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0930-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Sep 16, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: James Mulhern
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 18m 06s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2
ESOTERY (esoteri)
KENYON (Kenion)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

14. Where Forrest Gump played college football : ALABAMA
The epic 1994 movie “Forrest Gump” is based on a 1986 novel of the same name by Winston Groom. Groom said that he had envisioned John Goodman playing the title role, and not Tom Hanks.

16. "Funky Cold Medina" rapper : TONE LOC
Tone Lōc is the stage name of the rapper Anthony Smith.

18. Fig. on a quarterly report : YTD
Year-to-date (YTD)

19. Test pattern? : INKBLOT
The Rorschach test is a psychological test in which a subject is asked to interpret a series of inkblots. The test was created by Swiss Freudian psychoanalyst Hermann Rorschach in the 1920s.

21. Certain flight pattern : VEE
Apparently geese fly in a V-formation for a couple of reasons. One is that it makes for efficient flight and conserves energy. The leading bird gets no advantage, but every following bird gets to "slipstream" a little. It has been noted that the lead bird drops to the back of the formation when he/she gets fatigued. It's also thought that the flock can stick together more easily when in formation, so it is more difficult to lose someone along the way.

22. 1970s TV spinoff : RHODA
The seventies sitcom “Rhoda” was a spinoff of “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” that starred Valerie Harper. The eighth episode of the show was an hour-long special in which Rhoda married her fiance Joe (played by David Groh). At the time of airing it was the second-most watched television episode in history, second only to the 1953 birth of Little Ricky on “I Love Lucy”.

24. Some mouse cells : AAAS
The first computer mouse was invented at the Stanford Research Institute in 1963, by one Douglas Engelbart. Sadly for him, his patent ran out before mice became standard equipment on computers, so he never made any money from his amazing invention.

25. Broadway score? : SEAT
It can be quite a coup to “score” a seat at the hot show in town.

26. Weigh station sight : SEMI
A “semi” is a “semi-trailer truck”. The vehicle is so called because it consists of a tractor and a half-trailer. The half-trailer is so called because it only has wheels on the back end, with the front supported by the tractor.

27. Place to go when you're not going to the races, for short? : OTB
Off-Track Betting (OTB) is the legal gambling that takes place on horse races outside of a race track. A betting parlor can be referred to as an OTB.

28. Joneses (for) : HURTS
Back in the late 60s, “Jones” was a slang term for an intense desire or an addiction. This usage probably came from an earlier meaning for “Jones” as a synonym for “heroin”. The etymology of the heroin meaning is very unclear.

29. Creamy chilled soup : VICHYSSOISE
Vichyssoise is a thick puréed potato soup that can be served hot, but is usually served cold. As well as potatoes, a classic vichyssoise contains leeks, onions, cream and chicken stock. Although the origin is disputed, it seems that the vichyssoise was invented in America, albeit by a French chef. That chef named his soup after the town of Vichy in France.

35. N.B.A. M.V.P. who has hosted "Saturday Night Live" : LEBRON JAMES
Basketball player LeBron James (nicknamed “King James”) seems to be in demand for the covers of magazines. James became the first African American man to adorn the front cover of "Vogue" in March 2008. That made him only the third male to make the "Vogue" cover, following Richard Gere and George Clooney.

37. New Agey sounds : OMS
“Om” is a sacred mystic word from the Hindu tradition. “Om” is sometimes used as a mantra, a focus for the mind in meditation.

New-Age music is created to provide a relaxing and stress-free atmosphere. The New Age movement is often said to have begun with the release of an album called “Spectrum Suite” by Steven Halpern in 1975.

42. "Everyone's private driver" sloganeer : UBER
Uber is a ridesharing service that was founded in 2009 and is based in San Francisco. The service is somewhat controversial and has been described as an illegal taxicab operation. Central to Uber’s service is the company’s mobile app, which can use the client’s GPS location to help find the nearest available ride. Uber’s main competitor is Lyft. Personally, I love the service and have only had good experiences …

43. Kind of walk : PERP
When a crime suspect in the custody of the police is walked through a public place, often to and from a courthouse, it is known as a “perp walk”.

45. River of forgetfulness : LETHE
The Lethe is one of the five rivers of Hades in Greek mythology. All the souls who drank from the river Lethe experienced complete forgetfulness. The Greek word “lethe” means “oblivion, forgetfulness”.

47. "The Chalk Garden" playwright, 1955 : BAGNOLD
Enid Bagnold was a British author and is best known for her 1935 novel “National Velvet”, which was of course adapted into a very successful film starring Elizabeth Taylor.

50. 1983 hit song that mentions Santa Monica Boulevard : I LOVE LA
“I Love L.A.” is a song written and recorded by Randy Newman in 1983. The song is played at major sporting events in the city, after the home team scores or wins.

52. Arcane matters : ESOTERY
Something that is “arcane” is something that is understood by only a few, something that might be described as mysterious.

56. Playwright Eve : ENSLER
Eve Ensler is a playwright whose most famous work is “The Vagina Monologues”. When Ensler was only 23 years of age she adopted a 15 year old boy. We are familiar with that boy on the big screen these days: actor Dylan McDermott.

Down
1. Figures in ribald Greek plays : SATYRS
The satyrs of Greek mythology came with a very high sex drive. They are the "rude" male subjects drawn on the side of old Greek vases. The nubile maidens known as nymphs were often an object of attention for the satyrs.

4. Vigoda of "The Godfather" : ABE
Abe Vigoda played Detective Sergeant Phil Fish in television’s “Barney Miller” in the seventies, and even got his own spinoff show called “Fish”. On the big screen, Vigoda played Sal Tessio in “The Godfather” and Grandpa Ubriacco in “Look Who’s Talking”.

5. Shire of "The Godfather" : TALIA
The actress Talia Shire is best-known for playing Rocky’s wife Adrian in the “Rocky” series of movies. She also played Connie, the daughter of Don Corleone, in “The Godfather” films. Shire is the sister of movie director Francis Ford Coppola and the aunt of actor Nicolas Cage. Her son is the actor Jason Schwartzman.

7. Collaborative computer coding event : HACKATHON
A “hackathon” is an event in which software developers collaborate intensively on a project, usually for a day or a week. It is a “hack marathon”, with “hack” in this case being legal, explorative programming. Apparently, the first event described as a hackathon was held by ten American developers who met in Calgary to work on cryptographic software. Calgary was chosen so as to avoid US export regulations relating to software.

8. Plants sometimes used to make flour : TAROS
The corm of some taro plants is used to make poi, the traditional Hawaiian dish (that I think tastes horrible). When a taro plant is grown as an ornamental, it is often called Elephant Ears due to the shape of its large leaves.

9. Letter of the law? : WRIT
A writ is an order issued by some formal body (these days, usually a court) with the order being in written form. Warrants and subpoenas are examples of writs.

12. Creature that Dalí walked on a leash in public : ANTEATER
The artist Salvador Dalí liked to make a splash in public. He was known to walk an anteater on a lead around Paris. He also brought an anteater on stage to an interview on “The Dick Cavett Show” in 1970.

15. Weapon that's thrown : BOLA
Bolas are heavy balls connected by cords that constitute a throwing weapon. Bolas are often used to capture animals by tripping them as they run. The weapon is usually associated with gauchos, the South American cowboys, although there is evidence that the Inca army used them in battle.

20. Swedish-based maker of infant carriers : BABYBJORN
Babybjörn is a Swedish company known for manufacturing and selling baby products, and is especially known for its baby carriers. The company was named for its founder Björn Jakobson.

23. Seedy place to drink : DIVE BAR
We’ve been using the word “dive” in American English for a run-down bar since the latter half of the 19th century. The term comes from the fact that disreputable taverns were usually located in basements, so one had to literally and figuratively dive into them.

27. Quattuor doubled : OCTO
In Latin, twice “quattuor” (four) is “octo” (eight).

30. Reply that's a bit of a humblebrag : I TRY
The term “humblebrag”, meaning “self-deprecating boast”, was coined by Harris Wittels, a writer for the sitcom “Parks and Recreation”.

31. Contestants in a war of words? : SLAM POETS
A poetry slam is a competition in which poets read their own work (usually), with winners being chosen by members of audience. Apparently the first poetry slam took place in Chicago in 1984. Now there is a Nation Poetry Slam that takes place each year, with representatives from the US, Canada and France.

32. BJ's competitor, informally : SAM’S
Sam's Club is owned and operated by Walmart and is named after the company's founder, Sam Walton.

BJ’s Wholesale Club is a membership-only warehouse club that operates mainly on the East Coast of the US. When BJ’s was founded in 1984, the president of the company was Mervyn Welch. Welch chose the name BJ’s from the initials of his daughter Beverly Jean Welch.

33. Major blood protein : GLOBULIN
Globulins are globular proteins found in blood. Globular proteins are largely spherical in shape, globe-like.

40. What it always starts with? : SHORT I
The word “it” starts with a short letter I.

41. College where Rutherford B. Hayes was valedictorian : KENYON
Kenyon College is a private school in Gambier, Ohio that was founded in 1824. The college was established largely with funds from English peers Lord Kenyon and Lord Gambier. The list of Kenyon graduates includes President Rutherford B. Hayes, actor Paul Newman, comedian Jonathan Winters and actress Allison Janney.

45. Component of the combo drug Sinemet : L-DOPA
The name of the drug L-3,4-DihydrOxyPhenylAlanine can be shortened, thankfully, to L-DOPA. Swedish scientist Arvid Carlsson won a Nobel Prize for showing that L-DOPA could be used to reduce the symptoms of Parkinson’s Syndrome.

47. Actress Daniels or Neuwirth : BEBE
Bebe Daniels was a singer, dancer and a prolific actress. Starting in the silent movie era, Daniels made over 230 films.

Bebe Neuwirth is a wonderful actress and dancer, very famous for portraying Dr. Lilith Sternin, the wife of Dr. Frasier Crane on “Cheers” and “Frasier”. Neuwirth is a fabulous dancer, having studied ballet at Juilliard. In more recent years she has had starring roles on Broadway, and in 2010 played opposite Nathan Lane in “The Addams Family”. Neuwirth also plays a leading role on the show “Madame Secretary”.

48. Practice exam? : LSAT
The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) has been around since 1948.

51. ___ d'Isère (French ski resort) : VAL
Val d'Isère is a noted ski resort in south-eastern France, lying just 3 miles from the Italian border. If you’ve ever watched the British sitcom “Absolutely Fabulous”, Edina and Patsy used to holiday in Val d'Isère whenever they got they chance.

53. Spam's place : TIN
Spam is a precooked meat product that is sold in cans. It was introduced by Hormel Foods in 1937. The main meat ingredients are pork shoulder meat and ham. The name “Spam” was chosen as the result of a competition at Hormel, with the winner earning himself a hundred dollars. According to the company, the derivation of the name “Spam” is a secret known by only a few former executives, but the speculation is that it stands for “spiced ham” or “shoulders of pork and ham”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Golf handicap of zero : SCRATCH
8. Like some garages : TWO-CAR
14. Where Forrest Gump played college football : ALABAMA
15. Everything included : BAR NONE
16. "Funky Cold Medina" rapper : TONE LOC
17. Gives a walk-through, say : ORIENTS
18. Fig. on a quarterly report : YTD
19. Test pattern? : INKBLOT
21. Certain flight pattern : VEE
22. 1970s TV spinoff : RHODA
24. Some mouse cells : AAAS
25. Broadway score? : SEAT
26. Weigh station sight : SEMI
27. Place to go when you're not going to the races, for short? : OTB
28. Joneses (for) : HURTS
29. Creamy chilled soup : VICHYSSOISE
33. Source of break-dancing beats : GHETTO BLASTER
35. N.B.A. M.V.P. who has hosted "Saturday Night Live" : LEBRON JAMES
36. Inroad : FORAY
37. New Agey sounds : OMS
38. Facial option at a spa : MASK
42. "Everyone's private driver" sloganeer : UBER
43. Kind of walk : PERP
45. River of forgetfulness : LETHE
46. Jerk : TUG
47. "The Chalk Garden" playwright, 1955 : BAGNOLD
49. Shipload : TON
50. 1983 hit song that mentions Santa Monica Boulevard : I LOVE LA
52. Arcane matters : ESOTERY
54. Lazy bum : LIE-ABED
55. Access : TAP INTO
56. Playwright Eve : ENSLER
57. Pinch-hitter : STAND-IN

