONE PERCENT
3. Brains : GRAY MATTER
4. Twisted sorts : SICKOS
5. Figure in a dark suit : SPADE
6. They're held at both ends when eating : COBS
7. Sister co. of Verizon Wireless : AOL
8. "How Deep Is Your Love" Grammy winners : THE BEE GEES
9. Principal, e.g. : AMOUNT
10. Catacomb component : TOMB
11. Turn and a half on the ice : AXEL
12. Shoppers' headache : LINE
13. "I'm in!" : LET’S!
18. Cry after "One, two, three," maybe : HIT IT!
19. Rail hubs? : MARSHES
23. Intolerantly pious : CHURCHY
24. Takes pleasure (in) : BASKS
25. Deep in thought : COGITATING
26. "Yeah, right!" : HAH!
27. Like the Bahamas, Barbados and Belize : ANGLOPHONE
28. Cuts through : INTERSECTS
29. "Two thumbs way up!" and such : RAVES
32. Like losers' looks : HANGDOG
35. Get : SEE
40. Doughnutlike : TORIC
43. Kind of pass in basketball : NO-LOOK
45. Make furniture-safe, in a way : DECLAW
47. Relatives of sprains : PULLS
48. Relative of a spoonbill : IBIS
49. Just about : NIGH
50. African tree cultivated for its nuts : KOLA
51. Like-minded voters : BLOC
52. Muslim judge of North Africa : QAID
53. Bit of improv : SKIT
55. Driver of a bus. : CEO


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0728-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Jul 16, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Adam G. Perl
THEME: Lost Art
Today’s themed answers have LOST ART, the letters ART are missing in the grid. The resulting answer is another word, but one that makes no sense to the clue:
39A. Letter writing, they say ... or a hint to eight answers in this puzzle : LOST ART

1A. Auto booster : CAR THIEF (-ART = CHIEF)
10A. Has a ball : PARTIES (-ART = PIES)
33A. One making the rounds? : BARTENDER (-ART = BENDER)
44A. Black-and-white Best Picture winner : THE ARTIST (-ART = THEIST)
67A. Series opener : PART ONE (-ART = PONE)
69A. Bond orders : MARTINIS (-ART = MINIS)
6D. Ones taking sides : PARTISANS (-ART = PISANS)
48D. Went back to square one : RESTARTED (-ART = RESTED)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 11m 30s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Auto booster : CAR THIEF
“To boost” is a slang term meaning “to steal” and especially “to shoplift”.

14. One-named musician who has performed at the Egyptian pyramids and the Taj Mahal : YANNI
Yanni is a remarkable Greek musician, very successful in the world of New Age music. What I find so remarkable is that he is a self-taught musician.

16. ___ Accords : OSLO
The Oslo Accords grew out of secret negotiations between the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) and Israel in a residence in Oslo in the early nineties. The delegates shared the same house while they conducted 14 meetings. While eating all their meals together at the same table, the negotiators came to respect one another and apparently friendships developed.

17. Like the rock in "Rock of Ages" : CLEFT
“Rock of Ages” is Christian hymn that dates back to 1763 when it was written by the Reverend Augustus Montague Toplady (what a great name!). Tradition has it that Toplady was caught in a storm while travelling along a gorge near his parish in the Mendip Hills in England. He took shelter in a gap in the gorge, and the fissure that protected him inspired him to write the title and first few lines of the hymn on a playing card that he was carrying. If you travel through the Mendip Hills today, there is indeed a fissure that is marked “Rock of Ages”.

18. River across the French/German border : SAAR
The Saar is a river that rises on the border between Alsace and Lorraine in France, flows through western Germany and finally enters the Moselle. Historically the Saar river valley was an important source for coal, iron and steel.

19. Composer Schifrin : LALO
Lalo Schifrin is an Argentine pianist and composer best-known for writing film and television scores. Famously, Schifrin wrote the theme for “Mission: Impossible”, but also for “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.”, “Mannix” and “Starsky and Hutch”.

20. Singer of "Footloose" : LORI
Lori Singer is an actress, and also a cellist. Singer's most famous acting role was the daughter of the Reverend Shaw Moore (played by John Lithgow) in "Footloose".

The 1984 musical drama “Footloose” tells the story of a Chicago teen (played by Kevin Bacon) who moves to a small town in which dancing and rock music has been banned. The storyline is loosely based on real events in the Oklahoma City of Elmore. Dancing was banned in Elmore for almost 100 years, with the ban eventually being lifted in 1980.

21. Spray in a kitchen : PAM
PAM cooking oil was introduced in 1961 by Leon Rubin and Arthur Meyerhoff. The name “PAM” is an acronym … standing for “Product of Arthur Meyerhoff”. Who’d a thunk it …?

