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0831-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Aug 16, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Ned White
THEME: Make It Last
Each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase with “IT” added at the end, to suit the clue:
62A. "Use this sparingly" ... or a hint to this puzzle's theme : MAKE IT LAST
17A. Hormel's assurance that Spam is packed safely? : YES, WE CAN IT (“Yes We Can” + “it”)
29A. Playground equipment thief? : SWING BANDIT (“swing band” + “it”)
38A. "Enough!" as opposed to "You quit that right now!"? : SHORT “STOP IT” (“shortstop” + “it”)
48A. "Miss Dickinson, put your poem on Facebook"? : EMILY, POST IT (“Emily Post” + “it”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 8m 38s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Stuff for sale at concerts : MERCH
“Merch” (merchandise)

10. Galileo Galilei Airport city : PISA
Galileo Galilei may be the most famous son of the city of Pisa in Italy and was considered by many to have been the father of modern science. In the world of physics, Galileo postulated that objects of different masses would fall at the same rate provided they did so in a vacuum (so there was no air resistance). There is a story that he dropped two balls of different masses from the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa to demonstrate this, but this probably never happened. Centuries later, Astronaut David Scott performed Galileo’s proposed experiment when he dropped a hammer and feather on the moon during the Apollo 15 mission and we all saw the objects hit the moon surface, at exactly the same time.

14. Federico of the Clinton cabinet : PENA
Federico Peña served as the Secretary of Transportation and as the Secretary of Energy in the Clinton administration.

15. State bordering British Columbia : IDAHO
The US state of Idaho has a panhandle that extends northwards between Washington and Montana, right up to the border with Canada. Across that border is the Canadian province of British Columbia. Most of Idaho is in the Mountain Time Zone, but Northern Idaho (the Panhandle) is in the Pacific Time Zone.

16. Bow-toting deity : EROS
Eros, the Greek god of love, was also known as Amor. The Roman counterpart to Eros was Cupid.

17. Hormel's assurance that Spam is packed safely? : YES, WE CAN IT (“Yes We Can” + “it”)
Spam is a precooked meat product that is sold in cans. It was introduced by Hormel Foods in 1937. The main meat ingredients are pork shoulder meat and ham. The name “Spam” was chosen as the result of a competition at Hormel, with the winner earning himself a hundred dollars. According to the company, the derivation of the name “Spam” is a secret known by only a few former executives, but the speculation is that it stands for “spiced ham” or “shoulders of pork and ham”.

The 2008 campaign that resulted in the election of President Barack Obama used the slogan “Change we can believe in”, along with the associated chant “Yes We Can”. The words “Yes We Can” were perhaps borrowed from the United Farm Workers, which organization uses the motto “Sí, se puede”. “Sí, se puede” translates as “Yes, it is possible” and is a phrase very much associated with labor leader Cesar Chavez.

19. [I need this immediately] : ASAP
As soon as possible (ASAP)

20. Singer Lambert : ADAM
Singer Adam Lambert is one of the “successes” to come out of the “American Idol” machine.

23. Like most pretzels : SALTY
Pretzels originated in Europe and are especially popular in Southern Germany where a pretzel is known as “Brezel”. Pretzels were introduced into the US in the 1800s by immigrants from Germany and Switzerland who came to be known over here as the Pennsylvania Dutch.

26. Brazil ___ : NUT
The Brazil nut tree is native to South America, however, the largest exporter of Brazil nuts isn’t Brazil but is in fact Bolivia. And, the Brazil nut isn’t actually a nut in the strict sense of the word and instead is a seed (as opposed a hard-shelled fruit).

27. L.A. campus : USC
The University of Southern California (USC) is a private school in Los Angeles. Apart from its excellent academic record, USC is known the success of its athletic program. USC athletes have won more Olympic medals than the students of any other university in the world. The USC marching band is very famous as well, and is known as the “Spirit of Troy”. The band has performed with many celebrities, and is the only college band to have two platinum records.

42. Bathroom fixture : BIDET
“Bidet” is a French word that we imported into English. In French, the word “bidet” originally described a small horse or a pony. What we know as a bidet was so called because one can straddle it like a horse in order to use it.

44. ___ de toilette : EAU
“Eau de toilette” (toilet water) is a diluted perfume. A French person when dressing is said to be attending to his or her "toilette".

45. Zero, at Ashe Stadium : LOVE
In tennis the score of zero is designated as “love”. Some people believe that this usage originates from the French “l’oeuf” (meaning “the egg”). The idea is that the written character "0" looks like an egg.

The Arthur Ashe Stadium in Queens, New York opened in 1997 and for years was the largest outdoor, tennis-only venue in the world. The stadium was often criticized for not having a retractable dome to protect the playing surface from inclement weather. Well, that changed in 2016 when the stadium dubuted its new retractable roof, a $150 million investment in the facility.

48. "Miss Dickinson, put your poem on Facebook"? : EMILY, POST IT (“Emily Post” + “it”)
Emily Dickinson wrote nearly 1800 poems in her lifetime, with less than a dozen published before she died in 1886. Emily’s younger sister discovered the enormous collection, and it was published in batches over the coming decades.

52. An air ball misses this : RIM
That would be in basketball.

53. Mental health org. : APA
American Psychiatric Association (APA)

54. Parker or Cross : PEN
The Parker Pen Company was founded in 1888 in Janesville, Wisconsin by George Safford Parker. Parker had repaired and sold fountain pens as a sideline for many years. With this experience, he created pens that were less likely to leak ink and founded his company based on these patented designs.

A. T. Cross is a company that claims to be the oldest manufacturer of fine pens. Cross was founded in 1846 in Providence, Rhode Island by one Richard Cross. Richard passed the company on to his son Alonzo T. Cross, who gave it the current name.

55. Kentucky Derby prize : ROSES
The first Kentucky Derby was run in 1875, and is a race modelled on the Epsom Derby in England and the Grand Prix de Paris (now called the “Prix de l‘Arc de Triomphe”). As such, The Kentucky Derby was run over 1½ miles, although in 1896 this was shortened to 1¼ miles. The winning horse is presented with a very elaborate blanket made of red roses.

61. Victims of the Morlocks, in sci-fi : ELOI
In the 1895 novel by H. G. Wells called "The Time Machine", there are two races that the hero encounter in his travels into the future. The Eloi are the “beautiful people” who live on the planet's surface. The Morlocks are a race of cannibals living underground who use the Eloi as food.

67. Broadway musical based on "La Bohème" : RENT
The musical “Rent” by Jonathan Larson is based on the Puccini opera “La bohème”. “Rent” tells the story of struggling artists and musicians living in the Lower East Side of New York, and is set against the backdrop of the AIDS epidemic. We saw “Rent” on Broadway quite a few years ago and we were very disappointed …

“La bohème” by Giacomo Puccini is the second most frequently performed opera in the US (after Puccini's "Madama Butterfly"). The lead female role in the piece is Mimì, a seamstress.

68. Epic of Troy : ILIAD
“The Iliad” is an epic poem by the Greek poet Homer, which tells the story of the ten-year siege of Ilium (also known as Troy) during the Trojan war. “The Odyssey”, also attributed to Homer, is sometimes described as a sequel to “The Iliad”.

69. Tree of Life locale : EDEN
There is mention in the Bible of both the tree of life and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. Apparently there is some debate over whether or not the two trees are one and the same.

71. Reds and Blues : TEAMS
The Red Scare (i.e. anti-communist sentiment) following WWII had such an effect on the populace that it even caused the Cincinnati baseball team to change its name from the Reds. The team was called the Cincinnati Redlegs from 1953-1958, as the management was fearful of losing money due to public distrust of any association with "Reds".

The St. Louis Blues hockey team takes its name from the song “St. Louis Blues”, a jazz and popular music classic.

Down
2. Stan of Marvel Comics : LEE
Stan Lee did just about everything at Marvel Comics over the years, from writing to being president and chairman of the board. If you like superhero movies based on the characters from Marvel Comics, then you could spend a few hours trying to spot Stan Lee in those films as he has a penchant for making cameo appearances. Lee can be spotted in “X-Men” (2000), “Spider-Man” (2002), “Hulk” (2003), “Fantastic Four” (2005), “Iron Man” (2008) and many other films.

3. Walk-___ : ONS
A walk-on role in a performance is one in which the actor makes an appearance on stage or on set, but has no dialog. One line of dialog elevates the role to a “bit part”.

5. Mineral used for insulation : MICA
Mica is a mineral, a sheet silicate. Thin sheets of mica are transparent and are used in place of glass in certain applications. This form of mica is called isinglass, and as it has a better thermal performance than glass it is a great choice for "peepholes' in boilers and lanterns. Mica is also used in the electronics industry, making use of its unique electrical and thermal insulating properties.

6. Dutch cheese town : EDAM
Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

8. China's ___ Kai-shek : CHIANG
Chiang Kai-Shek was the leader of the Nationalist Movement in China right through to the end of WWII. The Nationalists lost out in a Civil War to the Communists backed by the Soviet Union after war, and Chiang Kai-Shek and his government were forced to flee to Taiwan. Chiang Kai-shek claimed rule over China from Taiwan until his death in 1975.

10. Bog fuel : PEAT
When dead plant matter accumulates in marshy areas, it may not fully decay due to a lack of oxygen or acidic conditions. We are familiar with this in Ireland, because this decaying matter can form peat, and we have lots and lots of peat bogs.

11. Taxpayers' bugaboos : IRS AUDITORS
“Bugaboo” is another term for a bogeyman, an imaginary and scary creature used to frighten children. More generally, a bugaboo is something that creates fear or worry.

18. Breyers alternative : EDY’S
Dreyers’ ice cream sells its products under the name Dreyers in the Western United States, and Edy’s in the Eastern states. The company’s founders were William Dreyer and Joseph Edy.

Breyers ice cream was introduced by William A. Breyer in 1866, in Philadelphia. Always known for using all-natural ingredients, Breyers products made in recent years contain more and more food additives in an attempt to cut costs in a competitive market. In fact, most Breyers products can’t even be labeled “ice cream” anymore as they don’t contain enough milk and cream and so are labeled “frozen dairy dessert” instead.

25. Gangland rival of Dutch Schultz : LEGS DIAMOND
Legs Diamond was a Philadelphia and New York City gangster who plied his trade during Prohibition. There were so many attempts on Diamond’s life that he earned the moniker “clay pigeon of the underworld”. His enemies eventually caught up with him in a rooming house in Albany, New York in 1931, shooting him three times in the back of the head. Diamond’s widow was shot and killed just two years later.

30. Cabinet department until 1947 : WAR
The US Department of War was established by Congress in 1789, soon after George Washington was made President of the United States. The War Department continued as part of the cabinet until after WWII, then in 1947 was broken up into the Department of the Army and the Department of the Air Force. These two new departments were combined with the already-existing Department of the Navy in 1949 to form the Department of Defense.

31. Acct. earnings : INT
A bank account (acct.) usually earns Interest (int.)

32. Rhinoplasty targets : NOSES
A nose job is more correctly called rhinoplasty. The term comes from the Greek combining form “rhino-” meaning “nose”, and “plastos” meaning “act of forming”.

