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1031-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Oct 16, Monday




QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers


CROSSWORD SETTER: Peter A. Collins
THEME: Song, Song Titles
Each of today’s themed answers is a 3-word song title, with the first and second words repeated:
17A. 1988 #1 hit for UB40 : RED RED WINE
24A. 1971 hit for Marvin Gaye subtitled "The Ecology" : MERCY MERCY ME
39A. 1920s standard with the lyric "Sugar's sweet, so is she" : BYE BYE BLACKBIRD
51A. 1986 hit for Talking Heads : WILD WILD LIFE
63A. 1990 hit that samples the bass line from Queen/Bowie's "Under Pressure" : ICE ICE BABY
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 02s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Twin city of Raleigh : DURHAM
The North Carolina city of Durham started out as a rail depot between the already-settled towns of Raleigh and Hillsborough. As such, the community initially went by the name “Durham Station”, with the name referring to Dr. Bartlett Durham, on whose land the rail depot was built.

10. The "m" of e = mc^2 : MASS
In Albert Einstein’s famous equation E=mc², “E” stands for energy, “m” stands for mass, and “c” stands for the speed of light (from the Latin “celeritas” meaning “speed”).

14. Italian cheese : ASIAGO
Asiago is a crumbly cheese, named after the region in northeastern Italy from where it originates.

17. 1988 #1 hit for UB40 : RED RED WINE
The song “Red Red Wine” was written and originally recorded by Neil Diamond, in 1967. The lyrics refer to someone drowning his sorrows in red wine. The most famous cover version of the song was recorded by UB40 in 1982. It’s an interesting exercise to compare the mood of the two very different recordings, both of which I think have their merits …

22. Empty ___ (parent whose children have all moved away) : NESTER
Still working on that …

24. 1971 hit for Marvin Gaye subtitled "The Ecology" : MERCY MERCY ME
“Mercy Mercy Me” is a 1971 Marvin Gaye song that bemoans the fate of the environment due to the ravages of man.

27. Toy gun pellets : BBS
A BB gun is an air pistol or rifle that shoots birdshot known as BBs. Birdshot comes in a number of different sizes, from size 9 (0.070″ in diameter) to size FF (.230″). Birdshot that is size BB (0.180" in diameter) gives the airgun its name.

31. List-ending abbr. : ET AL
Et alii (et al.) is the equivalent of et cetera (etc.), with et cetera being used in place of a list of objects, and et alii used for a list of names. In fact “et al.” can stand for et alii (for a group of males, or males and females), aliae (for a group of women) and et alia (for a group of neuter nouns, or for a group of people where the intent is to retain gender-neutrality).

34. "___ Lay Dying" : AS I
“As I Lay Dying” is a novel by William Faulkner first published in 1930. The book has an unusual structure, with stream of consciousness writing throughout. There is one whole chapter that I’d like to quote here:
My mother is a fish.
That’s a five-word chapter …

39. 1920s standard with the lyric "Sugar's sweet, so is she" : BYE BYE BLACKBIRD
“Bye Bye Blackbird” is a song published and first recorded in 1926. It has been recorded many, many times over the past decades, including separate versions by two ex-Beatles. Ringo Starr including the song on his 1970 album “Sentimental Journey”, and it also appears as a track on Paul McCartney’s 2012 album “Kisses on the Bottom”.

43. Woman in "The King and I" : ANNA
“The King and I” is a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical based on a book by Margaret Landon called “Anna and the King of Siam” first published in 1944. Landon’s book is based on a true story, told in the memoirs of Anna Leonowens. Leonowens was the governess of the children of King Mongkut of Siam in the 1860s, and she also taught the king’s wives.

44. 12, on a grandfather clock : XII
There are several sizes of “longcase clocks”, tall, freestanding clocks driven by a pendulum swinging inside a tower below the clock face. A longcase clock over 6 feet tall is called a grandfather, and one below five feet is a granddaughter, One that falls between five and six feet is known as a grandmother. The name of the clock derives from an 1876 song called “My Grandfather’s Clock”.

45. ___ bin Laden, 2011 Navy SEALs target : OSAMA
Osama bin Laden founded his militant Islamist group called al-Qaeda in the late eighties. “Al-Qaeda” translates as “the base”, and can refer to a military base. It was originally the name of a training camp set up for mujahedin fighters opposing the Russians who occupied Afghanistan at the time.

SEAL is an acronym used by the US Navy’s SEa, Air and Land teams. The SEALs were born out of the Navy’s special warfare groups from WWII, like the Underwater Demolition Teams and the Motor Torpedo Boat Squadrons. The Navy SEAL unit was established soon after President Kennedy’s famous speech in which he announced the plan to put a man on the moon, as in the same speech the president allocated $100m of funding to strengthen special operations forces. The Navy used some of this money to set up guerrilla and counterguerrilla units, which soon became the SEALs.

46. Salt, chemically : NACL
Sodium chloride (NaCl, common salt) is an ionic compound, a crystal lattice made up of large chloride (Cl) ions in a cubic structure, with smaller sodium (Na) ions in between the chlorides.

48. Psychic power, informally : ESP
Extrasensory perception (ESP)

50. June preceder : MAY
The month of May was named after Maia, the Greek goddess of fertility.

51. 1986 hit for Talking Heads : WILD WILD LIFE
“Wild Wild Life” is a song recorded by the new wave band Talking Heads in 1986. That’s all I know …

56. Classical music halls : ODEONS
In Ancient Greece an odeon (also “odeum”) was like a small theater, with "odeon" literally meaning a "building for musical competition". Odea were used in both Greece and Rome for entertainments such as musical shows and poetry readings.

62. Gas in commercial signs : NEON
The basic design of neon lighting was first demonstrated at the Paris Motor Show in 1910. Such lighting is made up of glass tubes containing a vacuum into which has been introduced a small amount of neon gas. When a voltage is applied between two electrodes inside the tube, the neon gas “glows” and gives off the familiar light.

63. 1990 hit that samples the bass line from Queen/Bowie's "Under Pressure" : ICE ICE BABY
“Ice Ice Baby” is 1990 song released by rap artists Vanilla Ice and DJ Earthquake.

66. 1941 film "citizen" : KANE
1941’s “Citizen Kane” was the first film made by Orson Welles, one considered by many to be the finest film ever made. It’s a remarkable achievement by Wells, as he played the lead, and also produced and directed. Despite all the accolades for “Citizen Kane” over the decades, the movie was far from a commercial success in its early run and actually lost money at the box office.

69. Toboggan, e.g. : SLED
“Toboggan” came into English from the French Canadian “tabagane”, the name for a long sled with a flat bottom. The French Canadian word is probably from the Algonquian word for a sled, “tobakun”,

70. Route displayer on a dashboard, for short : GPS
Global positioning system (GPS)

Down
1. Something thrown at a bull's-eye : DART
Darts is a wonderful game often played in English and Irish pubs, even over here in America. The scoring in a traditional game of darts is difficult to describe in a sentence or two, but the game of darts called “Round the Clock” is simply hitting the numbers 1 through 20 in sequence.

2. Pusher's customer : USER
That would be the pushing and using of illegal drugs.

4. ___ pants (baggy wear) : HAREM
Harem pants are an item of female clothing that originated in the Arabian Peninsula. They are loose fitting pants that gather at the ankle. The pants worn by belly dancers would be called harem pants.

8. German "a" : EIN
The definite article in German is der, die or das, for masculine, feminine and neuter nouns. The indefinite article is ein, eine or ein, again depending on the gender of the noun. A further complication, relative to English, is that the masculine form (and only the masculine form) of the article changes when used in the accusative case, when used with the object of a sentence. The accusative forms are “den” and “einen”.

12. Cry to an attack dog : SIC ‘EM!
“Sic ’em” is an attack order given to a dog, instructing the animal to growl, bark or even bite. The term dates back to the 1830s, with “sic” being a variation of “seek”.

13. One cubic meter : STERE
“Stere” is a metric measure, although it is not part of the modern metric system. Nowadays the stere is used as a measure for firewood, and is equal to one cubic meter.

18. City between Dallas and Austin : WACO
The Texas city of Waco is named for the Wichita people known as the “Waco”, who occupied the area for thousands of years.

23. A pitching ace has a low one, in brief : ERA
Earned run average (ERA)

25. Like a Monday crossword puzzle, relatively speaking : EASY
I must admit, before I started doing crossword puzzles regularly, I had no idea that the puzzles increased in difficulty level as the week progressed …

26. Western plateau : MESA
“What’s the difference between a butte and a mesa?” Both are hills with flat tops, but a mesa has a top that is wider than it is tall. A butte is a much narrower formation, taller than it is wide.

28. ___ Mawr College : BRYN
I used to live not far from Bryn-mawr (sometimes written as "Brynmwar") in Wales, the town with the highest elevation in the country. Appropriately enough, "bryn mawr" is Welsh for "big hill". There is also a Bryn Mawr in Pennsylvania (note the different capitalization) that is named after its Welsh counterpart. At the Pennsylvania location there's a Bryn Mawr college, a private women's school that was the first American university to offer graduate degrees to women.

34. With 27-Down, foe of the Forty Thieves : ALI
(27D. See 34-Down : BABA)
In the folk tale “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves”, the title character is a poor woodcutter who discovers the magic words “Open Sesame” that open the thieves’ den.

36. Setting for "The King and I" : SIAM
Siam was the official name of Thailand up to 1939 (and again from 1945 to 1949).

37. Funny Bombeck : ERMA
Erma Bombeck wrote for newspapers for about 35 years, producing more than 4,000 witty and humorous columns describing her home life in suburbia.

38. June 6, 1944 : D-DAY
The most famous D-Day in history was June 6, 1944, the date of the Normandy landings in WWII. The term “D-Day” is used by the military to designate the day on which a combat operations are to be launched, especially when the actual date has yet to be determined. What D stands for seems to have been lost in the mists of time although the tradition is that D just stands for “Day”. In fact, the French have a similar term, “Jour J” (Day J), with a similar meaning. We also use H-Hour to denote the hour the attack is to commence.

41. New York City mayor de Blasio : BILL
Bill de Blasio was a elected Mayor of New York City in 2013, and succeeded Mayor Michael Bloomberg the following January. De Blasio is married to poet and activist Chirlane McCray.

47. Barley beard : AWN
“Awn” is the name given to hair or bristle-like structures found in numerous species of plants. In some species, like barley, the awns can contain photosynthetic tissue.

48. "The Time Machine" race : ELOI
In the 1895 novel by H. G. Wells called "The Time Machine", there are two races that the hero encounter in his travels into the future. The Eloi are the “beautiful people” who live on the planet's surface. The Morlocks are a race of cannibals living underground who use the Eloi as food.

49. "30 Rock" or "3rd Rock From the Sun" : SITCOM
“30 Rock” is a sitcom on NBC that was created by the show’s star Tina Fey. Fey is an ex-performer and writer from “Saturday Night Live” and uses her experiences on that show as a basis for the “30 Rock” storyline. Fey plays Liz Lemon, the head writer for the fictional sketch comedy series “TGS with Tracy Jordan”.

“3rd Rock From the Sun” is a sci-fi sitcom starring John Lithgow as high commander of an expedition of extraterrestrials sent to Earth to observe the behavior of human beings. The four visitors regard the Earth as very insignificant, just the “third rock (planet) from the Sun”.

