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1130-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Nov 16, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Molly Young
THEME: Products from Apple?
Today’s themed answers are written as if they are Apple products (i.e. iProduct), but sound like eye-related items:
14A. New push-up bra from Apple? : ILIFT (sounds like “eye lift”)
66A. New whip from Apple? : ILASH (sounds like “eyelash”)
8D. New sports equipment from Apple? : IBALL (sounds like “eyeball”)
12D. New colander from Apple? : ISTRAIN (sounds like “eye strain”)
40D. New tracking device from Apple? : ISHADOW (sounds like “eyeshadow”)
52D. New parachute from Apple? : IDROP (sounds like “eye drop”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 10m 21s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

10. Footnote abbr. : IBID
Ibid. is short for the Latin word "ibidem" and is typically found in footnotes and bibliographies. Ibid. is used to refer the reader to the prior citation, instead of giving the same information all over again (title, author etc.).

14. New push-up bra from Apple? : ILIFT (sounds like “eye lift”)
The word “brassière” is French in origin, but it isn’t the word the French use for a “bra”. In France, what we call a bra is known as a “soutien-gorge”, translating to “held under the neck”. The word “brassière” is indeed used in France but there it describes a baby’s undershirt, a lifebelt or a harness. “Brassière” comes from the Old French word for an “arm protector” in a military uniform (“bras” is the French for “arm”). Later “brassière” came to mean “breastplate” and from there the word was used for a type of woman’s corset. The word jumped into English around 1900.

15. ___ purse : HOBO
A hobo bag is rather unstructured-looking, a crescent-shaped bag with a long strap and soft sides that tends to slump when set down. It’s called a hobo bag because the shape resembles that of the bundle carried by archetypal hobos on the ends of sticks resting on their shoulders.

17. Preceder of Barbara or Clara : SANTA
The city of Santa Barbara on the California coast was indirectly named by Spanish explorer Sebastián Vizcaíno in 1602. He named the channel between the mainland and the Channel Islands “Santa Barbara Channel”, while naming one of the islands “Santa Barbara”. Some time later, the Spanish established the Santa Barbara Mission on the Feast of Saint Barbara in 1786.

The Santa Clara Valley, just a few miles from me at the south of San Francisco Bay, is better known as "Silicon Valley". The term "Silicon Valley" dates back to 1971 when it was apparently first used in a weekly trade newspaper called "Electronic News" in articles written by journalist Don Hoefler.

19. What Pac-Man eats : DOTS
The Pac-Man arcade game was first released in Japan in 1980, and is as popular today as it ever was. The game features characters that are maneuvered around the screen to eat up dots and earn points. The name comes from the Japanese folk hero "Paku", known for his voracious appetite. The spin-off game called Ms. Pac-Man was released in 1981.

20. Ambrose who wrote "The Devil's Dictionary" : BIERCE
Ambrose Bierce was, among other things, an American satirist. He wrote a satirical lexicon called “The Devil’s Dictionary” published in 1911. The book is still popular today, with an updated version released in 2009. It includes “new” definitions from Bierce that were not included in his original work. Roy Morris, Jr. wrote a biography about Bierce called “Ambrose Bierce: Alone in Bad Company”.

25. Thomas who wrote "Buddenbrooks" : MANN
Thomas Mann was a German novelist whose most famous work is probably his novella "Death in Venice", originally published in German in 1912 as "Der Tod in Venedig". The story was famously adapted for the big screen in 1971, in a movie starring Dirk Bogarde.

“Buddenbrooks” was Thomas Mann’s first novel, published in 1901. When Mann was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1929, it was given on the basis of his whole body of work, although “Buddenbrooks” was specifically mentioned as the main reason for the award.

26. Great Dane? : HAMLET
The full title of William Shakespeare’s play that we tend to call “Hamlet” is “The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark”. It is the most performed of all Shakespeare’s plays and it is also his longest, the only one of his works comprising over 4,000 lines. That’s about a 4-hour sitting in a theater …

29. "Get. Out. Of. Here!" : OMG
OMG is text-speak for Oh My Gosh! Oh My Goodness! or any other G words you might think of …

30. Leather bag for wine : BOTA
A bota bag is a traditional Spanish receptacle used to hold liquids. Also known as a wineskin, it is usually made of leather and carries wine.

31. Perfidy : DECEIT
“Perfidy” is a deliberate breach of trust. The term originated from the Latin phrase “per fidem decipere”, meaning “to deceive through trustingness”.

36. British P.M. between Churchill and Macmillan : EDEN
Sir Anthony Eden served as Britain’s Foreign Secretary during WWII, and then as Prime Minister from 1955-57. I think it’s fair to say that Eden doesn’t have a great reputation as a statesman. He was proud of his stance in favor of peace over war, so his critics characterized him as an appeaser. His major stumble on the world stage occurred with the Suez Crisis in 1956. Egypt’s President Nasser unilaterally nationalized the Suez Canal causing war to be declared on Egypt by Britain, France and Israel. Within a few months political pressure from the US and the USSR caused the allies to withdraw, bolstering Egypt’s national reputation. Eden never recovered from the loss of face at home, and it is felt that the stress even affected his health. Eden resigned in January 1957.

50. Acidity measures : PHS
As we all recall from chemistry class, a pH of 7 is considered neutral. Anything less than 7 is an acid, and anything above 7 is a base.

55. Kind of talk : TED
The acronym TED stands for Technology Entertainment and Design. TED is a set of conferences held around the world by a non-profit group called the Sapling Foundation. The conference subjects are varied, and the meetings are often led by big names such as Bill Clinton, Al Gore, Bill Gates and Jane Goodall. The Sapling Foundation then makes recordings of the conferences available for free online with the intent of disseminating the ideas globally. These conferences are known as “TED Talks”.

56. Numerous : LEGION
The word “legion” can be used to mean “a large number”.

60. Seed cover : ARIL
The casing surrounding many seeds is called the aril, and it may be quite fleshy. This fruit-like characteristic makes it desirable as a food and aids in the dispersion of the seeds.

65. Writer Jaffe : RONA
Rona Jaffe was an American novelist perhaps most famous for two of her books, “The Best of Everything” and “Mazes and Monsters”. “The Best of Everything” was published in 1958 and has been compared with the HBO television series “Sex and the City” as it depicts women in the working world. “Mazes and Monsters” was published in 1981 and explores a role-playing game similar to Dungeons & Dragons and the impact it has on players.

67. So, so cute : TWEE
In the UK, something “twee” is cutesy or overly nice. “Twee” came from “tweet”, which is the cutesy, baby-talk way of saying “sweet”.

Down
7. Eggs rich in omega-3 fatty acids : ROE
Fish oils are noted for containing omega-3 fatty acids, which have many health benefits including the reduction of inflammation. Like so many essential nutrients that we get from animals, the only reason the animal has them is that it feeds on plants. In this case, fish cannot manufacture omega-3 fatty acids, and instead absorb them from algae. Omega-3 fatty acids are also readily found in other plant oils such as flaxseed oil.

10. Iraq war danger, for short : IED
Having spent much of my life in the border areas between southern and Northern Ireland, sadly I am all too familiar with the devastating effects of Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs). One has to admire the bravery of soldiers who spend their careers defusing (or attempting to defuse) such devices in order to save the lives and property of others.

12. New colander from Apple? : ISTRAIN (sounds like “eye strain”)
A colander is a bowl-shaped utensil with holes in it that is used for draining liquid from food. The term “colander” comes from the Latin word “colum” meaning “sieve”.

27. Magazine with a fold-in back cover : MAD
"Mad" magazine has been around since 1952, although back then it was more of a comic book than a magazine. The original founder and editor was Harvey Kurtzman and in order to convince him to stay, the publisher changed the format to a magazine in 1955. That’s when the publication really took off in terms of popularity.

37. Orwell's "Animal Farm" and Kafka's "The Metamorphosis," for two : NOVELLAS
“Animal Farm” is a 1945 novella written by George Orwell, a satire of life in the Soviet Union under Joseph Stalin. Orwell had trouble getting his novel published in his homeland of the UK during WWII, as anti-Soviet literature wasn't a good thing to publish while the UK and USSR were on the same side of a World War. In fact, one publisher who was willing to distribute the book changed his mind after being warned off by the British Ministry of Information. Given his experiences, I find it interesting that Orwell should write "Nineteen Eighty-Four" a few years later, and introduce the world to Big Brother.

"The Metamorphosis" is a famous novella by Franz Kafka, regarded by many as one of the greatest pieces of short fiction written in the 20th century. The story tells of the metamorphosis of Gregor Samsa into a gigantic insect. His sister, Grete Samsa, becomes his caregiver.

43. It can help you get a leg up : OTTOMAN
The piece of furniture known as an ottoman can be a couch, usually with a head but no back or sides. Here in the US, the term more usually applies to a padded and upholstered seat or bench that can also be used as a footrest. The original ottoman couch came from the Ottoman Empire, hence the name.

52. New parachute from Apple? : IDROP (sounds like “eye drop”)
The term “parachute” was coined by Frenchman François Blanchard, from “para-” meaning “defence against” and “chute” meaning “a fall”.

53. Garlicky mayonnaise : AIOLI
To the purist, especially in Provence in the South of France, the “home” of aioli, aioli is prepared just by grinding garlic with olive oil. However, other ingredients are often added to the mix, particularly egg yolks.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Rings up? : HALOS
6. In good physical condition : TRIM
10. Footnote abbr. : IBID
14. New push-up bra from Apple? : ILIFT (sounds like “eye lift”)
15. ___ purse : HOBO
16. In addition : ELSE
17. Preceder of Barbara or Clara : SANTA
18. Gather : REAP
19. What Pac-Man eats : DOTS
20. Ambrose who wrote "The Devil's Dictionary" : BIERCE
22. Groovy things, for short? : LPS
24. Miners dig it : ORE
25. Thomas who wrote "Buddenbrooks" : MANN
26. Great Dane? : HAMLET
28. Golf goal : PAR
29. "Get. Out. Of. Here!" : OMG
30. Leather bag for wine : BOTA
31. Perfidy : DECEIT
33. Like some albums and skills : MASTERED
35. Merits : EARNS
36. British P.M. between Churchill and Macmillan : EDEN
37. Goes out for a bit? : NAPS
39. Contract add-on : RIDER
42. Predicted : FORETOLD
46. Some mutterings : ASIDES
48. Hard-core : AVID
49. Scones go-with : TEA
50. Acidity measures : PHS
51. Gleams : SHINES
53. Slightly : A TAD
54. ___ smear : PAP
55. Kind of talk : TED
56. Numerous : LEGION
58. What might make a nose wrinkle : ODOR
60. Seed cover : ARIL
62. Lover : ROMEO
64. Like some cheeks and outlooks : ROSY
65. Writer Jaffe : RONA
66. New whip from Apple? : ILASH (sounds like “eyelash”)
67. So, so cute : TWEE
68. Massage joints : SPAS
69. Money makers : MINTS