35. Silverstein who wrote "A Boy Named Sue" : SHEL
“A Boy Named Sue” is a classic song by Shel Silverstein that was made famous by Johnny Cash. Cash recorded the song at a live concert he gave in 1969 at San Quentin State Prison.

Author Shel Silverstein had a varied career and did a lot more than write books. Silverstein was a poet, composer, cartoonist and screenwriter among other things. One of his successful children’s books is “The Giving Tree”, which was first published in 1964. “The Giving Tree” tells of a young boy who has a special relationship with a tree in a forest. The message of the book seems to be that the tree provides the little boy with everything he needs.

39. Most common blood group : O-TYPE
The most important grouping of blood types is the ABO system. Blood is classified as either A, B, AB or O, depending on the type of antigens on the surface of the red blood cells. A secondary designation of blood is the Rh factor, in which other antigens are labelled as either positive or negative. When a patient receives a blood transfusion, ideally the donor blood should be the same type as that of the recipient, as incompatible blood cells can be rejected. However, blood type O-neg can be accepted by recipients with all blood types, A, B, AB or O, and positive or negative. Hence someone with O-neg blood type is called a “universal donor”.

40. Bit of body art, in brief : TAT
The word "tattoo" (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word "tatau" into our "tattoo". Tattoos are also sometimes referred to as “ink”.

41. Montréal assent : OUI
The original name of Montreal was Ville-Marie, meaning the City of Mary. Ville-Marie is now the name of a borough in the city, the borough which includes the downtown area and “Old Montreal”. The present-day city covers most of the Island of Montreal (in French, Île de Montréal) that is located where the Saint Lawrence and Ottawa Rivers meet. The name Montreal comes from the three-headed hill that dominates the island and is called Mount Royal.

47. Rescue squad letters : EMS
Emergency Medical Services (EMS)

63. Rio automaker : KIA
Kia have making the subcompact model called a Rio since 2000.

64. Suffix with Gator or Power : -ADE
Gatorade was developed at the University of Florida by a team of researchers at the request of the school's football team. And so, Gatorade is named after the Gators football team.

Powerade is one of those sports drinks, and the only real competitor to Gatorade.

66. Explosive in Road Runner cartoons : TNT
Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner are two much-loved cartoon characters from Warner Bros. Wile E. Coyote was created first, and Road Runner was invented as someone for Wile E. to play off. I love this cartoon; definitely one of the best …

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Sty fare : SLOP
5. Stuff for sale at concerts : MERCH
10. Galileo Galilei Airport city : PISA
14. Federico of the Clinton cabinet : PENA
15. State bordering British Columbia : IDAHO
16. Bow-toting deity : EROS
17. Hormel's assurance that Spam is packed safely? : YES, WE CAN IT (“Yes We Can” + “it”)
19. [I need this immediately] : ASAP
20. Singer Lambert : ADAM
21. Exposed to risk : AT STAKE
23. Like most pretzels : SALTY
26. Brazil ___ : NUT
27. L.A. campus : USC
28. Ill temper : IRE
29. Playground equipment thief? : SWING BANDIT (“swing band” + “it”)
34. Places to hang hats : PEGS
36. "It's ___-brainer!" : A NO
37. Major conduits : MAINS
38. "Enough!" as opposed to "You quit that right now!"? : SHORT “STOP IT” (“shortstop” + “it”)
42. Bathroom fixture : BIDET
44. ___ de toilette : EAU
45. Zero, at Ashe Stadium : LOVE
48. "Miss Dickinson, put your poem on Facebook"? : EMILY, POST IT (“Emily Post” + “it”)
52. An air ball misses this : RIM
53. Mental health org. : APA
54. Parker or Cross : PEN
55. Kentucky Derby prize : ROSES
57. Picnic baskets : HAMPERS
59. A skeptic may raise one : BROW
61. Victims of the Morlocks, in sci-fi : ELOI
62. "Use this sparingly" ... or a hint to this puzzle's theme : MAKE IT LAST
67. Broadway musical based on "La Bohème" : RENT
68. Epic of Troy : ILIAD
69. Tree of Life locale : EDEN
70. Track figures : ODDS
71. Reds and Blues : TEAMS
72. Not a good thing to do while driving : TEXT

Down
1. One may bug you : SPY
2. Stan of Marvel Comics : LEE
3. Walk-___ : ONS
4. Handle clumsily : PAW AT
5. Mineral used for insulation : MICA
6. Dutch cheese town : EDAM
7. Campaigned : RAN
8. China's ___ Kai-shek : CHIANG
9. Poolside amenity : HOT TUB
10. Bog fuel : PEAT
11. Taxpayers' bugaboos : IRS AUDITORS
12. Penetrates fully : SOAKS IN
13. Sides : ASPECTS
18. Breyers alternative : EDY’S
22. "PAID," for one : STAMP
23. Enjoy, as brandy : SIP
24. "r," in a 72-Across : ARE
25. Gangland rival of Dutch Schultz : LEGS DIAMOND
30. Cabinet department until 1947 : WAR
31. Acct. earnings : INT
32. Rhinoplasty targets : NOSES
33. Something to hit on the head : NAIL
35. Silverstein who wrote "A Boy Named Sue" : SHEL
39. Most common blood group : O-TYPE
40. Bit of body art, in brief : TAT
41. Montréal assent : OUI
42. Come to the rescue : BE A HERO
43. Stuck : IMPALED
46. Go head-to-head : VIE
47. Rescue squad letters : EMS
49. Hunter's document : PERMIT
50. Attractive to bargain hunters : ON SALE
51. Gait slower than a canter : TROT
56. Little hooter : OWLET
58. The absolute worst, with "the" : PITS
59. Grin from ear to ear : BEAM
60. Purges : RIDS
63. Rio automaker : KIA
64. Suffix with Gator or Power : -ADE
65. "The birds and the bees" : SEX
66. Explosive in Road Runner cartoons : TNT


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0830-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Aug 16, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Roland Huget
THEME: Chemical Symbols
Each of today’s themed answers starts with the name of a CHEMICAL element, after which the element’s CHEMICAL SYMBOL appears, in circled letter(s):
36A. This puzzle's circled letters, for the words that precede them : CHEMICAL SYMBOLS

17A. Flowering plants from Australia : COPPER CUPS (hiding “Cu”)
26A. What hath the gardener wrought? : IRON FENCE (hiding “Fe”)
51A. Second-greatest period in something's history : SILVER AGE (hiding “Ag”)
58A. Antiquated office duplicate : CARBON COPY (hiding “C”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 22s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Android purchases : APPS
Android is an operating system for mobile devices that was developed by Google. Android is mainly used on touchscreen devices like smartphones and tablets, although versions have been developed for cars (Android Auto), for televisions (Android TV) and for wrist watches (Android Wear). Android is the most successful operating system today, having the most extensive installed base.

5. Campfire treat : S’MORE
S’mores are treats peculiar to North America, usually eaten around a campfire. A s’more consists of a roasted marshmallow and a layer of chocolate sandwiched between two graham crackers. The earliest written reference to the recipe is in a 1927 publication called “Tramping and Trailing with the Girl Scouts”. Girl Scouts always did corner the market on cookies and the like!

10. Ones coming out : DEBS
“Deb” is short for "debutante", which translates from French as "female beginner".

14. Lady of the Haus : FRAU
In Germany, a “Mr.” (Herr) is married to a “Mrs.” (Frau), and they live together in a house (Haus).

15. Forty ___ and a mule (post-Civil War allotment) : ACRES
“40 Acres and a Mule” was a promise made to newly-freed slaves, a promise to redistribute some former Confederate-owned lands. The essentials of the “promise” were called out in Union General William T. Sherman’s Special Field Order No. 15 in 1865, which was approved by President Abraham Lincoln. There was no actual mention of mules in the order, although Sherman gave instructions that army mules could be loaned to the settlers. The promise turned out to be an empty one, as Lincoln’s successor President Andrew Johnson overturned Sherman’s order and returned all designated land to the planters who originally owned it.

16. Like only one prime number : EVEN
The only even prime number is 2.

A prime number is a number greater than 1 that can only be divided evenly by 1 and itself. There are still some unanswered questions involving prime numbers, perhaps most notably Goldbach’s Conjecture. This conjecture dates back to the 1740s and is assumed to be true, but has never been proven. It states that every even integer greater than 2 can be expressed as the sum of two prime numbers.

17. Flowering plants from Australia : COPPER CUPS (hiding “Cu”)
“Copper cup” is a common name of the plant genus Pileanthus. All Pileanthus species are native to Australia.

19. End of a movement : CODA
In music, a coda is primarily a passage that brings a movement to a conclusion. “Coda” is Italian for “tail”.

20. Director Kazan : ELIA
Elia Kazan won Oscars for best director in 1948 for "Gentleman's Agreement" and in 1955 for "On The Waterfront". In 1999 Kazan was given an Academy Lifetime Achievement Award. He also directed “East of Eden”, which introduced James Dean to movie audiences, and “Splendor in the Grass” that included Warren Beatty in his debut role.

21. FICA tax payer : EARNER
The Federal Insurance Contributions Act tax (FICA) was introduced in the 1930s as part of President Roosevelt’s New Deal. FICA payments are made by both employees and employers in order to fund Social Security and Medicare.

26. What hath the gardener wrought? : IRON FENCE (hiding “Fe”)
Wrought iron is an iron alloy containing fibrous filaments called slag. The term “wrought” is a allusion to the iron being worked (wrought) by hand. One of the more famous uses of wrought iron was the construction of the Eiffel Tower in Paris.

29. Fake : SHAM
A “sham” is something that is imitation, fake. In the world of bed linens a sham is also imitation and fake, in the sense that it is a decorative cover designed to cover up a regular pillow used for sleeping.

32. Region affected by Brexit : EUROPE
The UK held a referendum in June 2016 in which 52% of voters chose to leave the European Union (EU). The term “Brexit” was used for vote, a portmanteau of “Britain” and “exit”. The vote has led to some debate about the future of the UK. The Scottish electorate voted for the UK to stay in the EU, and so there’s a lot of new talk about Scotland leaving the UK. There’s also some discussion about Northern Ireland’s future in the UK, as the Northern Irish electorate also voted to stay in the EU.

34. Sun and Sky org. : WNBA
The Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) includes the Connecticut Sun and the Chicago Sky.

42. Bell town in a Longfellow poem : ATRI
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote "The Sicilian's Tale; The Bell of Atri", a narrative poem set in the small town of Atri in the Abruzzo region of Italy.

44. Buddy who played Jed Clampett in 1960s TV : EBSEN
The actor Buddy Ebsen was best known for playing Jed Clampett in television’s “The Beverly Hillbillies”. Ebsen had been cast in the role of the Tin Man in the 1939 movie “The Wizard of Oz”, but he developed an allergy to the aluminium dust that was used in the makeup. He ended up in hospital and had to walk away from the part. Ebsen blamed “The Wizard of Oz” on persistent problems that he had with his lungs in subsequent years. But Ebsen lived 16 years longers that any of the other major cast members of the film, so maybe he got the last laugh!

