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0816-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 16 Aug 17, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Andrew Kingsley & John Lieb
THEME: Spin Class
Each of today’s themed answers is someone associated with SPIN or SPINNING, who might perhaps hold a SPIN CLASS:
60A. Modern exercise option ... or what the answers to 17-, 26-, 36- or 49-Across could teach? : SPIN CLASS

17A. Peter Parker is his alter ego : SPIDER-MAN (spins a web)
26A. Grammy-winning electronic music producer and D.J. : SKRILLEX (spins records)
36A. Name assumed by billiards great Rudolf Wanderone : MINNESOTA FATS (spins the cue ball)
49A. Longtime co-worker of Vanna White : PAT SAJAK (spins the Wheel of Fortune)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 8m 34s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Early Peruvian : INCAN
The Inca people emerged as a tribe around the 12th century, in what today is southern Peru. The Incas developed a vast empire over the next 300 years, extending along most of the western side of South America. The Empire fell to the Spanish, finally dissolving in 1572 with the execution of Tupac Amaru, the last Incan Emperor.

6. "Gone With the Wind" studio : MGM
The Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) film studio was founded in 1924 by Marcus Loew. Loew was already a successful movie theater owner when he purchased Metro Pictures Corporation in 1919, and then Goldwyn Pictures in 1924. Later in 1924, Loew also purchased Louis B. Mayer Pictures, mainly so that Louis B. Meyer could merge all three studios and run them himself as Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

As casting proceeded for the movie version of “Gone With the Wind”, Clark Gable was a shoo-in from day one. The role of Scarlett O’Hara was considered very desirable in the acting community, with Bette Davis on the short list, and Katherine Hepburn demanding an appointment with producer David O. Selznick to discuss the role. Vivien Leigh was an unlikely contender, an English actress for the definitive Southern belle role. Selznick was adamant though, and stuck by his choice despite a lot of protests.

15. Folk singer DiFranco : ANI
Ani DiFranco is a folk-rock singer and songwriter. DiFranco has also been labeled a "feminist icon", and in 2006 won the "Woman of Courage Award" from National Organization for Women.

16. Edward Snowden, e.g. : EXILE
Edward Snowden is a former NSA contractor who leaked several top secret NSA documents to the media beginning in June 2013. After disclosing his name as the source of the leaks, Snowden tried to seek asylum in Ecuador. While travelling to Ecuador he had a layover in Moscow. While in Moscow, the US government revoked his passport, which effectively left him stranded in the transit area of Moscow Airport. The Russian government eventually granted him annually-renewable temporary asylum.

17. Peter Parker is his alter ego : SPIDER-MAN (spins a web)
Spider-Man is a creation of Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, and first appeared in comics in 1962. Spider-Man was a somewhat groundbreaking character in that his alter ego was a teenage high school student (named Peter Parker), which marked the first time that a young person featured front and center as the superhero.

19. Musical piece for nine : NONET
A nonet is a piece of music requiring nine musicians for a performance. The term is also used for the group itself.

21. Wipes out on the half-pipe, say : EATS IT
Half-pipes and quarter-pipes are ramped structures used in extreme sports, such as skateboarding, snowboarding and freestyle BMX.

23. Comedian Philips : EMO
Emo Philips is a stand-up comedian from Chicago. He’s had a long and successful career, and listed on his resume is a small acting part in the 1992 hit movie “Meet the Parents” starring Robert De Niro and Ben Stiller. Philips was also the executive producer for that very same film, so, I’d say he made a few pennies …

26. Grammy-winning electronic music producer and D.J. : SKRILLEX (spins records)
“Skrillex” is a the stage name of Sonny Moore, a producer of electronic dance music. Not something that or someone who I know anything about …

29. Red Cross response : AID
Back in 1859, a Swiss businessman called Henri Dunant went to meet French emperor Napoleon III, to discuss making it easier to conduct commerce in French-occupied Algeria. The Emperor was billeted at Solferino, where France and Austria were engaged in a major battle. In one day, Dunant witnessed 40,000 soldiers die in battle and countless wounded suffering on the battlefield without any organized medical care. Dunant abandoned his business agenda and instead spent a week caring for the sick and wounded. Within a few years he had founded the precursor to the Red Cross, and in 1901 he was awarded the first ever Nobel Peace Prize.

31. J. Peterman employee on "Seinfeld" : ELAINE
The character Elaine Benes, unlike the other lead characters (Jerry, Kramer and George), did not appear in the pilot episode of “Seinfeld”. NBC executives specified the addition of a female lead when they picked up the show citing that the situation was too “male-centric”.

32. Excited Spanish cry : ARRIBA!
“Arriba” is Spanish for “above”. Speedy Gonzales used to yell out “Arriba!” a lot, meaning “get up!”.

35. D-Day carriers: Abbr. : LSTS
“LST” stands for Landing Ship, Tank. LSTs are the large vessels used mainly in WWII that have doors at either ends through which tanks and other vehicles can roll off and onto beaches. The design concept persists to this day in the huge fleet of commercial roll-on/roll-off car ferries, all inspired by the LST.

36. Name assumed by billiards great Rudolf Wanderone : MINNESOTA FATS (spins the cue ball)
“Minnesota Fats” was the nickname adopted by professional pool player Rudolf Wanderone. The original Minnesota Fats was a character in the Walter Tevis novel “The Hustler”, played in the 1961 film adaptation by Jackie Gleason. Prior to the release of the film, Wanderone had been using the name “New York Fats”. A story emerged that the character “Fats” in the book and movie had been inspired by Wanderone, and so Wanderone stopped using “New York Fats” to become “Minnesota Fats”.

41. Way to watch "Game of Thrones" on your phone : HBO NOW
HBO’s “Game of Thrones” is a fantasy television drama that is adapted from a series of novels by George R. R. Martin called “A Song of Ice and Fire”. “Game of Thrones” is actually filmed in and around Belfast, Northern Ireland.