Down
1. Figures in ribald Greek plays : SATYRS
2. Make a decent person out of? : CLOTHE
3. Stochastic : RANDOM
4. Vigoda of "The Godfather" : ABE
5. Shire of "The Godfather" : TALIA
6. "Get outta here!" : C’MON!
7. Collaborative computer coding event : HACKATHON
8. Plants sometimes used to make flour : TAROS
9. Letter of the law? : WRIT
10. Not you specifically : ONE
11. Exchange words : CONVERSE
12. Creature that Dalí walked on a leash in public : ANTEATER
13. Puts back in the original state : RESETS
15. Weapon that's thrown : BOLA
20. Swedish-based maker of infant carriers : BABYBJORN
23. Seedy place to drink : DIVE BAR
25. "I'm down with that" : SUITS ME
27. Quattuor doubled : OCTO
28. Rip off : HOSE
30. Reply that's a bit of a humblebrag : I TRY
31. Contestants in a war of words? : SLAM POETS
32. BJ's competitor, informally : SAM’S
33. Major blood protein : GLOBULIN
34. Cry before taking the plunge : HERE GOES!
36. Pointless : FUTILE
39. Make it : ATTEND
40. What it always starts with? : SHORT I
41. College where Rutherford B. Hayes was valedictorian : KENYON
43. Less tanned : PALER
44. "OMG!," old-style : EGAD!
45. Component of the combo drug Sinemet : L-DOPA
47. Actress Daniels or Neuwirth : BEBE
48. Practice exam? : LSAT
51. ___ d'Isère (French ski resort) : VAL
53. Spam's place : TIN


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0929-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Sep 16, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Jonathan M. Kaye
THEME: Divided By
We have a rebus puzzle today, which is poorly represented in my grid (apologies!). The letters DD should be written one on top of the other, so that they appear to make the letter B. The letters VI should also be written one on top of the other, so that they form the letter Y. As a result, we have a DIVIDED “BY”, the word “BY” divided by an imaginary horizontal line across the middle of the rebus squares. The letters B and Y are used in the across-answers, and the letters DD and VI are used in the down-answers:
17A. Carbon dioxide or water vis-à-vis cellular respiration : BY-PRODUCT
29A. Artisanal, maybe : MADE BY HAND
46A. Staples of Indiana Jones films : BOOBY TRAPS
61A. ÷ ... or a literal hint to interpreting eight squares in this puzzle : DIVIDED BY (DIVIDED “BY”)
1D. Pals : BUDDIES
2D. Kind of fertilization : IN VITRO
21D. Formations of unions? : WEDDINGS
30D. Shop holders : VISES
32D. Noted fountain name : TREVI
42D. Operating requirement? : MD DEGREE
50D. Big Mac? : FREDDIE
51D. Boring things : WEEVILS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 26s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

9. Brand of mouthwash : SCOPE
Scope is a brand of mouthwash made by Procter & Gamble. Scope has been marketed as the “better-tasting alternative” to Listerine.

16. Word after New or tax : HAVEN
The city of New Haven, Connecticut was founded in 1638 by Puritan immigrants from England. New Haven is home to Yale University. The city also initiated the first public tree planting program in the country. The large elms included in the program led to New Haven being called “the Elm City”.

21. Drone of a drone, say : WHIR
That would be the whir or drone of an unmanned aerial vehicle, also known as a drone.

25. Demi-___ (ballet move) : PLIE
The French word for “bent” is “plié”. In the ballet move known as a plié, the knees are bent.

28. Barflies : SOTS
Our word “sot” comes from the Old English “sott”, meaning “fool”. The word “sot” started to be associated with alcohol and not just foolery in the late 1500s.

31. Uber calculation, briefly : ETA
Expected time of arrival (ETA)

33. E.P.A. concern : EMISSION
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

34. Lawful ends? : ELS
There is a letter L (el) at either end of the word “lawful”.

37. Law "thing" : RES
“Res” is the Latin for “thing”. “Res” is used in a lot of phrases in the law, including “res ipsa loquitur”. The literal translation of “res ipsa loquitur” is “the thing speaks for itself”. It refers to situations when there is an injury, and the nature of the injury is such that one can assume that negligence had to have taken place.

40. Part of a modern police database : DNA
I've always been fascinated by the fact that the DNA of living things is so very similar across different species. Human DNA is almost exactly the same for every individual (to the degree of 99.9%). However, those small differences are sufficient to distinguish one individual from another, and to determine whether or not individuals are close family relations.

44. Fed. property overseer : GSA
The US Government’s General Services Administration (GSA), as the name suggests, provides general services to other federal agencies. So for example, the GSA manages office space for the other agencies, and transportation.

46. Staples of Indiana Jones films : BOOBY TRAPS
Raiders of the Lost Ark is, in my humble opinion, the best of the Indiana Jones franchise of movies. This first Indiana Jones film was released in 1981, produced by George Lucas and directed by Steven Spielberg. Harrison Ford was Spielberg's first choice to play the lead, but Lucas resisted as he was concerned that he would be too closely associated with the actor (as Ford played Han Solo in "Star Wars", and also appeared in Lucas's "American Graffiti"). Tom Selleck was offered the role but he couldn't get out of his commitments to "Magnum, P.I." Eventually Spielberg got his way and Ford was hired, a good thing I say …

48. Warning next to an internet link : NSFW
The abbreviation “NSFW” stands for “not safe/suitable for work”. It’s Internet slang used to describe online content that is best not viewed at work.

52. Sullivan who taught Helen Keller : ANNE
Helen Keller became a noted author despite been deaf and blind, largely through the work of her teacher, Anne Sullivan. Keller was left deaf and blind after an illness (possible meningitis or scarlet fever). when she was about 18 months old. She was to become the first deaf and blind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. The relationship between Sullivan and Keller is immortalized in the play and film called “The Miracle Worker”.

54. Hiccup cure, it's said : SCARE
Hiccups is a series of forced intakes of breath, caused by spasms in the muscles of the chest and throat. The most common cause of hiccups is some sort of irritation to the stomach or oesophagus, usually taking place while eating. Apparently, we don’t really understand the reason why we hiccup, but a favored suggestion is that it may be something that we inherited from our ancestors of long ago who didn’t stand up quite as straight as we do. Gravity helps us swallow our food, but animals who walk on all fours don’t have that advantage as the food moves horizontally down the throat and into the stomach. Such beasts are in greater need of an involuntary hiccup should some food get stuck. Just a theory ...

55. Brand with a Thick & Fluffy variety : EGGO
Eggo is the brand name of a line of frozen waffles made by Kellogg’s. When they were introduced in the 1930s, the name “Eggo” was chosen to promote the “egginess” of the batter. “Eggo” replaced the original name chosen, which was “Froffles”, created by melding “frozen” and “waffles”.

59. Its version of table tennis had a square ball : ATARI
Do you remember the arcade video game that was like a game of tennis, with paddles moving up and down to hit what looked like a ball, over what looked like a net? Well, that was “Pong”.

62. Onetime Venetian leaders : DOGES
Doges were the elected chief magistrates of the former republics of Venice and Genoa.

64. Buzz preceder, famously : NEIL
Neil Armstrong was the most private of individuals. You didn't often see him giving interviews, unlike so many of the more approachable astronauts of the Apollo space program. His famous, "That's one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind" statement; that was something that he came up with himself while Apollo 11 was making its way to the moon.

Buzz Aldrin is a true American hero, I'd say. He flew 66 combat missions in Korea, shot down two MiGs, earned his Sc. D. degree from MIT, and was one of the two men who landed on the moon for the first time. Now that man, he has lived a life worth living.

66. Popular crafts site : ETSY
Etsy.com is an e-commerce website where you can buy and sell the kind of items that you might find at a craft fair.

67. Número of Disney Caballeros : TRES
“The Three Caballeros” is a 1944 Disney film, the seventh animated feature released by the studio. Star of the movie is Donald Duck.

Down
2. Kind of fertilization : IN VITRO
In vitro fertilization is the process in which egg cells are fertilized by sperm cells outside of the body “in vitro”, meaning “in glass”, usually in a culture dish.

5. Flamingos do it : WADE
The name “flamingo” comes from the Greek word for “purple wing”. The flamingo’s pink or reddish color comes from the bird’s diet, and in particular the pigments ingested from animal and plant sources.

6. Pet that's a herbivore : IGUANA
An iguana is a lizard, and as such is cold-blooded. There are times when pet iguanas need heat from an IR lamp to maintain body temperature.

8. Is written on papyrus? : EST
“Est” is Latin for “is”.

The papyrus plant was commonly found in the Nile Delta of Europe. The pith of the plant was used to make a thick, paper-like material on which one could write. This writing material, which became known as papyrus (plural “papyri”), became a competitor for the most popular writing surface of the day known as parchment, which was made from animal skins.

9. Noted exile of 1979 : SHAH
The last Shah of Iran was Mohammed-Reza Shah Pahlavi, as he was overthrown in the revolution led by the Ayatollah Khomeini in 1979. The post-revolution government sought the extradition of the Shah back to Iran while he was in the United States seeking medical care (he had cancer). His prolonged stay in the United States, recovering from surgery, caused some unrest back in Iran and resentment towards the United States. Some say that this resentment precipitated the storming of the US Embassy in Tehran and the resulting hostage crisis.

10. Abu Bakr and others : CALIPHS
The Islamic sects of Sunni and Shia Muslims differ in the belief of who should have taken over leadership of the Muslim faithful after the death of the Prophet Muhammad. Followers of the Sunni tradition agree with the decision that the Prophet Muhammad’s confidante Abu Bakr was the right choice to become the first Caliph of the Islamic nation. Followers of the Shia tradition believe that leadership should have stayed within the Prophet Muhammad’s own family, and favored the Prophet’s son-in-law Ali.

12. Pay-click connection : PER
“Pay-per-click” is an advertising model commonly used on the Internet. The scheme allows advertisers to place ads for free, only paying every time that a reader clicks on an ad.

13. Specialist in three of the five senses, for short : ENT
Ear, nose and throat specialist (ENT)

18. Shelley's "___ to Liberty" : ODE
Percy Bysshe Shelley was an English Romantic poet. Shelley had strong views on vegetarianism. He was dedicated to the cause of all sentient beings, believing that the slaughter of animals by humans for the use of food was a barbaric practice. He wrote a famous essay on the subject called "A Vindication of Natural Diet" in 1813.

24. Tear down, in real-estate lingo : DEMO
Demolish (demo)

27. Designer Mode of "The Incredibles" : EDNA
"The Incredibles" is a 2004 animated feature from Pixar, not a great movie if you ask me. But asking me probably isn't a good idea, as the film won two Oscars ...

29. Leader in a pit : MAESTRO
“Maestro” is often used to address a musical conductor. “Maestro” (plural “maestri”) is the Italian word for “master, teacher”. The plural in English is usually “maestros”.

32. Noted fountain name : TREVI
The Trevi Fountain is a huge fountain in Rome, the largest constructed in the Baroque style. The tradition is that if one throws a coin in the fountain then one is guaranteed a return visit to the city. Tourists throw in an amazing 3,000 euros (over $4,000) every day. The money is collected and is used to stock a supermarket for the needy of the city.

34. Actor Idris : ELBA
The English actor Idris Elba is probably best known in North America for playing the drug lord Stringer Bell in the marvelous HBO drama series “The Wire”, and the title character in the 2013 film “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom”. Off the screen, Elba works as a disk jockey using the name DJ Big Driis.

35. Spanish provincial capital : LEON
León is a province in the autonomous community of Castile and León in the northwest of Spain. The province’s capital is the city of León, which was founded as Roman military encampment around 29 BC.

36. Very primitive : STONE-AGE
Ancient societies can be classified by the "three-age system", which depends on the prevalence of materials used to make tools. The three ages are:
  • The Stone Age
  • The Bronze Age
  • The Iron Age
The actual dates defined by each age depend on the society, as the timing of the transition from the use of one material to another varied around the globe.

45. Like the Aramaic language : ANCIENT
The ancient Biblical land of Aram was named after Aram, a grandson of Noah. Aram was located in the center of modern-day Syria. Aramaic became the everyday language of Syria, Mesopotamia and Palestine.

47. Overuse of the word "like," and others : PEEVES
The phrase “pet peeve”, meaning “thing that provokes one most”, seems to be somewhat ironic. A “peeve” is a source of irritation, and the adjective “pet” means “especially cherished”.

50. Big Mac? : FREDDIE
“Freddie Mac” is the familiar name for the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (FHLMC).