55. Contact lens care brand : RENU
ReNu is a brand name of contact lens products sold by Bausch & Lomb.

57. Had too much, briefly : ODED
Overdose (OD)

58. Antiquated office duplicate : CARBON COPY (hiding “C”)
I wonder do the kids of today know that “cc” stands for carbon copy, and do they have any idea what a carbon copy was? Do you remember how messy carbon paper was to handle?

69. Barbecue side dish : SLAW
The term “coleslaw” is an Anglicized version of the Dutch name “koolsla”, which in itself is a shortened form of “Koolsalade” meaning “cabbage salad”.

Down
1. Patriots' org. : AFC
American Football Conference (AFC)

The New England Patriots football team was founded in 1959 as the Boston Patriots. The “Patriots” name was selected from suggestions made by football fans in Boston. The team played at several different stadiums in the Boston area for just over ten years, before moving to their current home base in Foxborough, Massachusetts. At the time of the move, the “Boston” name was dropped and changed to “New England”.

3. Soft food for babies : PAP
One meaning of "pap" is soft or semi-liquid food for babies and small children. "Pap" comes into English via French, from the Latin word used by children for "food". In the 1500s, "pap" also came to mean "an oversimplified" idea. This gives us a usage that's common today, describing literature or perhaps TV programming that lacks real value or substance. Hands up those who think there's a lot of pap out there, especially on television ...

5. Bollywood costume : SARI
Bollywood is the informal name given to the huge film industry based in Mumbai in India. The term “Bollywood” is a melding of “Bombay”, the old name for Mumbai, and “Hollywood”.

6. Palin was his running mate : MCCAIN
When John McCain selected Sarah Palin as candidate for Vice President in the 2008 presidential election, she became the first Alaskan to go on the national ticket for a major party. She also became the first woman nominated for Vice President by the Republican Party.

7. Tulsa sch. named for an evangelist : ORU
Oral Roberts University (ORU) is a private school in Tulsa, Oklahoma. ORU was founded relatively recently, in 1963 by the late televangelist Oral Roberts. The campus includes a Prayer Tower at its center, a spectacular glass and steel structure designed by architect Frank Wallace. The tower includes an observation deck, and is a popular tourist attraction. The school’s sports teams are known as the Oral Roberts Golden Eagles.

9. Ruhr Valley city : ESSEN
Essen is a large industrial city located on the River Ruhr in western Germany.

The Ruhr is a large urban area in western Germany. The area is heavily populated, and is the fifth largest urban area in the whole of Europe, after Istanbul, Moscow, London and Paris. The Ruhr became heavily industrialized due to its large deposits of coal. By 1850, the area contained nearly 300 operating coal mines. Any coal deposits remaining in the area today are too expensive to exploit.

11. Goolagong of tennis : EVONNE
Evonne Goolagong is a former Australian tennis player who was at the pinnacle of her success in seventies and early eighties. Her colorful family name, Goolagong, came from her Aboriginal father who worked for much of his life as an itinerant sheep shearer. I remember seeing Goolagong play back then, and I always thought that she was so elegant and such a lady on the court …

13. Some drums : SNARES
Snare drums are so called because they have a set of wire strands (called snares) stretched across the bottom surface of the drum. When the drum is struck, the snares vibrate against the bottom drumhead producing a unique sound.

18. Old Third Ave. trains in New York City : ELS
The IRT Third Avenue El was one of the last elevated trains to operate in Manhattan. The line opened in 1878, and the last of the service was shut down in 1973. Trains running along the Third Avenue El were a popular backdrop used in movies set in New York City.

22. Ski lodge, often : A-FRAME
An A-frame house is one that has a steeply-angled roof, one forming the shape of the letter “A”. The A-frame design is popular in snowy regions, as the roof is so steeply pitched that it does not collect snow.

23. Tiny fraction of a min. : PSEC
A picosecond is one trillionth of a second, and is correctly abbreviated to “ps” in the SI system of measurements. I guess that’s what “psec” is meant to be …

27. Best-selling author who was a runner-up for Time's 2007 Person of the Year : ROWLING
The author of the amazingly successful "Harry Potter" series of books is J. K. Rowling. Rowling wrote the first book when she was living on welfare in Edinburgh in Scotland, and in longhand. She would often write in local cafes, largely because she needed to get her baby daughter out of the house (she was a single mom), and the youngster would tend to fall asleep on walks. Within five years, the single mom on welfare became a very rich woman, and is now worth about $1 billion!

“Time” magazine started naming a “Man of the Year” in 1927, only changing the concept to “Person of the Year” in 1999. Prior to 1999, the magazine did recognize four females as “Woman of the Year”: Wallis Simpson (1936), Soong May-ling a.k.a. Madame Chiang Kai-shek (1937), Queen Elizabeth II (1952) and Corazon Aquino (1986). “Time” named Albert Einstein as Person of the Century in 1999, with Franklin D. Roosevelt and Mahatma Gandhi as runners-up.

33. Electric keyboard heard on "I Am the Walrus" : PIANET
“I Am the Walrus” is a Beatles song released in 1967. It was written by John Lennon, with the Walrus being a reference to the poem “The Walrus and the Carpenter” from Lewis Carroll’s “Through the Looking-Glass”.

35. Admiral who explored the Antarctic : BYRD
Rear Admiral Richard Byrd was an officer in the US Navy, famous as an aviator and explorer of the polar regions. Byrd was the first person to cross the South Pole by air, in 1929. Three years earlier, Byrd claimed he had flown over the North Pole, and would have been the first person to have done so if this was true. But whether or not Byrd actually made it over the North Pole continues to be the subject of much debate.

37. Vegas resort with a musical name : ARIA
Aria is one of the newer casinos on the Las Vegas Strip. “Popular Mechanics” magazine described Aria as “the most technologically-advanced hotel ever built”.

39. Fit for service : ONE-A
The US government maintains information on all males who are potentially subject to military conscription, using what is called the Selective Service System(SS). In the event that a draft was held, men registered would be classified into groups to determine eligibility for service. Class 1-A registrants are those available for unrestricted military service. Other classes are 1-A-O (conscientious objector available for noncombatant service), 4-A (registrant who has completed military service) and 4-D (Minister of religion).

40. Dryer screen buildup : LINT
“Lint”, meaning “fluff”, is one of those terms that I had to learn when I moved to the US. We call the same thing “fuzz” on the other side of the Atlantic.

41. Old blade : SNEE
A "snee" is a type of dagger formerly used by Scottish highlanders.

45. One over an eagle : BIRDIE
The following terms are routinely used in golf for scores relative to par:
Bogey: one over par
Par
Birdie: one under par
Eagle: two under par
Albatross (also “double eagle”): three under par
Condor: four under par
No one has ever recorded a condor during a professional tournament.

46. Something a tank top lacks : SLEEVE
“Tank top” is another one of those terms that always catches me out, as it has a different meaning on each side of the Atlantic. In the US a tank top is a sleeveless shirt, something we would call a “vest” back in Ireland (and the US “vest” is what we call a “waist coat”). A tank top in Ireland is a sleeveless sweater, which further adds to the confusion. The name “tank top” is derived from “tank suit”, an old name for a woman’s one-piece bathing suit. The use of “tank” for the bathing suit came from “swimming tank”, an obsolete term used in the 1920s for a swimming pool.

53. Massachusetts' Cape ___ : ANN
Cape Ann is 30 miles north of Boston and is on the northernmost edge of Massachusetts Bay. The Cape was first mapped by the explorer John Smith. Early in his adventurous life Smith had been captured and enslaved by the Ottoman Empire. His "owner" in his days of slavery was a woman called Tragabigzanda, and apparently the slave and owner fell in love. Smith originally called Cape Tragabigzanda in her memory, but King Charles I changed the name to Cape Ann in honor of his own mother, Anne of Denmark.

59. Notre Dame's Parseghian : ARA
Ara Parseghian coached the Notre Dame football team from 1964 to 1974, a period known as "The Era of Ara".

60. Ballpark fig. : RBI
Run batted in (RBI)

61. Tin Man's need : OIL
Actor Jack Haley played the Tin Man in “The Wizard of Oz”. Haley was the second choice for the role, as it was originally given to Buddy Ebsen (who later played Jed Clampett in “The Beverly Hillbillies”). Ebsen was being “painted up” as the Tin Man when he had an extreme, near-fatal reaction from inhaling the aluminum dust makeup that was being used. When Haley took over, the makeup was changed to a paste, but it was still uncomfortable and caused him to miss the first four days of shooting due to a reaction in his eyes. During filming, Haley must have made good friends with the movie’s star, Judy Garland, as years later Jack’s son married Judy’s daughter, Liza Minnelli.

62. Sch. group : PTA
Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

63. Tree used in bow-making : YEW
Yew is the wood of choice for the longbow, a valued weapon in the history of England. The longbow is constructed with a core of yew heartwood (as the heartwood resists compression) that has a sheath of yew sapwood (as the sapwood resists stretching). The yew was in such demand for longbows that for centuries yew trees were in short supply in Britain and the wood had to be imported from all over Europe.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Android purchases : APPS
5. Campfire treat : S’MORE
10. Ones coming out : DEBS
14. Lady of the Haus : FRAU
15. Forty ___ and a mule (post-Civil War allotment) : ACRES
16. Like only one prime number : EVEN
17. Flowering plants from Australia : COPPER CUPS (hiding “Cu”)
19. End of a movement : CODA
20. Director Kazan : ELIA
21. FICA tax payer : EARNER
23. Sounds from a happy kitty : PURRS
26. What hath the gardener wrought? : IRON FENCE (hiding “Fe”)
29. Fake : SHAM
30. Reason for school cancellation : SNOW
31. Makes a big stink : REEKS
32. Region affected by Brexit : EUROPE
34. Sun and Sky org. : WNBA
36. This puzzle's circled letters, for the words that precede them : CHEMICAL SYMBOLS
42. Bell town in a Longfellow poem : ATRI
43. Bring under control : REIN IN
44. Buddy who played Jed Clampett in 1960s TV : EBSEN
48. How M.L.B. games are often broadcast : IN HD
50. Part of a family inheritance : GENE
51. Second-greatest period in something's history : SILVER AGE (hiding “Ag”)
53. Subside : ABATE
54. Invent : CREATE
55. Contact lens care brand : RENU
57. Had too much, briefly : ODED
58. Antiquated office duplicate : CARBON COPY (hiding “C”)
64. Tear apart : RIVE
65. ___ sprawl : URBAN
66. Toy with a tail : KITE
67. Ticked (off) : TEED
68. Train track parts : RAILS
69. Barbecue side dish : SLAW