42. Tater Tots maker : ORE-IDA
Ore-Ida frozen foods are all made using potatoes. The company is located in Oregon, just across the border from Idaho. “Ore-Ida” is a melding of the two state names.

Ore-Ida’s founders came up with the idea for Tater Tots when they were deciding what to do with residual cuts of potato. They chopped up the leftovers, added flour and seasoning, and extruded the mix through a large hole making a sausage that they cut into small cylinders. We eat 70 million pounds of this extruded potato every year!

46. ___ Kat : KIT
I grew up eating Kit Kat bars as a kid, as the chocolate confection has been around since the thirties. Kit Kats didn’t hit the shelves in the US until the seventies. I’ve seen new varieties of Kit Kat over in the UK, such as an orange-flavored version, but haven’t seen anything like that over here.

49. Longtime co-worker of Vanna White : PAT SAJAK (spins the Wheel of Fortune)
Pat Sajak took over the hosting of "Wheel of Fortune" from Chuck Woolery back in 1983 and has been doing the job ever since. Sajak had a short run as a talk show host in 1989/1990 and used to sub quite often for Larry King and Regis Philbin.

Vanna White is the lady who turns the letters on the “Wheel of Fortune” game show. White is big into knitting and crochet, and has her own line of yarns called “Vanna’s Choice”.

52. Chevy's response to the Mustang : CAMARO
The Chevrolet Camaro is a car produced by General Motors from 1966 to 2002, and reintroduced in 2009. The Camaro shared much of its design with the Pontiac Firebird, and was introduced as a potential competitor to the Ford Mustang.

55. Sushi condiment : WASABI
Sometimes called Japanese horseradish, wasabi is a root used as a condiment in Japanese cooking. The taste of wasabi is more like mustard than a hot pepper in that the vapors that create the “hotness” stimulate the nasal passages rather than the tongue. Personally, I love the stuff …

58. TBS late-night host : CONAN
Before Conan O’Brien came to fame as a late night talk show host he was a writer. He wrote for both “Saturday Night Live” and “The Simpsons”.

62. A straight one is 180° : ANGLE
In geometry, there are several classes of angles:
  • Acute (< 90 degrees) 
  • Right (= 90 degrees) 
  • Obtuse (> 90 degrees and < 180 degrees) 
  • Straight (180 degrees) 
  • Reflex (> 180 degrees)

64. Fictional orphan protected by Punjab : ANNIE
“Little Orphan Annie” is a comic strip created in 1924 by Harold Gray. The title was taken from a poem written in 1885 by James Whitcomb Riley called “Little Orphant Annie” (and yes, that spelling “orphant” is correct). Strangely enough, the original name of the poem was “Little Orphant Allie”, changed forever at its third printing, purely because of a typesetter’s error!

66. West who said "Too much of a good thing can be wonderful" : MAE
Comic actress Mae West can be quoted so easily, as she had so many great lines delivered so well. Here are a few:
  • When I’m good, I’m very good. When I’m bad, I’m better.
  • When choosing between two evils, I always like to try the one I’ve never tried before.
  • I’ll try anything once, twice if I like it, three times to make sure.
  • Marriage is a great institution, but I’m not ready for an institution yet.
  • I used to be Snow White, but I drifted.
  • Why don’t you come on up and see me sometime — when I’ve got nothin’ on but the radio.
  • It’s better to be looked over than overlooked.
  • To err is human, but it feels divine.
  • I like my clothes to be tight enough to show I’m a woman, but loose enough to show I’m a lady.
  • I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number you get in a diamond.
  • Is that a gun in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?

Down
2. Huey, Dewey or Louie, to Donald Duck : NEPHEW
Donald Duck’s nephews are identical triplets called Huey, Dewey and Louie, and they first appeared on the screen in 1938. Once in awhile due to errors in production, a fourth duck can be seen in the background. This little “mistake” is affectionately called “Phooey Duck” by folks in the industry.

5. Bill ___, the Science Guy : NYE
That would be “Bill Nye the Science Guy”. Bill’s show ran on PBS for four years from 1993-97.

6. One of the Three Bears : MAMA
The story of “Goldilocks and the Three Bears” was first recorded in 1837, in England, although the narrative was around before it was actually written down. The original fairy tale was rather gruesome, but successive versions became more family-oriented. The character that eventually became Goldilocks was originally an elderly woman, and the three “nameless” bears became Papa Bear, Mama Bear and Baby Bear.

7. Cloud in the summer : GNATS
Gnats are attracted to the smell of rotting food, and to vinegar. Simple homemade traps that use vinegar are often constructed to attract and kill gnats.

8. Capital of Belarus : MINSK
Minsk is the capital of Belarus, formerly known as the Belorussian Soviet Socialist Republic. One of Minsk’s more infamous residents was Lee Harvey Oswald, who lived there from 1960 to 1962.

9. Kind of soup mentioned in Genesis : LENTIL
Esau was the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When their mother Rebekah gave birth to the twins "the first emerged red and hairy all over (Esau), with his heel grasped by the hand of the second to come out (Jacob)". As Esau was the first born, he was entitled to inherit his father's wealth (it was his "birthright"). Instead, Esau sold his birthright to Jacob for the price of a "mess of pottage" (a meal of lentils).

10. Losing tic-tac-toe line : O-X-O
When I was growing up in Ireland we played “noughts and crosses” … our name for the game tic-tac-toe.

12. Earth, wind and fire : ELEMENTS
The Greek philosopher Empedocles proposed that there are four elements that made up the universe, namely earth, water, air and fire. Aristotle later proposed a fifth element which he called aether (also "ether"). Aether was the divine substance that made up the stars and planets.

27. 1980s-'90s NBC drama : LA LAW
“L.A. Law” ran on NBC from 1986 to 1994, and was one of the network’s most successful drama series. It took over from the equally successful “Hill Street Blues” in the Thursday night 10 p.m. slot until, after a six-year run, it was itself replaced by yet another respected drama, “E.R.” The opening credits showed that famous California licence plate. The plate was on a Jaguar XJ for most of the series, but moved onto a Bentley towards the end of the run. For each series the registration sticker was updated, so no laws were being broken.