51. Boring things : WEEVILS
A weevil is a small beetle, known for the damage that it can do to crops. The boll weevil damages cotton plants by laying eggs inside cotton bolls. The young weevils then eat their way out. Some weevils have snouts that are as long as their body.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. They're used for storage : BINS
5. Fresh : WISE
9. Brand of mouthwash : SCOPE
14. Storage ___ : UNIT
15. Gets on : AGES
16. Word after New or tax : HAVEN
17. Carbon dioxide or water vis-à-vis cellular respiration : BY-PRODUCT
19. Ding or buzz, maybe : ALERT
20. "Let's shake on that" : IT'S A DEAL
21. Drone of a drone, say : WHIR
22. Undo : ERASE
23. Kind of beach : NUDE
25. Demi-___ (ballet move) : PLIE
28. Barflies : SOTS
29. Artisanal, maybe : MADE BY HAND
31. Uber calculation, briefly : ETA
33. E.P.A. concern : EMISSION
34. Lawful ends? : ELS
37. Law "thing" : RES
39. Unified : ONE
40. Part of a modern police database : DNA
41. "So many choices ..." : LET ME SEE ...
44. Fed. property overseer : GSA
46. Staples of Indiana Jones films : BOOBY TRAPS
48. Warning next to an internet link : NSFW
52. Sullivan who taught Helen Keller : ANNE
53. Grade : RATE
54. Hiccup cure, it's said : SCARE
55. Brand with a Thick & Fluffy variety : EGGO
57. Captive : DETAINEE
59. Its version of table tennis had a square ball : ATARI
61. ÷ ... or a literal hint to interpreting eight squares in this puzzle : DIVIDED BY (DIVIDED “BY”)
62. Onetime Venetian leaders : DOGES
63. Really mad : IRED
64. Buzz preceder, famously : NEIL
65. "Awesome!" : SWEET
66. Popular crafts site : ETSY
67. Número of Disney Caballeros : TRES

Down
1. Pals : BUDDIES
2. Kind of fertilization : IN VITRO
3. Gently bites : NIPS AT
4. German avenue : STRASSE
5. Flamingos do it : WADE
6. Pet that's a herbivore : IGUANA
7. Place in solitary : SECLUDE
8. Is written on papyrus? : EST
9. Noted exile of 1979 : SHAH
10. Abu Bakr and others : CALIPHS
11. Like veneer : OVERLAID
12. Pay-click connection : PER
13. Specialist in three of the five senses, for short : ENT
18. Shelley's "___ to Liberty" : ODE
21. Formations of unions? : WEDDINGS
24. Tear down, in real-estate lingo : DEMO
26. Privy to : IN ON
27. Designer Mode of "The Incredibles" : EDNA
29. Leader in a pit : MAESTRO
30. Shop holders : VISES
32. Noted fountain name : TREVI
34. Actor Idris : ELBA
35. Spanish provincial capital : LEON
36. Very primitive : STONE-AGE
38. Evening in Italy : SERA
42. Operating requirement? : MD DEGREE
43. Humble oneself : EAT DIRT
45. Like the Aramaic language : ANCIENT
47. Overuse of the word "like," and others : PEEVES
49. Shop device : SANDER
50. Big Mac? : FREDDIE
51. Boring things : WEEVILS
54. Down : SAD
56. Meat : GIST
58. Like some sums : TIDY
59. Targets of some blockers : ADS
60. Aftermath of a breakdown : TOW
61. Mint apparatus : DIE


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0928-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Sep 16, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Morton J. Mendelson
THEME: Double-Duty Clues
We have just one set of clues today, labeled neither across nor down. As a result, some pairs of answers in the grid use the same clue, once in the across-direction and once in the down-direction:
1. Zip : ZEST / ZILCH
5. Back : STERN / SPONSOR
10. Bill : BEAK / BANKNOTE
25. Beam : GRIN / GIRDER
32. Dump : STY / SELL
41. Cut : SEVER / SHARE
43. Over : AFRESH / AT AN END
55. Hide : SCREEN / SKIN
58. Break : TAKE FIVE / TAME
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 9m 53s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Zip : ZEST / ZILCH
We use the term “zilch” to mean “nothing”. Our current usage evolved in the sixties, before which the term was used to describe “meaningless speech”. There was a comic character called Mr. Zilch in the 1930s in “Ballyhoo” magazine. Mr. Zilch’s name probably came from the American college slang “Joe Zilch” that was used in the early 1900s for “an insignificant person”.

2. Subject of some 2015 border control measures : EBOLA
The Ebola virus causes a very nasty form of hemorrhagic fever. The name of the virus comes from the site of the first known outbreak, in a mission hospital in the Ebola River Valley in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The disease is transmitted from human to human by exposure to bodily fluids. In nature, the main carrier of Ebola is the fruit bat.

3. Instrument with 18+ strings : SITAR
The sitar has been around since the Middle Ages. The sitar is a stringed instrument that is played by plucking, and is used most often in Hindustani classical music. In the West we have been exposed to the instrument largely through the performances of Ravi Shankar and some music by George Harrison of the Beatles, a onetime student of Shankar.

4. Women's shoe feature : T-STRAP
A t-strap is a t-shaped strap that is part of many women’s shoes. The strap is in two parts, with one part going across the ankle, and the other lying along the length of the foot on top.

8. Artery: Abbr. : RTE
Route (rte.)

11. One guarded in a duel? : EPEE
“En garde” is a French term that has been absorbed into the sport of fencing. Originally a warning “on guard!”, it is spoken at the start of an encounter to warn the fencers to take a defensive position.

13. Etta of old comics : KETT
“Etta Kett” was a comic strip that first ran in 1925. The strip ceased to be published in 1974, when creator Paul Robinson passed away. The initial intent was to offer tips to teenagers on manners and social graces, hence the name of the title character Etta Kett (sounds like “etiquette”).

14. Bird with a forcepslike bill : IBIS
The ibis is a wading bird that was revered in ancient Egypt. “Ibis” is an interesting word grammatically speaking. You can have one “ibis” or two “ibises”, and then again one has a flock of “ibis”. And if you want to go with the classical plural, instead of two “ibises” you would have two “ibides”!

15. City north of Lisboa : PORTO
In Portuguese, “Lisboa” (Lisbon) and “Porto” (Oporto) are the two largest cities in Portugal.

16. Something that sticks out in a church? : APSE
The apse of a church or cathedral is a semicircular recess in an outer wall, usually with a half-dome as a roof and often where there resides an altar. Originally, apses were used as burial places for the clergy and also for storage of important relics.

17. Former Mississippi senator Trent : LOTT
Trent Lott was raised Democrat in Mississippi, but served in Congress as a Republican. Lott ran into trouble for remarks he made that were interpreted as being racially motivated, and ended up resigning in 2007.

20. Mozart was the first major composer to write specifically for it : CLARINET
The clarinet is a lovely-sounding instrument, isn’t it? The name comes from the Italian word “clarino” meaning “trumpet” with the “-et” suffix indicating “small”.

21. Key : ISLET
A “key” (also “cay”) is a low island offshore, as in the Florida Keys. Our term in English comes from the Spanish “cayo” meaning “shoal, reef”.

23. Chill : NIP
The air might be described as “crisp” on a frosty morning. One might also say that there is a “nip” in the air.

24. Razz : HARASS
Not so much here in America, but over in the British Isles "blowing a raspberry" is a way of insulting someone (I think it's called "a Bronx cheer" in the US). The verb "to razz" comes from a shortened form of "raspberry".

30. Starter home? : EDEN
According to the Book of Genesis, Adam and Eve lived in a garden “in” Eden, with Eden being geographically located by reference to four rivers including the Tigris and the Euphrates. Some scholars hypothesize that Eden was located in Mesopotamia, which encompasses much of modern-day Iraq.

31. Like black rhinos : RARE
There are five types of rhinoceros that survive today, and the smaller Javan Rhino is the most rare. The rhinoceros is probably the rarest large mammal on the planet, thanks to poaching. Hunters mainly prize the horn of the rhino as it is used in powdered form in traditional Chinese medicine.

35. Heading in a baseball box score : ERRORS
In baseball, the line square is a summary set of statistics for the game. It is seen at every baseball stadium, and includes the number of runs scored by each team per innings, as well as the total number of hits and errors. The more comprehensive box score includes the line score, but also shows the individual performance of each player.

39. Specialty skillet : CREPE PAN
“Crêpe” is the French word for “pancake”.

40. ___ Vashem, Israel's Holocaust memorial : YAD
Jerusalem’s Yad Vashem is a memorial to the victims of the Holocaust was opened to the public in 1957. The name “Yad Vashem” can be translated from Hebrew as “a place and a name”, and comes from a verse in the Book of Isaiah in the Hebrew Bible:
Even unto them will I give in my house and within my walls a place and a name better than of sons and of daughters: I will give them an everlasting name, that shall not be cut off

42. Mythomaniac : LIAR
A “mythomaniac” has a propensity for telling lies, for creating “myths”.

44. Super ___ (toy water guns) : SOAKERS
The Super Soaker brand of water gun first went on sale in toy shops in 1989. Since then, over a billion dollars worth of Super Soakers have been sold.

45. Suffix with acetyl : -ENE
Acetylene is one of the simplest hydrocarbons, and has the formula C2H2. About 20% of the acetylene produced in the world is used for oxyacetylene gas welding and cutting.

49. Murder : crows :: ___ : turkeys : RAFTER
There doesn’t seem to be a definitive etymology for “murder” as the collective noun for crows. One suggestion is that it comes from the scavenging behavior of crows, sometime feeding on rotting bodies of dead animals.

50. Word with prickly or alligator : PEAR
“Alligator pear” is another name for the avocado.

51. One of the six official languages of the United Nations : ARABIC
Today there are six official languages of the United Nations:
  • Arabic
  • Chinese
  • English
  • French
  • Russian
  • Spanish

53. Something the U.S. government bans the sale of : IVORY
The hard, white material called ivory has mainly been sourced from the tusks of elephants, although it can also be collected from the walrus, hippopotamus, killer whale, wart hog and others. The word “ivory” comes into English via Latin from the Ancient Egyptian word for “elephant”.

57. Longtime Dallas Cowboys QB Tony : ROMO
Tony Romo is a quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys. Romo is also an avid amateur golfer and has even tried (albeit unsuccessfully) to qualify for the US Open golf championship.

59. Sources of vitamin C : ADES
The essential nutrient referred to as vitamin C is also called L-ascorbic acid or ascorbate. A lack of vitamin C causes the disease scurvy.

60. C. Everett ___, 1980s surgeon general : KOOP
C. Everett Koop was Surgeon General from 1982-89, appointed by President Reagan. Koop was a somewhat controversial character and one who brought the position of Surgeon General into the spotlight more than was historically the case. Partly this was due to his pro-life position, his anti-tobacco stance and the fact that AIDS became a prominent issue while he was in office.

62. What "whisky" is to "whiskey": Abbr. : VAR
Don’t forget that we use the spelling “whiskey” for American and Irish versions of the drink, and “whisky” for Scotch, the Scottish version.

64. ___ Bunt, villainess in "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" : IRMA
“On Her Majesty’s Secret Service” is the sixth of the James Bond series films, and the only one to star George Lazenby in the leading role. He wasn’t a great choice for 007 …

67. Commercial light : NEON
The basic design of neon lighting was first demonstrated at the Paris Motor Show in 1910. Such lighting is made up of glass tubes containing a vacuum into which has been introduced a small amount of neon gas. When a voltage is applied between two electrodes inside the tube, the neon gas “glows” and gives off the familiar light.

69. Novelist Jean who wrote "Wide Sargasso Sea" : RHYS
Wide Sargasso Sea” was written by Jean Rhys and first published in 1966. It’s a clever work, written as a sort of prequel to Charlotte Bronte’s famous “Jane Eyre”, which dates back to 1847.