51. Policy experts : WONKS
A “wonk” is an overly studious person. It is an American slang term that has been around at least since 1954. More recently, “wonk” has acquired an air of respectability as it has come to mean someone who has studies a topic thoroughly and become somewhat expert.

53. Sierra ___ (African country) : LEONE
The Republic of Sierra Leone is a country in West Africa, lying on the Atlantic Coast. The capital city of Freetown was originally set up as a colony to house the “Black Poor” of London, England. These people were mainly freed British slaves of Caribbean descent who were living a miserable life in the run-down parts of London. Perhaps to help the impoverished souls, perhaps to rid the streets of “a problem”, three ships were chartered in 1787 to transport a group of blacks, with some whites, to a piece of land purchased in Sierra Leone. Those who made the voyage were guaranteed British citizenship and protection. The descendants of these immigrants, and others who made the journey over the next 60 years, make up the ethnic group that’s today called the Sierra Leone Creole.

54. Bottom-of-the-bottle stuff : DREGS
The dregs in wine, the sediment that settles during fermentation (and sometimes in the bottle), is also called “lees”.

59. Word that fills both blanks in "This ___ is your ___" : LAND
Woody Guthrie was a singer-songwriter best known for his recording of the folk song “This Land is Your Land”, the lyrics of which were written by Guthrie himself.

60. Brother of Cain : ABEL
According to the Bible, Adam and Eve had several children, although only the first three are mentioned by name: Cain, Abel and Seth.

61. Jekyll's alter ego : HYDE
Robert Louis Stevenson’s novella “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” was first published in 1886. There are many tales surrounding the writing of the story including one that the author wrote the basic tale in just three to six days, and spent a few weeks simply refining it. Allegedly, Stevenson’s use of cocaine stimulated his creative juices during those few days of writing.

65. Commercial lead-in to Pen : EPI-
EpiPen is a brand name of epinephrine auto-injector. An EpiPen delivers a measured dose of epinephrine, usually for the treatment of an allergic reaction.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Twin city of Raleigh : DURHAM
7. Dictionary offering: Abbr. : DEF
10. The "m" of e = mc^2 : MASS
14. Italian cheese : ASIAGO
15. Tire filler : AIR
16. Give off : EMIT
17. 1988 #1 hit for UB40 : RED RED WINE
19. "___ going!" : NICE
20. Oak or elm : TREE
21. Big feature on a donkey : EAR
22. Empty ___ (parent whose children have all moved away) : NESTER
24. 1971 hit for Marvin Gaye subtitled "The Ecology" : MERCY MERCY ME
27. Toy gun pellets : BBS
30. Year: Sp. : ANO
31. List-ending abbr. : ET AL
32. Regions : AREAS
34. "___ Lay Dying" : AS I
35. Like some textbooks : USED
39. 1920s standard with the lyric "Sugar's sweet, so is she" : BYE BYE BLACKBIRD
43. Woman in "The King and I" : ANNA
44. 12, on a grandfather clock : XII
45. ___ bin Laden, 2011 Navy SEALs target : OSAMA
46. Salt, chemically : NACL
48. Psychic power, informally : ESP
50. June preceder : MAY
51. 1986 hit for Talking Heads : WILD WILD LIFE
56. Classical music halls : ODEONS
57. Decay : ROT
58. Yawn-inducing : BLAH
62. Gas in commercial signs : NEON
63. 1990 hit that samples the bass line from Queen/Bowie's "Under Pressure" : ICE ICE BABY
66. 1941 film "citizen" : KANE
67. Complain, complain, complain : NAG
68. Laid down the first card : OPENED
69. Toboggan, e.g. : SLED
70. Route displayer on a dashboard, for short : GPS
71. Word with finger or America : MIDDLE

Down
1. Something thrown at a bull's-eye : DART
2. Pusher's customer : USER
3. Carnival attraction : RIDE
4. ___ pants (baggy wear) : HAREM
5. See 6-Down : AGE
6. With 5-Down, present time : MODERN
7. Grocery section with milk and yogurt : DAIRY
8. German "a" : EIN
9. Crazily fast : FRENETIC
10. "Old boys' network" meeting places : MEN’S CLUBS
11. Friendliness : AMITY
12. Cry to an attack dog : SIC ‘EM!
13. One cubic meter : STERE
18. City between Dallas and Austin : WACO
23. A pitching ace has a low one, in brief : ERA
25. Like a Monday crossword puzzle, relatively speaking : EASY
26. Western plateau : MESA
27. See 34-Down : BABA
28. ___ Mawr College : BRYN
29. Observed : SEEN
33. Left behind : ABANDONED
34. With 27-Down, foe of the Forty Thieves : ALI
36. Setting for "The King and I" : SIAM
37. Funny Bombeck : ERMA
38. June 6, 1944 : D-DAY
40. Removing surgically : EXCISING
41. New York City mayor de Blasio : BILL
42. Head: Ger. : KOPF
47. Barley beard : AWN
48. "The Time Machine" race : ELOI
49. "30 Rock" or "3rd Rock From the Sun" : SITCOM
51. Policy experts : WONKS
52. Perfect : IDEAL
53. Sierra ___ (African country) : LEONE
54. Bottom-of-the-bottle stuff : DREGS
55. Flowed back : EBBED
59. Word that fills both blanks in "This ___ is your ___" : LAND
60. Brother of Cain : ABEL
61. Jekyll's alter ego : HYDE
64. Item of apparel often worn backward : CAP
65. Commercial lead-in to Pen : EPI-


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1030-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Oct 16, Sunday




QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers


CROSSWORD SETTER: Caleb Madison
THEME: Updates
Each of today’s themed answers starts with the name of a Mac operating system, and those operating systems are also named for big cats:
65A. Things found at the starts of the answers to the six starred clues : MAC OPERATING SYSTEMS

28A. *2000s group with three eponymous Disney Channel films, with "the" : CHEETAH GIRLS
34A. *Athletic footwear once promoted by Pelé : PUMA SNEAKERS
58A. *Enzo Ferrari called it "the most beautiful car ever made" : JAGUAR XKE
75A. *Showy orange bloom : TIGER LILY
96A. *Something spotted on a runway? : LEOPARD PRINT
103A. *1968 Peter O'Toole drama, with "The" : LION IN WINTER
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 26m 58s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. One talking on the phone, nowadays? : SIRI
Siri is software application that works with Apple’s iOS operating system. “Siri” is an acronym standing for Speech Interpretation and Recognition Interface. You’ve probably seen the ads on television, with folks talking to their iPhones asking for information and responding with a voice. I hear that Google is a little scared by Siri, as Siri is non-visual. There’s no need to touch a screen or a keyboard to work with Siri, no opportunity to click on one of Google’s ads! By the way, voice-over artist Susan Bennett revealed herself as the female American voice of Siri not that long ago. The British version of Siri is called Daniel, and the Australian version is called Karen. Also, “Siri” is a Norwegian name meaning “beautiful woman who leads you to victory”, and was the name the developer had chosen for his first child.

13. Coronas, e.g. : CIGARS
The most common shape of cigar is the “parejo”, with such cigars usually referred to as “coronas”.

20. Whitman sampler? : POEM
Walt Whitman is considered to be one of the greatest American poets. He was born in 1819 on Long Island, and lived through the American Civil War. Whitman was a controversial character, even during his own lifetime. One view held by him was that the works attributed to William Shakespeare were not actually written by Shakespeare, but rather by someone else, or perhaps a group of people.

21. Like sardines : OILY
Sardines are oily fish related to herrings. Sardines are also known as pilchards, although in the UK “sardine” is a noun reserved for a young pilchard. Very confusing …

22. The princess in "The Princess Diaries" : AMELIA
“The Princess Diaries” is a series of novels for young adults by Meg Cabot. There have been two Disney adaptations of the books, both starring Anne Hathaway and Julie Andrews.

25. Banned pollutants : PCBS
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were banned with good reason. Apart from their link to cancer and other disorders in humans and animals, they are extremely persistent in the environment once contamination has occurred. Among other things, PCBs were used as coolants and insulating fluids in electrical gear such as transformers and large capacitors, as well as a transfer agent in carbonless copy paper.

28. *2000s group with three eponymous Disney Channel films, with "the" : CHEETAH GIRLS
The Cheetah Girls were a musical girl group active from 2003 until 2008. The trio was put together by Disney for a 2003 movie based on a series of young adult books titled “The Cheetah Girls”. There followed two film sequels: “The Cheetah Girls 2” and “The Cheetah Girls: One World”.

30. U.S.C.G. rank : CPO
A Chief Petty Officer (CPO) is a non-commissioned officer (NCO) in the Navy (USN) and Coast Guard (USCG). The “Petty” is derived from the French word “petit” meaning “small”.

The US Coast Guard (USCG) has the distinction of being the country’s oldest continuous seagoing service. The USCG was founded as the Revenue Cutter Service by Alexander Hamilton in 1790.

31. Woman of whom it's begged "Please don't take my man," in a 1973 hit : JOLENE
I must admit that I am not a big fan of country music, but I do like the 1974 hit “Jolene” written and performed by Dolly Parton. Dolly Parton tells the story that the song was inspired by a red-headed bank teller who was frequently flirting with her husband.

33. Place : LIEU
As one might perhaps imagine, "in lieu" comes into English from the Old French word "lieu" meaning "place", which in turn is derived from the Latin "locum", also meaning "place". So, "in lieu" means "in place of".

34. *Athletic footwear once promoted by Pelé : PUMA SNEAKERS
Puma is a German company that sells athletic shoes worldwide. The company is most famous for its line of soccer boots.

Pelé is the nickname of Edson de Nascimento, a soccer player who has used the name Pelé for most of his life. Pelé is now retired, and for my money was the world's greatest ever player of the game. He is the only person to have been part of three World Cup winning squads, and is a national treasure in his native Brazil. One of Pele’s nicknames is “O Rei do Futebol” (the King of Football).

39. Bo'sun for Captain Hook : SMEE
In J. M. Barrie’s play and novel about Peter Pan, Smee is one of Captain Hook’s pirates and is Hook’s right-hand man. Smee is described by Barrie as being “Irish” and “a man who stabbed without offence”. Nice guy! Captain Hook and Smee sail on the pirate ship called the Jolly Roger.

A boatswain works on the deck of a boat. A boatswain is unlicensed, and so is not involved in the navigation or handling of the vessel. He or she has charge of the other unlicensed workers on the deck. Boatswain is pronounced "bosun" and this phonetic spelling is often used interchangeably with "boatswain". The contraction "bo’s'n" is also very popular.

43. Soon enough : ANON
“Anon” originally meant “at once” and evolved into today’s meaning of “soon” apparently just because the word was misused over time.

44. Prefix with -pathy : SOCIO-
A sociopath is someone deemed to exhibit antisocial behavior. The term is often used interchangeably with “psychopath”.

45. School in Berkshire : ETON
The world-famous Eton College is just a brisk walk from Windsor Castle, which itself is just outside London. Eton is noted for producing many British leaders including David Cameron who took power in the last UK general election. The list of Old Etonians also includes Princes William and Harry, the Duke of Wellington, George Orwell, and the creator of James Bond, Ian Fleming (as well as 007 himself as described in the Fleming novels).