Down
1. Casual greetings : HIS
2. First state to declare Christmas a legal holiday : ALABAMA
3. Insides of coats : LININGS
4. Many a time : OFTEN
5. Celebrity : STAR
6. Jeopardize : THREATEN
7. Eggs rich in omega-3 fatty acids : ROE
8. New sports equipment from Apple? : IBALL (sounds like “eyeball”)
9. Swabbed : MOPPED
10. Iraq war danger, for short : IED
11. Funny outtake : BLOOPER
12. New colander from Apple? : ISTRAIN (sounds like “eye strain”)
13. Leaves high and dry : DESERTS
21. Tedious task : CHORE
23. Like 49-Across : STEEPED
25. Having a baby makes one : MOM
27. Magazine with a fold-in back cover : MAD
30. Doctor's order for recuperation : BED REST
32. List in movie credits : CAST
34. Plenty angry, with "off" : TEED
37. Orwell's "Animal Farm" and Kafka's "The Metamorphosis," for two : NOVELLAS
38. Get up : ARISE
39. Friendly relationship : RAPPORT
40. New tracking device from Apple? : ISHADOW (sounds like “eyeshadow”)
41. Scrap, with "of" : DISPOSE
42. Season ticket holder, e.g. : FAN
43. It can help you get a leg up : OTTOMAN
44. Having the least fat : LEANEST
45. Having a baby makes one : DAD
47. Pruning tools : SHEARS
52. New parachute from Apple? : IDROP (sounds like “eye drop”)
53. Garlicky mayonnaise : AIOLI
57. Not looking good at all : GRIM
59. Ham on ___ : RYE
61. ___ pinch : IN A
63. Cries of surprise : OHS


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1129-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Nov 16, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Jacob Stulberg
THEME: The Joy of Cooking
Today’s themed answers are foodstuffs used that are COOKED or used in COOKING, with each ending with a synonym of JOY:
40A. Classic kitchen volume ... or a hint to 18-, 24-/53- and 62-Across : THE JOY OF COOKING

18A. Marmalade ingredient : ORANGE ZEST
24A. With 53-Across, a sugary treat : TURKISH …
53A. See 24-Across : … DELIGHT
62A. Sweet and tangy picnic side dish : CORN RELISH
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 8m 26s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Croquet needs : PEGS
The very genteel game of croquet is played on lawns all over the world. It’s the game where mallets are used to hit wooden balls through hoops embedded in the grass. The name “croquet” is from French dialect and means “hockey stick”. The game originated in Brittany in France, and was popularized in Ireland in the 1830s.

9. Sorority sisters, e.g., in old lingo : COEDS
Coeducation is a system in which male and female students are educated together. We use the adjective “coed” to describe such a system. The noun “coed” is hangover from the past, and describes only a female in such an institution, and not a male.

16. Muppet who co-hosted "The Adventures of Elmo in Grouchland" : ERNIE
“The Adventures of Elmo in Grouchland” is a 1999 musical film featuring characters from the children’s TV show “Sesame Street”.

22. Historian's Muse : CLIO
In Greek mythology, the muses are the goddesses who inspire the creation of literature and the arts. The number of muses is a subject of debate at times, but the most popular view is that there are nine:
  • Calliope (epic poetry)
  • Clio (history)
  • Erato (lyric poetry)
  • Euterpe (music)
  • Melpomene (tragedy)
  • Polyhymnia (choral poetry)
  • Terpsichore (dance)
  • Thalia (comedy)
  • Urania (astronomy)

23. Black-and-white swimmer : ORCA
The taxonomic name for the killer whale is Orcinus orca. The use of the name “orca”, rather than “killer whale”, is becoming more and more common. The Latin word “Orcinus” means “belonging to Orcus”, with Orcus being the name for the Kingdom of the Dead.

24. With 53-Across, a sugary treat : TURKISH …
53. See 24-Across : … DELIGHT
Turkish delight is a confection or candy made mainly from a starch gel and sugar. Additional ingredients can include chopped dates and nuts, as well as rosewater, orange or lemon flavoring.

26. Blacktop : TAR
The terms “Tarmac” and “macadam” are short for “tarmacadam”. In the 1800s, Scotsman John Loudon McAdam developed a style of road known as “macadam”. Macadam had a top-layer of crushed stone and gravel laid over larger stones. The macadam also had a convex cross-section so that water tended to drain to the sides. In 1901, a significant improvement was made by English engineer Edgar Purnell Hooley who introduced tar into the macadam, improving the resistance to water damage and practically eliminating dust. The “tar-penetration macadam” is the basis of what we now call Tarmac.

29. Snake for a charmer : ASP
Snake charmers don’t actually hypnotize their cobras, but they do train them. The snake is trained to “follow” the movement of end of the pungi, the instrument that the charmer uses in the act. The snake presents no danger to the charmer or the audience, as it is typically defanged or has it’s mouth partially stitched up so that only the tongue can be moved in and out. Not a very nice practice …

32. "Cherry Wine" rapper : NAS
Rapper Nas used to go by another stage name, Nasty Nas, and before that by his real name, Nasir bin Olu Dara Jones. Nas released his first album “Illmatic” in 1994, and inventively titled his fifth studio album “Stillmatic”, released in 2001. Not my cup of tea, I would say …

35. Purim villain : HAMAN
Purim is a festival commemorating the deliverance of the Jewish people from a plot to wipe them out by Haman the Agagite, as recorded in the Book of Esther.

40. Classic kitchen volume ... or a hint to 18-, 24-/53- and 62-Across : THE JOY OF COOKING
Irma Rombauer was the author of the famous cookbook “The Joy Of Cooking”. Rombauer self-published the book back in 1931 in St. Louis, Missouri. She and her family continued to publish privately as demand was high, and then a commercial printing house picked it up in 1936. “The Joy of Cooking” has been in print continuously ever since.

43. World capital that celebrated its 1,000th anniversary in 2010 : HANOI
Hanoi was the capital of North Vietnam, and Saigon the capital of South Vietnam. After the Vietnam War, Hanoi was made capital of the reunified state. Saigon, the larger metropolis, was renamed to Ho Chi Minh City. Hanoi is located in the delta of the Red River, and is just over 50 miles from the Gulf of Tonkin in the South China Sea.

44. Surgeon's insertion : STENT
In the world of medicine and surgery, a stent is an artificial tube inserted inside a vessel in the body, say an artery, so that it reduces the effects of a local restriction in the body’s conduit.

46. Areas at rivers' ends : DELTAS
A river delta is a triangular landform at the mouth of a river created by the deposition of sediment. The most famous “delta” in the United States isn’t actually a delta at all. The Mississippi Delta is an alluvial plain that lies 300 miles north of the river’s actual delta, which is known as the Mississippi River Delta. Very confusing ...
48. Image of Homer, perhaps : CEL
In the world of animation, a cel is a transparent sheet on which objects and characters are drawn. In the first half of the 20th century the sheet was actually made of celluloid, giving the "cel" its name.

“The Simpsons” is one of the most successful programs produced by the Fox Broadcasting Company. Homer Simpson's catchphrase is "D'oh!", which became such a famous exclamation that it has been included in the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) since 2001. “D’oh!” can be translated as “I should have thought of that!”

52. ___ Lankan : SRI
The island nation of Sri Lanka lies off the southeast coast of India. The name “Sri Lanka” translates from Sanskrit into English as "venerable island". Before 1970, Sri Lanka was known as Ceylon, a name given to the country during British rule.

59. Color of raw linen : ECRU
The shade called ecru is a grayish, yellowish brown. The word “ecru” comes from French and means “raw, unbleached”. “Ecru” has the same roots as our word “crude”.

61. Connecticut collegian : YALIE
Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut was founded in 1701, making it the third-oldest university in the US. Originally called the Collegiate School, it was renamed to Yale University in honor of retired merchant from London called Elihu Yale, who made generous contributions to the institution. Yale University’s nickname is “Old Eli”, in a nod to the benefactor.

65. Where Beethoven was born : BONN
After WWII, Bonn was chosen as the capital of West Germany, a choice promoted by Chancellor Konrad Adenauer who was from the area. After German reunification, the capital was moved to Berlin.

Ludwig van Beethoven is one of my favorite composers from the Classical period. There are two excellent films that showcase his music and give fictionalized yet entertaining accounts of different aspects of his life: “Immortal Beloved” (1994) that speculates on the identity of one of Beethoven’s lovers, and “Copying Beethoven” (2006) that explores the events leading up to the triumphant premiere of his 9th Symphony.

67. Voice below soprano : ALTO
In choral music, an alto (plural “alti”) is the second-highest voice in a four-part chorus made up of soprano, contr(alto), tenor and bass. The word “alto” describes the vocal range, that of the deepest female singing-voice, whereas the term “contralto” describes more than just the alto range, but also its quality and timbre. An adult male’s voice (not a boy’s) with the same range as an alto is called a “countertenor”.

68. Mother ___ : LODE
A lode is a metal ore deposit that’s found between two layers of rock or in a fissure. The “mother lode” is the principal deposit in a mine, usually of gold or silver. “Mother lode” is probably a translation of “veta madre”, an expression used in mining in Mexico.

Down
1. Milwaukee brewer : PABST
Pabst Blue Ribbon (PBR) is the most recognizable brand of beer from the Pabst Brewing Company. There appears to be some dispute over whether or not Pabst beer ever won a "blue ribbon" prize, but the company claims that it did so at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893. The beer was originally called Pabst Best Select, and then just Pabst Select. With the renaming to Blue Ribbon, the beer was sold with an actual blue ribbon tied around the neck of the bottle until it was dropped in 1916 and incorporated into the label.

Milwaukee sits on the western shore of Lake Michigan, and is the largest city in the state of Wisconsin. Milwaukee has a long tradition of brewing, a tradition that dates back to the 1850s and that is associated with the large number of German immigrants that started to arrive in the area during the 1840s. Even though the city was once home to four of the world’s largest breweries, namely Schlitz, Blatz, Pabst and Miller, only the latter is a major employer in Milwaukee today.

2. Diplomat Root : ELIHU
Elihu Root was an American statesman, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1912 for his diplomatic work that brought “nations together through arbitration and cooperation”. Root served as Secretary of State under President Theodore Roosevelt.

4. Neil who sang "Laughter in the Rain" : SEDAKA
Neil Sedaka has been performing and composing for well over 50 years. His list of hits includes classics such as “Stupid Cupid”, “Oh! Carol”, “Happy Birthday Sweet Sixteen” and “Breaking Up Is Hard to Do”.