Down
1. Patriots' org. : AFC
2. Old hand : PRO
3. Soft food for babies : PAP
4. Family multitasker : SUPERMOM
5. Bollywood costume : SARI
6. Palin was his running mate : MCCAIN
7. Tulsa sch. named for an evangelist : ORU
8. Gym unit : REP
9. Ruhr Valley city : ESSEN
10. Court order : DECREE
11. Goolagong of tennis : EVONNE
12. Festoon : BEDECK
13. Some drums : SNARES
18. Old Third Ave. trains in New York City : ELS
22. Ski lodge, often : A-FRAME
23. Tiny fraction of a min. : PSEC
24. "No way!" : UH-UH!
25. Steak specification : RARE
27. Best-selling author who was a runner-up for Time's 2007 Person of the Year : ROWLING
28. Completely dominates : OWNS
30. Splinter group : SECT
33. Electric keyboard heard on "I Am the Walrus" : PIANET
35. Admiral who explored the Antarctic : BYRD
37. Vegas resort with a musical name : ARIA
38. Considerable salary to pull down : BIG BUCKS
39. Fit for service : ONE-A
40. Dryer screen buildup : LINT
41. Old blade : SNEE
44. Go along with : ESCORT
45. One over an eagle : BIRDIE
46. Something a tank top lacks : SLEEVE
47. Got around : EVADED
49. Kind of supplement : HERBAL
52. Come around again : RECUR
53. Massachusetts' Cape ___ : ANN
56. Stars exist over them : EONS
59. Notre Dame's Parseghian : ARA
60. Ballpark fig. : RBI
61. Tin Man's need : OIL
62. Sch. group : PTA
63. Tree used in bow-making : YEW


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0829-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Aug 16, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: David Steinberg
THEME: Wyoming
Each of today’s themed answers is a celebrated location in WYOMING:
39A. Squarest of the 50 states : WYOMING

17A. Famous geyser in 39-Across : OLD FAITHFUL
60A. Historic trading post in 39-Across : FORT LARAMIE
11D. Noted rock formation in 39-Across : DEVILS TOWER
24D. Skiing mecca in 39-Across : JACKSON HOLE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 4m 36s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Apple computers : IMACS
The iMac is a desktop computer platform from Apple introduced in 1998. One of the main features of the iMac is an "all-in-one" design, with the computer console and monitor integrated. The iMac also came in a range of colors, that Apple marketed as “flavors”, such strawberry, blueberry and lime.

6. Game with a stack of blocks : JENGA
Jenga is a simple but very entertaining game, one in which one stacks wooden blocks as high as possible until the resulting tower collapses. “Jenga” is the Swahili word for “to build”.

11. Nevada/Arizona's Hoover ___ : DAM
When the magnificent Hoover Dam was completed in 1936 it was the largest hydroelectric plant in the world, as well as being the world's largest concrete structure. The edifice was originally known as Boulder Dam, due to its location near Boulder City, Nevada. The dam was eventually named after Herbert Hoover for his role in having the dam built when he was Secretary of Commerce, and his later support as US President. There was a formal dedication ceremony held in September 1935 when President Franklin D. Roosevelt was in the area, when only work on the powerhouse was incomplete. President Roosevelt managed to make his dedication speech without once referring to the name of his former opponent President Hoover. When the dam was finally put into service in 1936, the project was two years ahead of schedule. Those were the days …

14. Gold ___ flour : MEDAL
Gold Medal is a brand of flour produced by General Mills. The line was introduced by a precursor company to General Mills named Washburn-Crosby in 1880, following a gold-medal win at the Millers’ International Exhibition in Cincinnati.

15. Sometimes-bad bacteria : E COLI
Escherichia coli (E. coli) are usually harmless bacteria found in the human gut, working away quite happily. However, there are some strains that can produce lethal toxins. These strains can make their way into the food chain from animal fecal matter that comes into contact with food designated for human consumption.

17. Famous geyser in 39-Across : OLD FAITHFUL
Old Faithful is a geyser in Yellowstone National Park. It erupts almost every 63 minutes on the nose, making it one of the most predictable geographic features on the planet. It was this predictability that led to the name “Old Faithful”. In the early days of Yellowstone’s existence as a park, the geyser was used as a laundry. Dirty linen clothing was placed in the geyser’s crater during the quiet period. The clothing was ejected during the eruption, thoroughly washed.

19. Good job for an animal-loving ex-G.I.? : VET
An animal lover might become a vet (veterinarian), and an ex-GI might be termed a vet (veteran).

22. Style of music north of the Rio Grande : TEJANO
Tejano is the Spanish word for “Texan”. Tejano music is strongly influenced by Cajun culture, because of the proximity of Texas to Louisiana. The other strong influence came with immigrants from the Poland and what is now the Czech Republic. These immigrants brought with them the waltz, polka … and the accordion.

25. Cosmic clouds : NEBULAE
In astronomical terms, a nebula is a cloud of dust and ionized gases (“nebula” is the Latin for “cloud”). Many nebulae form as gases collapse in on themselves under the influence of enormous gravitational forces. Ultimately these collapses can result in the creation of new stars.

27. ___ the Terrible : IVAN
The Grand Prince of Moscow Ivan IV became known as Ivan the Terrible. The name "terrible" is a translation from Russian, and perhaps creates the wrong impression about the man. The Russian word is "Grozny", which is more akin to "strict" and "powerful" rather than "cruel" or "abominable".

28. Preparer of fast food that's "finger-lickin' good" : KFC
The famous "Colonel" of Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) fame was Harland Sanders, an entrepreneur from Henryville, Indiana. Although not really a "Colonel", Sanders did indeed serve in the military. He enlisted in the Army as a private in 1906 at the age of 16, lying about his age. He spent the whole of his time in the Army as a soldier in Cuba. It was much later, in the 1930s, that Sanders went into the restaurant business making his specialty deep-fried chicken. By 1935 his reputation as a "character" had grown, so much so that Governor Ruby Laffoon of Kentucky gave Sanders the honorary title of "Kentucky Colonel". Later in the fifties, Sanders developed his trademark look with the white suit, string tie, mustache and goatee. When Sanders was 65 however, his business failed and in stepped Dave Thomas, the founder of Wendy's. Thomas simplified the Sanders menu, cutting it back from over a hundred items to just fried chicken and salads. That was enough to launch KFC into the fast food business. Sanders sold the US franchise in 1964 for just $2 million and moved to Canada to grow KFC north of the border. He died in 1980 and is buried in Louisville, Kentucky. The Colonel's secret recipe of 11 herbs and spices is indeed a trade secret. Apparently there is only one copy of the recipe, a handwritten piece of paper, written in pencil and signed by Colonel Sanders. Since 2009, the piece of paper has been locked in a computerized vault surrounded with motion detectors and security cameras.

31. Catches red-handed : NABS
“To be caught red-handed” means to be caught in the act. The expression originated in Scotland and dates back at least to the 1400s. The red in question is blood, as in being caught with blood on one’s hands after perhaps committing a murder or an act of poaching.

32. Clic Stic pen maker : BIC
Société Bic is a French company, based in Clichy in France. The first product the company produced, more than fifty years ago, was the Bic Cristal ballpoint pen that is still produced today. Bic also makes other disposable products such as lighters and razors.

39. Squarest of the 50 states : WYOMING
Wyoming is nicknamed the “Equality State”, and the state’s motto is “equal rights”. Wyoming was the first state to give women the vote, and the first to allow women serve on juries. It was also the first state to have a female governor, Nellie Tayloe Ross, who took office in 1925. Unofficially, Wyoming is also referred to as the “Cowboy State”.

44. British coins : PENCE
The official name of our smallest denomination coin is a “cent”, and our use of the word “penny” is just a colloquialism derived from the British coin of the same name. However, in the UK the plural of penny is “pence”, whereas we have “pennies” in our pockets.

48. Luau necklace : LEI
"Lei" is the Hawaiian word for “garland, wreath”, although in more general terms a “lei” is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

Nowadays the word “luau” denotes almost any kind of party on the Hawaiian Islands, but to the purist a luau is a feast that always includes a serving of “poi”, the bulbous underground stems of taro baked with coconut milk.

49. Money due in Monopoly : RENT
The commercial game of Monopoly is supposedly a remake of “The Landlord’s Game” created in 1903 by a Quaker woman called Lizzie Phillips. Phillips used her game as a tool to explain the single tax theory of American economist Henry George. The Landlord’s Game was first produced commercially in 1924. The incredibly successful derivative game called Monopoly was introduced in 1933 by Charles Darrow, who became a very rich man when Parker Brothers bought the rights to the game just two years later in 1935.

53. Like Mustangs and Camaros : SPORTY
The Ford Mustang car was introduced in 1964. Back then the Mustang wasn’t a brand new design, but was based on the Ford Falcon. The Mustang was the first of the “pony cars”, American models that are compact and affordable, as well as sporty in image and performance.

The Chevrolet Camaro is a car produced by General Motors from 1966 to 2002, and reintroduced in 2009. The Camaro shared much of its design with the Pontiac Firebird, and was introduced as a potential competitor to the Ford Mustang.

59. Greek "r" : RHO
Rho is the Greek letter that looks just like our Roman letter “p”, although it is equivalent to the Roman letter R.

60. Historic trading post in 39-Across : FORT LARAMIE
The town of Fort Laramie, Wyoming is named for the trading post and military encampment of the same name that was located nearby. Fort Laramie was a stop on the Oregon, California and Mormon trails.

64. Note after fa : SOL
The solfa syllables are: do, re, mi, fa, sol, la & ti.

66. Boy Scouts squad : TROOP
As every little boy (of my era) knows, the Scouting movement was founded by Lord Baden Powell, in 1907. The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) soon followed, in 1910. And, the Boy Scouts motto is “Be Prepared”.

68. 1990s fitness fad with infomercials : TAE BO
Tae Bo isn’t an ancient martial art, even though it perhaps sounds like one. The discipline was developed as a form of aerobic exercise in the 1990s by taekwondo expert Billy Blanks who gave it the name Tae Bo, a melding of “taekwondo” and “boxing”.

69. Evil animal in "The Lion King" : HYENA
Among the group of lions at the center of “The Lion King” story, young Simba is the heir apparent, the lion cub destined to take over as leader of the pride. His uncle is jealous of Simba, and plots with a trio of hyenas to kill Simba, so that he can take his position. The uncle was originally named Taka (according to books) but he was given the name Scar after being injured by a buffalo. The trio of hyenas are called Shenzi, Banzai and Ed.

Down
1. Texter's "I think ..." : IMO
In my opinion (IMO)

2. Brooks of "Spaceballs" : MEL
Mel Brooks’ real name is Melvin Kaminsky. Brooks is one of very few entertainers (there are only ten) who has won the “Showbiz Award Grand Slam” i.e. an Oscar, Tony, Grammy and Emmy. He is in good company, as the list also includes the likes of Richard Rogers, Sir John Gielgud, Marvin Hamlisch and Audrey Hepburn.

“Spaceballs” is a 1987 spoof of sci-fi films, mainly poking fun at the “Star Wars” franchise. It was co-written and directed by, and indeed stars, Mel Brooks.

4. Mideast robe : CAFTAN
A kaftan (also “caftan”) is long robe associated for thousands of years with Islamic cultures.

6. Ballet leap : JETE
A jeté is a leap in ballet, coming from the French word “jeter” meaning “to throw”. A “jeté en avant” is a “leap to the front”, towards the audience. A “grand jeté” is a long horizontal jump, a split in the air, leaping from one foot to the other.

9. Protein in bread : GLUTEN
Gluten is a protein mixture found in foods processed mainly from wheat. The sticky properties of gluten are used in making bread, giving dough its elasticity and making the final product chewy. “Gluten” is the Latin word for “glue”.