24. Gloria of Miami Sound Machine : ESTEFAN
Gloria Estefan is a Cuban American singer, born in Havana. She fled Cuba along with her family after the Cuban Revolution, and ended up in Miami. Her father fought for the US military in Vietnam, and also took part in the doomed Bay of Pigs invasion. Years later, Gloria herself was approached by the CIA to work for the agency due to her skill with languages. She ended up doing quite well singing instead …

29. Plains tribe : KIOWA
The Kiowa Native Americans have a name that means “Principal People”. Most of the Kiowas today live on a reservation in southwestern Oklahoma.

41. Bklyn. ___ : HTS
The part of the borough of Brooklyn known as Brooklyn Heights was the first commuter town for New York, blossoming when the a steam ferry service started to run between the Heights and Wall Street in the early 19th-century.

42. One of the carriers in the SkyTeam alliance : AEROFLOT
Aeroflot is the flag carrier of the Russian Federation. Aeroflot is one of the oldest airlines in the world and started operations as the Russian Society of Voluntary Air Fleet in 1923. Back in the days of the Soviet Union, Aeroflot was also the world’s largest airline, an honor that now goes to Delta Airlines. I flew Aeroflot into Moscow one time. Quite memorable ...

The airline alliance known as SkyTeam is headquartered at Schiphol Airport in the Netherlands. SkyTeam was founded in 2000 by Aeroméxico, Air France, Delta Air Lines, and Korean Air as a competitor to the Star Alliance and Oneworld.

44. Black-and-white Best Picture winner : THE ARTIST
“The Artist” is a 2011 movie from France that was filmed in black-and-white, and without sound. This dated format reflects the movie’s subject matter. The story takes place in Hollywood during the days when silent movies were being replaced by “talkies”. “The Artist” has won more awards than any other French film in history, including a Best Picture Oscar.

46. Big name in soup : KNORR
When I was growing up in Ireland, we never saw Campbell’s soup on the shelves. It was basically all Knorr products, and dehydrated soup from a packet at that. How times have changed. Knorr is a German brand, now owned by the Anglo-Dutch Company Unilever.

58. Subtext of Jefferson Airplane's "White Rabbit" : LSD
The sixties folk group called Jefferson Airplane gave rise to two spin-off groups that were founded by former Jefferson Airplane band members. The first was Jefferson Starship, and the second was Starship. Confusing, huh?

59. Reebok competitor : AVIA
The Avia brand name for athletic shoes was chosen as "avia" is the Latin word for "to fly", and suggests the concept of aviation. Avia was founded in Oregon in 1979.

The brand name Reebok was adopted as the new company name for Foster Shoes of the UK in 1960. The name Reebok (more commonly “Rhebok”) is an Afrikaans word for an antelope, and comes from the term "roe buck".

63. Orbitz bookings : TRIPS
Orbitz is one of the big online travel companies, one that is based in Chicago. Orbitz was originally set up as a joint-venture of several airlines including Continental, Delta, Northwest and United.

65. Musical with the song "It's Today" : MAME
The musical “Mame” opened on Broadway in 1966, with Angela Lansbury in the title role. The musical is based on the 1955 novel “Auntie Mame” written by Patrick Dennis.

69. Bond orders : MARTINIS
The term "martini" probably takes it name from the "Martini & Rossi" brand of dry vermouth, although no one seems to be completely sure. What is clear is that despite the Martini name originating in Italy, the martini drink originated in the US. The original martini was made with gin and sweet vermouth, but someone specifying a “dry” martini was given gin and dry vermouth. Nowadays we use dry vermouth for all martinis and the term "dry" has become a reference to how little vermouth is included in the drink. Famously, Noel Coward liked his drink very dry and said that a perfect martini is made by "filling a glass with gin then waving it in the general direction of Italy". The German-American journalist and satirist H. L. Mencken referred to the martini as “the only American invention as perfect as a sonnet”.

Down
2. Celestial rings : HALOS
The Greek word “halos” is the name given to the ring of light around the sun or moon, which gives us our word “halo”, used for a radiant light depicted above the head of a saintly person.

4. W.W. I rifle : ENFIELD
Enfield is the most northerly borough of London. Enfield was home to the Royal Small Arms Factory, the manufacturer of the famed Lee-Enfield .303 rifle, standard issue to the British Army through WWII.