7. Like the Kia logo : OVAL
Kia Motors is the second largest manufacturer of cars in South Korea, behind Hyundai (and Hyundai is a part owner in Kia now). Kia was founded in 1944 as a manufacturer of bicycle parts, and did indeed produce Korea’s first domestic bicycle. The company’s original name was Kyungsung Precision Industry, with the Kia name introduced in 1952.

10. Rice-shaped pasta : ORZO
Orzo is pasta that has been formed into granular shapes, much like barley. And indeed, "orzo" is the Italian word for "barley".

12. "Boogie Oogie Oogie" music genre : DISCO
“Boogie Oogie Oogie” is a 1978 disco song released by the Los Angeles R&B band called A Taste of Honey.

19. Egg on : GOAD
The verb “edge” has been used to mean to incite, to urge on, from the 16th century. Somewhere along the way “edge” was mistakenly replaced with “egg”, giving us our term “to egg on” meaning “to goad”.

21. They're rich in omega-3 fatty acids : FISH OILS
Fish oils are noted for containing omega-3 fatty acids, which have many health benefits including the reduction of inflammation. Like so many essential nutrients that we get from animals, the only reason the animal has them is that it feeds on plants. In this case, fish cannot manufacture omega-3 fatty acids, and instead absorb them from algae. Omega-3 fatty acids are also readily found in other plant oils such as flaxseed oil.

25. Neuter : SPAY
Our verb “to spay”, meaning “to surgically remove the ovaries of” (an animal) comes from an old Anglo-French word “espeier” meaning “to cut with a sword”.

27. How telecommuters work : REMOTELY
Our verb “to commute”, meaning “to go back and forth to work”, ultimately derives from the Latin “commutare”, meaning “to often change”. Back in the late 1800s, a “commutation ticket” was a season pass, so named because it allowed one to “change” one kind of payment into another. Quite interesting …

31. Himalayan grazer : YAK
The English word “yak” is an Anglicized version of the Tibetan name for the male of the species. Yak milk is much prized in the Tibetan culture. It is made into cheese and butter, and the butter is used to make a tea that is consumed in great volume by Tibetans. The butter is also used as a fuel in lamps, and during festivals the butter is even sculpted into religious icons.

36. Contents of the Torah : MOSAIC LAW
The Torah, the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, are traditionally believed to have been written by Moses. As such, they are sometimes referred to as the Law of Moses, or Mosaic Law.

38. Musician Brian : ENO
Brian Eno is a musician, composer and record producer from England who first achieved fame as the synthesizer player with Roxy Music. As a producer, Eno has worked with David Bowie, Devo, Talking Heads and U2.

39. York, for one: Abbr. : SGT
The marvelous 1941 film called "Sergeant York" stars Gary Cooper playing the real-life WWI hero Alvin York. York was the most decorated American soldier in the First World War, and the movie about his life became the highest-grossing film of 1941. For his heroism, York was not only awarded the Medal of Honor by the United States, but also the French “Légion d'honneur” (the highest decoration in France) and the Italian “Croce di Guerra”.

41. Morning beverage, slangily : JOE
It seems that no one really knows why we refer to coffee as “joe”, but we’ve been doing so since early in WWII.

42. Fairy tale starter : ONCE
The stock phrase “Once upon a time” has been used in various forms as the start of a narrative at least since 1380. The stock phrase at the end of stories such as folktales is often “and they all lived happily ever after”. The earlier version of this ending was “happily until their deaths”.

50. Major manufacturer of soda cans : ALCOA
The Aluminum Corporation of America (ALCOA) is the largest producer of aluminum in the United States. The company was founded in 1888 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania where its headquarters are to this day.

55. Language in Bollywood films : HINDI
Bollywood is the informal name given to the huge film industry based in Mumbai in India. The term “Bollywood” is a melding of “Bombay”, the old name for Mumbai, and “Hollywood”.

56. Words to live by : TENET
A tenet is an article of faith, something that is held to be true. “Tenet” is Latin for “he holds”.

63. E.R. workers : RNS
One might find a registered nurse (RN) or a medical doctor (MD) in an emergency room (ER).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Croquet needs : PEGS
5. On : ATOP
9. Sorority sisters, e.g., in old lingo : COEDS
14. Skin cream component : ALOE
15. Bird in a magician's hat : DOVE
16. Muppet who co-hosted "The Adventures of Elmo in Grouchland" : ERNIE
17. Secure : BIND
18. Marmalade ingredient : ORANGE ZEST
20. Stack of sheets : SHEAF
22. Historian's Muse : CLIO
23. Black-and-white swimmer : ORCA
24. With 53-Across, a sugary treat : TURKISH …
26. Blacktop : TAR
28. Figured out : GOT
29. Snake for a charmer : ASP
30. It might end with an early touchdown : RED-EYE
32. "Cherry Wine" rapper : NAS
35. Purim villain : HAMAN
37. Ones to go pubbing with : MATES
40. Classic kitchen volume ... or a hint to 18-, 24-/53- and 62-Across : THE JOY OF COOKING
43. World capital that celebrated its 1,000th anniversary in 2010 : HANOI
44. Surgeon's insertion : STENT
45. Camp bed : COT
46. Areas at rivers' ends : DELTAS
48. Image of Homer, perhaps : CEL
50. Bark deeper than a yip : ARF
52. ___ Lankan : SRI
53. See 24-Across : … DELIGHT
57. "___ alive!" : LOOK
59. Color of raw linen : ECRU
61. Connecticut collegian : YALIE
62. Sweet and tangy picnic side dish : CORN RELISH
65. Where Beethoven was born : BONN
66. Frequently : OFTEN
67. Voice below soprano : ALTO
68. Mother ___ : LODE
69. Poker targets? : ASHES
70. Sunset's direction : WEST
71. Discharge : EMIT

Down
1. Milwaukee brewer : PABST
2. Diplomat Root : ELIHU
3. One with zero chance of success : GONER
4. Neil who sang "Laughter in the Rain" : SEDAKA
5. Stir : ADO
6. Commit arson on : TORCH
7. Like the Kia logo : OVAL
8. Display of remorse : PENITENCE
9. Middling grade : CEE
10. Rice-shaped pasta : ORZO
11. Peppy : ENERGETIC
12. "Boogie Oogie Oogie" music genre : DISCO
13. Attacked : SET AT
19. Egg on : GOAD
21. They're rich in omega-3 fatty acids : FISH OILS
25. Neuter : SPAY
27. How telecommuters work : REMOTELY
30. Large amounts : RAFTS
31. Himalayan grazer : YAK
32. To the ___ degree : NTH
33. "How brilliant!" : AHA!
34. Discharge : SEND FORTH
36. Contents of the Torah : MOSAIC LAW
38. Musician Brian : ENO
39. York, for one: Abbr. : SGT
41. Morning beverage, slangily : JOE
42. Fairy tale starter : ONCE
47. Shade provider : TREE
49. Apt (to) : LIABLE
50. Major manufacturer of soda cans : ALCOA
51. Landing spots for Santa : ROOFS
53. Cleans, in a way : DUSTS
54. What a rain cloud over a head may represent, in comics : GLOOM
55. Language in Bollywood films : HINDI
56. Words to live by : TENET
58. Spot hit by a reflex hammer : KNEE
60. Upset : RILE
63. E.R. workers : RNS
64. 100° or more, say : HOT


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1128-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Nov 16, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Kristian House
THEME: Duck, Duck, Goose
Today’s themed answers contain hidden words made from the circled letters in the grid. Reading from the top, those hidden words are a DUCK, DUCK and a GOOSE. That sequence reminds of the children’s game DUCK, DUCK, GOOSE:
58A. Children's game ... or the circled words in 20-, 28- and 48-Across : DUCK, DUCK, GOOSE

20A. "Bowiemania" and "Come Together: America Salutes the Beatles" : TRIBUTE ALBUMS (hiding “teal”)
28A. 1948-94, in South Africa : APARTHEID ERA (hiding “eider”)
48A. Bitter rivals : SWORN ENEMIES (hiding “nene”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 33s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Taxis : CABS
A hansom cab is a very specific design of horse and buggy that was patented by Joseph Hansom in 1834 in England. The “cab” in the name is short for “cabriolet”, an earlier design of carriage on which the hansom was based. It’s from “hansom cab” that we get our modern term “cab”.

9. Wiccan or Druid : PAGAN
A pagan is someone who holds religious beliefs that are different from the main religions of the world. In classical Latin, “paganus” was a villager, a rustic.

Wicca is a relatively new phenomenon, a Neopagan religion that developed in the twentieth century. A follower of Wicca is called a Wiccan or a Witch.

Druids were priests of Celtic Europe during the Iron Age.

15. Demolish : RAZE
To “raze” (“rase”, in UK English) is to level to the ground. I’ve always thought it odd that “raise”, a homophone of “raze”, means to build up.

18. Razor brand : ATRA
Fortunately for crossword constructors, the Atra razor was introduced by Gillette in 1977. The Atra was sold as the Contour in some markets and its derivative products are still around today.

19. Zapped with a stun gun : TASED
Victor Appleton wrote a novel for young adults called “Tom Swift and His Electric Rifle”. The company that developed the TASER electroshock weapon partly named its product as a homage to the novel. The acronym “TASER” stands for “Thomas A. Swift’s Electric Rifle”.

20. "Bowiemania" and "Come Together: America Salutes the Beatles" : TRIBUTE ALBUMS (hiding “teal”)
The beautiful color of teal takes it name from the duck called a “teal”, which has dark greenish-blue (teal) markings on its head and wings.

24. Bill with Hamilton's visage : TEN
The US ten-dollar bill features the image of Alexander Hamilton, the first US Secretary of the Treasury, on the obverse. As such, ten-dollar bills are sometimes called “Hamiltons”. By the way, the $10 bill is the only US currency in circulation in which the portrait faces to the left. The reverse of the ten-dollar bill features the US Treasury Building.

25. McKellen who played Gandalf : IAN
Sir Ian McKellen is a marvelous English actor, someone who is comfortable playing anything from Macbeth on stage to Magneto in an “X-Men” movie. On the big screen, McKellen is very famous for playing Gandalf in "The Lord of Rings". In the UK, Sir Ian is noted for being at the forefront of the campaign for equal rights for gay people, a role he has enthusiastically embraced since the eighties.

28. 1948-94, in South Africa : APARTHEID ERA (hiding “eider”)
Apartheid was the system of racial segregation used in South Africa from 1948 to 1994. “Apartheid” is an Afrikaans word meaning “apart-hood, the state of being apart”. Eiders are large sea ducks. Their down feathers are used to fill pillows and quilts, giving the name to the quilt called an “eiderdown”.