30. One running away in "Hey Diddle Diddle" : DISH
The nursery rhyme “Hey Diddle Diddle” has been around at least since the mid-1700s.
Hey diddle diddle,
The cat and the fiddle,
The cow jumped over the moon,
The little dog laughed to see such fun,
And the dish ran away with the spoon.

33. Short cut : BOB
A bob cut is a short hairstyle in which the hair is cut straight around the head, at about the line of the jaw. Back in the 1570s, “bob” was the name given to a horse’s tail that was cut short, and about a century later it was being used to describe short hair on humans. The style became very popular with women in the early 1900s (as worn by actress Clara Bow, for example), with the fashion dying out in the thirties. The style reemerged in the sixties around the time the Beatles introduced their “mop tops”, with Vidal Sassoon leading the way in styling women’s hair in a bob cut again. Personally, I like it …

36. With Pelé, co-winner of FIFA's Player of the Century award : MARADONA
Diego Maradona has to be the most famous of Argentina’s soccer players. He is also one of the country’s most controversial sportsmen, noted for his outspoken manner with journalists and his cocaine addiction.

“Pelé” is the nickname of Edson de Nascimento, a soccer player who has used the name “Pelé” for most of his life. Pelé is now retired, and for my money was the world's greatest ever player of the game. He is the only person to have been part of three World Cup winning squads, and is a national treasure in his native Brazil. One of Pele’s nicknames is “O Rei do Futebol” (the King of Football).

38. Advil alternative : ANACIN
Anacin is a brand of pain reliever that comprises aspirin and caffeine as active ingredients.

44. 1977 Steely Dan album : AJA
Steely Dan’s heyday was in the seventies when they toured for a couple of years, although the group mainly focused on studio work. The band was formed in 1972 and broke up in 1981. The core of the band reunited in 1993 and they are still going strong today. Steely Dan’s best-selling album is “Aja” (pronounced “Asia”), which was released in 1977.

46. Samurai sword : KATANA
The katana is a curved sword worn by the samurai of Japan. The katana is sometimes referred to as a “samurai sword”.

47. Silent film opener : IRIS-IN
In the word of movie-making, An “Iris” is a technique in which an image is shown in only a small round area of the screen. An “Iris-out” starts as a pinpoint in the screen then moves outward to reveal a full scene. An “Iris-in” begins as a full scene and then closes down to pinpoint a specific circular area in the scene.

50. Kind of tea from Asia : ASSAM
Assam is a state in the very northeast of India, just south of the Himalayas. Assam is noted for its tea as well as its silk.

51. 10th of 24 : KAPPA
Kappa is the 10th letter of the Greek alphabet, and the equivalent of our letter K.

53. Pooh creator : MILNE
Alan Alexander (A.A.) Milne was an English author who is best known for his delightful "Winnie-the-Pooh" series of books. He had only one son, Christopher Robin Milne, born in 1920. The young Milne was the inspiration for the Christopher Robin character in the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. Winnie-the-Pooh was named after Christopher Robin's real teddy bear, one he called Winnie, who in turn was named after a Canadian black bear called Winnie that the Milnes would visit in London Zoo. The original Winnie teddy bear is on display at the main branch of the New York Public Library in New York.

56. Orthodontist's concern : BITE
Orthodontics is a branch of dentistry dealing with the straightening of teeth. The name comes from the Greek “orthos” meaning “straight” and “dontia” meaning “teeth”.

61. Kiss ___ : CAM
The kiss cam is a diversion during some sporting events in which a video camera picks out random couples in the crowd, projecting their image onto the giant screen at the venue. The couples are encouraged to kiss, for the entertainment of the fans. Famously, President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama kissed for the kiss cam at a basketball game a few years ago, as did former President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Early Peruvian : INCAN
6. "Gone With the Wind" studio : MGM
9. Mooed : LOWED
14. Festive : MERRY
15. Folk singer DiFranco : ANI
16. Edward Snowden, e.g. : EXILE
17. Peter Parker is his alter ego : SPIDER-MAN (spins a web)
19. Musical piece for nine : NONET
20. "That's terrible!" : OH NO!
21. Wipes out on the half-pipe, say : EATS IT
23. Comedian Philips : EMO
24. Rue : REGRET
26. Grammy-winning electronic music producer and D.J. : SKRILLEX (spins records)
28. Ram's mate : EWE
29. Red Cross response : AID
31. J. Peterman employee on "Seinfeld" : ELAINE
32. Excited Spanish cry : ARRIBA!
35. D-Day carriers: Abbr. : LSTS
36. Name assumed by billiards great Rudolf Wanderone : MINNESOTA FATS (spins the cue ball)
40. Asset for a press secretary : TACT
41. Way to watch "Game of Thrones" on your phone : HBO NOW
42. Tater Tots maker : ORE-IDA
45. Course standard : PAR
46. ___ Kat : KIT
49. Longtime co-worker of Vanna White : PAT SAJAK (spins the Wheel of Fortune)
52. Chevy's response to the Mustang : CAMARO
54. Vow before testifying : I DO
55. Sushi condiment : WASABI
57. Words said before and after "what" : IT IS
58. TBS late-night host : CONAN
60. Modern exercise option ... or what the answers to 17-, 26-, 36- or 49-Across could teach? : SPIN CLASS
62. A straight one is 180° : ANGLE
63. Suitable : APT
64. Fictional orphan protected by Punjab : ANNIE
65. Zapped, as unwanted hair : LASED
66. West who said "Too much of a good thing can be wonderful" : MAE
67. Wherewithal : MEANS