5. Honda offering : FIT
The Honda Fit (called the Jazz in some markets) is a subcompact hatchback. We looked at the Fit when shopping for a new car recently, but opted for the larger Toyota Prius instead, a choice we have not regretted …

7. Cheese used in Babybels : EDAM
The Babybel brand of cheese was launched in 1952 by the Bel Group, a multinational supplier of cheese that is headquartered in Paris. Babybel cheese is sold in distinctive packaging. It comes in a netted bag, with small pieces of the cheese are encased in red wax with an outer cellophane wrapper. That’s a lot of packaging for a small amount of cheese …

8. Like : A LA
The phrase “in the style of” can be translated in “alla” in Italian and “à la” in French.

10. Guiding light : POLARIS
Because the orientation of the Earth’s axis shifts, albeit very slowly, the position of north relative to the stars changes over time. The bright star that is closest to true north is Polaris, and so we call Polaris the North Star or Pole Star. 14,000 years ago, the nearest bright star to true north was Vega, and it will be so again in about 12,000 years time.

12. Scatter? : ELLA
Scat singing is a vocal improvisation found in the world of jazz. There aren't any words as such in scat singing, just random nonsense syllables made up on the spot.

Ella Fitzgerald, the "First Lady of Song", had a hard and tough upbringing. She was raised by her mother alone in Yonkers, New York. Her mother died while Ella was still a schoolgirl, and around that time the young girl became less interested in her education. She fell in with a bad crowd, even working as a lookout for a bordello and as a Mafia numbers runner. She ended up in reform school, from which she escaped, and found herself homeless and living on the streets for a while. Somehow Fitzgerald managed to get herself a spot singing in the Apollo Theater in Harlem. From there her career took off and as they say, the rest is history.

28. L.A.'s ___ Museum : GETTY
The J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles is one of the most visited museums in the country. Like many museums in developed countries these days, the Getty has been embroiled in disputes about ownership of artifacts. The curators of the Getty have gone so far as to repatriate some items in recent years, especially to Greece and Italy. The J. Paul Getty Museum has to locations. The Getty Center is the primary location, and houses art from the Middle Ages to the present. The associated (and beautiful) Getty Villa displays art from ancient Greece, Rome and Etruria.

33. Schnozz : BEAK
“Schnoz” is a slang term for a nose, particularly a large one.

35. Enemy of the early Christians : NERO
Nero was Emperor of Rome from 54 to 68 CE, and he had quite the family life. When he was just 16-years-old Nero married his step-sister Claudia Octavia. He also had his mother and step-brother executed.

37. Squire of "The Wind in the Willows" : MR TOAD
Mr. Toad is one of the main characters in the children’s novel “The Wind in the Willows” by Kenneth Grahame. A. A. Milne (of “Winnie the Pooh” fame) wrote several plays based on “The Wind in the Willows”, the first of which is “Toad of Toad Hall”. And, Mr Toad’s Wild Ride was (it’s gone now!) one of the original rides at Disneyland when the park opened in 1955.

"The Wind in the Willows" is a classic children's novel first published in 1908. Featured in the story are characters such as Mole, Ratty, Mr. Toad and Mr. Badger. The story's author was Kenneth Grahame, a man who held the exalted position of Secretary of the Bank of England.

43. First name in popcorn : ORVILLE
Orville Redenbacher’s Gourmet Popping Corn was introduced in 1969. Redenbacher starred in the commercials for the product, until he died in 1995. Sadly, he suffered a heart attack and drowned in his jacuzzi.

45. King nicknamed Longshanks : EDWARD I
Edward I of England was on the throne from 1272 to 1307 and was also known as Edward Longshanks. The “Longshanks” name came from Edward’s exceptional height.

50. Vagabond : TRAMP
A “vagabond” is a person without a home who moves from place to place. The term derives from the Latin “vagabundus” meaning “wandering, strolling about”.

52. Fiji alternative : EVIAN
Évian-les-Bains (or simply Évian) is in the very east of France, on the shores of Lake Geneva directly across the lake from Lausanne, Switzerland. As one might imagine, Évian is the home of Évian mineral water, the most successful business in town. Personally, I can't stand the distinctive taste of Évian water …

Fiji Water, as you might guess, is a brand of water from the Fiji Islands. I just think that bottling water and sending it around the world is absolutely insane …

53. Florentine painter : LIPPI
Fra’ Filippo Lippi was an Italian painter in the 15th century, who was also called Lippo Lippi would you believe? The Victorian poet Robert Browning used the artist as the main character in a dramatic monologue he called “Fra Lippo Lippi”.

56. Ice cream flavor : OREO
Apparently Oreo Ice Cream flavors were introduced relatively recently, in 2010.

57. Get some quick money for, say : PAWN
I remember the bad old days growing up in Dublin, Ireland, when my mother had to go to the pawn shop (I hope she doesn't read this!). I'd wait outside with my brother, looking up at the pawnbroker's sign, three gold balls hanging down from a metal bar. This traditional sign used by pawnbrokers is said to date back to the Medici family as the sign had symbolic meaning in the province of Lombardy where the Medici family reigned supreme. Because of this connection, pawn shop banking was originally called Lombard banking.