32. I.S.P. with a butterfly logo : MSN
The Microsoft Network (MSN) used to be an Internet service provider (ISP). These days, MSN is mainly a web portal.

42. Common play on fourth down : PUNT
That would be football.

48. Bitter rivals : SWORN ENEMIES (hiding “nene”)
The bird called a nene is a native of Hawaii, and is also known as the Hawaiian goose. The name "nene" is imitative of its call. When Captain Cook landed on the islands in 1778, there were 25,000 nene living there. By 1950, the number was reduced by hunting to just 30 birds. Conservation efforts in recent years have been somewhat successful.

52. That, in Tabasco : ESO
Tabasco is one of Mexico’s 31 “estados” (states), and is located in the very southeast of the country.

53. Chicken ___ king : A LA
A dish prepared “a la king” (usually chicken or turkey), is food prepared in a cream sauce, with mushrooms, pimentos, green peppers and sherry.

58. Children's game ... or the circled words in 20-, 28- and 48-Across : DUCK, DUCK, GOOSE
“Duck, Duck, Goose” is a kid’s game, and not one that I’d heard of to be honest …

62. Actress Kirsten of "Spider-Man" : DUNST
Kirsten Dunst is a Hollywood actress from Point Pleasant, New Jersey. Dunst is perhaps best known for playing the love interest and female lead in the “Spider-Man” series of movies opposite Tobey Maguire. Personally, my favorite Dunst films are “Wimbledon” and “Marie Antoinette”. Dunst is a dual citizen of the US and Germany, as her father is from Hamburg.

64. Part of an archipelago : ISLE
“Archipelago” is a name often used for a group or chain of islands. “Archipelago” is our spelling of the Italian “arcipelago”, a word that has Greek roots. “Arcipelago” was the proper name for the Aegean Sea in Greek, a word that was eventually used for the Aegean Islands.

66. Chum, in Chihuahua : AMIGO
Chihuahua is a state in northern Mexico that shares a border with Texas and New Mexico. Chihuahua is the largest state in the country, so has the nickname "El Estado Grande". The state takes its name from the Chihuahuan Desert which lies largely within its borders. The Chihuahua breed of dog takes its name from the state.

69. Senegal's capital : DAKAR
The Republic of Senegal is a country on the far western coast of Africa. For many years Senegal was a French colony, gaining independence in 1960. The capital of Senegal is Dakar, a city located on the Cap-Vert Peninsula that juts out into the Atlantic Ocean.

70. Ice cream brand known as Dreyer's west of the Rockies : EDY’S
Dreyers’ ice cream sells its products under the name Dreyers in the Western United States, and Edy’s in the Eastern states. The company’s founders were William Dreyer and Joseph Edy.

Down
3. Tony ___, 1990s-2000s British P.M. : BLAIR
Tony Blair was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom for ten years, from 1997 to 2007. Blair led his Labour Party from the left towards the center, helped along by the phrase “New Labour”. Under his leadership, Labour won a landslide victory in 1997, and was comfortably elected into power again in 2001 and 2005. Blair stepped down in 2007 and Gordon Blair took over as prime minister. Labour was soundly defeated at the polls in the next general election, in 2010.

4. Balkan country once part of Yugoslavia : SERBIA
Serbia is a landlocked country in southeast Europe. After WWII, Serbia became one of several states making up the nation called Yugoslavia. Serbia became independent again in 2006 as Yugoslavia broke up after the declaration of independence by Montenegro.

The Balkan Peninsula in Southeast Europe is usually referred to as “the Balkans”. The region takes its name from the Balkan Mountains located in present-day Bulgaria and Serbia. “Balkan” is Bulgarian for “mountain”.

5. Group that included Demi Moore and Emilio Estevez : BRAT PACK
The Brat Pack moniker is reminiscent of the Rat Pack of the fifties and sixties (Franks Sinatra & co.). To qualify as a "founding" member of the Brat Pack, the actor had to appear in either "The Breakfast Club" or "St. Elmo's Fire", or both. So we have Emilio Estevez, Anthony Michael Hall, Rob Lowe, Andrew McCarthy, Demi Moore, Judd Nelson, Molly Ringwald and Ally Sheedy.

6. After curfew : LATE
Our word “curfew” comes from an Old French word meaning “cover fire”. In medieval days a bell would be ring in the evenings as a signal to bank the hearths in preparation for sleeping. The intent was to prevent uncontrolled fires starting from fireplaces that were not tended during the night.

7. Klein of Vox.com : EZRA
Ezra Klein is a journalist and blogger who writes for “The Washington Post”, “Bloomberg” and “MSNBC”. Klein’s contribution at “The Washington Post” is the most-read blog that the paper publishes.

Vox is a news and opinion website that was founded by former “Washington Post” journalist Ezra Klein in 2014.

8. What the Forbes 400 measures : WEALTH
The Forbes 400 is a list published annually by “Forbes Magazine”, a list of the 400 Americans with the largest net worth. Top of the list for the 17 years up to 2010 was Bill Gates. In the year 2000, the 400 wealthiest people controlled 12.2% of the country’s Gross Domestic Product. That's 12.2% ... I wonder what Thomas Jefferson would have thought of that …

9. Flower that's also a girl's name : PETUNIA
The flowering plants known as petunias are in a genus that related to the tobacco plant. The name “petunia” comes from the obsolete French word “petun” meaning “tobacco plant”.

10. Economist Smith : ADAM
Adam Smith was a pioneer in the field of “political economy”, an original term used for the study of production and trade and their relationship with law, government and the distribution of wealth. Adam Smith’s great work is called “The Wealth of Nations”, published in 1776. The book was a big hit within his own lifetime and went a long way to earning him the reputation as the father of modern economics and capitalism. Smith coined the phrase “the invisible hand of the market”, describing his assertion that a marketplace tends to self-regulate.

11. Dressed to the nines : GUSSIED UP
“To gussy up” is to dress showily, and is derived from the slang term “gussy” that was used for an overly-dressed person.

The term “to the nines” means “to perfection”. The first person to use the term in literature was Robbie Burns. Apparently the idea behind the use of “nines” is figurative (pun!), with the number nine considered “ideal” as it is arrived at by multiplying three by three.

13. Homer Simpson's neighbor : NED
Ned Flanders lives next door to Homer on TV’s “The Simpsons”. Ned is voiced by actor Harry Shearer and has been around since the very first episode aired in 1989.

21. Diamond officials, informally : UMPS
That would be baseball.

32. Inventor of a "code" : MORSE
Samuel Morse came up with the forerunner to modern Morse code for use on the electric telegraph, of which he was the co-inventor. Morse code uses a series of dots and dashes to represent letters and numbers. The most common letters are assigned the simplest code elements e.g. E is represented by one dot, and T is represented by one dash. When words are spelled aloud in Morse code, a dot is pronounced as "dit", and a dash is pronounced as "dah".

38. "Ben-___" : HUR
Lew Wallace was a general for the Union Army during the Civil War, and was also an author. He wrote a very successful and celebrated book called “Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ”, first published in 1880, which was made into a movie starring Charlton Heston.

40. T. S. Eliot's Rum ___ Tugger : TUM
Rum Tum Tugger is one of the characters in T. S. Eliot’s “Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats”. Rum Tum Tugger also appears in the Andrew Lloyd Webber’s “Cats”, the musical based on Eliot’s book. In the musical, Rum Tum Tugger’s persona was written as a homage to Mick Jagger of Rolling Stones. So, the character tends to strut around the stage a lot.

49. Majestic Yellowstone creature : ELK
Yellowstone was the first National Park to be established in the world, when it was designated as such by President Grant in 1872. What a great tradition it started! The American National Parks truly are a treasure.

50. Literature Nobelist Gordimer : NADINE
Nadine Gordimer is an author and political activist from South Africa. Gordimer’s writing was recognized in 1991 when she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. One of the main focuses of her works is the apartheid that was once part of South African culture and law.

57. "Our Gang" dog : PETEY
Hal Roach made a whole series of comedy shorts with “The Little Rascals”, also known as “Our Gang”. The gang included a Pit Bull Terrier that we should remember, as he had that distinctive ring around his eye. When the dog first appeared on screen, he was called “Pansy”, but the name was soon changed to “Pete the Pup”, or sometimes simply “Petey”.

59. Links org. : USGA
The United States Golf Association (USGA) was formed in 1894. The need for a governing body for the sport became evident that year when both the Newport Country Club and the St. Andrew's Golf Club in Yonkers, declared that the winner of a tournament at each of their courses was the "national amateur champion". The first president of the USGA was Theodore Havemeyer, and to this day the one and only US Amateur Trophy bears his name.

The oldest type of golf course is a links course. The name “links” comes from the Old English word “hlinc” meaning “rising ground”. “Hlinc” was used to describe areas with coastal sand dunes or open parkland. As a result, we use the term “links course” to mean a golf course that is located at or on the coast, often amid sand dunes. The British Open is always played on a links course.

61. Adobe material : CLAY
The building material known as adobe has been around a long time, and has been used in dry climates all over the world. The original form of the word “adobe” dates back to Middle Egyptian times, about 2000 BC. The original spelling is “dj-b-t”, and translates as mud (sun-dried) brick.

63. "___ Thurman" (Fall Out Boy song) : UMA
Fall Out Boy is a rock band from Chicago that formed in 2001. And then, I lost interest …

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Taxis : CABS
5. Huffed and puffed : BLEW
9. Wiccan or Druid : PAGAN
14. Fit for the job : ABLE
15. Demolish : RAZE
16. Draw out : EDUCE
17. What lions and big engines do : ROAR
18. Razor brand : ATRA
19. Zapped with a stun gun : TASED
20. "Bowiemania" and "Come Together: America Salutes the Beatles" : TRIBUTE ALBUMS (hiding “teal”)
23. Be extremely frugal : SCRIMP
24. Bill with Hamilton's visage : TEN
25. McKellen who played Gandalf : IAN
28. 1948-94, in South Africa : APARTHEID ERA (hiding “eider”)
32. I.S.P. with a butterfly logo : MSN
35. What a knife wound might leave : SCAR
36. Senate staffers : AIDES
37. "I know! I know!" : OH! OH!
39. Makes a blanket, e.g. : KNITS
42. Common play on fourth down : PUNT
43. Go ___ (no longer follow orders) : ROGUE
45. It may have 40, 60 or 75 watts : BULB
47. Shell out : PAY
48. Bitter rivals : SWORN ENEMIES (hiding “nene”)
52. That, in Tabasco : ESO
53. Chicken ___ king : A LA
54. Appear, as problems : CROP UP
58. Children's game ... or the circled words in 20-, 28- and 48-Across : DUCK, DUCK, GOOSE
62. Actress Kirsten of "Spider-Man" : DUNST
64. Part of an archipelago : ISLE
65. Letter-shaped metal fastener : T-NUT
66. Chum, in Chihuahua : AMIGO
67. In close proximity : NEAR
68. "___ goes nothin'!" : HERE
69. Senegal's capital : DAKAR
70. Ice cream brand known as Dreyer's west of the Rockies : EDY’S
71. Catch sight of : ESPY