The Sargasso Sea is an area within the Atlantic Ocean that is famous as the home to many species of Sargassum, the algae floating on the surface that gives the area its name. The Sargasso Sea is also where both European and American species of eel lay their eggs and hatch their young. The young eels (or “elvers”) then head east or west, depending on the species.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Zip : ZEST / ZILCH
2. Subject of some 2015 border control measures : EBOLA
3. Instrument with 18+ strings : SITAR
4. Women's shoe feature : T-STRAP
5. Back : STERN / SPONSOR
6. "Don't use that ___ with me!" : TONE
7. Back when, long ago : ERST
8. Artery: Abbr. : RTE
9. Sign to continue straight : NO TURNS
10. Bill : BEAK / BANKNOTE
11. One guarded in a duel? : EPEE
12. Stat : ASAP
13. Etta of old comics : KETT
14. Bird with a forcepslike bill : IBIS
15. City north of Lisboa : PORTO
16. Something that sticks out in a church? : APSE
17. Former Mississippi senator Trent : LOTT
18. Outbreak : ONSET
19. Orderly : NEAT
20. Mozart was the first major composer to write specifically for it : CLARINET
21. Key : ISLET
22. Broken, as promises : UNKEPT
23. Chill : NIP
24. Razz : HARASS
25. Beam : GRIN / GIRDER
26. What a spoiler may spoil : PLOT
27. Work toward : TRY FOR
28. Holding office : IN POWER
29. Swell : WAVE
30. Starter home? : EDEN
31. Like black rhinos : RARE
32. Dump : STY / SELL
33. Quartet minus one : TRIO
34. Pro side of a vote : YEAS
35. Heading in a baseball box score : ERRORS
36. Row : OAR
37. "There! I did it!" : TADA!
38. Like the posture of human beings : ERECT
39. Specialty skillet : CREPE PAN
40. ___ Vashem, Israel's Holocaust memorial : YAD
41. Cut : SEVER / SHARE
42. Mythomaniac : LIAR
43. Over : AFRESH / AT AN END
44. Super ___ (toy water guns) : SOAKERS
45. Suffix with acetyl : -ENE
46. Is licked by : LOSES TO
47. Go out with : SEE
48. Laugh without restraint : ROAR
49. Murder : crows :: ___ : turkeys : RAFTER
50. Word with prickly or alligator : PEAR
51. One of the six official languages of the United Nations : ARABIC
52. What to expect when you're expecting : BIRTH
53. Something the U.S. government bans the sale of : IVORY
54. Gives up : CEDES
55. Hide : SCREEN / SKIN
56. ___ curriculum : CORE
57. Longtime Dallas Cowboys QB Tony : ROMO
58. Break : TAKE FIVE / TAME
59. Sources of vitamin C : ADES
60. C. Everett ___, 1980s surgeon general : KOOP
61. Get around : EVADE
62. What "whisky" is to "whiskey": Abbr. : VAR
63. Stepped (on) : TROD
64. ___ Bunt, villainess in "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" : IRMA
65. Whistle-blower, e.g. : NAMER
66. French "to be" : ETRE
67. Commercial light : NEON
68. Put bandages on, as wounds : DRESS
69. Novelist Jean who wrote "Wide Sargasso Sea" : RHYS


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0927-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Sep 16, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Robert Cirillo
THEME: A Recuperative Word Ladder
We have some “RECUPERATIVE” themed answers in today’s grid, as well as a RECUPERATIVE word ladder taking us from SICK in the top-left to WELL in the bottom-right:
30A. How to avoid becoming 1-Across, so they say : AN APPLE A DAY
49A. Aid for getting 73-Across, so they say : CHICKEN SOUP

1A. Start of a "recuperative" word ladder ending at 73-Across : SICK
15A. Part 2 of the word ladder : SILK
19A. Part 3 of the word ladder : SILT
62A. Part 4 of the word ladder : WILT
69A. Part 5 of the word ladder : WELT
73A. End of the word ladder : WELL
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 10s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Pres. Jefferson : THOS
Thomas Jefferson was born a British subject in 1743 in the Colony of Virginia, one of ten children born to Peter Jefferson and Jane Randolph Jefferson. The Jefferson’s had four sons in all, with two dying in infancy. The remaining two sons inherited Peter’s estate, divided between them. Thomas came into 5,000 acres of land, including Monticello, and 20-40 slaves.

9. 1000 or 2000, but not 0 : YEAR
The designations Anno Domini (AD, “year of Our Lord”) and Before Christ (BC) are found in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The dividing point between AD and BC is the year of the conception of Jesus, with AD 1 following 1 BC without a year “0” in between. The AD/BC scheme dates back to AD 525, and gained wide acceptance soon after AD 800. Nowadays a modified version has become popular, with CE (Common/Christian Era) used to replace AD, and BCE (Before the Common/Christian Era) used to replace BC.

13. Cookies with a Double Stuf variety : OREOS
Double Stuf Oreo was introduced in 1975, and has twice the normal amount of white cream filling as the original cookie.

16. Singer Fitzgerald : ELLA
Ella Fitzgerald, the "First Lady of Song", had a hard and tough upbringing. She was raised by her mother alone in Yonkers, New York. Her mother died while Ella was still a schoolgirl, and around that time the young girl became less interested in her education. She fell in with a bad crowd, even working as a lookout for a bordello and as a Mafia numbers runner. She ended up in reform school, from which she escaped, and found herself homeless and living on the streets for a while. Somehow Fitzgerald managed to get herself a spot singing in the Apollo Theater in Harlem. From there her career took off and as they say, the rest is history.

17. Socially unacceptable : NON-PC
Non-politically correct (non-PC)

18. Cleveland's lake : ERIE
Lake Erie is the fourth largest of the five Great Lakes by area (Lake Ontario is the smallest). The lake takes its name from the Erie tribe of Native Americans that used to live along its southern shore. Erie is the smallest of the Great Lakes by volume and the shallowest, something for which nearby residents must be quite grateful. Being relatively shallow, much of Erie freezes over part way through most winters putting an end to most of the lake effect snow that falls in the snow belt extending from the lake’s edge.

Cleveland, Ohio was named after the man who led the team that surveyed the area prior to founding of the city. General Moses Cleaveland did his work in 1796 and then left Ohio, never to return again.

20. Morsel for an aardvark : ANT
The aardvark is the oddest looking of creatures, a nocturnal burrowing animal, native to Africa. The name "aardvark" is Afrikaans for "earth pig", although it is not in fact related to the pig. Aardvarks are noted, among other things, for their unique teeth. Their teeth have no enamel and wear away quite readily, but continuously regrow.

24. Blue Jays, on scoreboards : TOR
The Toronto Blue Jays baseball franchise was founded in 1977. The Blue Jays are the only team based outside the US to have won a World Series, doing so in 1992 and 1993. And since the Montreal Expos relocated to Washington, the Blue Jays are the only Major League Baseball team now headquartered outside of the US.

25. Switch ups? : ONS
Not only did I have to learn new spellings of words when I moved here from Ireland (here I go, whining again!) but I had to learn that down is the “off” position for a switch most times, and up is the “on” position. It’s exactly the opposite on the other side of the pond. Have I ever told you about the steering wheel position in the car? Aaargh!

26. Place to get outta, in a saying : DODGE
The phrase “get out of Dodge”, meaning “scram, flee”, is a reference to Dodge City, Kansas. The phrase became a cliche on TV westerns (mainly “Gunsmoke”, I think) and was then popularized by teenagers in the sixties and seventies.

30. How to avoid becoming 1-Across, so they say : AN APPLE A DAY
Apparently the old adage “an apple a day keeps the doctor away” originated in Pembrokeshire in Wales. There was a local proverb in the area quoted in print in the mid-1800s:
Eat an apple on going to bed,
And you’ll keep the doctor from earning his bread.

35. 60 minuti : ORA
In Italian, there are “sessanta minuti” (sixty minutes) in an “”ora” (hour).

36. ___-majesté : LESE
“Lèse majesté” is the crime of offending the dignity of the "majesty" or sovereign, or the state. The term is from French Law, and comes from the law of Ancient Rome. In Latin "laesa maiestas" means "injured majesty". Clearly, the term has no relevance in the United States but in other countries, including many in Europe, the law is occasionally cited.

39. Palindromic band name : ABBA
I am an unapologetic fan of ABBA’s music. ABBA was of course the Swedish group who topped the charts in the seventies and eighties. The name ABBA is an acronym formed from the first letters of the given names of each of the band members: Agnetha, Benny, Bjorn and Anni-Frid. Early in their careers, the four fell in love and formed two married couples: Agnetha and Bjorn, and Benny and Anni-Frid. However, at the height of their success, the relationships became strained and both couples divorced.

43. No. on a periodic table : AT WT
The atomic weight (at. wt.) of an element is the mass of one atom of the element, relative to the mass of an atom of carbon (which is assumed to have an atomic weight of 12).

Dmitri Mendeleev was a Russian chemist. When Mendeleev classified elements according to their chemical properties, he noticed patterns and was able to group elements into his famous 1869 Periodic Table. So powerful was his table that he actually predicted the properties of some elements that had not even been discovered in 1869. Element number 101 is mendelevium and was named after Mendeleev.

46. ___-ho : GUNG
Kung ho is a Chinese expression meaning "work together, cooperate". The anglicized version "gung ho" was adopted by a Major Evans Carlson as an expression of combined spirit for his 2nd Marine Raider Battalion during WWII. From there the term spread throughout the Marine Corps and back to America where it persists to this day.

53. Capital of Senegal : DAKAR
The Republic of Senegal is a country on the far western coast of Africa. For many years Senegal was a French colony, gaining independence in 1960. The capital of Senegal is Dakar, a city located on the Cap-Vert Peninsula that juts out into the Atlantic Ocean.

55. ___ Lingus : AER
Aer Lingus is my favorite airline! Well, the service isn’t that great, but when I get on board an Aer Lingus plane I feel like I am back in Ireland. Aer Lingus is the national airline of Ireland, with “Aer Lingus” being a phonetic spelling of the Irish “aer-loingeas” meaning “air fleet”. These days Aer Lingus can only lay claim to the title of Ireland’s oldest airline as it is no longer the biggest. That honor goes to the controversial budget airline called Ryanair.

56. General ___ (name on a Chinese menu) : TSO
General Tso’s chicken is an American creation, often found on the menu of a Chinese restaurant. The name General Tso may be a reference to General Zuo Zongtang of the Qing Dynasty, but there is no clear link.

61. ___ Pinafore : HMS
“H.M.S. Pinafore” is one of my favorite of the Gilbert & Sullivan comic operas (a production we staged at high school, many moons ago). “Pinafore” was one of the first big hits for Gilbert & Sullivan (in their native Britain, and in America), and they followed it up with “The Pirates of Penzance” and “The Mikado”.

65. Football coach Jim : MORA
Jim L. Mora was a head coach in the NFL from 2004 to 2009, and then head coach for the UCLA Bruins starting in 2012. His father, Jim E. Mora, was also an NFL head coach.

68. Taiwan-based computer maker : ACER
I owned several Acer laptops, which were for my money the most reliable machine at the best price. Acer is a Taiwanese company that I used to visit a lot when I was in the electronics business. I was very impressed back then with the company’s dedication to quality, but have heard that things haven’t gone so well in recent years …

70. Andrea ___ (ill-fated ship) : DORIA
The SS Andrea Doria was an Italian ocean liner with the home port of Genoa. She was named after Andrea Doria, a 16th-century admiral from the city. As always seems to be the case with ships that go down, the Andrea Doria was the pride of the fleet and was deemed to be the biggest, fastest and safest of Italy's ships in the fifties. Her end came in 1956 when she collided with the MS Stockholm off the coast of Nantucket Island. Such was the damage to the side of the vessel that she quickly and severely listed to starboard, rendering half her lifeboats unusable. Nonetheless, 1,660 crew and passengers were rescued by vessels that came to her aid. Only 46 lives were lost, mainly in the collision itself. The Andrea Doria capsized and sank eleven hours after the collision.

71. Alien: Prefix : XENO-
The Greek combining form “xeno-” means “strange, foreign”, as in xenophobia, a fear of foreigners.

72. Fr. honorees : STES
“Sainte” (ste.) is French for “saint”, when referring to a female.

Down
1. Hyundai model : SONATA
The Hyundai factory in Ulsan, South Korea is the largest integrated automobile manufacturing facility in the world, able to produce 1.6 million vehicles each year.

3. The Fed, for example : CENTRAL BANK
The Federal Reserve System is more usually known simply as “the Fed”, and is the central banking system of the US. It was introduced in 1913 in response to a number of financial panics at the beginning of the 20th century. The original role for the Fed was to act as a lender of last resort, in case there was a run on a bank. This can happen as most of the money that is deposited by customers in a bank is reinvested by that bank, so it has very little liquid cash available. If too many customers look for their money at one time, then the bank can be short of cash and this can start a “run”. The Fed’s responsibilities have broadened since those early days …

4. Keystone ___ : KOP
The Keystone Cops (sometimes “Keystone Kops”) were a band of madcap policemen characters who appeared in silent movies. A 1914 short film called “A Thief Catcher” that was believed lost was rediscovered in 2010. “A Thief Catcher” featured the magnificent Charlie Chaplin in an early role as a Keystone Cop.

5. Fly over sub-Saharan Africa? : TSETSE
Tsetse flies live on the blood of vertebrate mammals. The name “tsetse” comes from Tswana, a language of southern Africa, and translates simply as “fly”. Tsetse flies are famous for being carriers of the disease known as “sleeping sickness”. Sleeping sickness is caused by a parasite which is passed onto humans when the tsetse fly bites into human skin tissue. If one considers all the diseases transmitted by the insect, then the tsetse fly is responsible for a staggering quarter of a million deaths each year.