11. Noted rock formation in 39-Across : DEVILS TOWER
Devils Tower is an igneous intrusion that rises over 1200 feet from the ground in the Black Hills in northeastern Wyoming. Devils Tower was the first of the nation’s National Monuments, having being so designated in 1906 by President Theodore Roosevelt. Devils Tower played a pivotal role in the 1977 movie “Close Encounters of the Third Kind”.

12. Gladiators' locale : ARENA
The term “gladiator” means “swordsman”, coming from “gladius”, the Latin word for “sword”.

13. Nonglossy finish : MATTE
“Matte”, meaning flat and lusterless, comes from the Old French word “mat” meaning beaten down and withered. In turn, the French “mat” comes from the Latin “maddus”, meaning “maudlin with drink”. Sometimes I wonder about these derivations …

22. Lower leg bone : TIBIA
The tibia is the shin bone, the larger of the two bones right below the knee. The tibia is the strongest weight-bearing bone in the human body. "Tibia" is the Roman name for a Greek flute and it is thought that the shin bone was given the same name because flutes were often fashioned out of the shin bones of animals.

24. Skiing mecca in 39-Across : JACKSON HOLE
Jackson Hole is the name of a beautiful valley in Wyoming formed between the Teton and Gros Ventre Ranges. The name “Jackson Hole” is also used locally for the town of Jackson, located in the valley.

29. Edsel or New Coke, notably : FLOP
The Edsel brand of automobile was named for Edsel, son of Henry Ford. Sadly, the name "Edsel" has become synonymous with "failure", which was no fault of Edsel himself who had died several years before the Edsel line was introduced. When the Ford Motor Company introduced the Edsel on 4 September 1957, Ford proclaimed the day to be “E Day”.

When “new Coke” was introduced in 1985, the market reacted very, very badly. The public reaction was so negative that the Coca-Cola company quickly reintroduced its “Coca Cola Classic” line. Ironically, the whole debacle resulted in Coke actually gaining market share when the “old coke” returned to supermarket shelves.

30. Animal with a hump : CAMEL
The dromedary, also known as the Arabian Camel or Indian Camel, is the camel that has only one hump. The other species of camel is the Bactrian, which has two humps. The hump of a dromedary contains up to 80 pounds of fat, which can be broken down into water and energy if no food or water is available.

33. Group of gnats : SWARM
Gnats are attracted to the smell of rotting food, and to vinegar. Simple homemade traps that use vinegar are often constructed to attract and kill gnats.

40. CBS spinoff set in SoCal : NCIS: LA
NCIS is the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, which investigates crimes in the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. The service gives its name to the CBS TV show "NCIS", a spin-off drama from "JAG" in which the main "NCIS" characters were first introduced. The big star in "NCIS" is the actor Mark Harmon. “NCIS” is now a franchise, with spinoff shows “NCIS: Los Angeles” and “NCIS: New Orleans”.

47. Stuffed Indian pastry : SAMOSA
A samosa is quite a tasty appetizer, usually a triangular-shaped savory that often has a vegetarian filling. The word “samosa” is primarily used on Indian menus, and the name comes from “sanbosag”, the name for the dish in Persia.

49. Set of religious beads : ROSARY
The Rosary is a set of prayer beads used in the Roman Catholic tradition. The name "Rosary" comes from the Latin "rosarium", the word for a "rose garden" or a "garland of roses". The term is used figuratively, in the sense of a "garden of prayers".

50. Crocodile's home : MARSH
Crocodiles and alligators do indeed bear a resemblance to each other, although they belong to distinct biological families. One of the main ways used to distinguish them is by their teeth and jaws. Both the upper and lower sets of teeth of a crocodile are visible when its mouth is closed, whereas only the upper teeth of an alligator are visible with the mouth shut.

54. Australia's City of Light : PERTH
Perth is the capital city of Western Australia. Perth earned itself the nickname of “City of Light” in 1962 as the virtually all the town’s lights were turned on at full power when astronaut John Glenn passed overhead in earth orbit in Friendship 7, so that he could see the city below. The city gave a repeat performance for Glenn in 1998 when he passed overhead in the Space Shuttle in 1998.

58. Queen killed by an asp, familiarly : CLEO
The asp is a venomous snake found in the Nile region of Africa. It is so venomous that the asp was used in ancient Egypt and Greece as a means of execution. Cleopatra observed such executions noting that the venom brought on sleepiness without any painful spasms. When the great queen opted to commit suicide, the asp was therefore her chosen method.

61. One of the Three Stooges : MOE
If you've seen a few of the films starring "The Three Stooges" you'll have noticed that the line up changed over the years. The original trio was made up of Moe and Shemp Howard (two brothers) and Larry Fine (a good friend of the Howards). This line up was usually known as "Moe, Larry and Shemp". Then Curly Howard replaced his brother when Shemp quit the act, creating the most famous trio, "Moe, Larry And Curly". Shemp returned when Curly had a debilitating stroke in 1946, and Shemp stayed with the troupe until he died in 1955. Shemp was replaced by Joe Besser, and then "Curly-Joe" DeRita. When Larry Fine had a stroke in 1970, it effectively marked the end of the act.

62. Lithium-___ battery : ION
Lithium-ion and nickel-cadmium are types of rechargeable batteries.

63. Energy Star org. : EPA
The Energy Star standard was created by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) during the Clinton Administration. In general, an item marked with an Energy Star uses 20-30% less energy than that mandated by federal standards. We just put an Energy Star roof on our house, and I am looking forward to seeing if the home stays cooler this summer.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Apple computers : IMACS
6. Game with a stack of blocks : JENGA
11. Nevada/Arizona's Hoover ___ : DAM
14. Gold ___ flour : MEDAL
15. Sometimes-bad bacteria : E COLI
16. Political period : ERA
17. Famous geyser in 39-Across : OLD FAITHFUL
19. Good job for an animal-loving ex-G.I.? : VET
20. Gentle discipline for a misbehaving child : TIME OUT
21. Hue : TINT
22. Style of music north of the Rio Grande : TEJANO
25. Cosmic clouds : NEBULAE
27. ___ the Terrible : IVAN
28. Preparer of fast food that's "finger-lickin' good" : KFC
31. Catches red-handed : NABS
32. Clic Stic pen maker : BIC
33. Dish of greens : SALAD
35. Inhibit : DETER
38. "Gross!" : ICK!
39. Squarest of the 50 states : WYOMING
41. Lab eggs : OVA
42. Where the buoys are? : AT SEA
44. British coins : PENCE
45. Rainy : WET
46. Crew implements : OARS
48. Luau necklace : LEI
49. Money due in Monopoly : RENT
50. Exemplar of masculinity : MAN'S MAN
53. Like Mustangs and Camaros : SPORTY
55. Sore, as 56-Across : ACHY
56. Parts of the body that may be ripped : MUSCLES
59. Greek "r" : RHO
60. Historic trading post in 39-Across : FORT LARAMIE
64. Note after fa : SOL
65. Topic to debate : ISSUE
66. Boy Scouts squad : TROOP
67. Soil-turning tool : HOE
68. 1990s fitness fad with infomercials : TAE BO
69. Evil animal in "The Lion King" : HYENA

Down
1. Texter's "I think ..." : IMO
2. Brooks of "Spaceballs" : MEL
3. ___ Friend (Facebook option) : ADD
4. Mideast robe : CAFTAN
5. Killed : SLAIN
6. Ballet leap : JETE
7. Canyon phenomenon : ECHO
8. Completely joyless : NO FUN
9. Protein in bread : GLUTEN
10. Not feel well : AIL
11. Noted rock formation in 39-Across : DEVILS TOWER
12. Gladiators' locale : ARENA
13. Nonglossy finish : MATTE
18. "Don't worry, nothing's broken" : I'M OKAY
21. Inner ___ (flotation device) : TUBE
22. Lower leg bone : TIBIA
23. Kick out : EVICT
24. Skiing mecca in 39-Across : JACKSON HOLE
26. Boy Scouts award : BADGE
29. Edsel or New Coke, notably : FLOP
30. Animal with a hump : CAMEL
33. Group of gnats : SWARM
34. Have a fancy meal : DINE
36. Wedding or concert : EVENT
37. In very bad condition : RATTY
40. CBS spinoff set in SoCal : NCIS: LA
43. Eggs over ___ : EASY
47. Stuffed Indian pastry : SAMOSA
49. Set of religious beads : ROSARY
50. Crocodile's home : MARSH
51. Allergy season sound : ACHOO!
52. One administering shots, maybe : NURSE
54. Australia's City of Light : PERTH
57. What's left of a ticket after it's used : STUB
58. Queen killed by an asp, familiarly : CLEO
60. Go on snugly : FIT
61. One of the Three Stooges : MOE
62. Lithium-___ battery : ION
63. Energy Star org. : EPA


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0828-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Aug 16, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Paolo Pasco
THEME: The First Shall Be Last
Each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase, but with the first letter of one word moved to the end:
22A. Reason to scream "Why won't this damn thing locate airplanes!"? : RADAR ANGER (from “radar range”)
23A. Honorary title in Wisconsin? : DAME CHEESE (from “Edam cheese”)
42A. "Hey, let's gather 100 people to enact laws and ratify treaties"? : SENATE IDEA (from “Senate Aide”)
50A. Listen to violinist Itzhak's music? : HEAR PERLMAN (from “Rhea Perlman”)
65A. Soft drink favored by the Marines? : SPRITE DE CORPS (from “esprit de corps”)
79A. Church response that's taken as a given? : ASSUMED AMEN (from “assumed name”)
87A. Newspaper essay on why not to go outdoors? : INSIDE OP-ED (from “inside dope”)
108A. Woody playing a medieval baron? : THANE ALLEN (from “Ethan Allen”)
110A. Books written entirely in chat rooms? : IMED NOVELS (from “dime novels”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 25m 50s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

15. Taiping Rebellion general : TSO
The Taiping Rebellion was a civil war in China that lasted from 1850 to 1864. On one side was the Qing dynasty, and on the other was a Christian movement known as the Heavenly Kingdom of Peace. Somewhere between 20 and 70 million died in the conflict, making it the bloodiest civil war in the history of the world.

22. Reason to scream "Why won't this damn thing locate airplanes!"? : RADAR ANGER (from “radar range”)
Scientists have been using radio waves to detect the presence of objects since the late 1800s, but it was the demands of WWII that accelerated the practical application of the technology. The British called their system RDF standing for Range and Direction Finding. The system used by the US Navy was called Radio Detection And Ranging, which was shortened to the acronym RADAR.

23. Honorary title in Wisconsin? : DAME CHEESE (from “Edam cheese”)
The state of Wisconsin is a leading producer of dairy products, and is particularly known for its cheese. The state’s licence plates have borne the motto “America’s Dairyland” since 1940.

Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

25. ___ Aduba of "Orange Is the New Black" : UZO
Uzo Aduba is an actress best known for playing prison inmate Suzanne “Crazy Eyes” Warren on the Netflix TV show “Orange Is the New Black”.