Down
1. Things pushed around a supermarket : CARTS
2. Multiple-choice options : A,B OR C
3. Tony ___, 1990s-2000s British P.M. : BLAIR
4. Balkan country once part of Yugoslavia : SERBIA
5. Group that included Demi Moore and Emilio Estevez : BRAT PACK
6. After curfew : LATE
7. Klein of Vox.com : EZRA
8. What the Forbes 400 measures : WEALTH
9. Flower that's also a girl's name : PETUNIA
10. Economist Smith : ADAM
11. Dressed to the nines : GUSSIED UP
12. Hole in one : ACE
13. Homer Simpson's neighbor : NED
21. Diamond officials, informally : UMPS
22. Buzzer : BEE
26. Venue for a rock concert : ARENA
27. Vile : NASTY
29. Sprinted : RAN
30. Shoshone or Sioux : TRIBE
31. Quick swim : DIP
32. Inventor of a "code" : MORSE
33. Broadway offerings : SHOWS
34. Baddie : NO-GOODNIK
38. "Ben-___" : HUR
40. T. S. Eliot's Rum ___ Tugger : TUM
41. Rain jackets : SLICKERS
44. Legislator : ENACTOR
46. Floating block of ice : BERG
49. Majestic Yellowstone creature : ELK
50. Literature Nobelist Gordimer : NADINE
51. Allay, as fears : SOOTHE
55. Southern corn breads : PONES
56. Take forcibly : USURP
57. "Our Gang" dog : PETEY
59. Links org. : USGA
60. Like most consignment shop items : USED
61. Adobe material : CLAY
62. "Dear old" person : DAD
63. "___ Thurman" (Fall Out Boy song) : UMA


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1127-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Nov 16, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Matt Ginsberg
THEME: Mixology
Today’s themed answers comprise two shorter answers MIXED together to arrive at a phrase (C). One of the answers (A) used for the MIX is outlined with circled letters, and the non-circled letters spell out the second answer (B). Each clue is in the format A + B = C.
23A. Infant + straying = noted coach : BEAR BRYANT = BABY + ERRANT
25A. Less polite + wildly unconventional = epicenter : GROUND ZERO = RUDER + GONZO
34A. Urban woe + squirms = pool accessory : SWIM GOGGLES = SMOG + WIGGLES
43A. Delay + dodos = some compromises : PLEA BARGAINS = LAG + PEABRAINS
60A. Remain + "Hmm ..." = R&B great : BO DIDDLEY = BIDE + ODDLY
70A. Bill producers + Western wear = info for events : STARTING TIMES = ATMS + STRING TIES
80A. Show, informally + African capital = Adonis : DREAMBOAT = DEMO + RABAT
97A. Pasty + vacation expense, maybe = hospital specialty : PRENATAL CARE = PALE + RENTAL CAR
103A. See + umbrella alternative = warming option : RADIANT HEAT = DATE + RAIN HAT
119A. Regarding + undercoat = network with 303 stations : PARIS METRO = AS TO + PRIMER
122A. Day of the month + succeed = some recital pieces : PIANO DUETS = IDES + PAN OUT
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 26m 02s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

14. "Back to the Future" antagonist : BIFF
Biff Tannen (and variants) was the bully character in the "Back to Future" trilogy. He was played by Thomas F. Wilson.

18. Stars-and-stripes land, informally : US OF A
Legend has it that Betsy Ross made the first American flag for General George Washington. However, this story only surfaced during the centennial celebrations of 1876, and although Betsy Ross was indeed one of several flag makers in Philadelphia in the days of George Washington, sadly there’s no definitive evidence that Ross provided that first stars and stripes.

19. Some Great Plains residents : OTOE
The Otoe (also Oto) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestwards ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

20. Possible destination for un inmigrante, with "el" : NORTE
“El Norte” is the term many people in Central America use for the United States and Canada, “the North” in Spanish.

23. Infant + straying = noted coach : BEAR BRYANT = BABY + ERRANT
Bear Bryant was head coach for the University of Alabama (“Bama”) for almost 25 years, from 1958 to 1983. Sadly, Bryant passed away unexpectedly just a few weeks after he retired as Alabama coach.

25. Less polite + wildly unconventional = epicenter : GROUND ZERO = RUDER + GONZO
Something “gonzo” is bizarre or unconventional. The term might perhaps come from the Italian “gonzo” meaning “rude, sottish”.

27. Eye part : SCLERA
The sclera is the white part of the eye. Usually the sclera is white, but in horses for example, it is black. Really, go check!

28. New pop of 1924 : NEHI
Nehi Corporation was the nickname for the Chero-Cola/Union Bottle Works that introduced the Nehi drink in 1924. Years later the company developed a new brand, Royal Crown Cola (also known as RC Cola). By 1955, RC Cola was the company's flagship product, so the "Nehi Corporation" became the "Royal Crown Company". In 1954, RC Cola became the first company to sell soft drinks in cans.

32. In Tahitian it means "good" : MAI TAI
The Mai Tai cocktail is strongly associated with the Polynesian islands, but the drink was supposedly invented in 1944 in Trader Vic's restaurant in Oakland, California. One recipe is 6 parts white rum, 3 parts orange curaçao, 3 parts Orgeat syrup, 1 part rock candy syrup, 2 parts fresh lime juice, all mixed with ice and then a float added of 6 parts dark rum. "Maita'i" is the Tahitian word for "good".

34. Urban woe + squirms = pool accessory : SWIM GOGGLES = SMOG + WIGGLES
“Smog” is a portmanteau word formed by melding “smoke” and “fog”. The term was first used to describe the air around London in the early 1900s. Several cities around the world have a reputation of being particularly smoggy. For example, the most smog-plagued city in Latin America is Mexico City, which is located in a highland “bowl” that traps industrial and vehicle pollution.

42. Big Ten sch. : MSU
Michigan State University’s sports teams used be called the Aggies, as the school was founded as the State Agricultural College of Michigan. The team name was changed to the Spartans in 1925, reflecting the school’s shift in focus beyond agriculture-centered education. The school mascot Sparty hit the scene in 1989.

46. Adorn brilliantly : EMBLAZON
Our terms “blazon” and “emblazon” both mean to decorate in a showy way. “To blazon” can also mean to adorn with a coat of arms. In the world of heraldry, a “blazon” is in fact a coat of arms, probably coming from the old French word “blason” meaning “shield”.

52. Pandora release : ILLS
According to Greek mythology, Pandora was the first woman. She was created by the gods, with each god bestowing on her a gift. Her name can be translated from Greek as “all-gifted”. Pandora is famous for the story of “Pandora’s Box”. In actual fact, the story should be about Pandora’s “Jar” as a 16th-century error in translation created a “box” out of the “jar”. In the story of Pandora’s Box, curiosity got the better of her and she opened up a box she was meant to leave alone. As a result she released all the evils of mankind, just closing it in time to trap hope inside.

53. Del ___ (fast-food chain) : TACO
The Del Taco chain of fast food restaurants opened for business in 1964, with the first restaurant called “Casa Del Taco” located in Yermo, California. Del Taco serves American-style Mexican cuisine as well as the typical collection of hamburgers, fries and shakes.

55. Poetic Muse : ERATO
In Greek mythology, Erato was the Muse of lyric poetry and is often depicted playing a lyre.

58. Nevada gold-mining town : ELKO
The city of Elko, Nevada came into being in 1868 as a settlement built around the eastern end of a railway line that was constructed from California and that was destined for Utah. When that section of the line was completed, the construction crews moved on towards the Nevada/Utah border, and the settlement was left behind to eventually form the city of Elko

60. Remain + "Hmm ..." = R&B great : BO DIDDLEY = BIDE + ODDLY
Bo Diddley was the stage name of Ellas Otha Bates, the celebrated R&B artist.

67. Letter at the end of three other letters : ETA
The three letters in the Greek letter “eta” serve as the endings to three other Greek letters: beta, zeta and theta.

74. Lisa, to Bart : SIS
Lisa Simpson is Bart’s brainy younger sister on TV’s “The Simpsons”. Lisa is voiced by actress Yeardley Smith.

75. Big name in root beer : DAD’S
Dad’s root beer was developed by Ely Klapman and Barney Berns in 1937, and was given the name “Dad’s” in honor of Klapman’s father who used to make root beer for his family at home.

78. Sushi go-with : SAKE
We refer to the Japanese alcoholic beverage made from rice as “sake”. We’ve gotten things a bit mixed up in the West. “Sake” is actually the word that the Japanese use for all alcoholic drinks. What we know as sake, we sometimes refer to as rice wine. Also, the starch in the rice is first converted to sugars that are then fermented into alcohol. This is more akin to a beer-brewing process than wine production, so the end product is really a rice “beer” rather than a rice “wine”.

80. Show, informally + African capital = Adonis : DREAMBOAT = DEMO + RABAT
Rabat is the capital city of the Kingdom of Morocco. After WWII, the United States maintained a major Air Force Base in Rabat, part of Strategic Air Command (SAC). Responding to pressure from the Moroccan government of King Mohammed V, the USAF pulled out in 1963.

89. Someone never seen in "Peanuts" : ADULT
Charles M. Schulz was a cartoonist best known for his comic strip “Peanuts” that featured the much-loved characters Charlie Brown and Snoopy. “Peanuts” was so successful, running daily in over 70 countries and 21 languages, that it earned Schulz an estimated 30-40 million dollars annually.

90. ___ Minor : URSA
Ursa Minor (Latin for “Smaller Bear”) sits right beside the constellation Draco (Latin for “dragon”). Ursa Minor used to be considered the wing of Draco, and so was once called “Dragon’s Wing”.

94. Feudal lord : LIEGE
A liege was a feudal lord, one to whom service or allegiance was owed under feudal law. "Liege" was also the term used for one who owed allegiance or service to a lord. Very confusing …

101. Radial alternative : BIAS TIRE
A bias tire is also known as a “cross ply”.

108. Minimal diamond margin : ONE RUN
That would be a baseball diamond.

112. Santa ___ : MARIA
When Columbus made his famous voyage of discovery, the largest of his three ships was the Santa Maria. The Santa Maria ran aground on the coast of Hispaniola on Christmas Day in 1492 and was lost. 39 of Columbus’s men were left behind with the permission of the locals. These men stripped the timbers from the Santa Maria and used them to build a settlement they called La Navidad (Spanish for “Christmas”). La Navidad is now the modern town of Môle-Saint-Nicolas in the Republic of Haiti.