Down
1. Complaint after overexercise : I’M SORE
2. Huey, Dewey or Louie, to Donald Duck : NEPHEW
3. Reaction to an awkward moment : CRINGE
4. Passion : ARDOR
5. Bill ___, the Science Guy : NYE
6. One of the Three Bears : MAMA
7. Cloud in the summer : GNATS
8. Capital of Belarus : MINSK
9. Kind of soup mentioned in Genesis : LENTIL
10. Losing tic-tac-toe line : O-X-O
11. Request at a fine restaurant : WINE LIST
12. Earth, wind and fire : ELEMENTS
13. Cleanses, in a way : DETOXES
18. Finish the job? : RETIRE
22. Boiling point? : IRE
25. Make : EARN
27. 1980s-'90s NBC drama : LA LAW
30. One running away in "Hey Diddle Diddle" : DISH
32. Opposing side : ANTIS
33. Short cut : BOB
34. Above : ATOP
36. With Pelé, co-winner of FIFA's Player of the Century award : MARADONA
37. Minibar accessory : ICE TONGS
38. Advil alternative : ANACIN
39. Fit ___ king : FOR A
40. In the news : TOPICAL
43. Began : DAWNED
44. 1977 Steely Dan album : AJA
46. Samurai sword : KATANA
47. Silent film opener : IRIS-IN
48. Scraps : TOSSES
50. Kind of tea from Asia : ASSAM
51. 10th of 24 : KAPPA
53. Pooh creator : MILNE
56. Orthodontist's concern : BITE
59. Pub pint : ALE
61. Kiss ___ : CAM


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0815-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 15 Aug 17, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Zhouqin Burnikel
THEME: Collectors
Each of today’s themed answers is an item that contains a COLLECTION of things:
18A. Stamp collector? : PASSPORT
28A. Record collector? : GUINNESS BOOK
45A. Bill collector? : CASH REGISTER
57A. Shell collector? : PASTA BAR
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 46s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

11. Deg. that requires a defense : PHD
PhD is an abbreviation for "philosophiae doctor", Latin for "teacher of philosophy". Often, candidates for an earned PhD already hold a bachelor’s and a master’s degree, so a PhD might be considered a “third degree”.

14. Japanese floor mat : TATAMI
A tatami is a traditional mat used on floors in Japan. The term “tatami” comes from the Japanese word “tatamu” meaning “to fold”, reflecting the fact that the mat is designed to be folded up for storage.

17. Old video game consoles : ATARIS
The kids today probably don’t realize that we had a video game console back in the seventies, and it wasn’t a Nintendo nor was it a PlayStation. The Atari 2600 game system introduced the idea of separating out computing hardware (the console) from the game code (a cartridge). The same concept persists to this day, although cartridges have been displaced by discs and downloads.

18. Stamp collector? : PASSPORT
As a result of a League of Nations conference in 1920, passports are usually written in French and one other language. French was specified back then as it was deemed the language of diplomacy. US passports use French and English, given that English is the nation’s de facto national language. Spanish was added as a language for US passports in the late nineties in recognition of Spanish-speaking Puerto Rico.

20. "Total Recall" director Wiseman : LEN
Len Wiseman is a movie director best known for the films “Live Free or Die Hard” (2007) and “Total Recall” (2012). Wiseman is married to English actress Kate Beckinsale.

“Total Recall” is a very entertaining 1990 sci-fi action movie starring Arnold Schwarzenegger. The film is loosely based on a short story by Philip K. Dick called “We Can Remember It for You Wholesale”. The 1990 film was remade in 2012. The 2012 version stars Colin Farrell, and is very forgettable …

27. "Hail Mary, full of grace ...," e.g. : PRAYER
"Ave Maria" ("Hail Mary" in English) is the prayer at the core of the Roman Catholic Rosary, which itself is a set of prayers asking for the assistance of the Virgin Mary. Much of the text of the "Hail Mary" comes from the Gospel of Luke. The words in Latin are:
AVE MARIA, gratia plena, Dominus tecum. Benedicta tu in mulieribus, et benedictus fructus ventris tui, Iesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc, et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.
The prayer has been adapted as a hymn. The two most famous musical versions of “Ave Maria” are by Charles Gounod (based on a piece by Bach) and by Franz Schubert.

28. Record collector? : GUINNESS BOOK
"The Guinness Book of World Records" holds some records of its own. It is the best-selling, copyrighted series of books of all time and is one of the books most often stolen from public libraries! The book was first published in 1954 by two twins, Norris and Ross McWhirter. The McWhirter twins found themselves with a smash hit, and eventually became very famous in Britain hosting a TV show based on world records.

33. Showy purple bloom : IRIS
Iris is a genus of flowering plants that come in a wide variety of flower colors. The term “iris” is a Greek word meaning “rainbow”. Many species of irises are called “flags”. One suggestion is that the alternate name comes from the Middle English “flagge” meaning “reed”. This term was used because iris leaves look like reeds.

34. Energy measurement, for short : BTU
In the world of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), the power of a heating or cooling unit can be measured in British Thermal Units (BTUs). This dated unit is the amount of energy required to heat a pound of water so that the water's temperature increases by one degree Fahrenheit.

37. Cranberry picking sites : BOGS
When early European settlers came across red berries growing in the bogs of the northern part of America, they felt that the plant’s flower and stem resembled the head and bill of a crane. As such, they called the plant “craneberry”, which later evolved into “cranberry”.

38. Who famously said "I'm not a crook" : NIXON
In 1973, at the height of the Watergate scandal, President Richard Nixon faced reporters in a question and answers session. Famously, or perhaps infamously, Nixon uttered the words:
People have got to know whether or not their President is a crook. Well, I’m not a crook. I’ve earned everything I’ve got.
A few month’s later, President Nixon stated that he was “never a quitter”. Well, he resigned in August 1974 under pressure from the scandal, and facing an almost inevitable impeachment.

41. Prefix with -metric : ISO-
The word "isometric" comes from Greek, and means "having equal measurement". Isometric exercise is a resistance exercise in which the muscle does not change in length (and the joint angle stays the same). The alternative would be dynamic exercises, ones using the joint's full range of motion.