49. Result of Québec's vote to leave Canada : NON
Québec is the largest province in Canada, and the only one with French as its sole official language. The name “Québec” comes from an Algonquin word “kebec” meaning “where the river narrows”. This refers to the area around Quebec City where the St. Lawrence River narrows as it flows through a gap lined by steep cliffs. The province has voted twice in referenda asking whether or not Quebec should become an independent country, once in 1980, and again in 1995. The 1995 result was 49% in favor of sovereignty, up from 40% in 1980.

50. Event code-named Operation Neptune : D-DAY
The Allied Invasion of Normandy during WWII was given the codename “Operation Overlord”. The Normandy landings that kicked off the invasion on D-Day (6 June 1944) were given the codename “Operation Neptune”.

51. Endure, in an expression : BEAR IT
Grin and bear it.

58. *Enzo Ferrari called it "the most beautiful car ever made" : JAGUAR XKE
I have to agree with Enzo …

Auto manufacturer Jaguar started out as a manufacturer of sidecars for motorcycles back in 1922, when the company was known as the Swallow Sidecar Company (SS for short). The company changed its name to Jaguar after WWII, because of the unfortunate connotations of the letters “SS” in that era (i.e. the Nazi paramilitary organization).

Enzo Ferrari was an Italian race car driver, and founder of the Ferrari car manufacturing company. Ferrari died in 1988, and in 2003 the company named the Enzo model after its founder.

62. Lush : WINO
"Lush" is a slang term for a heavy drinker. Back in the 1700s, “lush” was slang for “liquor”.

64. Acronym for an outdoor fantasy game : LARP
Live action role-playing (LARP)

65. Things found at the starts of the answers to the six starred clues : MAC OPERATING SYSTEMS
Apple introduced the OS X Operating System in 2000. Each version of this operating system has had a code name, and that code name until recently has been a type of big cat. The versions and code names are:
  • 10.0: Cheetah
  • 10.1: Puma
  • 10.2: Jaguar
  • 10.3: Panther
  • 10.4: Tiger
  • 10.5: Leopard
  • 10.6: Snow Leopard
  • 10.7: Lion
  • 10.8: Mountain Lion
  • 10.9: Mavericks
  • 10.10: Yosemite
  • 10.11: El Capitan
  • 10.12: macOS Sierra

72. Prefix with -stat : HEMO-
A hemostat is that scissors-like clamp that is used in surgery to close off blood vessels temporarily until more permanent repairs can be made.

73. Not go home by curfew : STAY OUT
Our word “curfew” comes from an Old French word meaning “cover fire”. In medieval days a bell would be ring in the evenings as a signal to bank the hearths in preparation for sleeping. The intent was to prevent uncontrolled fires starting from fireplaces that were not tended during the night.

80. Artist Magritte : RENE
Belgian artist René Magritte was a surrealist. His most recognized work maybe is “The Son of Man”, a painting he created as a self-portrait. It is the work that shows a man in a bowler hat with his face covered by an apple. The image features prominently in the great movie, the 1999 remake of “The Thomas Crown Affair”.

82. Chest bones : STERNA
“Sternum” (plural “sterna”) is the Latin name for the breastbone. “Sternon” is a Greek for “chest, breastbone”.

83. Some acids : AMINOS
Amino acids are essential to life in many ways, not least of which is their use as the building blocks of proteins.

84. Fantasy creatures : ORCS
Orcs are mythical humanoid creatures that appear in the writings of J. R. R. Tolkien. Since Tolkien’s use of orcs, they have also been featured in other fantasy fiction and in fantasy games.

86. Band with the 1991 #1 hit "Unbelievable" : EMF
EMF is an alternative rock dance band from England. EMF’s biggest hit was 1990’s “Unbelievable” that made it to the number one spot here in the US. The initialism “EMF” supposedly stands for “Epsom Mad Funkers”.

88. Like nonprescription meds : OTC
Over-the-counter drugs (OTC) don't need a prescription (Rx).

89. Colt 45 brewer : PABST
Colt 45 is a brand of lager that first went on the market in 1963. It has a relatively high alcohol content (6.1%) and so is sometimes referred to as a malt liquor.

91. American ___ : SAMOA
The official name for the South Pacific country formerly known as Western Samoa is the Independent State of Samoa. “Samoa” is the western part of the island group, with American Samoa lying to the southeast. The whole group of islands used to be known as Navigators Island, a name given by European explorers in recognition of the seafaring skills of the native Samoans.

93. Start of many congregation names : B’NAI
The Hebrew word “b'nai” means “sons”.

95. Woodrow Wilson was the only U.S. prez to have one : PHD
Woodrow Wilson was a professor at Princeton from 1890 to 1902 at which time he was promoted to president of the university. Professor Wilson had earned his PhD. at John Hopkins University in 1886, so that when he was elected 28th President of the United States in 1912, he became the only US President to hold a PhD.

99. Margarine : OLEO
Emperor Louis Napoleon III of France announced a competition to develop a substitute for butter, a substitute that would be more accessible to the lower classes and more practical for the armed forces. A French chemist called Hippolyte Mege-Mouries came up with something he called oleomargarine in 1869, which was eventually manufactured under the trade name "margarine". The name "oleomargarine" also gives us our generic term "oleo".

101. Axis foe : ALLIES
Before WWII, Hungary's prime minister was lobbying for an alliance between Germany, Hungary and Italy and worked towards such a relationship that he called an "axis". The main Axis powers during the war were Germany, Italy and Japan. However, also included in the relationship were Romania, Bulgaria and the aforementioned Hungary.

102. When sung five times, a 1974 Rolling Stones hit : DOO
“Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker)” is a 1973 song recorded by the Rolling Stones. It’s certainly no love song, as it relates the story of the shooting of a boy and the death of a ten-year-old girl from a drug overdose.

103. *1968 Peter O'Toole drama, with "The" : LION IN WINTER
“The Lion in Winter” is a play by James Goldman that was first staged in 1966 on Broadway. The two lead characters in the piece are King Henry II of England and his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine. The play was adapted into a very successful movie in 1968 starring Peter O’Toole and Katharine Hepburn. There was also a 2003 television movie adaption that I’d like to see, starring Patrick Stewart and Glenn Close.

Irish actor Peter O'Toole got his big break in movies when he played the title role in the 1962 epic film "Lawrence of Arabia". But my favorite of O'Toole's movies is much lighter fare, namely "How to Steal a Million" in which he stars opposite Audrey Hepburn.

107. 1998 Faith Hill hit that describes "perpetual bliss" : THIS KISS
Faith Hill is a country singer from Ridgeland, Mississippi. Hill is married to fellow country singer Tim McGraw.

112. Cold-weather conveyance : SNO-CAT
The brand name Sno-Cat is owned by the Tucker company. All “snowcats” are tracked vehicles built to work in snow, famously used in expeditions to the polar regions. The modern Sno-Cat from Tucker differs from its competitors in that it has four independently-mounted tracks.

113. Part of P.S.U.: Abbr. : UNIV
Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was founded in 1855 as the Farmer’s High School of Pennsylvania. Penn State is listed as one of the “Public Ivies”, a public university that offers a quality of education comparable to that of the Ivy League.

114. Annual California music festival : COACHELLA
The first Coachella Valley Music Festival was held in 1999, and then annually from 2001 until the present day.

115. Symbol of wisdom : ATHENA
The Greek goddess Athena (sometimes “Athene”) is often associated with wisdom, among other attributes. In many representations. Athena is depicted with an owl sitting on her head. It is this linkage of the owl with the goddess of wisdom that led to today's perception of the owl as being "wise". Athena's Roman counterpart was Minerva.

116. Small change : DIME
The term “dime”, used for a 10-cent coin, comes from the Old French word “disme” meaning “tenth part”.

Down
1. Kemo ___ : SABE
“Kemosabe” is a term used by the Tonto character in the iconic radio and television program “The Lone Ranger”. “Kemosabe” doesn't really mean anything outside of the show, and in fact was written as “ke-mo sah-bee” in the original radio show scripts. The term was created by longtime director of “The Lone Ranger”, Jim Jewell. To come up with the term, Jewell used the name of a boy’s camp that his father-in-law established called Kamp Kee-Mo Sah-Bee.

2. Corsica et d'autres : ILES
In French, “Corsica et d'autres” (Corsica and others) are “îles” (islands).

3. Recruiting org. : ROTC
The Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) is a training program for officers based in colleges all around the US. The ROTC program was established in 1862 when as a condition of receiving a land-grant to create colleges, the federal government required that military tactics be part of a new school’s curriculum.

4. Odysseus, by birth : ITHACAN
Ithaca is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea. The island features in Homer’s “Odyssey” as it was the home of the mythological hero Odysseus, who was Ithaca’s king.

7. Faction in "Twilight" fandom : TEAM JACOB
The reference is to a character in "The Twilight" series of books by Stephenie Meyer. "The Twilight Saga" is a series of films based on the books. “The Twilight” books feature vampires, and I don’t do vampires …

8. Funny Schumer : AMY
Amy Schumer is a stand-up comedian, and an alumna of the reality TV show “Last Comic Standing”, in which she placed fourth. Schumer now has her own comedy series “Inside Amy Schumer”, which airs on Comedy Central. Amy is a first cousin once removed of Chuck Schumer, the senior US Senator from New York.

9. Minnesota athlete : GOPHER
The University of Minnesota sports teams are known as the Golden Gophers. The team mascot is Goldy Gopher. The team name comes from Minnesota’s nickname, “The Gopher State”, a nickname that dates back to 1857.

11. Pulitzer-winning Edward : ALBEE
Playwright Edward Albee’s most famous play is “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” Albee won three Pulitzer Prizes for Drama:
  • 1967: “A Delicate Balance”
  • 1975: “Seascape”
  • 1994: “Three Tall Women”
Albee also won three Tony Awards:
  • 1963: “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” (Best Play)
  • 2002: “The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia?”
  • 2005: Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement

12. Best-selling PC game before The Sims : MYST
In the days when I played the occasional video game, the best of the bunch was undoubtedly “Myst”. It is a game full of puzzles with the player wandering through a beautifully-designed (for its day) interactive world.

SimCity is a very clever computer game. Players build and grow cities and societies by creating the conditions necessary for people (the Sims) to move in and thrive. "SimCity" was launched in 1989, and to this day it is consistently ranked as one of the greatest computer games of all time.

14. X-ray, e.g. : IMAGE
X-rays were first studied comprehensively by the German physicist Wilhelm Röntgen (also "Roentgen"), and it was he who gave the name "X-rays" to this particular type of radiation. Paradoxically, in Röntgen's native language of German, X-rays are routinely referred to as "Röntgen rays". In 1901 Röntgen won the first Nobel Prize in Physics that was ever awarded, recognition for his work on X-rays.

15. Tech help station : GENIUS BAR
The technical support desk found in Apple Retail Stores is rather inventively called the Genius Bar. The certified support technicians are known as “Geniuses”. The trainees are called GYOs: Grow-Your-Own-Geniuses.

16. 'Stro, e.g. : ALER
The Houston baseball team changed its name to the Astros (sometimes “'Stros”) from the Colt .45s in 1965 when they started playing in the Astrodome. The Astrodome was so called in recognition of the city’s long association with the US space program. The Astros moved from the National League to the American League starting in the 2013 season.