115. "My Cup Runneth Over" crooner : ED AMES
“My Cup Runneth Over” is a song from the 1966 Broadway musical “I Do! I Do!”. A very popular recording of the song was made by Ed Ames in 1967. The title of the song is a quotation from the Bible, from the Book of Psalms.

119. Regarding + undercoat = network with 303 stations : PARIS METRO = AS TO + PRIMER
The Paris Métro is the busiest underground transportation system in western Europe, carrying about 4.5 million passengers a day, about the same as the New York City Subway. The system took its name from the company that originally operated it, namely “La Compagnie du chemin de fer métropolitain de Paris”, which was shorted to “Métro”. The term “Metro” was then adopted for similar systems in cities all over the world.

122. Day of the month + succeed = some recital pieces : PIANO DUETS = IDES + PAN OUT
There were three important days in each month of the old Roman calendar. These days originally depended on the cycles of the moon but were eventually "fixed" by law. "Kalendae" were the first days of each month, originally the days of the new moon. "Nonae" were originally the days of the half moon. And "idus" (the ides) was originally the day of the full moon, eventually fixed at the 15th day of a month. Well, actually the ides were the 15th day of March, May, July and October. For all other months, the ides fell on the 13th. Go figure …

124. Epps of "House" : OMAR
Omar Epps is the actor who played Eric Forman on the excellent television series “House”. Prior to playing Dr. Forman, Epps had a recurring role playing Dr. Dennis Grant on “ER”. And, in another link to the world of medicine, Epps was born in Savannah, Georgia to single mom, Dr. Bonnie Epps.

125. Kind of chair : EAMES
Charles and Ray Eames were a husband-wife team of furniture designers. One of the more famous of their designs is the Eames lounge chair that comes with an ottoman. This trendy piece of furniture featured in a late episode of the television show “Frasier”. In the show, Frasier’s Dad remarks that the Eames chair is so comfortable that he might have gotten rid of his tatty old recliner a long time ago.

130. The time of Nick? : NITE
“Nick at Nite” is the name given to the late-night programming aired on the Nickelodeon channel space. Nick at Nite started broadcasting in 1985 and was conceived as television’s first “oldies” television network.

131. ___ Chris Steak House : RUTH’S
Ruth’s Chris Steak House is a huge chain of fine-dining restaurants, with well over 100 establishments. The company was started by a single mother of two called Ruth Fertel. In 1965 Fertel bought the Chris Steak House in New Orleans, and under the agreement governing the purchase, she had to retain the name “Chris”. So Fertel added her own name in front of the existing name, and Ruth’s Chris Steak Houses were born.

Down
1. "Jinx" breakers of 2016 : CUBS
The Chicago Cubs is one of only two charter members of the baseball’s National League who are still playing, the other being the Atlanta Braves. The Cubs won the World Series in 2016 for the first time since 1908, which is a long time ago. In fact, the Cubs had the longest championship drought of any professional sports team in North America.

4. Violinist Zimbalist : EFREM
Efrem Zimbalist was a prominent concert violinist from Russia. Zimbalist was married to the famous American soprano Alma Gluck. The couple had a son called Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. who became a well-known actor (co-star on “77 Sunset Strip”). Zimbalist, Sr. was therefore also the grandfather of actress Stephanie Zimbalist (co-star on “Remington Steele”).

5. Negev native : SABRA
Jewish people born in the State of Israel, or the historical region of israel, are known as Sabras. “Sabra” is actually the name of the prickly pear, the thorny desert cactus. Apparently the name “Sabra” is used because someone born in the region is said to be tough on the outside and sweet on the inside, just like a prickly pear.

The Negev is a desert region in southern Israel. The largest city in the Negev is Beersheba.

9. Green of "The Italian Job" : SETH
Seth Green is an actor and comedian best-known by many as creator and voice actor on the animated television series “Robot Chicken”. I know him best for playing “Napster” in the 2005 film “The Italian Job”.

10. Director Lee : ANG
Taiwanese director Ang Lee sure has directed a mixed bag of films, mixed in terms of genre but not in terms of quality. He was at the helm for such classics as "Sense & Sensibility" (my personal favorite), "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon", "Hulk", "Brokeback Mountain" and "Life of Pi".

16. The "F" in F = ma : FORCE
Newton’s second law of motion tells us that a body accelerates when a force is applied to it, and the greater the mass of the object, the greater the force required to cause that acceleration. Mathematically, the law can be written as Force = mass x acceleration (F=ma).

24. Mrs. Gorbachev : RAISA
Raisa Gorbachova was the wife of Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. There’s no doubt that Raisa’s charm and personality helped her husband as he worked to change the image of the Soviet Union.

33. Actress Hatcher : TERI
Teri Hatcher’s most famous role these days is the Susan Mayer character in “Desperate Housewives”. I’ve never seen more than a few minutes of “Housewives” but I do know Teri Hatcher as a Bond girl, as she appeared in “Tomorrow Never Dies”. More recently, she has been portraying Lois Lane on the show “Lois & Clark”.

46. Recall cause, maybe : E COLI
Escherichia coli (E. coli) are usually harmless bacteria found in the human gut, working away quite happily. However, there are some strains that can produce lethal toxins. These strains can make their way into the food chain from animal fecal matter that comes into contact with food designated for human consumption.

47. Computer hookups : MODEMS
A modem is a device that is used to facilitate the transmission of a digital signal over an analog line. At one end of the line a modem is used to “modulate” an analog carrier signal to encode the the digital information, and at the other end a modem is used to “demodulate” the analog carrier signal and so reproduce the original digital information. This modulation-demodulation gives the device its name: a MOdulator-DEModulator, or “modem”.

48. Chain that sells chains : ZALES
The first Zales jewelry store was opened by Morris and William Zale and Ben Lipshy in Wichita Falls, Texas, in 1924. Zales became successful largely by offering credit to their customers, a revolutionary concept at the time.

49. Cheri formerly of "S.N.L." : OTERI
Cheri Oteri was the SNL cast member who regularly appeared with Will Ferrell in the skit featuring a pair of Spartan cheerleaders.

50. "The Highwayman" poet : NOYES
Alfred Noyes was an English poet best known for his narrative poem “The Highwayman”, published in 1906. The highwayman in the poem is in love with an innkeeper’s daughter named Bess. Bess dies trying to warn her lover about an ambush, and then the highwayman dies when trying to exact revenge for her death. The highwayman and Bess meet up as ghosts on winter nights.

65. Relatives on the father's side : AGNATES
Something that is enate is growing outward, and "enate" is used to describe ancestors related on the mother's side. Something that is agnate comes from a common source, and "agnate" is used to describe relatives on the father's side of the family tree.

67. Classic Icelandic literary works : EDDAS
The Poetic Edda and Prose Edda are two ancient works that are the source for much of Norse mythology. Both Eddas were written in the 13th century, in Iceland.

68. Time for una siesta : TARDE
In Spanish, the “tarda” (afternoon) might be a good time for “una siesta” (a nap).

We use the word “siesta” to describe a short nap in the early afternoon, taking the word from the Spanish. In turn, the Spanish word is derived from the Latin “hora sexta” meaning “the sixth hour”. The idea is that the nap is taken at “the sixth hour” after dawn.

69. For two : A DEUX
We use the French term “à deux” to describe something involving two people, usually in a private arrangement (like maybe a dinner together).

71. Cabooses : REARS
The word “caboose” originally came from Middle Dutch and was the word for a ship’s galley. When the last car in a train in North America was given a stove for the comfort of the crew, it took on the name “caboose”. The term has also become slang for a person’s backside.

72. Some needlework, informally? : TATS
The word "tattoo" (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word "tatau" into our "tattoo". Tattoos are also sometimes referred to as “ink”.

76. Carter/Brezhnev agreement : SALT II
There were two rounds of Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT) between the US and the Soviet Union, and two resulting treaties (SALT I & SALT II). The opening round of SALT I talks were held in Helsinki as far back as 1970, with the resulting treaty signed by President Richard Nixon and General Secretary Leonid Brezhnev in 1972. Brezhnev also signed the SALT II treaty, with President Jimmy Carter in 1979.

81. After Rainier, highest peak in the Pacific Northwest : MT ADAMS
Mount Adams is a volcanic peak in the state of Washington, in the Cascade Range. There was an unsuccessful attempt in the 1930s to have the Cascade Range renamed to the President’s Range, with each of the major peaks named for a US president. The plan was to rename Mount Hood as Mount Adams, after President John Adams. Due to a cartographer’s error, the relatively unknown peak that we now call Mount Adams was given the name, instead of Mount Hood. The plans for “the President’s Range” came to nought, but the Mount Adams name stuck.

83. Island whose volcanic eruption is rumored to have destroyed Atlantis : SANTORINI
The legendary city of Atlantis was first referred to in writing by the Greek philosopher Plato. The story is that a navy from Atlantis attempted to invade Athens but failed, and as a result the city of Atlantis sank into the ocean.

91. Capital where Robert Louis Stevenson died : APIA
Apia is the capital city, and in fact the only city, of the Pacific island-nation of Samoa. The harbor of Apia is famous for a very foolish incident in 1889 involving seven naval vessels from Germany, the US and Britain. A typhoon was approaching so the safest thing to do was to head for open water away from land, but no nation would move its ships for fear of losing face in front of the others. Six of the ships were lost in the typhoon as a result and 200 American and German sailors perished. The British cruiser HMS Calliope barely managed to escape from the harbor and rode out the storm safely. Apia is also known as the home of writer Robert Louis Stevenson, for the last four years of his life.

93. Verb from which "suis" and "sommes" are conjugated : ETRE
The French for “to be” is “être”.

98. Heavy metal band with 1980s hits : RATT
Ratt is a rock band based in Los Angeles. Ratt was formed out of a San Diego group called Mickey Ratt.

99. Correo ___ (foreign mail stamp) : AEREO
The words “Correo Aereo” can be found on some stamps. The phrase translates from Spanish as “Air Mail”.

104. Old World lizard : AGAMA
Agama is a genus of lizards that are native to Africa.

105. Hulk Hogan trademark : DO-RAG
Hip-hoppers might wear do-rags today, but they have been around for centuries. If you recall the famous image of Rosie the Riveter, she was wearing a do-rag. The etymology is pretty evident, a piece of cloth (rag) to hold a hairstyle (do) in place

Hulk Hogan is the stage name (well, “ring” name) for wrestler Terry Gene Bollea. Hogan was big in the eighties and nineties. He fell out of public favor in 2015 when tapes of him making repeated racist remarks were published.