42. Calliope or Euterpe : MUSE
In Greek mythology, the muses are the goddesses who inspire the creation of literature and the arts. The number of muses is a subject of debate at times, but the most popular view is that there are nine:
  • Calliope (epic poetry)
  • Clio (history)
  • Erato (lyric poetry)
  • Euterpe (music)
  • Melpomene (tragedy)
  • Polyhymnia (choral poetry)
  • Terpsichore (dance)
  • Thalia (comedy)
  • Urania (astronomy)
Before the adoption of the nine muses of Greek mythology, there were originally three muses, the three Boeotian Muses. These were:
  • Mneme (memory)
  • Melete (meditation)
  • Aoede (song)

43. Play a fife : TOOTLE
A fife is a small flute that is often used in military and marching bands. The name “fife” comes from the German “Pfeife” meaning “pipe”.

47. Tiered Eastern temple : PAGODA
Pagodas are tiered (“storied”) towers found in various parts of Asia, usually built for religious purposes.

50. Something measured by holding fingers on the wrist : PULSE
One’s pulse is the rhythmic throbbing of arteries that is usually detected at the wrist or the neck. The contraction of the heart creates a pressure wave in the blood that moves the arterial walls, which is detected as the pulse.

51. Trojan War epic : ILIAD
“The Iliad” is an epic poem by the Greek poet Homer, which tells the story of the ten-year siege of Ilium (also known as Troy) during the Trojan war. “The Odyssey”, also attributed to Homer, is sometimes described as a sequel to “The Iliad”.

52. Galileo's hometown : PISA
The city of Pisa is right on the Italian coast, sitting at the mouth of the River Arno, and is famous for its Leaning Tower. The tower is actually the campanile (bell tower) of the city’s cathedral, and it has been leaning since it was completed in 1173. Just shows you how important good foundations are …

Galileo Galilei may be the most famous son of the city of Pisa in Italy and was considered by many to have been the father of modern science. In the world of physics, Galileo postulated that objects of different masses would fall at the same rate provided they did so in a vacuum (so there was no air resistance). There is a story that he dropped two balls of different masses from the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa to demonstrate this, but this probably never happened. Centuries later, Astronaut David Scott performed Galileo’s proposed experiment when he dropped a hammer and feather on the moon during the Apollo 15 mission and we all saw the objects hit the moon surface, at exactly the same time.

54. A detour offers a different one: Abbr. : RTE
Route (rte.)

62. Mobile CPR provider : EMT
An emergency medical technician (EMT) might administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

65. Morse code plea : SOS
The combination of three dots - three dashes - three dots, is a Morse signal first introduced by the German government as a standard distress call in 1905. The sequence is remembered as the letters SOS (three dots - pause - three dashes - pause - three dots), although in the emergency signal there is no pause between the dots and dashes, so SOS is in effect only a mnemonic. Similarly, the phrases "Save Our Souls" and "Save Our Ship" are also mnemonics, introduced after the "SOS" signal was adopted.

66. Multiple jobs, metaphorically : HATS
Some people wear many hats, do many jobs.

67. It might come with a cherry on top : SUNDAE
There’s a lot of speculation about how the dessert called a sundae got its name, but there seems to be agreement that it is an alteration of the word “Sunday”.

Down
1. Slanted in print: Abbr. : ITAL
Italic type leans to the right, and is often used to provide emphasis in text. The style is known as “italic” because the stylized calligraphic form of writing originated in Italy, probably in the Vatican.

2. FiveThirtyEight creator Silver : NATE
Nate Silver is a statistician who first gained notoriety by developing a forecasting system that predicted the future performance of baseball players. He then made a name for himself in the world of politics by predicting the outcome of the 2008 US presidential race on his website FiveThirtyEight.com. Silver successfully predicted the outcome of the election in 49 of the 50 states, missing out on Indiana, which Barack Obama won by less than 1% of the vote. FiveThirtyEight was less successful in predicting the specifics of the 2012 presidential election, but came closer than almost all other pollsters. In 2016, FiveThirtyEight predicted a victory for Hillary Clinton, but with a much lower probability than other poll aggregators. And, they all got it wrong. Oh, and why the name FiveThirtyEight.com? Because there are 538 electors in the US electoral college.

3. Rousing audience response, informally : STANDING O
Give 'em a big hand, maybe even a "standing O", a standing ovation.

6. Pageant title since 1983 : MISS TEEN USA
Miss Teen USA is a beauty pageant for girls between the ages of 14 and 19. The competition was first held in 1983 and is run by the Miss Universe Organization, which was owned by future president Donald Trump for nearly two decades up until 2015.

8. Cuisine with tom kha gai soup : THAI
In Thai cuisine, the name of the soup called “tom kha gai” is usually translated as “Thai coconut soup”.

10. Places serving salades et sandwiches : BISTROS
“Bistro” was originally a Parisian slang term for a "little wine shop or restaurant".

12. Derby entrant : HORSE
Our use of the word “derby” to mean a race started in 1780 with the English Derby horse race, which was founded then by the 12th Earl of Derby. Ultimately, the term “derby” derives from the old English shire of “Deorby”, a word meaning “deer village”.

22. Platform for Siri : IOS
iOS is what Apple now call their mobile operating system, previously known as iPhone OS.

Siri is a software application that works with Apple’s iOS operating system. “Siri” is an acronym standing for Speech Interpretation and Recognition Interface. You’ve probably seen the ads on television, with folks talking to their iPhones asking for information and responding with a voice. I hear that Google is a little scared by Siri, as Siri is non-visual. There’s no need to touch a screen or a keyboard to work with Siri, no opportunity to click on one of Google’s ads! By the way, voice-over artist Susan Bennett revealed herself as the female American voice of Siri not that long ago. The British version of Siri is called Daniel, and the Australian version is called Karen. Also, “Siri” is a Norwegian name meaning “beautiful woman who leads you to victory”, and was the name the developer had chosen for his first child.

25. Some chain pizzerias : UNO’S
The chain of pizza parlors known today as Uno Chicago Grill used to be called Pizzeria Uno, or just “Uno’s”. Apparently Uno’s created the world’s first deep dish pizza.