17. Streamlet : RILL
The word “rill”, meaning a small brook or rivulet, has German roots. It has the same roots as “Rhine”, the name of the major European river.

24. Tinder and others : APPS
Tinder is a matchmaking app that uses Facebook profiles. Users “swipe” photos of potential matches, either to the right (“like”) or to the left (“not interested”). Users who “match” each other can then chat within the app.

28. Miss ___ (late TV psychic) : CLEO
Miss Cleo was the stage name of psychic Youree Dell Harris. Miss Cleo was a spokesperson for the Psychic Readers Network, a pay-per-call service, for many years.

29. Astronaut Shepard : ALAN
Alan Shepard was the first American in space. Shepard's flight was originally scheduled for October 1960 but a series of delays pushed it out till May 5, 1961. Yuri Gagarin made his celebrated flight on April 12, 1961, just one one month earlier, winning that part of the Space Race for the Soviets. A decade later, Shepard went into space again at the age of 47, as commander of Apollo 14. He was the fifth man to walk on the moon, and indeed the oldest. Shepard was also the only one of the Mercury Seven team to make it to the moon. Famously, he drove two golf balls while on the lunar surface.

32. U.S. base site in the Pacific : OKINAWA
Okinawa is a large city located on the island of Okinawa in the very south of Japan. Okinawa is home to several US military facilities including Kadena Air Base and the Marine Corps’ Camp Foster.

34. Half of a 1960s pop group : PAPAS
The folk group called the Magic Circle renamed itself to the Mamas and the Papas in the early sixties. Sadly, the Mamas and the Papas weren’t a happy bunch, always fighting over who was getting credit for songs and whose voice was getting mixed out of recordings, so they split up, twice. While they were together though, they wrote and recorded some great songs, songs which really do epitomize the sound of the sixties. “Monday, Monday” was written by John Phillips, one of “the Papas”, and it was to become the only number one hit for the group. Here’s a shocker … when it hit number one in 1966, it was the first time that a group made up of both sexes topped the American charts!

35. Popular sleep aid : UNISOM
ZzzQuil, Benadryl, Unisom and Sominex are all brand names for the antihistamine diphenhydramine, which also has sedative properties.

36. Godzilla foe : MOTHRA
Mothra is a giant moth-like monster that made its big-screen debut in the 1961 film “Mothra”. Mothra turns up quite often in “Godzilla” movies.

Godzilla is a Japanese invention. The first in a very long series of films was released way back in 1954. The original name in Japanese was "Gojira", but this was changed to Godzilla for audiences outside of Japan. "Gojira" is a combination of "gorira" and "kujira", the Japanese words for gorilla and whale, apt because Godzilla is a big ape-like creature that came out of the deep.

40. Who said "Revolutions are the locomotives of history" : MARX
Karl Marx was a German philosopher and revolutionary who helped develop the principles of modern communism and socialism. Marx argued that feudal society created internal strife due to class inequalities which led to its destruction and replacement by capitalism. He further argued that the inequalities created in a capitalist society create tensions that will also lead to its self-destruction. His thesis was that the inevitable replacement of capitalism was a classless (and stateless) society, which he called pure communism.

41. Composer Satie : ERIK
Erik Satie was a French composer most famous for his beautiful composition, the three “Gymnopédies”. I have tried so hard to appreciate other works by Satie but I find them so very different from the minimalist simplicity of the lyrical “Gymnopédies”.

42. Dirección geográfica : ESTE
In Spanish, “este” (east) is a “dirección geográfica” (geographical direction).

46. ___ Boston (luxury hotel) : TAJ
The luxury hotel known today as the Taj Boston was opened in 1927 as the Ritz Carlton.

53. J.F.K. tower grp. : ATC
Air traffic control (ATC)

57. Familiar folks : KITH
The word “kith” describes friends and acquaintances, and is used used in the phrase “kith and kin” meaning “friends and family”. “Kith” comes from an Old English word meaning “native country, home”, as the expression “kith and kin” was used originally to mean “country and kinsmen”.

59. Target audience of Out magazine : GAYS
“Out” is a highest-circulation magazine aimed at the LGBT community.

61. Actress Polo : TERI
Teri Polo’s most prominent role on the big screen was Pam Focker in “Meet the Fockers” and its sequel. Pam is the wife of the character played by Ben Stiller. Polo also played the wife of Presidential candidate Matt Santos in “The West Wing”.

69. Angel who visited Joseph Smith : MORONI
According to the Mormon tradition, Angel Moroni visited founder Joseph Smith on several occasions. The Angel Moroni is the same person as the prophet-warrior Moroni who lived in the Americas in the fourth and fifth centuries.

76. Kind of theater : IMAX
The IMAX Corporation, which is behind the IMAX film format, is a Canadian company. The impetus for developing the system came after Expo ’67 in Montreal. Back then large format screenings were accomplished using multiple projectors with multiple screens, with images basically stitched together. The team behind the IMAX technology set out to simplify things, and developed a single-camera, single-projector system.

78. Settles snugly : ENSCONCES
To ensconce oneself, one settles securely or comfortably somewhere. Back in the late 1500s, “to ensconse” meant “to cover with a fort” as a “sconse” is a small defensive fort or earthwork.

81. Best Supporting Actress nominee for "Birdman" : EMMA STONE
The actress Emma Stone is from Scottsdale, Arizona. Stone really came to prominence with her performance in the 2010 high school movie called “Easy A”. Now one of the most sought-after actresses in Hollywood, Stone values her privacy and works hard to maintain a low profile. Good for her, I say …

“Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)” is a 2014 film that was an incredible critical success. The title character was played by Michael Keaton. I know I am in the minority, but I hated “Birdman” …

90. Eats : CHOW
“Chow” is an American slang term for food that originated in California in the mid-1800s. “Chow” comes from the Chinese pidgin English “chow-chow” meaning “food”.

91. Setting for a sunset on the Seine : SOIR
“Soir” is the French word for “evening” and a “soirée” is an “evening party”. The French word “soirée” has an acute accent over the first “e”, but we tend to drop this when using the word in English.

The Seine is the river that flows through Paris. The Seine empties into the English Channel to the north, at the port city of Le Havre.

95. The fingers of a hand, e.g. : PENTAD
A pentad is a group of five.

98. Fancy-schmancy : POSH
No one really knows the etymology of the word “posh”. The popular myth that POSH stands for “Port Out, Starboard Home” is completely untrue, and is a story that can actually be traced back to the 1968 movie “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang”. The myth is that wealthy British passengers travelling to and from India would book cabins on the port side for the outward journey and the starboard side for the home journey. This trick was supposedly designed to keep their cabins out of the direct sunlight.

100. Actress Balaban : LIANE
Liane Balaban is an actress from Ontario, Canada. Apparently, Balaban is often mistaken for fellow actress Natalie Portman.

101. Hit musical with the song "N.Y.C." : ANNIE
The Broadway musical “Annie” is produced in more than one version. There is an “Annie Jr.” that has been edited down to a shortened version more suitable for young performers and audiences. An even shorter version that lasts only 30 minutes is called “Annie KIDS”, and is meant for performers still in elementary school.

103. Exam with logic games, briefly : LSAT
The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) has been around since 1948.

106. Some contraceptive devices : IUDS
It seems that it isn’t fully understood how intrauterine devices (IUDs) work. The design that was most popular for decades was a T-shaped plastic frame on which was wound copper wire. It’s thought that the device is an irritant in the uterus causing the body to release chemicals that are hostile to sperm and eggs. This effect is enhanced by the presence of the copper.

109. "___, She Wolf of the SS" (1975 cult film) : ILSA
“Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS” is a 1975 cult film. Set in a WWII prison camp, it is classed as a Nazisploitation war film. It has very adult themes, and sounds very brutal.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. One talking on the phone, nowadays? : SIRI
5. Numerical prefix : OCTA-
9. Glitz : GLAM
13. Coronas, e.g. : CIGARS
19. What sweet gestures may mean : A LOT
20. Whitman sampler? : POEM
21. Like sardines : OILY
22. The princess in "The Princess Diaries" : AMELIA
23. "Fine, see if I care!" : BE THAT WAY!
25. Banned pollutants : PCBS
26. With reason : SANELY
27. Reading comics, doing crosswords, etc. : ESCAPISM
28. *2000s group with three eponymous Disney Channel films, with "the" : CHEETAH GIRLS
30. U.S.C.G. rank : CPO
31. Woman of whom it's begged "Please don't take my man," in a 1973 hit : JOLENE
33. Place : LIEU
34. *Athletic footwear once promoted by Pelé : PUMA SNEAKERS
38. Bled : RAN
39. Bo'sun for Captain Hook : SMEE
43. Soon enough : ANON
44. Prefix with -pathy : SOCIO-
45. School in Berkshire : ETON
47. Shelf supports : L-BARS
48. Set (against) : PIT
49. Result of Québec's vote to leave Canada : NON
50. Event code-named Operation Neptune : D-DAY
51. Endure, in an expression : BEAR IT
52. B flat equivalent : A-SHARP
56. Lie on the beach : BAKE
58. *Enzo Ferrari called it "the most beautiful car ever made" : JAGUAR XKE
60. Make sense of : SORT OUT
62. Lush : WINO
64. Acronym for an outdoor fantasy game : LARP
65. Things found at the starts of the answers to the six starred clues : MAC OPERATING SYSTEMS
71. Get bored (of) : TIRE
72. Prefix with -stat : HEMO-
73. Not go home by curfew : STAY OUT
75. *Showy orange bloom : TIGER LILY
80. Artist Magritte : RENE
82. Chest bones : STERNA
83. Some acids : AMINOS
84. Fantasy creatures : ORCS
86. Band with the 1991 #1 hit "Unbelievable" : EMF
88. Like nonprescription meds : OTC
89. Colt 45 brewer : PABST
90. Home to Hernando : CASA
91. American ___ : SAMOA
93. Start of many congregation names : B’NAI
94. Suit : EXEC
95. Woodrow Wilson was the only U.S. prez to have one : PHD
96. *Something spotted on a runway? : LEOPARD PRINT
99. Margarine : OLEO
101. Axis foe : ALLIES
102. When sung five times, a 1974 Rolling Stones hit : DOO
103. *1968 Peter O'Toole drama, with "The" : LION IN WINTER
107. 1998 Faith Hill hit that describes "perpetual bliss" : THIS KISS
112. Cold-weather conveyance : SNO-CAT
113. Part of P.S.U.: Abbr. : UNIV
114. Annual California music festival : COACHELLA
115. Symbol of wisdom : ATHENA
116. Small change : DIME
117. "I'll take care of that" : ON IT
118. Employments : USES
119. Threw out : TOSSED
120. In view : SEEN
121. Comes together : GELS
122. Football gear : PADS