62. Besmirch : TAR
“Besmirch” is a derivative of “smirch”, with both words meaning to “make dirty”. In particular, to besmirch is to sully someone's reputation.

63. Skye cap : TAM
A tam o'shanter is a man's cap traditionally worn by Scotsmen. "Tams" were originally all blue (and called "blue bonnets") but as more dyes became readily available they became more colorful. The name of the cap comes from the title character of the Robert Burns poem "Tam O'Shanter".

The Isle of Skye is off the northwest coast of Scotland in the Inner Hebrides. It is the second largest island in the country, and has been linked to the mainland by a road bridge since 1995. I’ve never been there, but I hear the views are spectacular.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Auto booster : CAR THIEF
6. It lends a smoky flavor to Scotch : PEAT
10. Has a ball : PARTIES
14. One-named musician who has performed at the Egyptian pyramids and the Taj Mahal : YANNI
15. Kind of chat : IDLE
16. ___ Accords : OSLO
17. Like the rock in "Rock of Ages" : CLEFT
18. River across the French/German border : SAAR
19. Composer Schifrin : LALO
20. Singer of "Footloose" : LORI
21. Spray in a kitchen : PAM
22. Patronize, as a hotel : STAY AT
24. Gloria of Miami Sound Machine : ESTEFAN
26. Sweetums : DEAR
27. Releases : LETS GO
29. Plains tribe : KIOWA
33. One making the rounds? : BARTENDER
36. Tangles up : ENMESHES
38. Day of planning : EVE
39. Letter writing, they say ... or a hint to eight answers in this puzzle : LOST ART
41. Bklyn. ___ : HTS
42. One of the carriers in the SkyTeam alliance : AEROFLOT
44. Black-and-white Best Picture winner : THE ARTIST
46. Big name in soup : KNORR
47. Secondary route : BY-ROAD
49. They're out of service : VETS
51. Have a healthy diet : EAT WELL
55. Cheating student : COPIER
58. Subtext of Jefferson Airplane's "White Rabbit" : LSD
59. Reebok competitor : AVIA
60. Like some hygiene : ORAL
61. Bickering : AT IT
63. Orbitz bookings : TRIPS
64. Whimper : MEWL
65. Musical with the song "It's Today" : MAME
66. Evolve : ADAPT
67. Series opener : PART ONE
68. Spur : PROD
69. Bond orders : MARTINIS

Down
1. New moon to new moon, e.g. : CYCLE
2. Celestial rings : HALOS
3. Unmoving : INERT
4. W.W. I rifle : ENFIELD
5. Honda offering : FIT
6. Ones taking sides : PARTISANS
7. Cheese used in Babybels : EDAM
8. Like : A LA
9. Not windy : TERSE
10. Guiding light : POLARIS
11. British interjection : I SAY!
12. Scatter? : ELLA
13. Shade of black : SOOT
21. Keep the beat? : PATROL
23. "So there!" : TAKE THAT!
25. "Help yourself" : FEEL FREE
26. Lady of Brazil : DONA
28. L.A.'s ___ Museum : GETTY
30. "Didn't think you'd be here" : OH HI
31. Dips in a bucket, say : WETS
32. Second hand: Abbr. : ASST
33. Schnozz : BEAK
34. What people who are hurt may try to get : EVEN
35. Enemy of the early Christians : NERO
37. Squire of "The Wind in the Willows" : MR TOAD
40. Breaks down : SOBS
43. First name in popcorn : ORVILLE
45. King nicknamed Longshanks : EDWARD I
48. Went back to square one : RESTARTED
50. Vagabond : TRAMP
52. Fiji alternative : EVIAN
53. Florentine painter : LIPPI
54. Holds up : LASTS
55. Give gratis : COMP
56. Ice cream flavor : OREO
57. Get some quick money for, say : PAWN
58. Member of a motorcade : LIMO
62. Besmirch : TAR
63. Skye cap : TAM


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0727-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Jul 16, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Natan Last, Finn Vigeland & J.A.S.A. Crossword Class
THEME: Ring Cycle
Today’s themed clues each use the letter O to represent the word “ring”. We CYCLE through five RING clues, with a couple of extras added in for good measure:
59A. Wagner work ... or a possible title for this puzzle : RING CYCLE

16A. Place to find one O : THE HOBBIT
22A. Place to find two Os : VENN DIAGRAM
28A. Place to find three Os : CIRCUS TENT
40A. Place to find four Os : AUDI DEALER
45A. Place to find five Os : OLYMPIC FLAG

64A. It's said at the exchange of Os : I DO
30D. A O doesn't have one : END
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 9m 03s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

13. Scent in incense and insect repellents : PATCHOULI
Patchouli is a bushy herb in the mint family that has a heavy, strong scent. The essential oil from patchouli is used in incense, insect repellants and some alternative medicines. The plant’s name comes from a Tamil word meaning “green leaf”.