26. Sinus doc : ENT
Ear, nose and throat specialist (ENT)

In anatomical terms a sinus is a cavity in tissue. Sinuses are found all over the body, in the kidney and heart for example, but we most commonly think of the paranasal sinuses that surround the nose.

27. Players bringing the ball up the court : POINT GUARDS
That would be basketball.

28. Desert along the Silk Road : GOBI
The large desert in Asia called the Gobi lies in northern China and southern Mongolia. The Gobi desert is growing at an alarming rate, particularly towards the south. This “desertification” is caused by increased human activity. The Chinese government is trying to halt the desert’s progress by planting great swaths of new forest, the so called “Green Wall of China”. The name “Gobi” is Mongolian for “waterless place, semidesert”.

The Silk Road was a network of trading routes that crossed North Africa and Asia, connecting Europe to West Asia. The routes get the name from the lucrative trade in silk from China.

29. Subjects of some fuzzy photos, for short : UFOS
Unidentified flying object (UFO)

30. Philly pro : SIXER
The Philadelphia 76ers basketball team is one of the oldest franchises in the NBA. “The Sixers” were formed in 1946 as the Syracuse Nationals. The team moved to Philadelphia in 1963, and the name 76er was chosen in a fan contest, a name that honors the men who fought for the country’s independence in 1776.

40. Big enchilada : BOSS
“Enchilada” is the past participle of the Spanish word “enchilar” meaning “to add chile pepper to”. An enchilada is a basically a corn tortilla rolled around some filling and then covered in chili pepper sauce. The term “big enchilada” is used in the same way as we would use “big cheese” i.e. the top dog. The phrase was popularized in the sixties when John Ehrlichman refers to Attorney General John Mitchell as “the big enchilada” on one of the Watergate Tapes.

44. Coconut product : OIL
Palm oil and coconut oil are two vegetable oils that aren’t very good for our health. Both are high in saturated fat.

46. Short albums, for short : EPS
An extended-play record, CD or download (EP) contains more music than a single, but less than an LP.

47. Puff pieces? : PIPES
A smoker might take a puff on pipe.

48. San Antonio mission : ALAMO
The San Antonio mission known as the Alamo may have been named for a grove of nearby cottonwood trees. “Álamo” is the Spanish name for the cottonwood.

58. Cry of shear terror? : BAA!
That would be a cry from a sheep being sheared.

60. It's in la Seine : EAU
“Eau” is French for “water”.

The Seine is the river that flows through Paris. The Seine empties into the English Channel to the north, at the port city of Le Havre.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Line of clothing : INSEAM
7. Random guess : STAB
11. Deg. that requires a defense : PHD
14. Japanese floor mat : TATAMI
15. "Didn't see ya there!" : OH HI!
16. Garden row maker : HOE
17. Old video game consoles : ATARIS
18. Stamp collector? : PASSPORT
20. "Total Recall" director Wiseman : LEN
21. Enthusiastic Spanish assent : SI, SI!
23. Like sports crowds during a close game : TENSE
24. Because of : DUE TO
27. "Hail Mary, full of grace ...," e.g. : PRAYER
28. Record collector? : GUINNESS BOOK
32. Significant : OF NOTE
33. Showy purple bloom : IRIS
34. Energy measurement, for short : BTU
37. Cranberry picking sites : BOGS
38. Who famously said "I'm not a crook" : NIXON
40. Media slant : BIAS
41. Prefix with -metric : ISO-
42. Calliope or Euterpe : MUSE
43. Play a fife : TOOTLE
45. Bill collector? : CASH REGISTER
47. Tiered Eastern temple : PAGODA
50. Something measured by holding fingers on the wrist : PULSE
51. Trojan War epic : ILIAD
52. Galileo's hometown : PISA
54. A detour offers a different one: Abbr. : RTE
57. Shell collector? : PASTA BAR
59. Undoing of legislation : REPEAL
62. Mobile CPR provider : EMT
63. Hit the ___ (go to bed) : SACK
64. Intimidates : DAUNTS
65. Morse code plea : SOS
66. Multiple jobs, metaphorically : HATS
67. It might come with a cherry on top : SUNDAE

Down
1. Slanted in print: Abbr. : ITAL
2. FiveThirtyEight creator Silver : NATE
3. Rousing audience response, informally : STANDING O
4. Something popped on a plane : EAR
5. Parisian pal : AMI
6. Pageant title since 1983 : MISS TEEN USA
7. Soaks (up) : SOPS
8. Cuisine with tom kha gai soup : THAI
9. Sighed sounds : AHS
10. Places serving salades et sandwiches : BISTROS
11. Hypocrite, say : PHONY
12. Derby entrant : HORSE
13. Hold off : DETER
19. Word after mountain or before season : PEAK
22. Platform for Siri : IOS
25. Some chain pizzerias : UNO’S
26. Sinus doc : ENT
27. Players bringing the ball up the court : POINT GUARDS
28. Desert along the Silk Road : GOBI
29. Subjects of some fuzzy photos, for short : UFOS
30. Philly pro : SIXER
31. ___ hug : BRO
34. Final and unhappy outcome : BITTER END
35. Fish story : TALE
36. ___ interface : USER
39. Kinda sorta : ISH
40. Big enchilada : BOSS
42. Frenzied race : MAD DASH
44. Coconut product : OIL
45. Wool, for a sheep : COAT
46. Short albums, for short : EPS
47. Puff pieces? : PIPES
48. San Antonio mission : ALAMO
49. Main points : GISTS
52. Treaty : PACT
53. Ticks off : IRKS
55. "Toodles!" : TA-TA!
56. "What ___ is new?" : ELSE
58. Cry of shear terror? : BAA!
60. It's in la Seine : EAU
61. The clue for 58-Down, e.g. [sorry!] : PUN


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0814-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 14 Aug 17, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Rich Proulx
THEME: Meatless Monday
Each of the themed answers in this MONDAY puzzle is a common dish that has been made MEATLESS:
51A. Weekly occurrence when 20-, 31- and 38-Across might be consumed : MEATLESS MONDAY

20A. Meal option #1 : MUSHROOM BURGER
31A. Meal option #2 : SPINACH LASAGNA
38A. Meal option #3 : BLACK BEAN CHILI
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 01s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Torso muscles, briefly : PECS
“Pecs” is the familiar name for the chest muscle, which is more correctly known as the pectoralis major muscle. “Pectus” is a the Latin word for “breast, chest”.