Down
1. Kemo ___ : SABE
2. Corsica et d'autres : ILES
3. Recruiting org. : ROTC
4. Odysseus, by birth : ITHACAN
5. Possible paths : OPTIONS
6. Intimidates : COWS
7. Faction in "Twilight" fandom : TEAM JACOB
8. Funny Schumer : AMY
9. Minnesota athlete : GOPHER
10. Able to practice, say : LICENSED
11. Pulitzer-winning Edward : ALBEE
12. Best-selling PC game before The Sims : MYST
13. Convert chips to money : CASH IN
14. X-ray, e.g. : IMAGE
15. Tech help station : GENIUS BAR
16. 'Stro, e.g. : ALER
17. Streamlet : RILL
18. "Goes" : SAYS
24. Tinder and others : APPS
28. Miss ___ (late TV psychic) : CLEO
29. Astronaut Shepard : ALAN
32. U.S. base site in the Pacific : OKINAWA
34. Half of a 1960s pop group : PAPAS
35. Popular sleep aid : UNISOM
36. Godzilla foe : MOTHRA
37. Ages and ages : EON
38. Prince and others : ROYALS
40. Who said "Revolutions are the locomotives of history" : MARX
41. Composer Satie : ERIK
42. Dirección geográfica : ESTE
46. ___ Boston (luxury hotel) : TAJ
47. Eagerly seized : LEAPT AT
50. One side of the climate change debate : DENIERS
51. Pops : BURSTS
53. J.F.K. tower grp. : ATC
54. Plant malady caused by overwatering : ROOT ROT
55. Teacher's head count : PUPILS
57. Familiar folks : KITH
59. Target audience of Out magazine : GAYS
61. Actress Polo : TERI
63. "Don't quit ___ now!" : ON ME
66. Browser button : RELOAD
67. Flipped : GONE APE
68. Assess : EYE
69. Angel who visited Joseph Smith : MORONI
70. Lie on the beach : SUNTAN
74. Implied : TACIT
75. Tailor's need : TAPE
76. Kind of theater : IMAX
77. Barb : GIBE
78. Settles snugly : ENSCONCES
79. 1000, 1500 and 2000: Abbr. : YRS
81. Best Supporting Actress nominee for "Birdman" : EMMA STONE
85. Make a "T" gesture in basketball : CALL TIME
87. Pro : FOR
90. Eats : CHOW
91. Setting for a sunset on the Seine : SOIR
92. Rehab attendees : ADDICTS
93. Split : BROKE UP
95. The fingers of a hand, e.g. : PENTAD
97. One plus one? : ELEVEN
98. Fancy-schmancy : POSH
100. Actress Balaban : LIANE
101. Hit musical with the song "N.Y.C." : ANNIE
103. Exam with logic games, briefly : LSAT
104. Digging : INTO
105. Sounds after a magic trick : OOHS
106. Some contraceptive devices : IUDS
108. Loudly acclaim : HAIL
109. "___, She Wolf of the SS" (1975 cult film) : ILSA
110. Cold-weather conveyance : SLED
111. Lip : SASS
114. Part of a wheel : COG



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1029-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Oct 16, Saturday




QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers


CROSSWORD SETTER: Patrick Berry
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 15m 16s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Pickup trucks from a foreign-owned company made and sold only in North America : NISSAN TITANS
The Titan is a pickup truck manufactured in the US by Nissan for the North American market. The first Nissan Titans rolled off the production line in 2003.

13. Familiar story line : ONCE UPON A TIME
The stock phrase “Once upon a time” has been used in various forms as the start of a narrative at least since 1380. The stock phrase at the end of stories such as folktales is often “and they all lived happily ever after”. The earlier version of this ending was “happily until their deaths”.

18. Moon, in Montreuil : LUNE
Montreuil is a commune located just a few miles from the center of Paris.

19. Imitation : SHAM
A “sham” is something that is imitation, fake. In the world of bed linens a sham is also imitation and fake, in the sense that it is a decorative cover designed to cover up a regular pillow used for sleeping.

21. Ford contemporary : OLDS
The REO Motor Company was founded by Ransom Eli Olds (hence the name REO). The company made cars, trucks and buses, and was in business from 1905 to 1975 in Lansing, Michigan. Among the company’s most famous models were the REO Royale and the REO Flying Cloud.

23. Jugged ___ (old British delicacy) : HARE
Jugged hare is a traditional dish made by stewing a whole hare in a tall jug placed in hot water. The hare’s blood is added to the dish at the end of the cooking process, along with port wine. Yuck …

24. Jazzman Montgomery : WES
Wes Montgomery was a jazz guitarist from Indianapolis.

25. White sheets : FLOES
An ice floe is a sheet of ice that has separated from an ice field and is floating freely on the ocean.

26. Second part of a historic trio : PINTA
Famously, Christopher Columbus used three ships in his first voyage across the Atlantic: the Santa Maria, the Niña and the Pinta. The Pinta was the fastest of the three, and it was from the Pinta that the New World was first spotted, by a sailor called Rodrigo de Triana who was a lookout on the fateful day. Pinta was a nickname for the ship that translated as "the painted one". The Pinta's real name has been lost in mists of time.

27. Some prizes on "The Price Is Right" : TRIPS
“The Price is Right” is a television game show that first aired way back in 1956.

28. Dance with high kicks : CAN-CAN
The Moulin Rouge cabaret is located right in the middle of one of the red light districts of Paris, the district of Pigalle. You can't miss the Moulin Rouge as it has a huge red windmill on its roof ("moulin rouge" is French for "red windmill"). The nightclub opened its doors in 1889 and soon after, the working girls of the cabaret adopted a "respectable" party dance and used it to entice their clients. That was the birth of the can-can. Nowadays, the Moulin Rouge is home to a lavish, Las Vegas-style show that costs millions of euros to stage. It features showgirls, dancers and acrobats, a whole host of entertainers in fact. And I am sure the can-can features as well …

29. They're put in barrels : RAMRODS
A ramrod is a “stick” that is inserted into the barrel of an older firearm in order to pack the bullet or ball tightly against the charge of gunpowder. A ramrod can also be used to push a cleaning rag through the barrel of a gun.

33. "___ in Moscow" (1959 children's book) : ELOISE
Kay Thompson wrote the "Eloise" series of children's books. Kay Thompson actually lived at the Plaza Hotel in New York, the setting she would choose for her "Eloise" stories. Eloise started out as a hit song for Thompson, a success that she parlayed into the book franchise.

34. Funereal tempo : LARGO
Largo is a instruction to play a piece of music with a very slow tempo. “Largo” is the Italian word for “broadly”.

35. Air spirit, in folklore : SYLPH
A sylph (also “sylphid”) is a mythological creature, an invisible and wispy being of the air. We also use the term “sylph” to describe a slender and graceful woman.

37. "Golly Gosh Oh ___" (Conway Twitty song) : GEE
Conway Twitty was a country singer who crossed over to the rock and roll and pop genres. Twitty’s real name was Harold Lloyd Jenkins, and he was named for the silent movie actor Harold Lloyd. There doesn’t seem to be a definitive explanation for how Twitty chose his stage name, but one suggestion is that he combined the names of the cities of Conway, Arkansas and Twitty, Texas.

40. Entertainment Weekly interviewee : IDOL
“Entertainment Weekly” (EW) is a magazine focused on entertainment media news and reviews of movies, television, books, etc. “EW” was launched in 1990.

43. ___ Parker, director and star of 2016's "The Birth of a Nation" : NATE
Nate Parker is a an actor and director from Norfolk, Virginia. Parker directed, co-wrote and stars in the 2016 film “Birth of a Nation”, which is about the life of Nat Turner. “Birth of a Nation” premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and was picked up by Fox Searchlight for $17.5 million, a record deal for Sundance.

46. Sitcom mom whose kids were named Becky, Darlene and D.J. : ROSEANNE CONNER
The comedian Roseanne Barr is perhaps best known as the star of her own sitcom called “Roseanne” in which she played the character Roseanne Conner. In 2012 Barr unsuccessfully vied for the Green Party’s nomination for US President. She didn’t give up though, and was successful in winning the nomination of the Peace and Freedom Party. In the 2012 presidential election she earned over 60,000 votes, and placed sixth in the list of candidates.

49. $100 purchase in Monopoly : VERMONT AVENUE
The street names in the US version of Monopoly are locations in or around Atlantic City, New Jersey.

Down
5. Dovekies, e.g. : AUKS
Auks are penguin-like sea birds that live in colder northern waters including the Arctic. Like penguins, auks are great swimmers, but unlike penguins, auks can fly.

6. "This is ___" : NPR
National Public Radio (now just called NPR) was launched in 1970 after President Johnson signed into law the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967. The intent of the act was to provide funding for radio and television broadcasting that wasn’t simply driven by profit. As a longtime fan of the state-funded BBC in the UK, I’d have to agree with that intent …

7. Single-rotation skating jumps : TOE LOOPS
A toe loop is a relatively simple jump in figure skating (not that I could do one!). In a toe loop, the skater uses the toe pick on the skate to lift off on a backward outside edge, landing on the same backward outside edge.

10. Discombobulated : AT SEA
To discombobulate is to faze, disconcert, to confuse.

11. Small carp : NIT
The word "carp" used to mean simply "talk" back in the 13th century, with its roots in the Old Norwegian "karpa" meaning "to brag". A century later the Latin word "carpere" meaning "to slander" influenced the use of "carp" so that it came to mean "find fault with".

16. Winemaking byproduct : TARTAR
The crystals that can sometimes precipitate out of wine stored in bottles are potassium bitartrate. The same chemical can be used in cooking, when it is referred to as cream of tartar.

22. Go down toward home? : SLIDE
That would be in baseball.

25. Campus newbie : FROSH
“Frosh” is a slang term for a college freshman. We call them “freshers” back in Ireland ...

27. Liqueur in a margarita : TRIPLE SEC
Triple sec is liqueur made from the dried peels of bitter and sweet oranges. I tend to use it in cocktails calling for Grand Marnier or Cointreau, as it is a cheaper alternative and tastes very similar …

No one seems to know for sure who first created the cocktail known as a margarita. The most plausible and oft-quoted is that it was invented in 1941 in Ensenada, Mexico. The barman mixed the drink for an important visitor, the daughter of the German ambassador. The daughter’s name was Margarita Henkel, and she lent her name to the new drink. The basic recipe for a margarita is a mixture of tequila, orange-flavored liqueur (like Cointreau) and lime juice.

30. Affirmed's rival for the Triple Crown : ALYDAR
The very successful racehorse called Affirmed won the Triple Crown in 1978. Affirmed had a famous rivalry with the the horse Alydar, with the pair meeting up on ten occasions. Affirmed and Alydar came in first and second in each of the 1978 Triple Crown races.

31. Protégé of Stalin : MOLOTOV
Vyacheslav Molotov was a prominent Soviet politician and protégé of Joseph Stalin. During the Winter War of WWII, between the Soviet Union and Finland, Molotov claimed in radio broadcasts that Finland was not being bombed, but rather that the Soviet Union was dropping food to relieve famine. With a sense of irony, the Finns started to call the Soviet bombs "Molotov bread baskets". The Finns also improvised incendiary bombs using bottles and a gasoline-based fuel, and called these devices "Molotov cocktails", a name that persists to this day.

32. Compiler of an 1855 reference work : BARTLETT
“Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations” is a popular reference work containing tons of quotations. Bartlett’s was first issued in 1855, and as such is the longest-lived collection of quotations that we have available to us. The book started as a private list of quotes gathered by John Bartlett who ran the University Bookstore in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He kept the list as he was always being asked “who said?” by customers.