16. Place to find one O : THE HOBBIT
In J. R. R. Tolkien’s fantasy novel “The Hobbit”, the title character is Bilbo Baggins, a hobbit who stumbles across a magical ring and then embarks on a series of adventures.

17. ___ vincit amor : OMNIA
“Omnia vincit amor” is a line from Eclogue X, one of the major works of the Latin poet Virgil. We know the phrase in English as “love conquers all”.

19. In a Yoda-like manner : SAGELY
Yoda is one of the most beloved characters of the "Star Wars" series of films. Yoda's voice was provided by the great modern-day puppeteer Frank Oz of "Muppets" fame.

22. Place to find two Os : VENN DIAGRAM
Englishman John Venn was an expert in the field of logic, and introduced the Venn diagram in his book "Symbolic Logic" in 1881. Venn diagrams are used in set theory, to illustrate the logical relationships between sets of variables.

24. Mexican shekels : PESOS
The coin called a “peso” is used in many Spanish-speaking countries around the world. The coin originated in Spain where the word “peso” means “weight”. The original peso was what we know in English as a “piece of eight”, a silver coin of a specific weight that had a nominal value of eight “reales”.

The shekel is the currency used today in Israel. The first use of the word “shekel” was in Mesopotamia around 3000 BCE when it probably referred to a specific weight of barley.

27. "That's what ___ said!" : SHE
Here in North America, we tend to use the phrase “That's what she said!" as a punch line after an unintended double entendre. On the other side of the Atlantic, the equivalent phrase is “... said the actress to the bishop”.

28. Place to find three Os : CIRCUS TENT
That would be a three ring circus.

36. Messes with 007's martini : STIRS
Why have a vodka martini shaken and not stirred (as does James Bond, 007)? Well, for one thing the shaken drink tends to be colder. And with more melted ice in the drink, it isn’t as strong. These are my personal observations … no need to write in …

37. Year, in the Yucatán : ANO
The Yucatán Peninsula is located in southeastern Mexico, where it separates the Gulf of Mexico to the northwest from the Caribbean Sea to the southeast.

38. 2003 Bennifer bomb : GIGLI
Everyone wanted to see the 2003 movie "Gigli" because it starred the couple of the day, Jennifer Lopez and Ben Affleck (aka “Bennifer”). Everyone wanted to see it, but nobody went it seems. Lots of folks have called it the worst film ever made. Apparently “Gigli” made only $6m after costing $54m to produce.

40. Place to find four Os : AUDI DEALER
The predecessor to today’s Audi company was called Auto Union. Auto Union was formed with the merger of four individual entities: Audi, Horch, DKW and Wanderer. The Audi logo comprises four intersecting rings, each representing one of the four companies that merged.

44. "Maleficent" star, 2014 : JOLIE
“Maleficent” is a 2014 movie starring Angelina Jolie in the title role, the evil queen from “Sleeping Beauty”. “Maleficent” is loosely based on the fairy tale, and is told from the perspective of the antagonist in “Sleeping Beauty”.

45. Place to find five Os : OLYMPIC FLAG
The symbol of the Olympic Games consists of five interlocking rings, with each ring representing one of the five continents involved in the Olympics. The five continents are Europe, Asia, Africa, Oceania and America (North and South combined). The symbol was designed in 1912, adopted in 1914, and introduced at the 1920 Games.

59. Wagner work ... or a possible title for this puzzle : RING CYCLE
Richard Wagner’s “Ring Cycle” is more properly called “Der Ring des Nibelungen”, and comprises four very, very long operas. The individual operas are:
“Das Rheingold”
“Die Walkure”
“Siegfried”
“Gotterdammerung”

61. Start of el 37-Across : ENERO
(37A. Year, in the Yucatán : ANO)
In Spanish, “el año” (the year) starts in “enero” (January) and ends in “diciembre” (December).

63. Muscle/bone connection : SINEW
Sinew is another name for a tendon. Tendons are bands of collagen that connect muscle to bone. Tendons are similar to ligaments and fasciae, which are also connective tissue made out of collagen, but ligaments join bone to bone, and fasciae connect muscle to muscle. We also use the term “sinew” to mean muscular power.