“Torso” (plural “torsi”) is an Italian word meaning the “trunk of a statue”, and is a term that we imported into English.

9. Turn into a pretzel : TWIST
Pretzels originated in Europe and are especially popular in Southern Germany where a pretzel is known as “Brezel”. Pretzels were introduced into the US in the 1800s by immigrants from Germany and Switzerland who came to be known over here as the Pennsylvania Dutch.

14. ___ palm (tree with a healthful berry) : ACAI
Açaí is a palm tree native to Central and South America. The fruit has become very popular in recent years and its juice is a very fashionable addition to juice mixes and smoothies.

16. Italian scooter brand : VESPA
Vespa is a brand of motor scooter originally made in Italy (and now all over the world) by Piaggio. “Vespa” is Italian for “wasp”.

17. Thrifty or Budget offering : RENTAL CAR
Thrifty Car Rental was founded back in 1958. Thrifty became part of Chrysler in 1989 and was merged by Chrysler with Dollar Rent A Car the following year.

The Budget Rent a Car company started out in 1958 with the intent of undercutting the existing price of renting a car at airports. Budget was founded by Morris Mirkin. Mirkin enlisted Julius Lederer as a co-founder the following year. Lederer was the husband of newspaper columnist “Ann Landers”.

22. 007, for one : SPY
The character James Bond was the creation of writer Ian Fleming. Fleming “stole” the James Bond name from an American ornithologist. The number 007 was “stolen” from the real-life, 16th century English spy called John Dee. Dee would sign his reports to Queen Elizabeth I with a stylized "007" to indicate that the reports were for “her eyes only”. There’s an entertaining miniseries that aired on BBC America called “Fleming: The Man Who Would Be Bond” that details Ian Fleming’s military career, and draws some nice parallels between Fleming’s experiences and aspirations and those of his hero James Bond. Recommended …

24. Cheer made with a pompom : RAH!
The French call a ball made of tufted wool a “pompon”, a word that we imported into English directly as “pompon”. We use “pompon” to describe perhaps bobbles on some hats, or the tufted balls that are shaken by cheerleaders at sports events. Over time, the spelling “pompom” has become common in English, probably due to mishearing. To confuse matters a little, we also use the word “pom-pom”, which is a nickname for a British autocannon used mainly as an anti-aircraft weapon, particularly during WWII.

25. Moo goo gai pan pan : WOK
“Wok” is a Cantonese word, the name for the frying pan now used in many Asian cuisines.

Moo goo gai pan is an American version of a traditional Cantonese dish. In Cantonese “moo goo” means “button mushroom”, “gai” is “chicken” and “pan” is “slices”.

26. Brit's teapot cover : COSY
A tea cozy (sometimes “cosy”) is an insulated cover for a teapot, something to keep the tea hot. I don’t know what I’d do without my tea cosy/cozy …

31. Meal option #2 : SPINACH LASAGNA
Lasagna was originally the name of a cooking pot, but it came to mean a dish that was cooked in it. Lasagna also became the name of the flat noodle used in the dish. If you order lasagna on the other side of the Atlantic, you’ll notice the “lasagne” spelling, the plural of “lasagna”. The plural is used as there is more than one layer of pasta in the dish.

38. Meal option #3 : BLACK BEAN CHILI
The full name of the dish that is often called simply "chili" is "chili con carne", Spanish for "peppers with meat". The dish was created by immigrants from the Spanish Canary Islands in the city of San Antonio, Texas (a city which the islanders founded). The San Antonio Chili Stand was a popular attraction at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, and that stand introduced the dish to the rest of America and to the world.

51. Weekly occurrence when 20-, 31- and 38-Across might be consumed : MEATLESS MONDAY
To help the war effort, the United States Food Administration (led by Herbert Hoover) introduced “Meatless Tuesdays” and “Wheatless Wednesdays” for the duration of WWI. Similar campaigns were revived during WWII. Wheatless Wednesdays have fallen by the wayside but Meatless Monday is very much in vogue these days as an attempt to improve the population’s health and help reduce global warming (less methane from fewer cows).

56. Dance to some Johann Strauss music : WALTZ
What we tend to think of as a waltz today is danced at about 90 beats per minute. The original waltz was much faster, and is danced at about 180 beats per minute. To differentiate, we now call the faster dance a “Viennese Waltz”, and sometimes refer to the other as the “English Waltz” or “slow waltz”.

Of the many classical composers with the Strauss name, "The Waltz King" was Johann Strauss II from Austria. Among the many beautiful waltzes that Strauss penned are "The Blue Danube" and "Tales from the Vienna Woods". He also composed the famous operetta "Die Fledermaus".

59. La ___ Tar Pits : BREA
The La Brea Tar Pits are located right in the heart of the city of Los Angeles. At the site there is a constant flow of tar that seeps up to the surface from underground, a phenomenon that has been around for tens of thousands of years. What is significant is that much of the seeping tar is covered by water. Over many, many centuries animals came to the water to drink and became trapped in the tar as they entered the water to quench their thirsts. The tar then preserved the bones of the dead animals. Today a museum is located right by the Tar Pits, recovering bones and displaying specimens of the animals found there. It’s well worth a visit if you are in town …

60. Blueprint : PLAN
Blueprints are reproductions of technical or architectural drawings that are contact prints made on light-sensitive sheets. Blueprints were introduced in the 1800s and the technology available dictated that the drawings were reproduced with white lines on a blue background, hence the name “blue-print”.

63. Sicilian volcano : ETNA
Mount Etna on the island of Sicily is the largest of three active volcanoes in Italy. Etna is about 2 1/2 times the height of its equally famous sister, Mt. Vesuvius. Mt. Etna is home to a 110-km long narrow-gauge railway, and two ski resorts.