6. Trumpeter Al : HIRT
Al Hirt was a trumpeter and bandleader. Hirt’s most famous recordings were the song “Java” and the album “Honey in the Horn”, as well the theme song used “The Green Hornet” TV series in the sixties.

7. Mélange : OLIO
“Olio” is a term meaning a hodgepodge or a mixture, coming from the mixed stew of the same name. The stew in turn takes its name from the Spanish "olla", the clay pot used for cooking.

“Mélange” is the French word for “mixture”.

10. Inventor Whitney : ELI
The inventor Eli Whitney is a best known for inventing the cotton gin. Whitney also came up with the important concept of “interchangeable parts”. Parts that are interchangeable can be swapped out of equipment or perhaps used in related designs.

11. The whole enchilada : ALL
“Enchilada” is the past participle of the Spanish word “enchilar” meaning “to add chile pepper to”. An enchilada is a basically a corn tortilla rolled around some filling and then covered in chili pepper sauce. The term “big enchilada” is used in the same way as we would use “big cheese” i.e. the top dog. The phrase was popularized in the sixties when John Ehrlichman refers to Attorney General John Mitchell as “the big enchilada” on one of the Watergate Tapes.

23. Tranquil scene : IDYL
An "idyll" (also "idyl") is a short poem with a pastoral theme, usually depicting the scene in romantic and idealized terms. The word comes from the Greek "eidyllion", which literally translates to "little picture" but was a word describing a short, poem with a rustic theme.

29. Heading for Marco Polo : EAST
Marco Polo was a merchant from Venice and a famous traveler throughout Asia. Polo journeyed with his father and uncle on an epic tour of Central Asia and China that lasted 24 years. Marco tends to be the member of the party we remember today though, because it was he who documented their travels in a book called “Il Milione”.

32. The Mexica people ruled over them : AZTEC
The Aztec people of Central America dominated the region in the 14th – 16th centuries. Two traits of the Aztec people are oft cited today. They built some magnificent pyramids, and they also engaged in human sacrifice. The two traits were linked in a way … for the consecration of the Great Pyramid of Tenochtitlan, 84,400 prisoners were sacrificed over a period of four days.

34. Orbital high points : APOGEES
In the celestial world, an apsis is a point in an orbit when the orbiting body is at its greatest, or least, distance from it's center of orbit. The farthest and closest points of orbit are known as the apogee and perigee, when talking about bodies orbiting the Earth. The farthest and closest points for bodies orbiting the sun are known as the aphelion and perihelion.

38. Writer Fleming and others : IANS
Ian Fleming is most famous for writing the “James Bond” series of spy novels. You might also know that he wrote the children’s story “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang”, which was made into a cute movie released in 1968 and even a stage musical that opened in 2002.

39. If you drop this you'll trip : ACID
LSD (colloquially known as “acid”) is short for lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist called Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn’t until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man …

40. ___ fide : BONA
“Bona fide(s)” translates from the Latin as "in good faith", and is used to indicate honest intentions. It can also mean that something is authentic, like a piece of art that is represented in good faith as being genuine.

42. Former telecom giant : MCI
MCI was a giant telecom company that suffered a similar fate to Enron, and around about the same time. MCI’s stock price fell in 2000 and in maneuvers designed to protect the price, the company committed illegal acts. The larger-than-life CEO back then, Bernie Ebbers, is now serving a 25-year sentence in Louisiana.

45. Hosiery shade : ECRU
The shade called ecru is a grayish, yellowish brown. The word “ecru” comes from French and means “raw, unbleached”. “Ecru” has the same roots as our word “crude”.

The word "hose" meaning a "covering for the leg" has the same roots as the contemporary German word "Hose" meaning "trousers, pants".

50. Gold standards : KARATS
A karat (also “carat”, the spelling outside of North America) is a measure of the purity of gold alloys, with 24-karat representing pure gold.

51. Service symbolized by a blue-and-white eagle : US MAIL
52. Relating to 51-Down : POSTAL
The US Postal Service (USPS) is a remarkable agency in many ways. For starters, the government’s right and responsibility to establish the Post Office is specifically called out in Article One of the US constitution. Also, the first postmaster general was none other than Benjamin Franklin. And, the USPS operates over 200,000 vehicles, which is the largest vehicle fleet in the world.

54. Houston ballplayer : ASTRO
The Houston baseball team changed its name to the Astros from the Colt .45s in 1965 when they started playing in the Astrodome. The Astrodome was so called in recognition of the city’s long association with the US space program. The Astros moved from the National League to the American League starting in the 2013 season.

58. German autos : BMWS
The abbreviation BMW stands for Bayerische Motoren Werke, which translates into Bavarian Motor Works. BMW was making aircraft engines during WWI, but had to cease that activity according to the terms of the Treaty of Versailles. The company then started making motorcycles, and moved into automobile production starting in 1928. BMW moved back into aircraft engine manufacturing during the build-up of the Luftwaffe prior to WWII.

59. Brand of bubbly, familiarly : MOET
Moët & Chandon is a French winery, one of the world's largest producers of champagne. The company was founded by wine trader Claude Moët in 1743. The name was changed to Moët & Chandon in the 1830s when Pierre-Gabriel Chandon, an in-law to the Moët family, was given co-ownership. Moët & Chandon owns the famous Dom Pérignon brand name, honoring the Benedictine monk who did so much to improve the quality of champagne.

60. Writer ___ Stanley Gardner : ERLE
I must have read all of the Perry Mason books when I was in college. I think they kept me sane when I was facing the pressure of exams. Author Erle Stanley Gardner was himself a lawyer, although he didn't get into the profession the easy way. Gardner went to law school, but got himself suspended after a month. So, he became a self-taught attorney and opened his own law office in Merced, California. Understandably, he gave up the law once his novels became successful.

62. Madame Tussaud material : WAX
Marie Tussaud was a wax sculptor from France. Some of her early work was very gruesome as she lived through the French Revolution. She would take the decapitated heads of executed citizens and use them to make death masks which were then paraded through the streets. She eventually moved to London, taking with her a vast collection of wax models made by her and her father. She opened a museum to display the works, and the Madame Tussaud’s wax museum is a major attraction in the city to this day.

63. Rocks or diamonds : ICE
“Ice” and “rocks” are slang terms for “diamonds”.

64. Judge Goodman of "Dancing With the Stars" : LEN
Len Goodman is a professional ballroom dancer. Goodman is the head judge on the US’s “Dancing with the Stars” as well as on the original UK version of the show called “Strictly Come Dancing”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Start of a "recuperative" word ladder ending at 73-Across : SICK
5. Pres. Jefferson : THOS
9. 1000 or 2000, but not 0 : YEAR
13. Cookies with a Double Stuf variety : OREOS
15. Part 2 of the word ladder : SILK
16. Singer Fitzgerald : ELLA
17. Socially unacceptable : NON-PC
18. Cleveland's lake : ERIE
19. Part 3 of the word ladder : SILT
20. Morsel for an aardvark : ANT
21. Seeking victory : OUT TO WIN
24. Blue Jays, on scoreboards : TOR
25. Switch ups? : ONS
26. Place to get outta, in a saying : DODGE
30. How to avoid becoming 1-Across, so they say : AN APPLE A DAY
35. 60 minuti : ORA
36. ___-majesté : LESE
37. Wires for thrill-seekers : ZIP LINES
39. Palindromic band name : ABBA
41. "Are not!" retort : AM TOO!
43. No. on a periodic table : AT WT
44. Come together : COALESCE
46. ___-ho : GUNG
48. Quaint lodging : INN
49. Aid for getting 73-Across, so they say : CHICKEN SOUP
53. Capital of Senegal : DAKAR
55. ___ Lingus : AER
56. General ___ (name on a Chinese menu) : TSO
57. Dunk : SUBMERSE
61. ___ Pinafore : HMS
62. Part 4 of the word ladder : WILT
65. Football coach Jim : MORA
66. Really bothered : ATE AT
68. Taiwan-based computer maker : ACER
69. Part 5 of the word ladder : WELT
70. Andrea ___ (ill-fated ship) : DORIA
71. Alien: Prefix : XENO-
72. Fr. honorees : STES
73. End of the word ladder : WELL

Down
1. Hyundai model : SONATA
2. Attach, as a patch : IRON ON
3. The Fed, for example : CENTRAL BANK
4. Keystone ___ : KOP
5. Fly over sub-Saharan Africa? : TSETSE
6. Trumpeter Al : HIRT
7. Mélange : OLIO
8. Slant : SKEW
9. Answerable with a head nod or shake : YES/NO
10. Inventor Whitney : ELI
11. The whole enchilada : ALL
12. Subway station sighting : RAT
14. Reporters' coups : SCOOPS
22. Let loose : UNLEASH
23. Tranquil scene : IDYL
27. "Can we not talk about that!" : DON’T GO THERE!
28. Ballooned : GREW
29. Heading for Marco Polo : EAST
31. Church bell sound : PEAL
32. The Mexica people ruled over them : AZTEC
33. God, in Roma : DIO
34. Orbital high points : APOGEES
38. Writer Fleming and others : IANS
39. If you drop this you'll trip : ACID
40. ___ fide : BONA
42. Former telecom giant : MCI
45. Hosiery shade : ECRU
47. Not book-smart : UNREAD
50. Gold standards : KARATS
51. Service symbolized by a blue-and-white eagle : US MAIL
52. Relating to 51-Down : POSTAL
54. Houston ballplayer : ASTRO
58. German autos : BMWS
59. Brand of bubbly, familiarly : MOET
60. Writer ___ Stanley Gardner : ERLE
62. Madame Tussaud material : WAX
63. Rocks or diamonds : ICE
64. Judge Goodman of "Dancing With the Stars" : LEN
67. A busy mom might keep a child in this : TOW


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0926-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 Sep 16, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Timothy Polin
THEME: Stuff It!
Each of today’s themed answers starts with something that is often STUFFED:
38A. "Shut up already!" ... or what you can do to the start of the answer to each starred clue : STUFF IT!

17A. *Iron Man's love interest : PEPPER POTTS
26A. *Intimate chitchat : PILLOW TALK
52A. *Annual Thanksgiving Day run : TURKEY TROT
60A. *Knit headwear that may have a tufted ball at its end : STOCKING CAP
11D. *Classic comedy set at the fictional Faber College : ANIMAL HOUSE
25D. *Offer of reconciliation : OLIVE BRANCH
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 48s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

7. Resident of Oman or Yemen : ARAB
Oman lies on the southeast coast of the Arabian Peninsula and is neighbored by the OAE, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Oman is a monarchy, and the official name of the state is the Sultanate of Oman. All of the country’s legislative, executive and judiciary power resides with the hereditary sultan.

Yemen is located on the Arabian Peninsula, lying just south of Saudi Arabia and west of Oman. Yemen is the only state on the peninsula that is a republic (its official name is the Republic of Yemen). Everyone over the age of 18 gets to vote, but only Muslims can hold elected office. Yemen has seen many rebellions over the centuries, and has been suffering through a Shia uprising since February 2015.

15. Protein-rich vegan staple : TOFU
Tofu is another name for bean curd, and is a Japanese word meaning just that … bean that has “curdled”. Tofu is produced by coagulating soy milk, using either salt or something acidic. Once the protein has coagulated, the curds are pressed into the familiar blocks. Personally I love tofu, but my wife, she absolutely hates it …

17. *Iron Man's love interest : PEPPER POTTS
Iron Man is another one of those comic book superheroes, created by Stan Lee for Marvel Comics. The character has become very famous in recent years since the appearance of the 2008 action movie "Iron Man" starring Robert Downey, Jr. in the title role. Iron Man’s love interest, Pepper Potts, is routinely played by Gwyneth Paltrow in the same series of films.

19. ___ Jima : IWO
Iwo Jima is a volcanic island located south of Tokyo that today is uninhabited. The name is Japanese for “Sulfur Island”, referring to the sulfur mining on which Iwo Jima’s economy once depended. There were about a thousand Japanese civilians living on the island prior to WWII. In 1944, there was a massive influx of Japanese military personnel in anticipation of the inevitable US invasion. As the Japanese military moved in, the civilians were forced out and no one has lived there since.

29. Old-fashioned address organizer : ROLODEX
The name Rolodex is short for "rolling index", and applies to a device that was invented back in 1956. Even in today's world that is run by computers, Rolodexes are still quite popular.

32. Unsettled feeling : AGITA
Agita is another name for acid indigestion, and more generally can mean “agitation, anxiety”.

33. Actor McKellen : IAN
Sir Ian McKellen is a marvelous English actor, someone who is comfortable playing anything from Macbeth on stage to Magneto in an “X-Men” movie. On the big screen, McKellen is very famous for playing Gandalf in "The Lord of Rings". In the UK Sir Ian is noted for being at the forefront of the campaign for equal rights for gay people, a role he has enthusiastically embraced since the eighties.