34. "The Jack ___ Show," 1959-85 : LALANNE
Jack LaLanne was a pioneer in the field of fitness and nutrition and was sometimes called “the godfather of fitness”. LaLanne was also a bodybuilder and actually beat 21-year-old Arnold Schwarzenegger in competition, when LaLanne was 54-years-old …

36. Start of a Spanish greeting : BUENOS …
“Buenos dias” translates from Spanish as “good day”, but can also be used to say “good morning”.

37. Australian monitor lizard : GOANNA
Monitor lizards are so called because they tend to stand up on their hind legs and “monitor” their surroundings.

39. Starter follower : ENTREE
Entrée means "entry" in French. An entrée can be something that helps one get “a way in", an interview for example perhaps helped along by a recommendation letter. In Europe, even in English-speaking countries, the entrée is the name for the "entry" to the meal, the first course. I found it very confusing to order meals when I first came to America!

42. His house in Giverny is a now a museum : MONET
Giverny is a commune in northern France, most famous as the location of artist Claude Monet’s home. It was in Giverny that Monet painted his famous “Water Lilies”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Pickup trucks from a foreign-owned company made and sold only in North America : NISSAN TITANS
13. Familiar story line : ONCE UPON A TIME
15. Durable, as a wristwatch : SHOCK RESISTANT
17. Goes no further : HALTS
18. Moon, in Montreuil : LUNE
19. Imitation : SHAM
21. Ford contemporary : OLDS
22. To some degree : SORTA
23. Jugged ___ (old British delicacy) : HARE
24. Jazzman Montgomery : WES
25. White sheets : FLOES
26. Second part of a historic trio : PINTA
27. Some prizes on "The Price Is Right" : TRIPS
28. Dance with high kicks : CAN-CAN
29. They're put in barrels : RAMRODS
32. Keeps a mock rivalry going, say : BANTERS
33. "___ in Moscow" (1959 children's book) : ELOISE
34. Funereal tempo : LARGO
35. Air spirit, in folklore : SYLPH
36. Metallic stickers : BARBS
37. "Golly Gosh Oh ___" (Conway Twitty song) : GEE
40. Entertainment Weekly interviewee : IDOL
41. Niche religions : CULTS
42. Low lament : MOAN
43. ___ Parker, director and star of 2016's "The Birth of a Nation" : NATE
44. Not staged : REAL
45. Land line? : COAST
46. Sitcom mom whose kids were named Becky, Darlene and D.J. : ROSEANNE CONNER
49. $100 purchase in Monopoly : VERMONT AVENUE
50. Something played at 1980s parties : CASSETTE TAPE

Down
1. Ticket waster : NO-SHOW
2. Eat fast, slangily : INHALE
3. Dresses down : SCOLDS
4. Niche religions : SECTS
5. Dovekies, e.g. : AUKS
6. "This is ___" : NPR
7. Single-rotation skating jumps : TOE LOOPS
8. Covers : INSURES
9. Ruins the reputation of : TAINTS
10. Discombobulated : AT SEA
11. Small carp : NIT
12. Hit hard : SMASH INTO
14. Add value to : ENHANCE
16. Winemaking byproduct : TARTAR
20. Monetary resources : MEANS
22. Go down toward home? : SLIDE
25. Campus newbie : FROSH
26. Symptoms of guilt : PANGS
27. Liqueur in a margarita : TRIPLE SEC
28. Bready bunch? : CARBS
29. Pitch, e.g. : RESIN
30. Affirmed's rival for the Triple Crown : ALYDAR
31. Protégé of Stalin : MOLOTOV
32. Compiler of an 1855 reference work : BARTLETT
34. "The Jack ___ Show," 1959-85 : LALANNE
36. Start of a Spanish greeting : BUENOS ...
37. Australian monitor lizard : GOANNA
38. Show some leniency : EASE UP
39. Starter follower : ENTREE
41. Is a quick learner? : CRAMS
42. His house in Giverny is a now a museum : MONET
45. Smuggler's hideaway : COVE
47. Monarch's reign, perhaps : ERA
48. Cool ___ : CAT


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1028-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Oct 16, Friday




QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers


CROSSWORD SETTER: Mary Lou Guizzo & Jeff Chen
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 15m 56s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Like the national currency known as the tala : SAMOAN
The currency used in Samoa is the “tala”, which is a transliteration of “dollar”. The tala is divided into 100 “sene”, a transliteration of “cent”.

7. Axilla : ARMPIT
“Axilla” is the anatomical name for armpit, not to be confused with “maxilla”, the upper jawbone.

18. London locale: Abbr. : ONT
The city of London, Ontario lies about halfway between Detroit, Michigan and Toronto, Ontario. Just like the city’s better known namesake in England, Canada's London is located on a river called the Thames.

21. Certain logic gate : NOT
Digital systems are made up from series of logic gates, electronic circuits with one or more inputs but only one output. Logic gates are named for the relationship between the input and output, and can be AND gates, OR gates or perhaps NOT gates.

22. One Direction member Payne : LIAM
One Direction is a UK-based boy band. Each member of the band competed in the reality show “The X Factor”, and didn’t do very well. The five were then combined in a boy band at a later stage of the competition. They only finished in third place, but I don’t think they care. They’re doing very, very well for “losers” …

24. The Flying Dutchman, e.g. : SHIP
The Flying Dutchman is a ghost ship of legend that is doomed to sail the oceans, never being able to come into port.

25. Limb-entangling weapon : BOLA
Bolas are heavy balls connected by cords that constitute a throwing weapon. Bolas are often used to capture animals by tripping them as they run. The weapon is usually associated with gauchos, the South American cowboys, although there is evidence that the Inca army used them in battle.

26. One nearly cut Bond in half in "Goldfinger" : LASER BEAM
There’s a famous scene in the James Bond movie 1964 “Goldfinger” when 007 is shackled to a table and in danger of being cut in half by an industrial laser. The scene is inspired by a situation in the 1959 novel by Ian Fleming. However, lasers hadn’t been invented at the time of the book’s writing, and so in print, Bond had to escape from a circular saw.

30. 1983 double-platinum album by Duran Duran : RIO
Duran Duran is a New Wave band from Birmingham in England. Duran Duran’s success was partially driven by some well-received MTV music videos in the 1980s. The band also worked hard on their image and paid a lot of money for very fashionable clothes in which they performed. As a result, one of Duran Duran’s nicknames is “the prettiest boys in rock”.

31. Everyday productivity enhancer, in modern lingo : LIFE HACK
A “life hack” is a technique that makes a routine task easier or more efficient. The term was coined in 2004 by journalist Danny O’Brien when describing less-than-elegant shortcuts used by IT professionals.

33. Fictional character whose name is French for "flight of death" : LORD VOLDEMORT
Lord Voldemort (born Tom Marvolo Riddle) is the main “bad guy” in the “Harry Potter” series of books. I heard author J. K. Rowling on the radio some time back and she tells us that “Voldemort” is supposed to be pronounced with a silent “t” on the end, so it sounds kind of French. But when the movies came out the actors went with the hard “t”, and that’s the pronunciation that seems to prevail now. It seems to be generally accepted that Rowling chose the name from the French “vol de mort” meaning “flight of death”.

36. Leading newspaper that took its name from a stage comedy : LE FIGARO
“Le Figaro” is one of the main French daily newspapers, along with “Le Parisien” and “Le Monde”. It was founded as a satirical publication in 1826, with the title a reference to the Pierre Beaumarchais comedy play “The Marriage of Figaro”.

38. One making introductions : EMCEE
The term “emcee” comes from “MC”, an initialism standing for Master or Mistress of Ceremonies.

44. Queen dowager of Jordan : NOOR
Queen Noor is the widow of King Hussein of Jordan. Queen Noor was born Lisa Halaby in Washington, D.C., the daughter of Najeeb Halaby. Her father was appointed by President Kennedy as the head of the Federal Aviation Administration, and later became the CEO of Pan Am. Lisa Halaby met King Hussein in 1977, while working on the design of Jordan’s Queen Alia Airport. The airport was named after King Hussein’s third wife who had been killed that year in a helicopter crash. Halaby and the King were married the next year, in 1978.

Originally, a dowry was money that was set aside by a man for his wife and children, to be used in the event that he passed away. A widow who receives said money was known as a “dowager”. Over time, “dowry” became a term used for the money, goods or estate that a woman brought into a marriage, and “dowager” came to mean an elderly woman with an elevated social position.

46. Ago, in an annual song : SYNE
The song “Auld Lang Syne” is a staple at New Year’s Eve (well, actually in the opening minutes of New Year’s Day). The words were written by Scottish poet Robbie Burns. The literal translation of “Auld Lang Syne” is “old long since”, but is better translated as “old times”. The sentiment of the song is “for old time’s sake”.

47. Animal with horns : GNU
A gnu is also known as a wildebeest, an antelope that is native to Africa. Wildebeest is actually the Dutch word for “wild beast”.

48. Norman ___, first Asian-American to hold a cabinet post : MINETA
Norman Mineta is a democrat who served as Secretary of Transportation in the George W. Bush administration. Mineta served for over five in the post, resigning in 2006, making him the longest serving Transportation Secretary ever. Mineta was born to Japanese immigrant parents and spent some of his childhood years with his family in an internment camp in Wyoming during WWII.

50. Abbr. in an office address : STE
Suite (ste.)

51. Princess cake and others : TORTES
A princess cake is a traditional layer cake from Sweden comprising sponge cake, pastry cream and whipped cream topped off by marzipan. Known as “prinsesstårta” in Swedish, the “princess cake” was a favorite of the daughters of Prince Carl, Duke of Västergötland, hence the name.

53. Simply not done : VERBOTEN
“Verboten” is the German word for “forbidden”, a word that we have imported into English.

58. Mixed forecasts? : SLEETS
Apparently "sleet" is a term used to describe two weather conditions. One is a shower of ice pellets, smaller than hail, and the second is a mixture of rain and snow, with the snow melting as it falls.

59. N.F.L. Hall-of-Famer nicknamed "The Kansas Comet" : SAYERS
Gale Sayers is a former NFL running back in the sixties and seventies. Speedy Gale Sayers is from Wichita, and is nicknamed “The Kansas Comet”. Sayers was famously supportive of his fellow chicago Bear Brian Piccolo, who was stricken with cancer. The friendship between the players was portrayed in a 1971 movie called “Brian’s Song”.

Down
1. Singer Twain : SHANIA
Shania Twain is a country and pop singer from Windsor, Ontario. Shania’s birth name was Eileen Edwards, and this changed to Eilleen Twain when her mother remarried. Twain changed her name to Shania in the early 1990s, around the same time that her musical career started to take off.

2. Blood lines : AORTAS
The aorta originates in the heart and extends down into the abdomen. It is the largest artery in the body.

8. Nothing, in Nantes : RIEN
Nantes is a beautiful city located on the delta of the Loire, Erdre and Sèvre rivers. It has the well deserved nickname of “The Venice of the West”. I had the privilege of visiting Nantes a couple of times on business, and I can attest that it really is a charming city …

9. Chant often heard toward the end of an N.B.A. season : MVP!
MVP (most valuable player)

10. Rick's, for one : PIANO BAR
The fictional Rick's Café Américain is the main setting used in the movie “Casablanca”, with the café owner played by Humphrey Bogart. Should you ever visit Morocco, you might try visiting Rick's Café Casablanca, an establishment opened in 2004 that largely recreates the look and feel of the memorable movie set.