“Orange Is the New Black" is a very entertaining comedy-drama series made by Netflix about an upper middle-class woman who goes to jail for a drug-related offense committed ten years earlier, in her youth. The series is based on a memoir by Piper Kerman called “Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison”.

26. Insect that shorted out an early computer, spawning the term "computer bug" : MOTH
Back in 1947, the famed computer programmer Grace Hopper noticed some colleagues fixing a piece of equipment by removing a dead moth from a relay. She remarked that they were “debugging” the system, and so Hopper has been given credit for popularizing the term.

27. "Ciao" : BYE BYE
Ciao is the Italian for "'bye". "Arrivederci" is more formal, and translates as "goodbye".

30. Hamiltons : TENS
The US ten-dollar bill features the image of Alexander Hamilton, the first US Secretary of the Treasury, on the obverse. As such, ten-dollar bills are sometimes called “Hamiltons”. By the way, the $10 bill is the only US currency in circulation in which the portrait faces to the left. The reverse of the ten-dollar bill features the US Treasury Building.

32. Domain of "Hamilton" : THEATER
“Hamilton” is a 2015 musical based on the life or US Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, as described in the 2004 biography by Ron Chernow. The representations of the main characters is decidedly ground-breaking. The show is rooted in hip-hop and the main roles such as Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson and George Washington are all played by African-American and Hispanic actors.

34. City with 500 attractions? : DAYTONA
The coastal city of Daytona Beach in Florida is known for hard-packed sand on the beach. This makes a good surface for driving motorized vehicles, and resulted in Daytona Beach becoming a center for motorsports. The Daytona 500 is the event with the largest purse on the NASCAR calendar.

38. Bay ___ : AREA
The San Francisco Bay comprises the nine counties that impinge on the San Francisco Bay itself: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano and Sonoma. The region also includes the major cities of San Jose, San Francisco and Oakland.

39. Section of "Aida," e.g. : SCENA
A scene in an opera is usually called a “scena”, the Italian term for “scene”.

“Aida” is the famous opera by Giuseppe Verdi, actually based on a scenario written by French Egyptologist Auguste Mariette. Mariette also designed the costumes and stages for the opening performance. The opera was first staged in 1871 in an opera house in Cairo. In the storyline, Aida is an Ethiopian princess brought into Egypt as a slave. Radames is an Egyptian commander who falls in love with her, and then of course complications arise!

41. Letters after CD : ROM
CD-ROM stands for “compact disc read only memory”. The name indicates that you can read information from the disc (like a standard music CD for example), but you cannot write to it. You can also buy a CD-RW, which stands for “compact disc – rewritable”, with which you can read data and also write over it multiple times using a suitable CD drive.

49. Super ___ : NES
The acronym Super NES (or SNES) stands for Super Nintendo Entertainment System. Our kids probably have one somewhere …

50. Listen to violinist Itzhak's music? : HEAR PERLMAN (from “Rhea Perlman”)
Itzhak Perlman is an Israeli-American violinist from Tel Aviv, and a virtuosi who I had the pleasure of hearing perform not too long ago. Little known fact: Perlman is a distant cousin of comedian Howie Mandel.

Rhea Perlman's most famous role has to be "Carla Tortelli", the irascible waitress in the long-running sitcom "Cheers". Perlman is also a successful children's author, and has published a series of six books called "Otto Undercover". She is married to Hollywood actor Danny DeVito, and has been so since 1982.

52. Like blue moons : RARE
As there is a full moon once every four weeks, approximately monthly, there are usually twelve full moons in any given year. However, every 2-3 years, depending on the phase of the moon at the beginning of the calendar year, there may be a thirteenth full moon. The “extra” full moon is called a “blue moon”, although no one seems to really know why the term “blue” is used, as far as I can tell. Which of the thirteen full moons that is designated as the blue moon varies depending on tradition. My favorite definition is from the Farmer’s Almanac. It states that as each of the seasons normally has three full moons (twelve divided by the four seasons), then the season with four full moons is designated as “special”, then the THIRD (and not the fourth) full moon in that “special” season is the blue moon. Complicated, huh?

53. Norm: Abbr. : STD
Standard (std.)

54. California missionary Junípero ___ : SERRA
Junípero Serra was a Spanish missionary, a founder of several missions out here in California. Among those associated with Serra is the Mission in Carmel, where Serra's remains are buried, and Mission San Juan Capistrano, the chapel of which is believed to be the oldest standing building in the state.

55. "Ready to relieve 'em of a ___ or two" ("Les Misérables" lyric) : SOU
A sou is an old French coin. We use the term “sou” to mean “an almost worthless amount”.

The 1980 musical “Les Misérables” is an adaptation of the 1862 novel of the same name by Victor Hugo. The show opened in London in 1985, and is the longest running musical in the history of London’s West End. My wife and I saw “Les Miz” in the Queen’s Theatre in London quite a few years ago, but were only able to get tickets in the very back row. The theater seating is very steep, so the back row of the balcony is extremely high over the stage. One of the big events in the storyline is the building of a street barricade over which the rebels fight. At the height we were seated we could see the stagehands behind the barricade, sitting drinking Coke, even smoking cigarettes. On cue, the stagehands would get up and catch a dropped rifle, or an actor who had been shot. It was pretty comical. I didn’t really enjoy the show that much, to be honest. Some great songs, but the musical version of the storyline just didn’t seem to hang together for me.

58. Group that appeared in the movie "Grease" : SHA NA NA
Do you remember the band "Johnny Casino & The Gamblers" in the movie "Grease"? That was actually the real-world group named Sha Na Na. Johnny Casino & the Gamblers sang "Those Magic Changes" at the high school dance, in between "Rock'N Roll Is Here to Stay" and "Hound Dog". Sha Na Na got together in the sixties and are still performing today.

60. Oscars grp. : AMPAS
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is the organization that gives the annual Academy Awards also known as the "Oscars". The root of the name "Oscar" is hotly debated, but what is agreed is that the award was officially named "Oscar" in 1939. The first Academy Awards were presented at a brunch in 1929 with an audience of just 29 people. The Awards ceremony is a slightly bigger event these days …

64. Out of gas, informally : ON E
On empty (on “E”)

65. Soft drink favored by the Marines? : SPRITE DE CORPS (from “esprit de corps”)
“Esprit de corps” is the morale of a group, best translated from French perhaps as “team spirit”.

68. Stephen of "Interview With the Vampire" : REA
Stephen Rea is an Irish actor from Belfast. Rea’s most successful role was Fergus in 1992’s “The Crying Game”, for which performance he was nominated for the Best Actor Oscar. In “The Crying Game”, Fergus was a member of the IRA. In real life, Rea was married to IRA bomber and hunger striker Dolours Price at the time he made the movie.

69. Sticky spots? : NESTS
Bird’s nests are often made of sticks, they might be described as “sticky”.

72. Blazing successes : METEORS
A meteoroid is a small rocky or metallic body travelling through space. Once in the atmosphere, the meteoroid is referred to as a “meteor” or “shooting star”. Almost all meteoroids burn up, but if one is large enough to survive and reach the ground then we call it a meteorite. The word “meteor” comes from the Greek “meteōros” meaning “high in the air”.

76. Indian wear : SARIS
The item of clothing called a "sari" (also "saree") is a strip of cloth, as one might imagine, unusual perhaps in that is unstitched along the whole of its length. The strip of cloth can range from four to nine meters long (that's a lot of material!). The sari is usually wrapped around the waist, then draped over the shoulder leaving the midriff bare. I must say, it can be a beautiful item of clothing.

77. Super ___ : PAC
A Political Action Committee (PAC) is a private group that works to influence the outcome of a particular election or group of elections. Any group becomes a PAC by law when it receives or spends more than $1,000 for the purpose of influencing the outcome of an election. In 2010 the Supreme Court ruled that PACS that did not make direct contributions to candidates or parties could accept unlimited contributions. These “independent-expenditure only committees” are commonly referred to as “super PACs”.

78. Setting for the beginning of "The Book of Mormon" : UTAH
“The Book of Mormon” is a satirical musical by Trey Parker and Robert Lopez (of “South Park” fame) and Matt Stone (of “Avenue Q” and “Frozen” fame). The show follows two missionaries from the Mormon Church seeking converts in a remote village in Uganda.

79. Church response that's taken as a given? : ASSUMED AMEN (from “assumed name”)
The word “amen” is translated as “so be it”. “Amen” is said to be of Hebrew origin, but it is likely to be also influenced by Aramaic and Arabic.

83. Lead-in to Pablo or Carlos : SAN ...
“San Pablo” is Spanish for “Saint Peter”, and “San Carlos” translates as “Saint Charles”.

84. Like Navy SEALs : ELITE
SEAL is an acronym used by the US Navy’s SEa, Air and Land teams. The SEALs were born out of the Navy’s special warfare groups from WWII, like the Underwater Demolition Teams and the Motor Torpedo Boat Squadrons. The Navy SEAL unit was established soon after President Kennedy’s famous speech in which he announced the plan to put a man on the moon, as in the same speech the president allocated $100m of funding to strengthen special operations forces. The Navy used some of this money to set up guerrilla and counterguerrilla units, which soon became the SEALs.

85. "Old MacDonald Had a Farm" sounds : BAAS
There was an American version of the English children's song "Old MacDonald Had a Farm" (E-I-E-I-O), that was around in the days of WWI. The first line of the US version goes "Old MacDougal had a farm, in Ohio-i-o".

86. "Got it" : ROGER
The term “roger”, meaning “yes” or “acknowledged”, comes from the world of radiotelephony. The British military used a phonetic alphabet in the fifties that included "Roger" to represent the letter “R”. As such, it became customary to say “Roger” when acknowledging a message, with R (Roger) standing for “received”.

87. Newspaper essay on why not to go outdoors? : INSIDE OP-ED (from “inside dope”)
“Op-Ed” is an abbreviation for "opposite the editorial page". Op-Eds started in "The New York Evening World" in 1921 when the page opposite the editorials was used for articles written by a named guest writer, someone independent of the editorial board.

Our use of the word “dope” to mean “inside information” probably comes from horse racing. The idea is that a better might have information about which horse has been drugged (doped) to influence its performance.

89. Skit show, for short : SNL
“Saturday Night Live” (SNL)

90. E-cigarette output : VAPOR
An electronic cigarette (also called an “e-cigarette”) is a battery-powered device that resembles a real cigarette. The e-cigarette vaporizes a solution that contains nicotine, forming a vapor that resembles smoke. The vapor is inhaled, delivering the nicotine into the body. The assumption is that an e-cigarette is healthier than a regular cigarette as the inhaled vapor is less harmful than inhaled smoke. But, that may not be so …

93. Top of the agenda : ITEM ONE
“Agenda” is a Latin word that translates as “things to be done”, coming from the verb “agere” meaning “to do”.

101. Tennis's King of Clay : NADAL
Rafael “Rafa” Nadal is a Spanish tennis player, noted for his expertise on clay courts, earning him the nickname “The King of Clay”.