37. Ford Escape or Jeep Cherokee, for short : SUV
The Ford Escape is an SUV that was developed jointly with Mazda and introduced in the 2001 model year. The Mazda version of the same vehicle is known as the Tribute.

The Jeep Cherokee is an SUV with some legs. The original SJ model was produced from 1974 until 1983, with derivative models very much alive today.

42. Cheer at a fútbol match : OLE!
“Fútbol” is the Spanish word for football, soccer.

48. Disney fawn : BAMBI
The 1942 Disney classic “Bambi” is based on a book written by Felix Salten called “Bambi, A Life in the Woods”. There is a documented phenomenon known as the Bambi Effect, whereby people become more interested in animal rights after having watched the scene where Bambi’s mother is shot by hunters.

52. *Annual Thanksgiving Day run : TURKEY TROT
“Turkey trots” are long-distance fun runs held around Thanksgiving here in the US, and around Christmas over the UK. The “turkey” reference is to the traditional dish served at both holidays.

56. Copper + zinc : BRASS
Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc. Compare this with bronze, an alloy of copper and tin. Copper and bronze are often mistaken for each other.

59. "Deadly" offense : SIN
The cardinal sins of Christian ethics are also known as the seven deadly sins. The seven deadly sins are:
  • Wrath
  • Greed
  • Sloth
  • Pride
  • Lust
  • Envy
  • Gluttony

66. Stephen Colbert's Americans for a Better Tomorrow, Tomorrow, e.g. : PAC
Satirist Stephen Colbert establish a Super PAC called Americans for a Better Tomorrow, Tomorrow in 2011, and allowed it to collect funds for over a year. The so-called “Colbert Super PAC” raised on a million dollars in that period, with the majority of funds eventually going to charity.

A Political Action Committee (PAC) is a private group that works to influence the outcome of a particular election or group of elections. Any group becomes a PAC by law when it receives or spends more than $1,000 for the purpose of influencing the outcome of an election. In 2010 the Supreme Court ruled that PACS that did not make direct contributions to candidates or parties could accept unlimited contributions. These “independent-expenditure only committees” are commonly referred to as “super PACs”.

68. ___ Beach, Calif. : LAGUNA
Laguna Beach is seaside resort city in Orange County in southern California. The city takes its name from nearby Laguna Canyon, and was originally known as Lagonas.

Down
1. Concert haul? : AMP
An electric guitar, for example, needs an amplifier (amp) to take the weak signal created by the vibration of the strings and turn it into a signal powerful enough for a loudspeaker.

2. "Ciao" : BYE
Ciao is the Italian for "'bye". "Arrivederci" is more formal, and translates as "goodbye".

6. Mexican shawl : SERAPE
“Serape” is the English pronunciation and spelling of the Spanish word “zarape”. A zarape is like a Mexican poncho, a soft woolen blanket with a hole in the middle for the head. Most serapes have colorful designs that use traditional Mayan motifs.

7. Ring-shaped reef : ATOLL
An atoll is a coral island that is shaped in a ring and enclosing a lagoon. There is still some debate as to how an atoll forms, but a theory proposed by Charles Darwin while on his famous voyage aboard HMS Beagle still holds sway. Basically an atoll was once a volcanic island that had subsided and fallen into the sea. The coastline of the island is home to coral growth which persists even as the island continues to subside internal to the circling coral reef.

10. Complete rubbish : BUSHWA
“Bushwa” is “rubbish, nonsense, rot”. The term originated in the early 1900s and may be a derivative of “bourgeois”.

11. *Classic comedy set at the fictional Faber College : ANIMAL HOUSE
The very funny 1978 movie "Animal House" has the prefix "National Lampoon's ..." because the storyline came out of tales that had already appeared in "National Lampoon" magazine. "Animal House" was to become the first in a long line of successful "National Lampoon" films. The main pledges in the movie are Tom Hulce (Pinto), who later played a magnificent "Amadeus", and Stephen Furst (Flounder), later played a regular role on television's "Babylon 5".

13. Bird on a birth announcement : STORK
In German and Dutch society, storks resting on the roof of a house were considered a sign of good luck. This tradition led to nursery stories that babies were brought to families by storks.

18. ___ fixe (menu notation) : PRIX
On a restaurant menu, items that are "à la carte" are priced and ordered separately. A menu marked "table d'hôte" (also called "prix fixe") is a fixed-price menu with limited choice.

22. Soul singer Redding : OTIS
Otis Redding is often referred to as the "King of Soul", and what a voice he had. Like so many of the greats in the world of popular music it seems, Redding was killed in a plane crash, in 1967 when he was just 26 years old. Just three days earlier he had recorded what was to be his biggest hit, "(Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay".

30. Prosecutors, briefly : DAS
District Attorney (DA)

35. Jimmy ___, reporter for the Daily Planet : OLSEN
In the “Superman” stories, Jimmy Olsen is a cub photographer who works on the "Daily Planet" newspaper with Clark Kent and Lois Lane.

39. ___ Keith, singer with 20 #1 country hits : TOBY
Toby Keith is a country music singer from Clinton, Oklahoma. One of Keith’s number one hits is a 2003 duet with Willie Nelson called “Beer for My Horses”.

40. Gram or dram : UNIT
The dram is a confusing unit of measurement, I think. It has one value as an ancient unit of mass, and two different values as a modern unit of mass, another value as a unit of fluid volume, and yet another varying value as a measure of Scotch whisky!

41. Indenting computer key : TAB
Like most features on our computer keyboards, the tab key is a hangover from the days of typewriters. When using a typewriter, making entries into a table was very tedious, involving lots of tapping on the spacebar and backspace key. So, a lever was added to typewriters that allowed the operator to “jump” across the page to positions that could be set by hand. Later this was simplified to a tab key which could be depressed, causing the carriage to jump to the next tab stop in much the same way that the modern tab key works on a computer.

44. Fifth Avenue retailer : SAKS
Saks Fifth Avenue is a high-end specialty store that competes with the likes of Bloomingdale’s and Neiman Marcus. The original Saks & Company business was founded by Andrew Saks in 1867. The first Saks Fifth Avenue store was opened on Fifth Avenue in New York City in 1924. There are now Saks Fifth Avenue stores in many major cities in the US, as well in several locations worldwide.

50. Nerd : DORK
I consider "dork" to be pretty offensive slang. It emanated in the sixties among American students, and has its roots in another slang term, a term for male genitalia.

51. Prima ballerina : ETOILE
In the world of ballet, the étoile is the leading dancer in a company (male or female). "Étoile" is the French word for "star".

The title of “prima ballerina” is the second-highest awarded to a female dancer in a company. The more prestigious “prima ballerina assoluta” is only awarded to the most notable dancers.

52. Cookbook amts. : TBSPS
Tablespoon (tbsp.)

53. Dickens's ___ Heep : URIAH
Uriah Heep is a sniveling insincere character in the novel "David Copperfield" by Charles Dickens. The character is such a "yes man" that today, if we know someone who behaves the same way, then we might call that person a "Uriah Heep".

61. "Singin' in the Rain" dance style : TAP
In the movie “Singin’ in the Rain”, the wonderful, wonderful dance sequence to the title song was filmed over 2-3 days. Gene Kelly was splashing through puddles and getting rained on while all the time he was sick, with a fever of 103F.

64. Santa ___, Calif. : ANA
Santa Ana is the county seat of Orange County, California and takes its name from the Santa Ana River that runs through the city.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Diminishes in intensity : ABATES
7. Resident of Oman or Yemen : ARAB
11. Breaks you wish would end? : ADS
14. "Sweetheart" : MY LOVE
15. Protein-rich vegan staple : TOFU
16. "Do ___ disturb" (motel sign) : NOT
17. *Iron Man's love interest : PEPPER POTTS
19. ___ Jima : IWO
20. Mean dog sound : SNARL
21. Hit one out of the park : HOMER
23. Trim, as a photograph : CROP
26. *Intimate chitchat : PILLOW TALK
29. Old-fashioned address organizer : ROLODEX
31. Most correspondence nowadays : EMAIL
32. Unsettled feeling : AGITA
33. Actor McKellen : IAN
34. Display : SHOW
37. Ford Escape or Jeep Cherokee, for short : SUV
38. "Shut up already!" ... or what you can do to the start of the answer to each starred clue : STUFF IT!
42. Cheer at a fútbol match : OLE!
43. Goes out with : SEES
45. Slip-___ : ONS
46. Mistreat : ABUSE
48. Disney fawn : BAMBI
50. Diminished in value, as a currency : DEBASED
52. *Annual Thanksgiving Day run : TURKEY TROT
55. Refuse to admit : DENY
56. Copper + zinc : BRASS
57. Came to light : AROSE
59. "Deadly" offense : SIN
60. *Knit headwear that may have a tufted ball at its end : STOCKING CAP
66. Stephen Colbert's Americans for a Better Tomorrow, Tomorrow, e.g. : PAC
67. Part of the roof where icicles form : EAVE
68. ___ Beach, Calif. : LAGUNA
69. Admonition in a movie theater : SHH!
70. Shadowbox : SPAR
71. Former celebrity : EX-STAR

Down
1. Concert haul? : AMP
2. "Ciao" : BYE
3. Swiss mountain : ALP
4. Number one position : TOP SPOT
5. Fair and balanced : EVEN
6. Mexican shawl : SERAPE
7. Ring-shaped reef : ATOLL
8. Spoil : ROT
9. Sternward : AFT
10. Complete rubbish : BUSHWA
11. *Classic comedy set at the fictional Faber College : ANIMAL HOUSE
12. Carpentry pin : DOWEL
13. Bird on a birth announcement : STORK
18. ___ fixe (menu notation) : PRIX
22. Soul singer Redding : OTIS
23. Lacking refinement : CRASS
24. Charming scoundrel : ROGUE
25. *Offer of reconciliation : OLIVE BRANCH
27. Page (through) : LEAF
28. All: Prefix : OMNI-
30. Prosecutors, briefly : DAS
33. "No ___, ands or buts" : IFS
35. Jimmy ___, reporter for the Daily Planet : OLSEN
36. Like overgrown gardens : WEEDY
39. ___ Keith, singer with 20 #1 country hits : TOBY
40. Gram or dram : UNIT
41. Indenting computer key : TAB
44. Fifth Avenue retailer : SAKS
47. Perpetual troublemakers : BAD EGGS
49. Pigsties : MESSES
50. Nerd : DORK
51. Prima ballerina : ETOILE
52. Cookbook amts. : TBSPS
53. Dickens's ___ Heep : URIAH
54. Indy 500 car : RACER
58. Chips and popcorn, in commercialese : SNAX
61. "Singin' in the Rain" dance style : TAP
62. Fertilizable cells : OVA
63. Sever : CUT
64. Santa ___, Calif. : ANA
65. 72, for many golf courses : PAR


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0925-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 25 Sep 16, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Jim Holland & Jeff Chen
THEME: Adding On
We ADD the suffix “-ING” ONTO well-known phrases to arrive at today’s themed answers:
29A. Hoopster observing Ramadan? : FASTING FORWARD (from “fast forward”)
46A. Gangster Luciano performing a risqué prank? : LUCKY STREAKING (from “lucky streak”)
68A. Hobo at the wheel? : BUM STEERING (from “bum steer”)
88A. Where to buy certain Christmas decorations? : STOCKING MARKET (from “stock market”)
105A. Mild form of corporal punishment? : LIGHT SWITCHING (from “light switch”)
15D. Cheering done in a plaza? : SQUARE ROOTING (from “square root”)
57D. Big fan of the "Lord of the Flies" author? : GOLDING DIGGER (from “gold digger”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 18m 31s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 3

  • GHOST (Ghist)
  • GONER (gomer)
  • TONE LOC (Time Loc!!!)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Lament after being backstabbed : ET TU?
It was Shakespeare who popularized the words "Et tu, Brute?" (And you, Brutus?), in his play "Julius Caesar", although the phrase had been around long before he penned his drama. It's not known what Julius Caesar actually said in real life just before he was assassinated on the steps of the Senate in Rome.

18. Classic word game : GHOST
In the word game "Ghost", players take turns in adding letters to a word fragment. The intent is not to complete a word, even though the fragment itself must be the start of some real word. I have never played it, I must admit ...

20. Dollar competitor : ALAMO
The third largest car rental company over recent years is Alamo, a relative newcomer that was founded in 1974. Alamo made inroads (pun!) into the market by popularizing the idea of "unlimited mileage".