Down
1. Creator of the Oompa-Loompas and the BFG : DAHL
Roald Dahl's name is Norwegian. Dahl's parents were from Norway, although Dahl himself was Welsh. Dahl became one of the most successful authors of the twentieth century. Two of his most famous titles are "James and the Giant Peach" and "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory".

The Oompa-Loompas are characters in the Roald Dahl book “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory”, and indeed in the sequel story “Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator”. Willy Wonka came across the Oompa-Loompas on an isolated island in the Atlantic and invited them to work in his factory in order to escape those hunting them on the island. Right before Dahl’s book was first published, he was intending to call the Oompa-Loompas the “Whipple-Scrumpets”.

“The BFG” is a 1982 children’s book by Welsh author Roald Dahl. The initialism in the title stands for “Big Friendly Giant”. Dahl dedicated “The BFG” to his daughter Olivia, who had passed away at the age of 7 in 1962.

2. They're marked on maps: Abbr. : RTES
Routes (rtes.)

4. First baseman in a classic comedy routine : WHO
Bud Abbott and Lou Costello made up the comedy duo Abbott and Costello who were immensely popular in the forties and fifties. Even when I was growing up in Ireland and knew nothing about baseball, I was rolling around the floor listening to Abbott and Costello’s famous “Who’s on First?” comedy routine. Can you name all the players?
First Base: Who
Second Base: What
Third Base: I Don’t Know
Left field: Why
Center field: Because
Pitcher: Tomorrow
Catcher: Today
Shortstop: I Don’t Care/I Don’t Give a Darn

5. Maxwell House alternative : YUBAN
Yuban is a brand of light-tasting coffee owned by Kraft Foods.

Maxwell House is a brand of coffee owned by Kraft Foods. The brand took its name from an old and prominent hotel in Nashville, Tennessee called the Maxwell House Hotel. President Theodore Roosevelt stayed in the Maxwell House Hotel and commented once that coffee he drank there was “good to the last drop”. “Good to the last drop” was used as an advertising slogan for Maxwell House coffee for many years.

7. Floated, as a bad check : KITED
Check kiting is illegal. The idea behind kiting is to write a check, even though there are insufficient funds to cover the amount. The con artist then writes another check, also with insufficient funds, from another bank’s account to cover the original check. I am not sure it would work nowadays, but then I am as honest as the day is long! Oh, and I think the term “kiting” comes from the older phrase “go fly a kite”, the idea being that the bad check is floated on air (non-existent funds).

9. Resistance measure : OHM
The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every schoolkid knows as Ohm’s Law.

10. Ted Turner vis-à-vis the Atlanta Braves, once : OWNER
Ted Turner's big initiative in the world of business was the founding of CNN, the first 24-hour cable news channel. Turner never graduated from college as he was expelled from Brown University for having a female student in his dormitory room. Years later, in 1989, Brown awarded him an honorary B.A.

11. Shearer of "The Red Shoes" : MOIRA
Moira Shearer was a ballet dancer and actress born Scotland. Shearer’s most famous film role was in 1948’s “The Red Shoes”, in which she played the lead character, a ballet dancer called Vicky Page. She was married to the respected English journalist and broadcaster Ludovic Kennedy.

13. Local fund-raising grp. : PTA
Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

22. You, in Nice : VOUS
In French, the pronouns “toi” and “vous” both mean “you”, with the former being used with family and friends, and children. “Vous” is more formal, and is also the plural form of “toi”.

The French city of Nice is on the Mediterranean coast in the southeast of the country. Although Nice is only the fifth most populous city in France, it is home to the busiest airport outside of Paris. That’s because of all the tourists flocking to the French Riviera.

25. Lake that stretches from Toledo to Buffalo : ERIE
Toledo, Ohio lies in the northwest of the state, at the western end of Lake Erie. Toledo was founded as a result of the prosperity that hit the area when the Miami and Erie Canal was constructed in the 19th century connecting Cincinnati to the Great Lakes. Toledo is known as the Glass City as several glass companies originated there, including Owens Corning and Pilkington North America. There is a large exhibition of glass art at the Toledo Museum of Art.

Buffalo is the second most-populous city in the state of New York. The city takes its name from Buffalo Creek that runs through the metropolis (although the waterway is called Buffalo River within the city). The source of the name Buffalo Creek is the subject of much speculation, but one thing is clear, there were never any bison in the area.

26. Scary movie that spawned the spoof "Scary Movie" : SCREAM
I don’t do horror films, so I haven’t seen any of the “Scream” movies …

“Scary Movie” is one of those parody movies, a film released in 2000 that pokes fun at famous horror films. It was advertised with the tagline “No mercy. No shame. No sequel”. The “no sequel” reference was a parody in itself, making fun of the fact that slasher movies in particular were made into strings of sequels. But there was in fact to be a sequel to “Scary Movie”. “Scary Movie 2” came out in 2001, with the tagline “We lied”.