108. Woody playing a medieval baron? : THANE ALLEN (from “Ethan Allen”)
Thanes were Scottish aristocrats. The most famous thanes have to be the Shakespearean characters Macbeth (the Thane of Glamis, later Thane of Cawdor) and MacDuff (the Thane of Fife). Other thanes in "Macbeth" are Ross, Lennox and Angus, as well as Menteith and Caithness.

Allan Stewart Konigsberg changed his legal name to Heywood Allen when he was 17 years old, and soon after started to call himself Woody Allen, the name with which he achieved celebrity. Allen has been nominated for an Academy Award an incredible 21 times in many different categories, and has won on four occasions. He has more Oscar nominations as a screenwriter than any other writer, but he spurns the Awards ceremony and only attended it once in all his years in the movie business. He broke tradition by turning up at the 2002 ceremony, unannounced, to beg producers to continue filming in his beloved New York City despite the fears created by the 9/11 attacks.

Ethan Allen was one of the founders of the state of Vermont. Allen was also a hero in the American Revolutionary War, famous for leading (along with Benedict Arnold) the small band of men known as the Green Mountain Boys that captured Fort Ticonderoga. And yes, the Ethan Allen store and furniture line is named for Ethan Allen the patriot, even though he had nothing to do with the furniture business.

110. Books written entirely in chat rooms? : IMED NOVELS (from “dime novels”)
Even though instant messaging (sending IMs) has been around since the 1960s, it was AOL who popularized the term “instant message” in the eighties and nineties.

The genre of literature called “dime novels” originated with books from the 1860s called the “Beadle’s Dime Novel” series. Some of those books cost a dime, but many went for 15 cents.

113. Robert of "Airplane!" : HAYS
The 1980 movie “Airplane!” has to be one of the zaniest comedies ever made. The lead roles were Ted Striker (played by Robert Hays) and Elaine Dickinson (played by Julie Hagerty). But it was Leslie Nielsen who stole the show, playing Dr. Barry Rumack. That’s my own humble opinion of course …

114. Singer LaBelle : PATTI
Patti LaBelle is the stage name of singer Patricia Holt-Edwards from Philadelphia. She started her career in the sixties as the lead singer of the vocal group Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles, later changing its name to simply “LaBelle”. When the group disbanded in 1976, Patti launched a remarkably successful solo career.

115. TLC and Destiny's Child : GIRL GROUPS
The girl band called TLC is from Atlanta, Georgia. The band’s name comes from the trio’s original members:
Tionne “T-Boz” Watkins
Lisa “Left Eye” Lopes
Rozonda “Chilli” Thomas

Destiny’s Child was an R&B group active from 1960 to 2006. The trio’s lineup changed over the years, and probably the most famous former member of the group is Beyoncé Knowles.

116. Most "Doctor Who" characters, for short : ETS
Extraterrestrial (ET)

The iconic science-fiction television show “Doctor Who” first aired in 1963, and relaunched in 2005 by the BBC. The relaunched series is produced in-house by the BBC in Cardiff in Wales, the location that is the setting of the successful "Doctor Who" spin-off called “Torchwood”. The new show is about the Cardiff branch of the Torchwood Institute which investigates incidents involving extraterrestrials.

118. ___ cone : NOSE
The forwardmost section of a rocket, missile or aircraft is called the “nose cone”.

119. On edge : ANTSY
The word “antsy” embodies the concept of “having ants in one’s pants”, meaning being nervous and fidgety. However, “antsy” has been used in English since the 1830s, whereas “ants in the pants” originated a century later.

Down
2. Crosswords in 1924-25, e.g. : CRAZE
Arthur Wynne is generally credited with the invention of what we now known as a crossword puzzle. Wynne was born in Liverpool, England and emigrated to the US when he was 19-years-old. He worked as a journalist and was living in Cedar Grove, New Jersey in 1913 when he introduced a “Word-Cross Puzzle” in his page of puzzles written for the “New York World”. The first book of crossword puzzles was published by Shuster & Shuster, in 1924. The collection of puzzles was a huge hit, and crosswords were elevated to the level of “a craze” in 1924 and 1925.

3. Home inspector's concern : RADON
Radon is a radioactive gas, a byproduct produced when uranium decays naturally in the earth. Radon gas can collect and accumulate in buildings and rooms that are particularly well insulated with very little air exchange. The danger is very real, as radon is listed as the second most frequent cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoke.

4. "Selma" director DuVernay : AVA
Ava DuVernay is a filmmaker who became the first African American woman to win the Best Director Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, a feat she achieved in 2012 for her feature film “Middle of Nowhere”. “Middle of Nowhere” tells the story of a woman who drops out of medical school to focus on husband when he is sentenced to 8 years in prison. DuVernay also directed the 2014 film “Selma”, which was centered on the 1965 voting rights marches from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama.

5. Locks in place for a while? : PERM
“Perm” is the name given to a permanent wave, a chemical or thermal treatment of hair to produce waves or curls. I don't worry about such things, as it's a number-one all over for me …

6. What the "1" of "1/2" represents : MONTH
If "1/2" is a date, then the "1" represents the month of January, and the "2" the 2nd day.

10. Bill of "Trainwreck" : HADER
Bill Hader is an actor and comedian best known as a member of the cast of “Saturday Night Live”. Hader was introduced to Lorne Michaels (producer of “Saturday Night Live”) by Megan Mullally, co-star of the sitcom “Will & Grace”.

“Trainwreck” is a romantic comedy released in 2015 that brings together the talents of Judd Apatow as director and Amy Schumer as writer. Schumer also stars.

11. Aladdin, e.g. : ARAB
“Aladdin” is a famous tale in the “Arabian Nights”, also called “The Book of One Thousand and One Nights”. However, there is no evidence at all that the story was in the original collection. It is generally believed that one Antoine Galland introduced the tale when he translated the “Arabian Nights” into French in the early 1700s.

12. "Ratatouille" rat : REMY
“Ratatouille” is a 2007 animated film produced by Pixar. The hero of the piece is Remy, a rat whose ambition is to become a chef. Remy was voiced by stand-up comedian Patton Oswalt. The veteran actor Peter O’Toole voiced the character Anton Ego, a restaurant critic.

15. Los Angeles Lakers' home until 1999 : THE FORUM
The Forum in Inglewood, California is an indoor arena that opened for business in 1967. It was famously host to the LA Lakers of the NBA and the LA Kings of the NHL, from 1967 to 1999.

The Los Angeles Lakers basketball team started out in 1947 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The team chose the Lakers name in honor of the nickname of Minnesota, “Land of 10,000 Lakes”. The Lakers moved to Los Angeles in 1960.

16. Assent to a married mujer : SI, SENORA
The equivalent of “Mrs.” in French is “Mme.” (Madame), in Spanish is “Sra.” (Señora) and in Portuguese is also “Sra.” (Senhora).

“Mujer” is a Spanish word meaning “woman”.

17. 89-Across character played by Adam Sandler : OPERA MAN
Adam Sandler’s big break came with “Saturday Night Live” (SNL). He then went on to make several successful movies and now Sandler has his own movie and television production company. Personally, I am not a fan …

19. "Tao Te Ching" philosopher : LAO TSE
Lao Tse (also Lao-Tzu) was a central figure in the development of the religion/philosophy of Taoism. Tradition holds that Lao-Tzu wrote the “Tao Te Ching”, a classical Chinese text that is fundamental to the philosophy of Taoism.

33. Mythical father of Harmonia, strangely enough : ARES
The Greek god Ares is often referred to as the Olympian god of warfare, but originally he was regarded as the god of bloodlust and slaughter. Ares united with Aphrodite to create several gods, including Phobos (Fear), Deimos (Terror) and Eros (Desire). The Roman equivalent to Ares was Mars.

Harmonia was the Greek goddess of harmony and concord. According to some Greek lore, she was the daughter of Ares and Aphrodite. She is noted for the story of “the Necklace of Harmonia”. She received the necklace as a gift at her wedding, and it brought bad luck to her and all who wore it.

35. Southern chain : ANDES
The Andes range is the longest continuous chain of mountains in the world, running right down the length of the west coast of South America for about 4,300 miles. The highest peak in the Andes is Mt. Aconcagua, at an elevation of 22,841 feet. Interestingly, the peak of Mt. Chimborazo in Ecuador is the furthest point on the Earth's surface from the center of the planet. That's because of the equatorial "bulge" around the Earth's "waist".

39. America's Cup, e.g. : SEA RACE
The America’s Cup is a trophy that has been awarded for yacht racing since 1851. It was first presented to the winner of a race around the Isle of Wight in England that was won by a schooner called “America”. The trophy was eventually renamed to “the America’s Cup” in honor of that first race winner.

40. Rostand protagonist ___ de Bergerac : CYRANO
Edmond Rostand wrote the famous play “Cyrano de Bergerac” in 1897. There have been a couple of interesting film adaptations, namely “Roxanne” starring Steve Martin, and an Oscar-winning “Cyrano de Bergerac” (in French) starring Gérard Depardieu.

43. Bush labor secretary Chao : ELAINE
When President George W. Bush appointed Elaine Chao as Secretary of Labor, he made a bit of history as Chao then became the first Chinese American in history to hold a cabinet post. It turned out that Chao became the only cabinet member to hold her post for President Bush’s full eight years in office. In 1993, Chao married Mitch McConnell, the Republican Leader of the US Senate.

47. Name on many a college hall, informally : ALUM
An "alumnus" (plural ... alumni) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is "alumna" (plural ... alumnae). The term comes into English from Latin, in which alumnus means foster-son or pupil. “Alum” is an informal term used for either an alumna or an alumnus.

50. One easily bowled over? : HEADPIN
Bowling has been around for an awfully long time. The oldest known reference to the game is in Egypt, where pins and balls were found in an ancient tomb that is over 5,000 years old. The first form of the game to come to America was nine-pin bowling, which had been very popular in Europe for centuries. In 1841 in Connecticut, nine-pin bowling was banned due to its association with gambling. Supposedly, an additional pin was added to get around the ban, and ten-pin bowling was born.

53. Racer's brand : STP
STP is a brand name for automotive lubricants and additives. The name STP comes from “Scientifically Treated Petroleum”.

57. Noted tea locale : ASSAM
Assam is a state in the very northeast of India, just south of the Himalayas. Assam is noted for its tea as well as its silk.

58. The Titanic, e.g. : STEAMER
The RMS Titanic set off on her tragic maiden voyage in 1912, sailing from Southampton, England bound for New York City. Regulations only required that the ship have lifeboat capacity for 1,178 people, even though a full complement of passengers and crew was 3,547. When the order was given to abandon ship, the captain adhered to the traditional protocol of "women and children first". As a result, only 20% of male passengers survived the disaster, compared to 75% of the female passengers. Perhaps more telling is that 61% of those in first class survived, and only 25% of those in third class. The crew fared even worse though, with only 24% making it.

59. Gucci competitor : ARMANI
Giorgio Armani is an Italian fashion designer and founder of the company that has borne his name since 1975. Although Armani is famous for his menswear, the company makes everything from jewelry to perfume.

Gucci was founded in Rome in 1921, by Guccio Gucci. Guccio's son Aldo took over the company after his father's death in 1953. It was Aldo who established the international presence for the brand and opened the company's first overseas store, in New York City.