24. Glossy fabric : SATIN
The material known as “satin” takes its name from “Zayton”, the medieval Arabic name for the Chinese port city of Quanzhou. Quanzhou was used for the export of large amounts of silk to Europe.

25. Dancer's leader : SANTA
We get the names for Santa’s reindeer from the famous 1823 poem called “A Visit from St. Nicholas”, although we’ve modified a couple of the names over the years. The full list is:
  • Dasher
  • Dancer
  • Prancer
  • Vixen
  • Comet
  • Cupid
  • Donder (originally “Dunder”, and now often “Donner”)
  • Blitzen (originally “Blixem”)
Rudolph was added to the list by retailer Montgomery Ward, would you believe? The store commissioned Robert L. May to create a booklet that could be handed out to children around Christmas in 1939, and May introduced us to a new friend for Santa, namely Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.

26. The Bulldogs of the S.E.C. : UGA
The sports teams of the University of Georgia are called the Bulldogs. The team mascot is known as Hairy Dawg. “Forbes” magazine lists Hairy Dawg as the third best Sports Mascot. Impressive …

29. Hoopster observing Ramadan? : FASTING FORWARD (from “fast forward”)
Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, and is traditionally a period of fasting. The faithful that observe Ramadan refrain from eating, drinking and sexual relations from dawn to dusk everyday, a lesson in patience, humility and spirituality.

32. Electric ___ : EEL
Electrophorus electricus is the biological name for the electric eel. Despite its name, the electric "eel" isn't an eel at all, but rather what is called a knifefish, a fish with an elongated body that is related to the catfish. The electric eel has three pairs of organs along its abdomen, each capable of generating an electric discharge. The shock can go as high as 500 volts with 1 ampere of current (that's 500 watts), and that could perhaps kill a human.

33. Shepherd's pie bit : PEA
Shepherd’s pie, also known as cottage pie, is one of my favorite dishes. It is a meat pie (although my wife makes a vegetarian version), with a crust made from mashed potato.

35. River through Seoul : HAN
Seoul is the capital city of South Korea. The Seoul National Capital Area is home to over 25 million people and is the second largest metropolitan area in the world, second only to Tokyo, Japan.

37. Nearly dried-up Asian sea : ARAL
The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad …

38. Country whose name becomes its language when you drop its last letter : LAOS
The official name for the country of Laos is the Lao People's Democratic Republic. In the Lao language, the country's name is "Meuang Lao". The French ruled Laos as part of French Indochina, having united three separate Lao kingdoms. As there was a plural of "Lao" entities united into one, the French added the "S" and so today we tend to use "Laos" instead of "Lao".

40. Frequent Winter Olympics setting : ALPS
There are eight Alpine countries:
  • Austria
  • Slovenia
  • France
  • Switzerland
  • Liechtenstein
  • Germany
  • Monaco
  • Italy

The first Winter Olympic Games was held in 1924, in Chamonix, France. The Winter and Summer Games were held in the same year until 1992, after which they were staggered so that we have an Olympic Games every two years.

45. Van Susteren formerly of Fox News : GRETA
I remember watching Greta Van Susteren as a legal commentator on CNN during the celebrated O. J. Simpson murder trial. She parlayed those appearances into a permanent slot as co-host of CNN’s “Burden of Proof”, before becoming host of her own show on the Fox News Channel called “On the Record". Van Susteren parted company with Fox in 2016, and apparently that parting wasn’t a happy one. She was immediately replaced on air, without giving her a chance to bid adieu to her TV audience.

46. Gangster Luciano performing a risqué prank? : LUCKY STREAKING (from “lucky streak”)
Lucky Luciano was an American gangster based in New York City, who had been born in Sicily. One of Luciano’s more significant moves was to split New York City into five regions controlled by different Mafia crime families. This act is considered the birth of modern organized crime in the US.

49. Ankle-exposing pants : CAPRIS
Capri pants first became popular on the island of Capri, apparently. They were invented in Europe in 1948, but only became stylish in the US in the sixties. Mary Tyler Moore often wore Capri pants on “The Dick Van Dyke Show” and to some extent she sparked a fashion trend. After a lull in the seventies and eighties there was a resurgence in sales after Uma Thurman wore them (and danced in them) in “Pulp Fiction”. Can’t stand the look of them myself …

51. Captains on The Atlantic, briefly? : EDS
Editors (eds.)

“The Atlantic” magazine was founded in 1857 in Boston as “The Atlantic Monthly”. The impressive list of founding sponsors of included Ralph Waldo Emerson, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Harriet Beecher Stowe. I guess double-barreled names were all the go back then …

54. Neighbor of N.Y. : ONT
The Canadian province of Ontario takes its name from the Great Lake. In turn, Lake Ontario’s name is thought to be derived from “Ontari:io”, a Huron word meaning “great lake”. Ontario is home to the nation’s capital of Ottawa as well as Toronto, Canada’s most populous city (and the capital of the province).

55. Young swan : CYGNET
An adult male swan is called a “cob”, and an adult female is a “pen”. Young swans are called “swanlings” or “cygnets”.

58. Colleens : LASSES
“Cailín” is the Irish word for “girl”, and is usually anglicized as “Colleen”.

62. Whole ___ : FOODS
The first Whole Foods Market was opened in 1980 by John Mackey and partners in Austin, Texas. For the two years prior to the Whole Foods launch, Mackay was operating his natural foods store that he called “Saferway”, as opposed to “Safeway”. Clever name …

63. I.Q. test name : BINET
The first usable intelligence test was invented by a French psychologist named Alfred Binet. Binet collaborated with Théodore Simon and together they produced the Binet-Simon Intelligence Scale that is still in use today for IQ tests.

64. 1982 #1 hit with the line "Watch out boy she'll chew you up" : MANEATER
Ostensibly, the 1982 Hall & Oates megahit “Maneater” is about a woman, and that’s how the final lyrics were written. However, John Oates tells us that the song was originally written with New York City in mind, and how the city could “chew you up”.

68. Hobo at the wheel? : BUM STEERING (from “bum steer”)
“Bum steer” is a slang term meaning “misleading advice”.

No one seems to know for sure how the term "hobo" originated, although there are lots of colorful theories. My favorite is that "hobo" comes from the first letters in the words "ho-meward bo-und", but it doesn't seem very plausible. A kind blog reader tells me that according to Click and Clack from PBS's "Car Talk" (a great source!), "hobo" comes from "hoe boy". Hoe boys were young men with hoes looking for work after the Civil War. Hobos differed from "tramps" and "bums", in that "bums" refused to work, "tramps" worked when they had to, while "hobos" traveled in search of work.

75. Movie Hall : ANNIE
I suppose if there is any Woody Allen movie that I enjoy watching, it’s “Annie Hall” from 1977. I think Diane Keaton is a great actress and she is wonderful in this film. You’ll see Paul Simon as well, making a rare movie appearance, and even Truman Capote playing himself. The film is also famous for sparking a movement in the fashion world to adopt the “Annie Hall” look, that very distinctive appearance championed by Diane Keaton as the Annie Hall character.

76. Bridge words : I PASS
That would be bridge, the card game.

80. Enliven, with "up" : GIN
“To gin up” is a slang term meaning “to enliven, excite”. The term probably derives from the older “to ginger up”. Gingering up was the rather nasty practice of putting ginger up inside a horse to make it lively and move with a high tail.

84. Sugar suffix : -OSE
Sugars are usually named using the “-ose” suffix e.g. glucose, fructose, sucrose.

85. Flatow of NPR's "Science Friday" : IRA
"Science Friday" is an excellent talk show broadcast every Friday on NPR, and hosted by Ira Flatow. Flatow is known to television audiences as the host of “Newton’s Apple”, which ran from 1983 to 1998.

86. Drops a line : ANGLES
We use the verb “to angle” to mean “to fish” because “angel” was an Old English word for a hook.

94. Early PC platform : MS-DOS
MS-DOS (short for Microsoft Disk Operating System) was the main operating system used by IBM-compatible PCs in the eighties and for much of the nineties.

96. Accident-investigating agcy. : NTSB
The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is responsible for the investigation of major accidents involving transportation. Included in this broad definition is the transportation of fluids in pipelines. The organization is independent in that it has no ties to other government agencies or departments so that its investigations can be viewed as “impartial”. The NTSB also earns a little money for the US as it hires out its investigation teams to countries who don’t have the necessary resources available on their own soil.

97. Part of STEM, for short : TECH
The acronym STEM stands for the disciplines of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. An alternative acronym with a similar meaning is MINT, standing for mathematics, information sciences, natural sciences and technology.

105. Mild form of corporal punishment? : LIGHT SWITCHING (from “light switch”)
Corporal punishment in schools is still legal in 20 US States, mostly in the south of the country.

112. Home of the Pampas: Abbr. : ARG
The Pampas are fertile lowlands covering a large part of Argentina, Uruguay and some of Brazil. “Pampa” is a Quechua word meaning “plain”.

116. Actress Swinton : TILDA
Tilda Swinton is an English actress, quite famous in her native land. Swinton made a big name for herself outside the UK when she played the “baddie” in the 2007 movie “Michael Clayton”, opposite the “goodie” played by George Clooney.

117. Golfer Michelle : WIE
Michelle Wie is an American golfer on the LPGA Tour. Wie began playing golf at the age of four and was the youngest player ever to qualify for an LPGA tour event. She turned pro just before her 16th birthday ...

118. "Scooby-Doo" girl : VELMA
“Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!” is a series of cartoons produced for Hanna-Barbera Productions, first broadcast in 1969. The title character is a great Dane dog owned by a young male called Shaggy Rogers. The character’s name was inspired by the famous “doo-be-doo-be-doo” refrain in the Frank Sinatra hit “Strangers in the Night”. Shaggy was voiced by famed disk jockey Casey Kasem.

119. Commercial cow : ELSIE
Elsie the Cow is the mascot of the Borden Company. Elsie first appeared at the New York World's Fair in 1939, introduced to symbolize the perfect dairy product. Elsie was also given a husband named Elmer the Bull. Elmer eventually moved over to the chemical division of Borden where he gave his name to Elmer's Glue.

120. Brownstone feature : STOOP
A stoop is a raised platform at the door of a house. “Stoop” came into American and Canadian English in the mid-1700s from the Dutch “stoep” meaning “flight of steps”.

121. The Bosporus, e.g.: Abbr. : STR
The Dardanelles and Bosphorus (also “Bosporus”) are two straits in Turkey. The Bosphorus and the Dardanelles lie either side of the Sea of Marmara, allowing continuous navigation from the Aegean Sea to the Black Sea. The Turkish Straits also form the boundary between Europe and Asia.

Down
2. "Walden" writer : THOREAU
Henry David Thoreau is a personal hero of mine. Thoreau is best known for his book called “Walden” published in 1854. The book outlines his philosophy of life and details his experiences living in a cabin near Walden Pond just outside Concord, Massachusetts.

3. "Wild Thing" rapper : TONE LOC
Tone Lōc is the stage name of the rapper Anthony Smith.

6. Saint for whom a Minnesota college is named : OLAF
St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota was named for the former king and patron saint of Norway, Olaf II.

7. ___ Hari : MATA
Mata Hari was the stage name used by Margaretha Geertruida Zella, born in the Netherlands in 1876. After an unsuccessful and somewhat tragic marriage, Zella moved to Paris in 1903 where she struggled to make a living. By 1905 she was working as an exotic dancer and using the name Mata Hari. She was a successful courtesan, notably moving in various circles of high-ranking military officers. She apparently worked as a double agent, both for the French and the Germans. When Mata Hari was accused by the French of passing information to the enemy, she was tried, found guilty and executed by firing squad at the height of WW1, in 1917.

8. Powerless group? : AMISH
The Amish are a group of Christian churches, a subgroup of the Mennonite churches. The Amish church originated in Switzerland and Alsace in 1693 when it was founded by Jakob Ammann. It was Ammann who gave the name to the Amish people. Many Amish people came to Pennsylvania in the 18th century.

11. Party handouts : SWAG BAGS
“Swag” is “loot, stolen property”, a term that started out as criminal slang in England in the 1830s. Swag is also the name given to the promotional freebies available at some events.

13. ___ Chigurh, villain in "No Country for Old Men" : ANTON
American novelist Cormac McCarthy published the novel "No Country for Old Men" in 2005, and saw it adapted into a very successful film of the same name released in 2007. The title comes from the opening line of the William Butler Yeats poem "Sailing to Byzantium", which we Irish schoolkids all had to read and learn to recite ...