11. Speech habits unique to an individual : IDIOLECT
An individual’s speech pattern is referred to as his or her “idiolect”. The idiolect comprises the vocabulary, grammar and pronunciation used by a person.

12. The first one was delivered in 1984 : TED TALK
The acronym TED stands for Technology Entertainment and Design. TED is a set of conferences held around the world by a non-profit group called the Sapling Foundation. The conference subjects are varied, and the meetings are often led by big names such as Bill Clinton, Al Gore, Bill Gates and Jane Goodall. The Sapling Foundation then makes recordings of the conferences available for free online with the intent of disseminating the ideas globally. These conferences are known as “TED Talks”.

13. "___ Stop the Rain" (1970 hit) : WHO’LL
“Who’ll Stop the Rain” is a Creedence Clearwater Revival hit from 1970. The song is used in a 1978 movie, also called “Who’ll Stop the Rain”, which stars Nick Nolte as a Vietnam veteran who gets caught up in drug smuggling.

14. Fright night? : ALL HALLOWS’ EVE
All Saints' Day is November 1st each year. The day before All Saints' Day is All Hallows’ Eve, better known by the Scottish term, "Halloween".

20. Pusillanimous : TIMID
Someone described as “pusillanimous” lacks courage and resolution. The term comes into English via Middle French from the Latin “pusillis” meaning “very weak” and “animus” meaning “spirit”.

28. Six-time Hugo Award winner Ben : BOVA
Ben Bova is a science fiction author, and winner of six Hugo Awards. Bova also served as editor of “Analog Magazine”, as well as editorial director of “Omni” magazine.

The Hugo Awards are presented annually for excellence in science fiction and fantasy writing. The awards are named for Hugo Gernsback, who founded the sci-fi magazine “Amazing Stories”.

32. Actress Sherilyn who was an Emmy nominee for "Twin Peaks" : FENN
Sherilyn Fenn is the actress who played Audrey Horne on “Twin Peaks” in the nineties. Fenn also played the title roles in the 1993 romantic drama film “Boxing Helena” and the 1995 TV biopic “Liz: The Elizabeth Taylor Story”.

35. NASA spacecraft designed for travel to Mars : ORION
NASA is developing a spacecraft for human exploration of asteroids and of Mars. The craft is known as the Orion MPCV (Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle).

41. With 54-Down, longtime Long Island home of Theodore Roosevelt : OYSTER
(54D. See 41-Down : BAY)
President Theodore Roosevelt and his wife Edith lived much of their lives in a 22-room mansion near Oyster Bay on the north shore of Long Island, New York. Named Sagamore Hill, the home was also known as the “Summer White House” in the years that President Roosevelt was in office.

52. The Nikkei 225 is one of its indexes: Abbr. : TSE
The Tokyo Stock Exchange (TSE) is the third largest stock exchange in the world, after New York and London.

55. Some lines of Milton : ODE
English poet John Milton is best known for his epic poem “Paradise Lost”. Milton also wrote several sonnets, the most famous of which is probably “On His Blindness”. The poet developed glaucoma which rendered him completely blind so he had to dictate a lot of his work, including the whole of “Paradise Lost”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Like the national currency known as the tala : SAMOAN
7. Axilla : ARMPIT
13. "Hold on there now!" : WHOA WHOA!
15. Chasm : DIVIDE
16. Powerful pitch : HARD SELL
17. Settled with : REPAID
18. London locale: Abbr. : ONT
19. Like the outer core of the earth : MOLTEN
21. Certain logic gate : NOT
22. One Direction member Payne : LIAM
24. The Flying Dutchman, e.g. : SHIP
25. Limb-entangling weapon : BOLA
26. One nearly cut Bond in half in "Goldfinger" : LASER BEAM
29. Rise up : REBEL
30. 1983 double-platinum album by Duran Duran : RIO
31. Everyday productivity enhancer, in modern lingo : LIFE HACK
33. Fictional character whose name is French for "flight of death" : LORD VOLDEMORT
36. Leading newspaper that took its name from a stage comedy : LE FIGARO
37. It's nothing, really : NIL
38. One making introductions : EMCEE
39. "You can't make me!" : I WON'T DO IT!
44. Queen dowager of Jordan : NOOR
45. Beyond repair : LOST
46. Ago, in an annual song : SYNE
47. Animal with horns : GNU
48. Norman ___, first Asian-American to hold a cabinet post : MINETA
50. Abbr. in an office address : STE
51. Princess cake and others : TORTES
53. Simply not done : VERBOTEN
56. Show disdain for, in a way : HISS AT
57. Subject of some PC Magazine reviews : E-READERS
58. Mixed forecasts? : SLEETS
59. N.F.L. Hall-of-Famer nicknamed "The Kansas Comet" : SAYERS


Down
1. Singer Twain : SHANIA
2. Blood lines : AORTAS
3. "Are you ___?!" : MAD
4. Cries that might be made while hopping on one foot : OWS
5. Slight interruption : AHEM
6. Sure-to-succeed : NO-LOSE
7. One with commercial interests, for short : AD REP
8. Nothing, in Nantes : RIEN
9. Chant often heard toward the end of an N.B.A. season : MVP!
10. Rick's, for one : PIANO BAR
11. Speech habits unique to an individual : IDIOLECT
12. The first one was delivered in 1984 : TED TALK
13. "___ Stop the Rain" (1970 hit) : WHO’LL
14. Fright night? : ALL HALLOWS’ EVE
20. Pusillanimous : TIMID
23. More festive : MERRIER
25. Views : BEHOLDS
27. Hiker's climb : RIDGE
28. Six-time Hugo Award winner Ben : BOVA
29. Invoice word : REMIT
32. Actress Sherilyn who was an Emmy nominee for "Twin Peaks" : FENN
33. Common ingredient in furniture polish : LEMON OIL
34. "No doubt!" : OF COURSE!
35. NASA spacecraft designed for travel to Mars : ORION
36. Units at a horse race : LENGTHS
40. Whiskered animals : OTTERS
41. With 54-Down, longtime Long Island home of Theodore Roosevelt : OYSTER
42. Lays to rest : INTERS
43. Frigid temps : TEENS
45. They may have bullets : LISTS
48. Main thrust : MEAT
49. Field : AREA
52. The Nikkei 225 is one of its indexes: Abbr. : TSE
54. See 41-Down : BAY
55. Some lines of Milton : ODE



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1027-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Oct 16, Thursday




QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers


CROSSWORD SETTER: Milo Beckman
THEME: Haunted
Today’s grid is full of GHOSTS. Four across-answers need the word GHOST in front to make sense. And, those across-answers “disappear” for the intersecting down-answers:
35A. Full of ghosts ... like four answers in this puzzle? : HAUNTED

22A. Like many celebrity memoirs : (GHOST)WRITTEN
24A. Some gold rush remnants : (GHOST) TOWNS
51A. Campfire entertainment : (GHOST) STORY
53A. Monster film hit of 1984 : (GHOST)BUSTERS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 24m 29s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Blu-ray ancestor : VCR
Video Cassette Recorder (VCR)

A CD player reads the information on the disc using a laser beam. The beam is produced by what’s called a laser diode, a device similar to a light-emitting diode (LED) except that a laser beam is emitted. That laser beam is usually red in CD and DVD players. Blu-ray players are so called as they use blue lasers.

4. European History and Physics C: Mechanics, for two : AP TESTS
The Advanced Placement (AP) program offers college-level courses to kids who are still in high school. After being tested at the end of the courses, successful students receive credits that count towards a college degree.

14. Fair-hiring inits. : EOE
Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE)

18. Tile in a mosaic : TESSERA
A tessera is an individual tile used in making a mosaic. Tesserae are usually formed in the shape of cubes.

19. The "World's Most Dangerous Group" : NWA
NWA was a hip hop group from Compton, California. The original five group members included rappers who have made a name for themselves as solo acts, including: Dr. Dre and Ice Cube. The story of NWA is told in a 2015 film, also called “Straight Outta Compton". I hear that the movie was well received, although I probably won’t be seeing it …

25. Sister publication of 16 Magazine : TEEN BEAT
“Teen Beat” was a fan magazine geared towards teenagers that was published from 1967 to 2007. It was a follow-on publication to “16 Magazine” that was launched in 1956, and “Tiger Beat” launched in 1965.

26. What's done in Haiti? : FINI
“Fini” is French for “finished”.

The Republic of Haiti occupies the smaller, western portion of the island of Hispaniola in the Caribbean. The rest of the island is taken up by the Dominican Republic. Haiti is one of only two nations in the Americas to have French as an official language, the other being Canada.

28. Column on an airport screen: Abbr. : ARRS
Arrivals (arrs.)

29. #1 hit for Bill Withers (1972) and Club Nouveau (1987) : LEAN ON ME
Bill Withers was working as an assembly operator while he was trying to make a name for himself in the music industry. Even as he found success with his glorious 1971 single "Ain't No Sunshine", he held onto his day job, worried that the music industry was unpredictable.

“Club Nouveau” is an R&B band that formed in 1986 in Sacramento, California. The group’s biggest hit is a 1986 cover version of the Bill Withers song “Lean on Me”.

32. ___ es Salaam : DAR
Dar es Salaam is the largest city in Tanzania, and sits right on the east coast of Africa. The city’s name is usually translated from Arabic as “Haven of Peace”.

34. Address not found on a GPS : URL
Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

Global positioning system (GPS)

37. "Now I ain't sayin' ___ a gold digger" (Kanye West lyric) : SHE
Kanye West is a rap singer who was born in Atlanta and raised in Chicago. He also spent some time in Nanjing, China as a child, where his mother was teaching as part of an exchange program. West is married to reality star Kim Kardashian.

40. ___ Pérignon (brand of bubbly) : DOM
Dom Pérignon is the name given to the prestige label of champagne from Moët et Chandon, the French winery. The label’s name honors the Benedictine monk, Dom Pérignon, who helped to improve the quality and production of champagne in the early 18th century. Although Dom Pérignon made major contributions to champagne production, many of the stories in which he figures are just myths. He did not “invent” champagne, nor sparkling wine in general. Nor did he say the famous words, “Come quickly, I am drinking the stars!”. That lovely line first appeared in a print advertisement in the late 1800s!

41. Milton Berle hosted the world's first one : TELETHON
The world’s first telethon was took place in 1949. It was a 16-hour fundraiser hosted by Milton Berle that raised over a million dollars for the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation. The term “telethon”, a portmanteau of “television” and “marathon”, was coined in the news media the day after the event.

Comedian Milton Berle was known as "Uncle Miltie" and "Mr. Television", and was arguably the first real star of American television as he was hosting "Texaco Star Theater" starting in 1948.

43. Berry said to have anti-aging qualities : ACAI
Açaí is a palm tree native to Central and South America. The fruit has become very popular in recent years and its juice is a very fashionable addition to juice mixes and smoothies.

46. Crew leader, for short : COX
The coxswain of a boat is one in charge, particularly of its steering and navigation. The name is shortened to "cox" particularly when used for the person steering and calling out the stroke in a competition rowing boat.

47. Advice between "buy" and "sell" : HOLD
That would be in the stock market.

48. Zapper : LASER GUN
The term “laser” comes is an acronym, “Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation” (LASER). It has been pointed out that a more precise name for laser technology is “Light Oscillation by Stimulated Emission of Radiation”, but the resulting acronym isn't quite so appealing, namely LOSER!