106. October option : TREAT
Trick or treat!

107. Counterpart of "stand" : HIT ME
“Stand” and “hit me” are instructions to the dealer in the card game Blackjack.

110. Remote land in the Pacific : NAURU
Nauru is the world’s smallest island nation, located in the South Pacific 300 km to the east of Kiribati. The island was taken as a colony by Germany in the late 1800s, and came under the administration of Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom after WWI. The Japanese invaded during WWII, but Nauru was one of the islands that was bypassed in the US advance across the Pacific towards Japan. Nauru achieved independence in 1968.

116. Rendezvous : MEET
A rendezvous is a meeting, from the French “rendez vous” meaning “present yourselves”.

118. Bygone boomers, for short : SSTS
Supersonic transports (SSTs) like the Concorde broke Mach 1, the speed of sound. As a plane flies through air, it creates pressure waves in front (and behind) rather like the bow and stern waves of a boat. These pressure waves travel at the speed of sound, so as an aircraft itself accelerates towards the speed of sound it catches up with the pressure waves until they cannot “get out of the way”. When the aircraft reaches the speed of sound, the compressed waves merge into one single shock wave, creating a sonic boom.

120. Org. authorized by the 16th Amendment : IRS
The Sixteenth Amendment to the US Constitution gives the US Congress the right to levy a personal income tax without the need to reapportion the funds collected to the States proportionally based on Census results. Prior to the amendment, taxes collected had to be returned to the States based on population.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. They often have small tables : CAFES
6. Base men? : CADS
10. Jazzes (up) : AMPS
14. "Back to the Future" antagonist : BIFF
18. Stars-and-stripes land, informally : US OF A
19. Some Great Plains residents : OTOE
20. Possible destination for un inmigrante, with "el" : NORTE
22. Hero : IDOL
23. Infant + straying = noted coach : BEAR BRYANT = BABY + ERRANT
25. Less polite + wildly unconventional = epicenter : GROUND ZERO = RUDER + GONZO
27. Eye part : SCLERA
28. New pop of 1924 : NEHI
30. Approached apace : RAN TO
31. Pro : ACE
32. In Tahitian it means "good" : MAI TAI
34. Urban woe + squirms = pool accessory : SWIM GOGGLES = SMOG + WIGGLES
37. Untuned, say : OFF
40. Halters? : SENTRIES
42. Big Ten sch. : MSU
43. Delay + dodos = some compromises : PLEA BARGAINS = LAG + PEABRAINS
46. Adorn brilliantly : EMBLAZON
51. Birthday girl's wear : TIARA
52. Pandora release : ILLS
53. Del ___ (fast-food chain) : TACO
55. Poetic Muse : ERATO
56. Spa, e.g. : SPRING
58. Nevada gold-mining town : ELKO
60. Remain + "Hmm ..." = R&B great : BO DIDDLEY = BIDE + ODDLY
62. ___ season : DEER
64. Moved at a crawl : SNAILED
66. Saharan : SERE
67. Letter at the end of three other letters : ETA
70. Bill producers + Western wear = info for events : STARTING TIMES = ATMS + STRING TIES
74. Lisa, to Bart : SIS
75. Big name in root beer : DAD’S
77. Overindulged : ATE A TON
78. Sushi go-with : SAKE
80. Show, informally + African capital = Adonis : DREAMBOAT = DEMO + RABAT
82. Social worker? : WASP
85. Suck it up? : SIPHON
89. Someone never seen in "Peanuts" : ADULT
90. ___ Minor : URSA
92. Yarn : TALE
94. Feudal lord : LIEGE
95. Mariners' aids : SEXTANTS
97. Pasty + vacation expense, maybe = hospital specialty : PRENATAL CARE = PALE + RENTAL CAR
100. Court affirmation : I DO
101. Radial alternative : BIAS TIRE
102. Was ahead : LED
103. See + umbrella alternative = warming option : RADIANT HEAT = DATE + RAIN HAT
108. Minimal diamond margin : ONE RUN
111. Lead-in to maniac : EGO-
112. Santa ___ : MARIA
113. Area to defend : TURF
115. "My Cup Runneth Over" crooner : ED AMES
119. Regarding + undercoat = network with 303 stations : PARIS METRO = AS TO + PRIMER
122. Day of the month + succeed = some recital pieces : PIANO DUETS = IDES + PAN OUT
124. Epps of "House" : OMAR
125. Kind of chair : EAMES
126. In years past : ONCE
127. Vertical : ERECT
128. Makes it? : TAGS
129. Prefix with byte : TERA-
130. The time of Nick? : NITE
131. ___ Chris Steak House : RUTH’S

Down
1. "Jinx" breakers of 2016 : CUBS
2. "Hold on ___!" : A SEC
3. Stable arrival : FOAL
4. Violinist Zimbalist : EFREM
5. Negev native : SABRA
6. Evasive : COY
7. Crooked : AT AN ANGLE
8. Accomplished everything : DONE IT ALL
9. Green of "The Italian Job" : SETH
10. Director Lee : ANG
11. Cat that epitomizes finickiness : MORRIS
12. Many a charity tournament : PRO-AM
13. Deeply offended : STUNG
14. Hollywood, with "the" : BIZ
15. Unimprovable : IDEAL
16. The "F" in F = ma : FORCE
17. Results of icy breakups? : FLOES
21. Finally put an end to? : ENTOMB
24. Mrs. Gorbachev : RAISA
26. Follower of an Alaskan team : DOGSLED
29. "The doctor ___" : IS IN
33. Actress Hatcher : TERI
35. Last part of the country to report election results : WEST
36. Keeps safe : GUARDS
37. Pulls (out of) : OPTS
38. Resell quickly : FLIP
39. "___ not!" : FEAR
41. Takes a chance : RISKS IT
44. Saharan : ARID
45. Curses : BANES
46. Recall cause, maybe : E COLI
47. Computer hookups : MODEMS
48. Chain that sells chains : ZALES
49. Cheri formerly of "S.N.L." : OTERI
50. "The Highwayman" poet : NOYES
54. Some : A BIT
57. Do pretty well gradewise : GET A B
59. Currently airing : ON NOW
61. What germs may turn into : IDEAS
63. Squeal on : RAT OUT
65. Relatives on the father's side : AGNATES
67. Classic Icelandic literary works : EDDAS
68. Time for una siesta : TARDE
69. For two : A DEUX
71. Cabooses : REARS
72. Some needlework, informally? : TATS
73. Art : SKILL
76. Carter/Brezhnev agreement : SALT II
79. Absolutely awesome : EPIC
81. After Rainier, highest peak in the Pacific Northwest : MT ADAMS
83. Island whose volcanic eruption is rumored to have destroyed Atlantis : SANTORINI
84. Simple truth : PLAIN FACT
86. Mend : HEAL
87. Nasty sort : OGRE
88. Attention, for some : NEED
91. Capital where Robert Louis Stevenson died : APIA
93. Verb from which "suis" and "sommes" are conjugated : ETRE
96. Anonymous : NO-NAME
98. Heavy metal band with 1980s hits : RATT
99. Correo ___ (foreign mail stamp) : AEREO
101. Carrier : BEARER
103. Move, as a plant : REPOT
104. Old World lizard : AGAMA
105. Hulk Hogan trademark : DO-RAG
106. October option : TREAT
107. Counterpart of "stand" : HIT ME
109. Milk container : UDDER
110. Remote land in the Pacific : NAURU
114. Familiar with : UP ON
116. Rendezvous : MEET
117. Impress deeply : ETCH
118. Bygone boomers, for short : SSTS
120. Org. authorized by the 16th Amendment : IRS
121. Spanish she-bear : OSA
123. Maiden name preceder : NEE


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1126-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 Nov 16, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Paolo Pasco
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 35m 57s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Facebook acquired it in 2014 for $19.3 billion : WHATSAPP
WhatsApp is a popular messaging service used on smartphones that sends messages and other files from one mobile phone number to another. Launched in 2011, WhatsApp is incredibly popular, most popular messaging service used today. Facebook acquired WhatsApp in 2014, paying over $19 billion.

13. Narrator of Broadway's "Hamilton" : AARON BURR
Aaron Burr was the third vice-president of the US, serving under Thomas Jefferson. In the final year of his term in office, Burr fought an illegal duel and killed his political rival Alexander Hamilton. Burr wasn't brought to justice, but he did pay the price politically. Thomas Jefferson dropped him from his ticket in the election held the following year.

“Hamilton” is a 2015 musical based on the life or US Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, as described in the 2004 biography by Ron Chernow. The representations of the main characters is decidedly ground-breaking. The show is rooted in hip-hop and the main roles such as Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson and George Washington are all played by African-American and Hispanic actors.

15. Dungeons & Dragons class : MAGE
Mage is an archaic word for a magician.

Dungeons & Dragons is a complex role-playing game (RPG) first published in 1974, by Tactical Studies Rules Incorporated (TSR). Dungeons & Dragons was probably the first of the modern role-playing games to be developed, and the most successful. It is still played by lots of people today, including my nerdy son …

16. Sci-fi hit whose tagline is "Bring him home" : THE MARTIAN
“The Martian” is a very intriguing 2015 science fiction film starring Matt Damon as an astronaut who is accidentally stranded on Mars. The movie is based on a 2011 novel of the same name by Andrew Weir. One thing that I liked about the film is that the science cited is fairly realistic. In fact, NASA collaborated with the filmmakers extensively from script development to principal casting.

18. Core component : IRON
The Earth’s core is divided into two zones, a relatively “solid” inner core and a liquid outer core. Both inner and outer core are comprised mainly of iron and nickel. It is believed that the Earth’s magnetic field is generated by electric currents created by convection currents in the outer core.

19. Japanese honorific : -SAN
The Japanese honorific “-san” is added to the end of names as a title of respect, and can be translated as “Mr.” or “Ms.” The usage is wider than it is in English, though. Sometimes “-san” is added to the name of a company, for example.

20. Subway alternative : PANERA
Panera Bread is a chain of bakery/coffeehouses. It’s a good place to get online while having a cup of coffee. Back in 2006 and 2007, Panera was the largest provider of free Wi-Fi access in the whole of the US.

The SUBWAY chain of fast food restaurants is the largest single-brand restaurant in the world. I’m a big fan of SUBWAY sandwiches, especially the toasted ones …

21. Org. featured in 16-Across : NASA
(16A. Sci-fi hit whose tagline is "Bring him home" : THE MARTIAN)
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

27. Brazilian state capital : NATAL
Natal is the capital of the Brazilian state Rio Grande do Norte in the northeast of the country. The city is located on the Atlantic Coast of Brazil, at the mouth of the Potengi River. To visualize Natal’s location, it helps to know that it is the nearest Brazilian state capital to Africa and Europe.

29. Religious period dating from A.D. 622 : MUSLIM ERA
What is known as the Muslim era started in with Muhammad’s emigration from Mecca to Medina, defined as year 1 in the Muslim calendar, and AD 622 in the Gregorian calendar.