16. Baked with breadcrumbs and cheese : AU GRATIN
To cook “au gratin” is to prepare something in a shallow dish with a crust of bread or cheese on top. In America we tend to think mainly of potatoes prepared this way, but the technique can be used for many different dishes. Notably, what we call French onion soup is called a “gratinée” in France, an onion soup with some bread and cheese baked on top.

31. ___ speed : WARP
In the “Star Trek” universe, the warp speed achieved by the warp drive engines is very much like our real-world Mach number. Just as a plane traveling at Mach 1 is moving at the speed of sound, a starship traveling at warp factor 1 is moving at the speed of light. Mach 2 is twice the speed of sound, and warp factor 2 is twice the speed of light. Cool, huh …?

34. Cockpit datum: Abbr. : ALT
Altitude (alt.)

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the original “cockpit” was a pit used for fighting cocks. The term was then applied nautically, as the name for the compartment below decks used as living quarters by midshipmen. The cockpit of a boat today, usually on a smaller vessel, is a sunken area towards the stern in which sits the helmsman and others (who can fit!). The usage extended to aircraft in the 1910s and to cars in the 1930s.

42. Carried chairs : SEDANS
A sedan chair is a litter that was used in England. Being a litter means that it had no wheels and was powered by humans. Most sedan chairs were built for one passenger, with two men providing the "lift". Henry VIII had a sedan chair, but towards the end of his opulent life he needed four strong men to carry it.

44. Nephew of Cain : ENOS
According to the Bible, Adam and Eve had several children, although only the first three are mentioned by name: Cain, Abel and Seth. Enos was the son of Seth, and therefore the grandson of Adam and Eve. According to the ancient Jewish work called the Book of Jubilees, Enos married his own sister Noam.

45. King who's a friend of Oprah : GAYLE
Gayle King is a co-anchor on the news magazine show “CBS This Morning”. King met Oprah Winfrey in 1976, with the pair now describing each other as best friends.

47. First name in fashion : YVES
Yves Saint-Laurent (YSL) was a French fashion designer, actually born in Algeria. Saint-Laurent started off working as an assistant to Christian Dior at the age of 17. Dior died just four years later, and as a very young man Saint-Laurent was named head of the House of Dior. However, in 1950 Saint-Laurent was conscripted into the French Army and ended up in a military hospital after suffering a mental breakdown from the hazing inflicted on him by his fellow soldiers. His treatment included electroshock therapy and administration of sedatives and psychoactive drugs. He was released from hospital, managed to pull his life back together and started his own fashion house. A remarkable story …

53. ___ of Glamis, title in Shakespeare : THANE
Thanes were Scottish aristocrats. The most famous thanes have to be the Shakespearean characters Macbeth (the Thane of Glamis, later Thane of Cawdor) and MacDuff (the Thane of Fife). Other thanes in "Macbeth" are Ross, Lennox and Angus, as well as Menteith and Caithness.

55. Corp. money pros : CFOS
Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

56. One holding many positions : YOGI
A yogi is a practitioner of yoga.

57. Big fan of the "Lord of the Flies" author? : GOLDING DIGGER (from “gold digger”)
"Lord of the Flies" is such a great story! William Golding wrote the novel as an allegory of society. The most famous screen adaptation was made in 1963, directed by Peter Brook.

65. Late author Wiesel : ELIE
Elie Wiesel was a holocaust survivor, best known for his book "Night" that tells of his experiences in Auschwitz and Buchenwald. Wiesel was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986.

77. Hoped-for result of swiping right on Tinder : DATE
Tinder is a matchmaking app that uses Facebook profiles. Users “swipe” photos of potential matches, either to the right (“like”) or to the left (“not interested”). Users who “match” each other can then chat within the app.

79. 75-Down around a saint : NIMBUS
(75D. See 79-Down : AURA)
Nimbus (plural “nimbi”) is another word for a halo, or an aura. “Nimbus” is Latin, and can also translate as “cloud”.

83. TV spinoff of 2002 : CSI: MIAMI
The “CSI” franchise of TV shows has been tremendously successful, but seems to be winding down. “CSI: Miami” (the “worst” of the franchise, I think) was cancelled in 2012 after ten seasons. “CSI: NY” (the “best” of the franchise) was cancelled in 2013 after nine seasons. The original “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”, set in Las Vegas, hung in there until 2015 when it ended with a two-hour TV movie. The youngest show in the series is “CSI: Cyber”, and it’s still on the air.

87. Narrow arm of the sea : LOCH
“Loch” is the Scottish Gaelic word for “lake”. The Irish Gaelic word is “lough”.

89. Part of the inner ear : COCHLEA
The cochlea is a spiral structure in the inner ear. Included in the cochlea are hair cells that receive sound vibrations, causing them to move. The movement of the hairs is converted into nerve impulses that are interpreted in the brain.

90. Channel with "Family Feud" reruns : GSN
Game Show Network (GSN)

“Family Feud” is an American game show that has been remade in countries all over the world. We even make a version in Ireland that we call “Family Fortunes”.

92. Galápagos Islands' country : ECUADOR
The Galápagos Islands lie over 500 miles west of Ecuador. The Galápagos owe their celebrity to the voyage of HMS Beagle which landed there in 1835, with Charles Darwin on board. It was Darwin’s study of various species on the islands that inspired him to postulate his Theory of Evolution.

93. Setting for many New Yorker cartoons : THERAPY
The world-famous "New Yorker" magazine is published by Conde Nast. It was founded back in 1925 by Harold Ross and his wife Jane Grant, a reporter for "The New York Times". The venerated magazine has become famous for many aspects of its content, including its stylish covers and its cartoons.

99. Actor Milo : O’SHEA
Milo O'Shea was a great Irish character actor from Dublin who has appeared in everything from "Romeo and Juliet" to "The West Wing". Sadly, O’Shea passed away in 2013, in New York City.

103. Beer ___ : NUTS
Beer Nuts is the brand name for a snack consisting of peanuts in a sweet-and-salty glaze. There’s no beer in the recipe, just the suggestion that the snack goes well with beer.

106. DVR choice : TIVO
TiVo was introduced in 1999 and was the world's first commercially successful DVR (Digital Video Recorder).

108. Pluto flyby org. : NASA
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Pluto was discovered in 1930, and was welcomed as the ninth planet in our solar system. Pluto is relatively small in size, just one fifth of the mass of our own moon. In the seventies, astronomers began to discover more large objects in the solar system, including Eris, a "scattered disc object" at the outer reaches. Given that Eris is actually bigger than Pluto, and other objects really aren't that much smaller, Pluto's status as a planet was drawn into question. In 2006 there was a scientific definition for a "planet" agreed for the first time, resulting in Pluto being relegated to the status of "dwarf planet", along with Eris.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Lament after being backstabbed : ET TU?
5. Crack up : GO MAD
10. Test one's metal? : ASSAY
15. Down : SAD
18. Classic word game : GHOST
20. Dollar competitor : ALAMO
21. Contemptible sort : SWINE
22. "___ linda!" ("How pretty!," in Spanish) : QUE
23. One who's dunzo : GONER
24. Glossy fabric : SATIN
25. Dancer's leader : SANTA
26. The Bulldogs of the S.E.C. : UGA
27. Line at the side of a photo : CREDIT
29. Hoopster observing Ramadan? : FASTING FORWARD (from “fast forward”)
32. Electric ___ : EEL
33. Shepherd's pie bit : PEA
35. River through Seoul : HAN
36. Bakery buy : BUN
37. Nearly dried-up Asian sea : ARAL
38. Country whose name becomes its language when you drop its last letter : LAOS
40. Frequent Winter Olympics setting : ALPS
43. Sign from a third base coach, say : STEAL
45. Van Susteren formerly of Fox News : GRETA
46. Gangster Luciano performing a risqué prank? : LUCKY STREAKING (from “lucky streak”)
49. Ankle-exposing pants : CAPRIS
50. "___ been thinking ..." : I’VE
51. Captains on The Atlantic, briefly? : EDS
52. By and large : MOSTLY
54. Neighbor of N.Y. : ONT
55. Young swan : CYGNET
58. Colleens : LASSES
60. Uncommon spelling for a common greeting : HALLO
62. Whole ___ : FOODS
63. I.Q. test name : BINET
64. 1982 #1 hit with the line "Watch out boy she'll chew you up" : MANEATER
67. Look lecherously : OGLE
68. Hobo at the wheel? : BUM STEERING (from “bum steer”)
71. Cunningness : WILE
72. Many web advertisements : SIDEBARS
74. Overly indulge in : ABUSE
75. Movie Hall : ANNIE
76. Bridge words : I PASS
77. Evil spirits : DEMONS
79. Gently jabbed : NUDGED
80. Enliven, with "up" : GIN
82. Build-it-yourself auto : KIT CAR
84. Sugar suffix : -OSE
85. Flatow of NPR's "Science Friday" : IRA
86. Drops a line : ANGLES
88. Where to buy certain Christmas decorations? : STOCKING MARKET (from “stock market”)
94. Early PC platform : MS-DOS
95. Link with : TIE TO
96. Accident-investigating agcy. : NTSB
97. Part of STEM, for short : TECH
98. Long tale : EPIC
99. ___-pah : OOM
100. Subzero, maybe : ICY
102. One whose life is in order? : NUN
104. Lament : RUE
105. Mild form of corporal punishment? : LIGHT SWITCHING (from “light switch”)
110. Poor : SUBPAR
112. Home of the Pampas: Abbr. : ARG
113. "Rumor has it ..." : I HEAR ...
114. Partner of live : LEARN
116. Actress Swinton : TILDA
117. Golfer Michelle : WIE
118. "Scooby-Doo" girl : VELMA
119. Commercial cow : ELSIE
120. Brownstone feature : STOOP
121. The Bosporus, e.g.: Abbr. : STR
122. Haven : OASIS
123. Change with the times : ADAPT
124. Moving well : SPRY

Down
1. Ovum : EGG CELL
2. "Walden" writer : THOREAU
3. "Wild Thing" rapper : TONE LOC
4. How many college textbooks are bought : USED
5. Lot of fun, informally : GAS
6. Saint for whom a Minnesota college is named : OLAF
7. ___ Hari : MATA
8. Powerless group? : AMISH
9. "It's worse than you can imagine" : DON’T ASK
10. Org. : ASSN
11. Party handouts : SWAG BAGS
12. Wicked : SINFUL
13. ___ Chigurh, villain in "No Country for Old Men" : ANTON
14. It takes months to complete : YEAR
15. Cheering done in a plaza? : SQUARE ROOTING (from “square root”)
16. Baked with breadcrumbs and cheese : AU GRATIN
17. Bringing up the rear : DEAD LAST
19. Set off, as a security alarm : TRIP
28. China display : TEASET
30. Under the wire, so to speak : IN TIME
31. ___ speed : WARP
34. Cockpit datum: Abbr. : ALT
39. Merely superficial : SKIN-DEEP
41. Olympics events rarely shown in prime time : PRELIMS
42. Carried chairs : SEDANS
44. Nephew of Cain : ENOS
45. King who's a friend of Oprah : GAYLE
47. First name in fashion : YVES
48. Word after liquid or fixed : ASSET
49. Sword fight sound : CLANG
53. ___ of Glamis, title in Shakespeare : THANE
55. Corp. money pros : CFOS
56. One holding many positions : YOGI
57. Big fan of the "Lord of the Flies" author? : GOLDING DIGGER (from “gold digger”)
59. Mirror buildup, at times : STEAM
61. Dangerous backyard projectile : LAWN DART
63. Pop : BURST
64. Erroneously hit "reply all" instead of "reply," say : MISSENT
65. Late author Wiesel : ELIE
66. Thatching material : REED
68. Underpinning : BASIS
69. Text on an iPad, say : E-BOOK
70. Collars : RUNS IN
73. Really feels the heat : BAKES
75. See 79-Down : AURA
77. Hoped-for result of swiping right on Tinder : DATE
78. Hot : EROTIC
79. 75-Down around a saint : NIMBUS
80. Wardens enforce them : GAME LAWS
81. Emotionally, if not physically : IN SPIRIT
83. TV spinoff of 2002 : CSI: MIAMI
87. Narrow arm of the sea : LOCH
89. Part of the inner ear : COCHLEA
90. Channel with "Family Feud" reruns : GSN
91. Sound of a pebble hitting water : KERPLOP!
92. Galápagos Islands' country : ECUADOR
93. Setting for many New Yorker cartoons : THERAPY
95. They get wetter as they dry : TOWELS
99. Actor Milo : O’SHEA
101. Bottom line : YIELD
103. Beer ___ : NUTS
106. DVR choice : TIVO
107. Refrain syllables : TRAS
108. Pluto flyby org. : NASA
109. Enthrall : GRIP
111. They come straight from the horse's mouth : BITS
115. Bottom line : NET


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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