53. Monster film hit of 1984 : (GHOST)BUSTERS
1984's "Ghostbusters" really is an entertaining movie. It stars Bill Murray and Harold Ramis, and was directed by Ivan Reitman (a trio that also worked together on 1981's "Stripes"). The first draft of the screenplay was written by another star of the movie, Dan Aykroyd. Aykroyd originally envisioned "Ghostbusters" as a vehicle for himself and John Belushi, but sadly Belushi passed away before the project could be realized.

56. Grp. that brought Colbert to Baghdad : USO
The United Service Organization (USO) was founded in 1941 at the request of FDR "to handle the on-leave recreation of the men in the armed forces". A USO tour is undertaken by a troupe of entertainers, many of whom are big-name celebrities. A USO tour usually includes troop locations in combat zones.

Stephen Colbert is a political satirist who hosted his own show on Comedy Central, "The Colbert Report". Colbert's first love was theater, and so he studied to become an actor. He then moved into comedy, and ended up on the "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart". He left "The Daily Show" in 2005 to set up his own spinoff, "The Colbert Report". In his own inimitable way, Colbert likes to use a "French" pronunciation for the name of his show, so "The Colbert Report" comes out as "The Col-bear Rep-oar". Colbert took over the “Late Show” when David Letterman retired.

59. Like on Twitter, informally : FAV
I guess “Twitter Fav” is similar to “Facebook Like”.

60. Bleu expanse : MER
In French, the “mer” (sea) is “bleu” (blue).

62. Word before "Happy New Year!" : ONE
Three, two, one … Happy New Year!

63. It went boom, for short : SST
The most famous supersonic transport (SST) is the retired Concorde. Famously, the Concorde routinely broke the sound barrier, and cruised at about twice the speed of sound. Above Mach 2, frictional heat would cause the plane’s aluminum airframe to soften, so airspeed was limited.

64. Repeat offenses, metaphorically : STRIKES
About half of the fifty US states have “three-strikes” laws, statutes that mandate courts to impose harsher sentences on an offender who has previously been convicted to two prior serious offenses.

65. GPS lines: Abbr. : RDS
Roads (rds.)

Down
6. Comedian Daniel : TOSH
Daniel Tosh is a stand-up comedian and host of “Tosh.0”, a video clip show on Comedy Central.

7. Brief records, in brief : EPS
An extended-play record, CD or download (EP) contains more music than a single, but less than an LP.

10. 4,200 feet, for the Golden Gate Bridge : SPAN
The Golden Gate is the opening of San Francisco Bay into the Pacific Ocean. The bridge that spans the Golden Gate is called “the Golden Gate Bridge” and was opened in 1937. At that time it was the longest suspension bridge in the world. One of the most eerie things about the Golden Gate Bridge is that is the second most popular place in the whole world to commit suicide (after the Nanjing Yangtze River Bridge). Steps have been taken to reduce the number of suicides, including suicide hotline telephones placed along the walkway, but still there is one suicide every two weeks on average throughout the year. There are plans to place a purpose-built net below the bridge as a deterrent, at a cost of tens of millions of dollars.

13. Tête-à-têtes : CHATS
A “tête-à-tête” is a one-on-one meeting, literally “head-to-head” in French.

21. Element #50 : TIN
The Latin word for tin is “stannum”, and so tin’s atomic symbol is “Sn”. One of the ores used as a source of tin is “stannite”.

25. Home of the Thunder, the Double-A affiliate of the Yankees : TRENTON
The city of Trenton, New Jersey was first settled in 1679 by Quakers. The settlement was named Trent-towne in 1719 in honor of William Trent, who was one of the biggest landowners in the area. The name “Trent-towne” was later shortened to Trenton. The city was the site of George Washington’s first military victory in the Revolutionary War, in 1776. Because of the Battle of Trenton, the New Jersey capital is sometimes called the “Turning Point of the Revolution”.

26. Certain bug : FLU
Influenza (flu) is an ailment that is caused by a virus. The virus is readily inactivated by the use of soap, so washing hands and surfaces is especially helpful in containing flu outbreaks.

27. ___ Darya : AMU
The Amu Darya is a major river in Central Asia that empties into the Aral Sea. It is also called the Oxus or Amu River.

31. "Smokey, this is not ___. This is bowling. There are rules" ("The Big Lebowski" quote) : NAM
“The Big Lebowski” is a 1998 comedy directed by Joel and Ethan Coen, and starring Jeff Bridges in the title role. The film’s script is loosely based on the Raymond Chandler novel “The Big Sleep”. I thought “The Big Lebowski” was just “okay” though …

32. Joe Biden's home: Abbr. : DEL
Vice President Joe Biden was a US Senator representing the state of Delaware from 1973 until he joined the Obama administration. While he was a senator, Vice President Biden commuted to Washington from Wilmington, Delaware almost every working day. He was such an active customer and supporter of Amtrak that the Wilmington Station was renamed as the Joseph R. Biden Railroad Station in 2011. Biden has made over 7,000 trips from that station, and the Amtrak crews were known to even hold the last train for a few minutes so that he could catch it. Biden earned himself the nickname “Amtrak Joe”.

33. Suffix with hater : -ADE
An extremely negative person might be described as having “drunk the haterade”, a play on the beverage Gatorade.

36. Ted Cruz's home: Abbr. : TEX
US Senator Ted Cruz served as Solicitor General for the state of Texas before heading to Washington. Cruz was appointed Solicitor General in 2003 at the age of 32, making him the youngest Solicitor General in the country. Famously, Cruz is an opponent of the Affordable Care Act and made a speech in 2013 in the US Senate on the subject that lasted for 21 hours and 19 minutes. It was the fourth longest speech in the history of the Senate.

38. Suriname colonizer : HOLLAND
The Republic of Suriname is located on the northeast coast of South America, and is the continent’s smallest country. What is now Suriname fell under Dutch rule in the late 1600s, gaining independence in 1975.

39. Last song recorded by all four Beatles, with "the" : END
“The End” is a Beatles song composed by Paul McCartney. It is the final song in a medley found on side two of the 1969 album “Abbey Road”. The song is mainly remembered as the last one recorded collectively by all four Beatles.

40. German article : DIE
The definite article in German is der, die or das, for masculine, feminine and neuter nouns. The indefinite article is ein, eine or ein, again depending on the gender of the noun. A further complication, relative to English, is that the masculine form (and only the masculine form) of the article changes when used in the accusative case, when used with the object of a sentence. The accusative forms are “den” and “einen”.

42. By way of: Abbr. : THR
Through (thr.)

43. Reunion attendees : ALUMS
An “alumnus” (plural … alumni) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is “alumna” (plural … alumnae). The term comes into English from Latin, in which alumnus means foster-son or pupil. “Alum” is an informal term used for either an alumna or an alumnus.

50. Joint ailment : GOUT
Gout is caused by an elevation of the levels of uric acid in the blood. As a result of the high concentrations, the uric acid can crystallize out in tissue causing extreme discomfort. What we tend to call gout occurs when the crystals are deposited in the big toe.

55. Fashion's ___ Saint Laurent : YVES
Yves Saint-Laurent (YSL) was a French fashion designer, actually born in Algeria. Saint-Laurent started off working as an assistant to Christian Dior at the age of 17. Dior died just four years later, and as a very young man Saint-Laurent was named head of the House of Dior. However, in 1950 Saint-Laurent was conscripted into the French Army and ended up in a military hospital after suffering a mental breakdown from the hazing inflicted on him by his fellow soldiers. His treatment included electroshock therapy and administration of sedatives and psychoactive drugs. He was released from hospital, managed to pull his life back together and started his own fashion house. A remarkable story …

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Blu-ray ancestor : VCR
4. European History and Physics C: Mechanics, for two : AP TESTS
11. One may be open at the bar : MIC
14. Fair-hiring inits. : EOE
15. Midriff-showing garment : CROP TOP
16. "Kinda sorta" : ISH
17. Area ___ : RUG
18. Tile in a mosaic : TESSERA
19. The "World's Most Dangerous Group" : NWA
20. Like fish and chips : BRITISH
22. Like many celebrity memoirs : (GHOST)WRITTEN
24. Some gold rush remnants : (GHOST) TOWNS
25. Sister publication of 16 Magazine : TEEN BEAT
26. What's done in Haiti? : FINI
27. Suffix with drunk : -ARD
28. Column on an airport screen: Abbr. : ARRS
29. #1 hit for Bill Withers (1972) and Club Nouveau (1987) : LEAN ON ME
32. ___ es Salaam : DAR
34. Address not found on a GPS : URL
35. Full of ghosts ... like four answers in this puzzle? : HAUNTED
37. "Now I ain't sayin' ___ a gold digger" (Kanye West lyric) : SHE
40. ___ Pérignon (brand of bubbly) : DOM
41. Milton Berle hosted the world's first one : TELETHON
43. Berry said to have anti-aging qualities : ACAI
46. Crew leader, for short : COX
47. Advice between "buy" and "sell" : HOLD
48. Zapper : LASER GUN
51. Campfire entertainment : (GHOST) STORY
53. Monster film hit of 1984 : (GHOST)BUSTERS
54. How the fashionable dress : SMARTLY
56. Grp. that brought Colbert to Baghdad : USO
57. "That was over the line" : NOT COOL
59. Like on Twitter, informally : FAV
60. Bleu expanse : MER
61. School assignment specification : DUE DATE
62. Word before "Happy New Year!" : ONE
63. It went boom, for short : SST
64. Repeat offenses, metaphorically : STRIKES
65. GPS lines: Abbr. : RDS


Down
1. Sink or swim, e.g. : VERB
2. Package delivery person : COURIER
3. Fit for a queen : REGINAL
4. It follows a curtain-raising : ACT I
5. Inauguration V.I.P.: Abbr. : PRES
6. Comedian Daniel : TOSH
7. Brief records, in brief : EPS
8. Knight's ride : STEED
9. Shredded : TORE
10. 4,200 feet, for the Golden Gate Bridge : SPAN
11. One involved with underground rock bands? : MINER
12. "This ___!" (fighting words) : IS WAR
13. Tête-à-têtes : CHATS
21. Element #50 : TIN
23. Ingot, e.g. : BAR
25. Home of the Thunder, the Double-A affiliate of the Yankees : TRENTON
26. Certain bug : FLU
27. ___ Darya : AMU
30. "Now you're talking!" : OHO!
31. "Smokey, this is not ___. This is bowling. There are rules" ("The Big Lebowski" quote) : NAM
32. Joe Biden's home: Abbr. : DEL
33. Suffix with hater : -ADE
36. Ted Cruz's home: Abbr. : TEX
37. Aimed at : SHOT FOR
38. Suriname colonizer : HOLLAND
39. Last song recorded by all four Beatles, with "the" : END
40. German article : DIE
42. By way of: Abbr. : THR
43. Reunion attendees : ALUMS
44. Welfare worker's workload : CASES
45. Of ___ (so to speak) : A SORT
46. More adorable : CUTER
49. Boxing segments: Abbr. : RNDS
50. Joint ailment : GOUT
51. Bit of dust : MOTE
52. Tap options : ALES
54. Take a long bath : SOAK
55. Fashion's ___ Saint Laurent : YVES
58. Early fifth-century year : CDI



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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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