33. Drinking game where each bar that's visited is considered a hole : PUB GOLF
Pub Golf is a “game” involving a pub crawl. There are usually nine or eighteen pubs (“holes”) on the crawl. Before starting out, each pub/hole is assigned a “par”. A par-4 hole/pub implies that a pint of beer be consumed in 4 drinks or gulps.

36. Locks in place for a while? : PERMS
“Perm” is the name given to a permanent wave, a chemical or thermal treatment of hair to produce waves or curls. I don't worry about such things, as it's a number-one all over for me …

37. The orangutan, in "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" : CULPRIT
“The Murders in the Rue Morgue” is a short story by Edgar Allen Poe, and is recognized as the first “detective story” ever written. The murder is solved when it is determined that the murderer was actually an orangutan.

42. Leaves on the menu? : SALAD
Our word “salad” comes from the Latin “salare” meaning “to salt”. The Latin “herba salata” translates as “salted vegetables”, which I guess could be a salad …

46. Going by : AKA
Also known as (aka)

47. Some farm vehicles : DEERES
John Deere invented the first commercially successful steel plow in 1837. Prior to Deere’s invention, farmers used an iron or wooden plow that constantly had to be cleaned as rich soil stuck to its surfaces. The cast-steel plow was revolutionary as its smooth sides solved the problem of “stickiness”. The Deere company that John founded uses the slogan “Nothing Runs Like a Deere”, and has a leaping deer as its logo.

49. Asian appetizer : SATE
The dish known as “satay” originated in Java, Indonesia and is marinated pieces of meat served on a skewer in a sauce, often a spicy peanut sauce. “Satay” is the Indonesian spelling, and “sate” is the Malay spelling.

50. Lead-in to -drome : VELO-
An arena used for competitive track cycling is known as a velodrome. “Vélo” is the familiar term used as an abbreviation for “vélocipède” (“velocipede” in English). A velocipede is a human-powered, wheeled vehicle. Tricycles, bicycles and unicycles are all velocipedes.

54. Sanders, for one: Abbr. : SEN
Bernie Sanders has served as US Senator from Vermont since 2007. Sanders describes himself as a democratic socialist, and used to appear on the ballot as an independent. Prior to joining the Democratic Party in 2015, Sanders had been the longest-serving independent in the history of the US Congress.

55. Longfellow's "Evangeline," e.g. : EPIC
"Evangeline, A Tale of Acadie" is an epic poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, first published in 1847. Nowadays we tend to think first of "Hiawatha" when we see the name Longfellow, but within his own lifetime "Evangeline" was Longfellow's most famous work. The poem tells the tale of Evangeline Bellefontaine who is separated from her beloved when the Acadians were forcibly removed from their land by the British.

56. Stereotypical wear for a crackpot theorist : TIN FOIL HAT
Before thin sheets of aluminum metal were available, thin sheets of tin were used in various applications. Tin foil isn’t a great choice for wrapping food though, as it imparts a tinny taste. On the other side of the pond, aluminum foil has a different name. No, it’s not just the different spelling of aluminum (“aluminium”). We still call it “tin foil”. You see, we live in the past …

58. Reggae's Peter : TOSH
Peter Tosh was a musician from Jamaica, a member of the Wailers reggae band. Sadly, Tosh was murdered in a home invasion and extortion attempt in 1987.

59. Swedish pop group whose 1994 hit "The Sign" was #1 for six weeks : ACE OF BASE
Ace of Base is a pop group from Sweden. The band had several names before settling on Ace of Base, which was inspired by the Motörhead song “Ace of Spades”.

Down
4. With 1-Down, five-time winner of the British Open : TOM
(1D. See 4-Down : WATSON)
Tom Watson is a professional golfer from Kansas City, Missouri. Watson was the world number one from 1978 to 1982. In 2009, he got very close to winning the British Open Championship, losing in a 4-hole playoff. At the time, Watson was just a few months shy of 60 years age …

6. Presidential middle name : ABRAM
President James Abram Garfield was born in Orange Township in Ohio, the youngest son of Abram Garfield. Abram had moved from New York to Ohio specifically to court his childhood sweetheart Mehitabel Ballou. When Abram arrived in Ohio, however, he found that Mehitabel had already married. Abram did manage to join the Ballou family though, as he eventually married Mehitabel’s sister Eliza.

7. General Israel of the American Revolution : PUTNAM
Israel Putnam was a officer in the American army during the Revolutionary War. Putnam is best known for the key role that he played in the Battle of Bunker HIll during the Siege of Boston. Many believe that it was Israel Putnam who coined the phrase “Don’t fire until you see the whites of their eyes” during the battle.

11. Search for oneself on Google, e.g. : EGOSURF
We've all done it, googling our own names to see what comes up. It's called “egosurfing”.

12. Response to "Gracias" : DE NADA
In Spanish, one can respond to “gracias” (thank you) with “de nada” (it’s nothing).

23. Kid-lit character with a "Purple Crayon" : HAROLD
“Harold and the Purple Crayon” is a children’s book by Crockett Johnson that was first published in 1955. Harold is a 4-year-old boy who can create a world of his own simply by drawing it with a purple crayon.

25. River flowing from the Garden of Eden, in the Bible : TIGRIS
According to the Book of Genesis, Adam and Eve lived in a garden "in" Eden, with Eden being geographically located by reference to four rivers including the Tigris and the Euphrates. Some scholars hypothesize that Eden was located in Mesopotamia, which encompasses much of modern-day Iraq.

28. Clobbered, in British slang : LAMPED
“To lamp” a guy is to hit him, pretty hard, to clobber him.

30. May honorees, colloquially : MOMMAS
Note the official punctuation in “Mother’s Day”, even though one might think it should be “Mothers’ Day”. President Wilson, and Anna Jarvis who created the tradition, specifically wanted Mother's Day to honor the mothers within each family and not just "mothers" in general, so they went with the "Mother's Day" punctuation.

35. Country of 180+ million people that has never participated in the Winter Olympics : NIGERIA
Nigeria is in West Africa, and it takes its name from the Niger River which flows through the country. Nigeria is the most populous country on the continent, with over 180 million inhabitants. It is also the most populous member of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC).

38. Ancient playwright who specialized in New Comedy : TERENCE
Terence is a the common name used in English when referring to the Roman playwright Publius Terentius Afer.

51. Adolph who coined the motto "All the News That's Fit to Print" : OCHS
Adolph Ochs was a former owner of “The New York Times”. Ochs had purchased a controlling interest in “The Chattanooga Times” when he was only 19 years of age, and took control of “The New York Times” in 1896 when he was 38 years old. Soon after taking charge, Ochs coined the paper’s slogan “All the News That's Fit to Print”. It was also Ochs who moved the paper’s headquarters to a new building on Longacre Square in Manhattan, which the city later renamed to the famous “Times Square” after the newspaper. The Ochs-Sulzberger family has owned the paper ever since.

53. Player of oldies when they were newies : HI-FI
Hi-fi systems were introduced in the late forties, and is audio equipment designed to give a much higher quality reproduction of sound than cheaper systems available up to that point. “Hi-fi” stands for “high fidelity”.

57. Birth announcement info: Abbr. : LBS
The unit of mass that we know today as a “pound” is descended from the old Roman unit of weight known as a “libra”. That “libra” connection is why we abbreviate “pound” to “lb”. The name “pound” though comes from the Latin “pondo” meaning “weight”. Our term “ounce” (abbreviated to “oz.”) comes from the Latin “uncia”, which was 1/12 of a Roman “libra”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Facebook acquired it in 2014 for $19.3 billion : WHATSAPP
9. Coffee shop menu adjective : ICED
13. Narrator of Broadway's "Hamilton" : AARON BURR
15. Dungeons & Dragons class : MAGE
16. Sci-fi hit whose tagline is "Bring him home" : THE MARTIAN
18. Core component : IRON
19. Japanese honorific : -SAN
20. Subway alternative : PANERA
21. Org. featured in 16-Across : NASA
22. "Pick me! Pick me!" : OH OH!
24. Hit the big time : MADE IT
26. ___ wrestling : MUD
27. Brazilian state capital : NATAL
29. Religious period dating from A.D. 622 : MUSLIM ERA
31. Just not done? : RAW
33. Drinking game where each bar that's visited is considered a hole : PUB GOLF
34. Like 38-Down : ROMAN
36. Locks in place for a while? : PERMS
37. The orangutan, in "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" : CULPRIT
39. Not at all sharp : DIM
40. Like noir detective novels, typically : HARD-EDGED
42. Leaves on the menu? : SALAD
46. Going by : AKA
47. Some farm vehicles : DEERES
49. Asian appetizer : SATE
50. Lead-in to -drome : VELO-
52. Something seen on cold days : BREATH
54. Sanders, for one: Abbr. : SEN
55. Longfellow's "Evangeline," e.g. : EPIC
56. Stereotypical wear for a crackpot theorist : TIN FOIL HAT
58. Reggae's Peter : TOSH
59. Swedish pop group whose 1994 hit "The Sign" was #1 for six weeks : ACE OF BASE
60. Stops waffling : OPTS
61. In force? : ENLISTED

Down
1. See 4-Down : WATSON
2. "You think you're soooo funny ..." : HA HA HA ...
3. Playground rejoinder : ARE NOT!
4. With 1-Down, five-time winner of the British Open : TOM
5. Breeze : SNAP
6. Presidential middle name : ABRAM
7. General Israel of the American Revolution : PUTNAM
8. Raised, as a trapdoor : PRIED UP
9. "Deal!" : I’M IN!
10. Sticky treats : CARAMELS
11. Search for oneself on Google, e.g. : EGOSURF
12. Response to "Gracias" : DE NADA
14. Stands on the hind legs, in dialect : RARES UP
17. Covered area near the fingertip : NAIL BED
23. Kid-lit character with a "Purple Crayon" : HAROLD
25. River flowing from the Garden of Eden, in the Bible : TIGRIS
28. Clobbered, in British slang : LAMPED
30. May honorees, colloquially : MOMMAS
32. Cost of fighting? : WAR DEBT
34. Definitely not a city slicker : RURALIST
35. Country of 180+ million people that has never participated in the Winter Olympics : NIGERIA
37. Snackable treat on a stick : CAKE POP
38. Ancient playwright who specialized in New Comedy : TERENCE
40. Can't help but : HAVE TO
41. Pound with sound : DEAFEN
43. Suddenly attack : LASH AT
44. Chilling : AT EASE
45. Made a bad impression on : DENTED
48. Stand-up comedian's prop, often : STOOL
51. Adolph who coined the motto "All the News That's Fit to Print" : OCHS
53. Player of oldies when they were newies : HI-FI
57. Birth announcement info: Abbr. : LBS


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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