67. Push-up muscle, informally : PEC
“Pecs” is the familiar term for the chest muscle, more correctly known as the pectoralis major muscle. “Pectus” is a the Latin word for “breast, chest”.

73. Passing remarks? : EULOGY
A eulogy is a speech or piece of writing that praises someone who has recently passed away or who is retiring. “Eulogy” comes from the Greek word “eulogia” meaning “praise”.

77. Nisan observances : PASSOVERS
Nisan is the first month in the Hebrew ecclesiastical calendar, the month in which Passover falls. Adar is the last month in the same calendar.

79. Green spirit : ABSINTHE
Absinthe is an alcoholic spirit that is distilled from various plants and herbs, including “wormwood”. Absinthe was banned in the US in 1915 as it was deemed to be an addictive psychoactive drug. However, the accepted opinion today seems to be that absinthe is no more addictive or dangerous than any other spirit.

83. Snoot : SNOB
Back in the 1780s, a “snob” was a shoemaker or a shoemaker’s apprentice. By the end of the 18th century the word was being used by students at Cambridge University in England to refer to all local merchants and people of the town. The term evolved to mean one who copies those who are his or her social superior (and not in a good way). From there it wasn't a big leap for “snob” to include anyone who emphasized their superior social standing and not just those who aspired to rank. Nowadays a snob is anyone who looks down on those considered to be of inferior standing.

Snoot is a variant of "snout" and is a word that originated in Scotland. The idea is that someone who is “snooty”, or snouty, tends to look down his or her nose at the rest of the world.

90. Cousin of a lemming : VOLE
Vole populations can really increase rapidly. Mama vole is pregnant for just three weeks before giving birth to litters of 5-10 baby voles. Then the young voles become sexually mature in just one month! If you have one pregnant vole in your yard, within a year you could have over a hundred of the little critters.

Lemmings are small rodents that live in cold climates, usually in or around the Arctic. There is a misconception that lemmings are prone to commit mass suicide. What is true is that like many animal species, lemmings are prone to mass migration, especially when the population in one area gets too great. Lemmings can swim, and will jump into a body of water in order to cross it. However, some lemmings may drown in the attempt. So, the lemmings jump en masse into a body of water to cross it, not to commit suicide. Then there was the famous Disney “White Wilderness” incident. Disney shot footage of lemmings “committing mass suicide” for the 1958 film “White Wilderness”. In fact, the lemmings in the morbid scene were flown to the location of the shoot, and were launched off a cliff using a turntable. Despicable …

91. Sch. whose honor code includes chastity : BYU
Brigham Young University (BYU) in Provo, Utah has about 34.000 students on campus making it the largest religious university in the country. The school was founded in 1875 by Brigham Young, then President of the Mormon Church.

95. Start of a few choice words? : EENIE
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe,
Catch the tiger/monkey/baby by the toe.
If it hollers/screams let him go,
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe, you are it!

98. Native of Alaska : ALEUT
The Aleuts live on the Aleutian Islands of the North Pacific, and on the Commander Islands at the western end of the same island chain. The Aleutian Islands are part of the United States, and the Commander Islands are in Russia.

103. Adele, voicewise : ALTO
Adele is the stage name of English singer Adele Adkins. Adele’s debut album is “19”, named after the age she was during the album’s production. Her second album was even more successful than the first. Called “21”, the second album was released three years after the first, when Adele was three years older. More recently, her third studio album “25”, released in 2015, broke the first-week sales records in both the UK and the US.

104. Spot checkers? : VETS
“Vet” is an abbreviation for “veterinarian”, a professional who treat animals for disease and injury. The word “veterinary” comes from the Latin “veterinae” meaning “working animals, beasts of burden”.

106. One of Asta's masters : NORA
Asta is the wonderful little dog in the superb "The Thin Man" series of films starring William Powell and Myrna Loy (as Nick and Nora Charles). In the original story by Dashiell Hammett, Asta was a female Schnauzer, but on screen Asta was played by a wire-haired fox terrier called "Skippy". Skippy was also the dog in "Bringing up Baby" with Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn, the one who kept stealing the dinosaur bone. Skippy retired in 1939, so Asta was played by other dogs in the remainder of "The Thin Man" films.

109. College-level H.S. courses : APS
The Advanced Placement (AP) program, as many of us parents know, offers college-level courses to kids who are still in high school. After being tested at the end of the courses, successful students receive credits that count towards a college degree.

111. "Dios ___!" : MIO
“Dios mio!” translates from Spanish as “My God!”

112. The "V" of fashion's "DVF" : VON
Diane von Fürstenberg (DVF) is a fashion designer from Brussels, now based in the US. Born Diane Halfin, she was Princess Diane of Fürstenberg from 1969 until 1972 while married to Prince Egon of Fürstenberg.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Ditch : SCRAP
6. See-through clothing material : MESH
10. Listens to Shakespeare? : HARKS
15. Taiping Rebellion general : TSO
18. Tourist's report : TRAVELOGUE
20. Ring or sphere : ARENA
21. Mail : SHIP
22. Reason to scream "Why won't this damn thing locate airplanes!"? : RADAR ANGER (from “radar range”)
23. Honorary title in Wisconsin? : DAME CHEESE (from “Edam cheese”)
25. ___ Aduba of "Orange Is the New Black" : UZO
26. Insect that shorted out an early computer, spawning the term "computer bug" : MOTH
27. "Ciao" : BYE BYE
29. Surmise : INFER
30. Hamiltons : TENS
32. Domain of "Hamilton" : THEATER
34. City with 500 attractions? : DAYTONA
36. Takes in : HAS
38. Bay ___ : AREA
39. Section of "Aida," e.g. : SCENA
41. Letters after CD : ROM
42. "Hey, let's gather 100 people to enact laws and ratify treaties"? : SENATE IDEA (from “Senate Aide”)
46. Fired (up) : KEYED
47. Glow : AURA
48. Get by : ELUDE
49. Super ___ : NES
50. Listen to violinist Itzhak's music? : HEAR PERLMAN (from “Rhea Perlman”)
52. Like blue moons : RARE
53. Norm: Abbr. : STD
54. California missionary Junípero ___ : SERRA
55. "Ready to relieve 'em of a ___ or two" ("Les Misérables" lyric) : SOU
56. Stamp incorrectly, in a way : MISDATE
58. Group that appeared in the movie "Grease" : SHA NA NA
60. Oscars grp. : AMPAS
64. Out of gas, informally : ON E
65. Soft drink favored by the Marines? : SPRITE DE CORPS (from “esprit de corps”)
68. Stephen of "Interview With the Vampire" : REA
69. Sticky spots? : NESTS
71. Cathedral feature : STEEPLE
72. Blazing successes : METEORS
74. "Oh, you're funny-y-y-y ..." : HAR
76. Indian wear : SARIS
77. Super ___ : PAC
78. Setting for the beginning of "The Book of Mormon" : UTAH
79. Church response that's taken as a given? : ASSUMED AMEN (from “assumed name”)
83. Lead-in to Pablo or Carlos : SAN
84. Like Navy SEALs : ELITE
85. "Old MacDonald Had a Farm" sounds : BAAS
86. "Got it" : ROGER
87. Newspaper essay on why not to go outdoors? : INSIDE OP-ED (from “inside dope”)
89. Skit show, for short : SNL
90. E-cigarette output : VAPOR
91. Frat boy types : BROS
92. Assn. : ORG
93. Top of the agenda : ITEM ONE
95. Fastener with a ring-shaped head : EYEBOLT
97. Cries of approval : YAYS
101. Tennis's King of Clay : NADAL
102. Cry from comic book civilians : SAVE US!
105. Futile : VAIN
107. Meadow : LEA
108. Woody playing a medieval baron? : THANE ALLEN (from “Ethan Allen”)
110. Books written entirely in chat rooms? : IMED NOVELS (from “dime novels”)
113. Robert of "Airplane!" : HAYS
114. Singer LaBelle : PATTI
115. TLC and Destiny's Child : GIRL GROUPS
116. Most "Doctor Who" characters, for short : ETS
117. "What if ...," informally : S’POSE ...
118. ___ cone : NOSE
119. On edge : ANTSY

Down
1. Walk with pride : STRUT
2. Crosswords in 1924-25, e.g. : CRAZE
3. Home inspector's concern : RADON
4. "Selma" director DuVernay : AVA
5. Locks in place for a while? : PERM
6. What the "1" of "1/2" represents : MONTH
7. Intellectual : EGGHEADED
8. Litigate : SUE
9. Home remedy drink : HERB TEA
10. Bill of "Trainwreck" : HADER
11. Aladdin, e.g. : ARAB
12. "Ratatouille" rat : REMY
13. Embroiled (in) : KNEE-DEEP
14. Biological pouch : SAC
15. Los Angeles Lakers' home until 1999 : THE FORUM
16. Assent to a married mujer : SI, SENORA
17. 89-Across character played by Adam Sandler : OPERA MAN
19. "Tao Te Ching" philosopher : LAO TSE
21. Mailed : SENT
24. "Howdy" : HIYA
28. "___, verily" : YEA
31. Gray, say : SHADED
33. Mythical father of Harmonia, strangely enough : ARES
35. Southern chain : ANDES
37. Took in : ATE
39. America's Cup, e.g. : SEA RACE
40. Rostand protagonist ___ de Bergerac : CYRANO
42. Sunday delivery : SERMON
43. Bush labor secretary Chao : ELAINE
44. Sips : NURSES
45. Puts under : INTERS
46. Bits of truth : KERNELS
47. Name on many a college hall, informally : ALUM
50. One easily bowled over? : HEADPIN
51. Laugh-filled broadcast : ROAST
53. Racer's brand : STP
54. More see-through : SHEERER
57. Noted tea locale : ASSAM
58. The Titanic, e.g. : STEAMER
59. Gucci competitor : ARMANI
61. Bit of expert advice : PRO TIP
62. Fill with gas : AERATE
63. Like pageant contestants, typically : SASHED
66. "Full speed ahead!" : IT'S A GO!
67. Push-up muscle, informally : PEC
70. "That means ..." : THUS ...
73. Passing remarks? : EULOGY
75. Showed over : RERAN
77. Nisan observances : PASSOVERS
79. Green spirit : ABSINTHE
80. Something felt at Christmas : SANTA HAT
81. Post-Christmas events : SALE DAYS
82. Hit upside the head, in slang : DOPE SLAP
83. Snoot : SNOB
84. Eternally, to poets : E’ER
87. Words of concession : I RESIGN
88. Liable to spoil? : DOTING
90. Cousin of a lemming : VOLE
91. Sch. whose honor code includes chastity : BYU
94. Staffs : MANS
95. Start of a few choice words? : EENIE
96. Big dipper : LADLE
98. Native of Alaska : ALEUT
99. Goes "Ow, ow, ow!" : YELPS
100. Like the response "Talk to the hand!" : SASSY
103. Adele, voicewise : ALTO
104. Spot checkers? : VETS
106. One of Asta's masters : NORA
109. College-level H.S. courses : APS
111. "Dios ___!" : MIO
112. The "V" of fashion's "DVF" : VON


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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