28. Forensic TV franchise : CSI
The “CSI” franchise of TV shows has been tremendously successful, but seems to be winding down. “CSI: Miami” (the “worst” of the franchise, I think) was cancelled in 2012 after ten seasons. “CSI: NY” (the “best” of the franchise) was cancelled in 2013 after nine seasons. The original “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”, set in Las Vegas, hung in there until 2015 when it ended with a two-hour TV movie. The youngest show in the series is “CSI: Cyber”, and it’s still on the air.

29. Letter on a sorority house : TAU
Tau is the 19th letter of the Greek alphabet, the letter which gave rise to our Roman “T”. Both the letters tau (T) and chi (X) have long been symbolically associated with the cross.

33. Citrus hybrid whose name suggests its appearance : UGLI
The ugli fruit is a hybrid of an orange and a tangerine, first discovered growing wild in Jamaica where most ugli fruit comes from today. “UGLI” is a trademark name that is a variant of “ugly”, a nod to the fruits unsightly wrinkled rind.

35. Common Yuletide purchase : FIR
The custom of decorating trees at Christmas seems to have originated in Renaissance Germany. Those first trees were placed in guildhalls and were decorated with sweets and candy for the apprentices and children. After the Protestant Reformation, the Christmas tree became an alternative in Protestant homes for the Roman Catholic Christmas cribs. The Christmas tree tradition was imported into Britain by the royal family because of its German heritage. That tradition spread from Britain into North America.

“Yule” celebrations coincide with Christmas, and the words “Christmas” and “Yule” have become synonymous in much of the world. However, Yule was originally a pagan festival celebrated by Germanic peoples. The name “Yule” comes from the Old Norse word “jol” that was used to describe the festival.

38. Sci. with maps : GEOG
Geography (geog.) is a science (sci.).

41. Title role in a 2012 Tarantino film : DJANGO
“Django Unchained” is a Quentin Tarantino film that was released in 2012, starring Jamie Foxx in the title role of branded black slave just before the outbreak of the Civil War. It is the highest grossing film that Tarantino has made to date. I tend to avoid Tarantino movies as I find them to be unnecessarily violent. Apparently “Django Unchained” is one of his more violent offerings.

43. British scientist/novelist with a wintry name : CP SNOW
C. P. Snow was an English novelist, physicist and even a minister in the UK government.

45. Fiona and Shrek, for two : OGRES
Before “Shrek” was a successful movie franchise and Broadway musical, it was a children’s picture book called “Shrek!” authored and illustrated by William Steig. The title “Shrek!” came from the German/Yiddish word Schreck, meaning “fear” or “terror”.

46. Star of "Madam Secretary" : LEONI
Téa Leoni is an American actress. One of Leoni’s early parts was in the great film "A League of Their Own" (a minor role, Racine at first base). She also played Sam Malone's fiancée on "Cheers" and opposite Adam Sandler in "Spanglish". My favorite of her more prominent movie roles was as Jane in "Fun with Dick and Jane". Leoni is now playing the title role in the drama series “Madam Secretary”, a show that I really enjoy …

47. Present-day locale of ancient Sheba : YEMEN
Yemen is located on the Arabian Peninsula, lying just south of Saudi Arabia and west of Oman. Yemen is the only state on the peninsula that is a republic (its official name is the Republic of Yemen). Everyone over the age of 18 gets to vote, but only Muslims can hold elected office. Yemen has seen many rebellions over the centuries, and has been suffering through a Shia uprising since February 2015.

Sheba is referenced in the Bible several times. The “Queen of Sheba” is mentioned as someone who traveled to Jerusalem to behold the fame of King Solomon. No one knows for sure where the kingdom of Sheba was located, although there is evidence that it was actually the ancient Semitic civilization of Saba. The Sabeans lived in what today is Yemen, on the Arabian Peninsula.

48. Pet at Queen Elizabeth II's side : CORGI
The Welsh corgi is a herding dog that originated in Britain, with two recognized breeds: the Pembroke and Cardigan. Corgis aren’t speedy enough to do their job by running around livestock like collies, and instead nip at the heels.

49. ___ out (didn't make it on base, in a way) : FLIED
That would be in baseball.

50. Slow, in music : LENTO
A lento passage is a piece of music that has a slow tempo.

53. Refusal from Putin : NYET
“Nyet” is Russian for “no”, and “da” is Russian for “yes”.

Vladimir Putin became acting President of Russia at the very end of 1999 when Boris Yeltsin resigned. Putin was elected in his own right in 2000, re-elected in 2004, and then ran up against a term limit in 2008. In 2008 Putin was appointed by his successor, President Dmitry Medvedev, to the position of Prime Minister. Putin is a controversial figure, inside and outside Russia. On the one hand he led the country out of an economic crisis into a period of stability and relative prosperity. On the other hand he has been associated with government corruption and accused of allowing private concerns to have undue influence on government actions.

54. One of 100 in Winnie-the-Pooh's wood : ACRE
Hundred Acre Wood is where Winnie the Pooh lives with his friends. According to a map illustrating the books by A. A. Milne, Hundred Acre Wood is part of a larger forest, with Owl's house sitting right at the center.

58. "___ You the One?" (MTV reality show) : ARE
“Are You the One?” is an MTV reality show that stars the season with ten men and ten women hoping to find their perfect love match. Nope …

60. Walgreens rival : CVS
The name of the drugstore chain CVS once stood for Consumer Value Stores, although these days the company uses the acronym to denote Convenience, Value and Service.

"Walgreens is the largest chain of drugstores in the United States, with over 7,500 retail outlets. The company is named for the owner of the first store and founder of the chain, Charles R. Walgreen. Also, Walgreens claims to have introduced the malted milkshake, in 1922.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Attracted : DREW
5. Talk and talk and talk : YAK
8. Opposites of busts : BOOMS
13. Scent in incense and insect repellents : PATCHOULI
15. "That's unbelievable!" : OH WOW!
16. Place to find one O : THE HOBBIT
17. ___ vincit amor : OMNIA
18. "On top of that ..." : ALSO ...
19. In a Yoda-like manner : SAGELY
21. Do the wrong thing : ERR
22. Place to find two Os : VENN DIAGRAM
24. Mexican shekels : PESOS
27. "That's what ___ said!" : SHE
28. Place to find three Os : CIRCUS TENT
32. "___ said!" : ‘NUFF
36. Messes with 007's martini : STIRS
37. Year, in the Yucatán : ANO
38. 2003 Bennifer bomb : GIGLI
39. "That's clear to me now" : I SEE
40. Place to find four Os : AUDI DEALER
42. Vegas performance : ACT
44. "Maleficent" star, 2014 : JOLIE
45. Place to find five Os : OLYMPIC FLAG
51. "That's unbelievable!" : GEE!
52. Snatched : STOLEN
53. Snatches : NABS
57. Type of type : ROMAN
59. Wagner work ... or a possible title for this puzzle : RING CYCLE
61. Start of el 37-Across : ENERO
62. "Oh, stop moping!" : GET OVER IT!
63. Muscle/bone connection : SINEW
64. It's said at the exchange of Os : I DO
65. Rung : STEP

Down
1. Creator of the Oompa-Loompas and the BFG : DAHL
2. They're marked on maps: Abbr. : RTES
3. "Hello ... hello ... hello ..." : ECHO
4. First baseman in a classic comedy routine : WHO
5. Maxwell House alternative : YUBAN
6. Sync up : ALIGN
7. Floated, as a bad check : KITED
8. "How do you like dem apples?!" : BOOYAH!
9. Resistance measure : OHM
10. Ted Turner vis-à-vis the Atlanta Braves, once : OWNER
11. Shearer of "The Red Shoes" : MOIRA
12. Bunch of bees : SWARM
13. Local fund-raising grp. : PTA
14. Lose sleep (over) : OBSESS
20. Itemize : LIST
22. You, in Nice : VOUS
23. Nice : GENIAL
24. Tire-changing spots : PITS
25. Lake that stretches from Toledo to Buffalo : ERIE
26. Scary movie that spawned the spoof "Scary Movie" : SCREAM
28. Forensic TV franchise : CSI
29. Letter on a sorority house : TAU
30. A O doesn't have one : END
31. "There's ___ in team" : NO I
33. Citrus hybrid whose name suggests its appearance : UGLI
34. Head for the hills : FLEE
35. Common Yuletide purchase : FIR
38. Sci. with maps : GEOG
40. Going ___ (battling) : AT IT
41. Title role in a 2012 Tarantino film : DJANGO
43. British scientist/novelist with a wintry name : CP SNOW
45. Fiona and Shrek, for two : OGRES
46. Star of "Madam Secretary" : LEONI
47. Present-day locale of ancient Sheba : YEMEN
48. Pet at Queen Elizabeth II's side : CORGI
49. ___ out (didn't make it on base, in a way) : FLIED
50. Slow, in music : LENTO
53. Refusal from Putin : NYET
54. One of 100 in Winnie-the-Pooh's wood : ACRE
55. Tiny anomaly : BLIP
56. Collector's goal : SET
58. "___ You the One?" (MTV reality show) : ARE
60. Walgreens rival : CVS


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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