Down
3. Colorful flower also known as heartsease : PANSY
The garden flower called the “pansy” takes its name from the French word “pensée” meaning “thought”. This name was chosen as the flower was often used as a symbol of remembrance.

4. ___ Lord (Jedi's foe) : SITH
The Sith are characters in the “Star Wars” universe who use the “dark side” of “the Force”, and as such are the antithesis of the Jedi Knights. Members of the Sith use the title “Darth” before their name, as in Darth Vader. The last made of the six “Star Wars” movies is called “Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith”.

5. Big oaf : PALOOKA
The word “palooka” was originally used to describe a mediocre prizefighter and dates back to the 1920s. Then there was a comic strip called “Joe Palooka”, and I guess the meanings got melded somehow. Today we use “palooka” as a slang term for an oaf or a clumsy person.

6. One no longer in the pen : EX-CON
A convict (con) might be incarcerated in the penitentiary (pen).

8. Belgrade native : SERB
Belgrade is the capital city of Serbia. The name “Belgrade” translates into “White City”.

13. Faucet : TAP
The common “faucet” in an American house is almost always referred to as a “tap” on the other side of the pond.

21. ___ Major (Great Bear) : URSA
The constellation named Ursa Major (Latin for “Larger Bear”) is often just called the Big Dipper because of its resemblance to a ladle or dipper. Ursa Major also resembles a plow, and that’s what we usually call the same constellation back in Ireland, the “plough”.

25. The Dairy State: Abbr. : WISC
The state of Wisconsin is a leading producer of dairy products, and is particularly known for its cheese. Wisconsin is sometimes referred to as the Dairy State, and the state’s licence plates have borne the motto “America’s Dairyland” since 1940.

27. Actress Lena of "Chocolat" : OLIN
Lena Olin is a Swedish actress, and clearly someone who had acting in her blood. Her mother was the actress Britta Holmberg and her father the actor and director Stig Olin. Olin had a very successful career in Sweden, often working with the great Ingmar Bergman. Olin’s breakthrough international and English-speaking role was playing opposite Daniel Day-Lewis in “The Unbearable Lightness of Being” released in 1988. Way back in 1974, the lovely Miss Olin was crowned Miss Scandinavia in a beauty pageant for Nordic women held in Helsinki, Finland.

28. Alike, in Paris : EGAL
“Égal” (feminine “égale”) is the French word for “equal, alike”, and a word we sometimes use in English. The national motto of France is “Liberté, égalité, fraternité”, meaning “Liberty, equality, fraternity (brotherhood).

29. ___-Defamation League : ANTI
The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) is a US organization that fights anti-Semitism and other forms of bigotry. The ADL was founded in 1913 as the Independent Order of B’nai B’rith.

30. ___ kwon do (martial art) : TAE
Tae kwon do is the national sport of Korea. “Tae” means “to strike or break with foot”; “kwon” means “to strike or break with fist”; “do” means “way” or “art”. Along with judo, tae kwon do is one of only two martial arts included in the Olympic Games.

32. Say grace, e.g. : PRAY
A grace is a short prayer recited before or after a meal.

33. First symbol on a musical staff : CLEF
“Clef” is the French word for “key”. In music, a clef is used to indicate the pitch of the notes written on the stave. The bass clef is also known as the F-clef, the alto clef is the C-clef, and the treble clef is the G-clef.

35. Torso muscles, briefly : ABS
The abdominal muscles (abs) are more correctly referred to as the rectus abdominis muscles. They are all called a “six-pack” in a person who has developed the muscles and who has low body fat. In my case, more like a keg …

39. They're all thumbs : KLUTZES
A klutz is an awkward individual, and the term comes from Yiddish. The Yiddish word for a clumsy person is "klots".

42. "Mankind's greatest blessing," per Mark Twain : HUMOR
Samuel Langhorne Clemens was the real name of the author Mark Twain. Twain wasn’t the only pen name used by Clemens. Early in his career he signed some sketches as “Josh”, and signed some humorous letters that he wrote under the name “Thomas Jefferson Snodgrass”. The name of Mark Twain came from the days when Clemens was working on riverboats on the Mississippi. A riverboatman would call out “by the mark twain” when measuring the depth of water. This meant that on the sounding line, according to the “mark” on the line, the depth was two (“twain”) fathoms, and so it was safe for the riverboat to proceed.

46. Espresso drink : LATTE
The term “latte” is an abbreviation of the Italian “caffelatte” meaning “coffee (and) milk”. Note that in the correct spelling of “latte”, the Italian word for milk, there is no accent over the “e”. An accent is often added by mistake when we use the word in English, perhaps meaning to suggest that the word is French.

49. The Devil : SATAN
Satan is the bringer of evil and temptation in the Abrahamic religions. The name “Satan” is Hebrew for “adversary”.

50. "Laughing" animal : HYENA
The spotted hyena of Sub-Saharan Africa is also known as the laughing hyena because of the sound it oftens makes, which resembles maniacal laughter.

51. Mother horse : MARE
There are lots of terms to describe horses of different ages and sexes, it seems:
  • Foal: horse of either sex that is less that one year old
  • Yearling: horse of either sex that is one to two years old
  • Filly: female horse under the age of four
  • Colt: male horse under the age of four
  • Gelding: castrated male horse of any age
  • Stallion: non-castrated male horse four years or older
  • Mare: female horse four years or older

52. Flair : ELAN
Our word "élan" was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours, i.e “style” or “flair”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Where holsters go : HIPS
5. Torso muscles, briefly : PECS
9. Turn into a pretzel : TWIST
14. ___ palm (tree with a healthful berry) : ACAI
15. Automobile rod : AXLE
16. Italian scooter brand : VESPA
17. Thrifty or Budget offering : RENTAL CAR
19. Keep occupied, as a phone line : TIE UP
20. Meal option #1 : MUSHROOM BURGER
22. 007, for one : SPY
23. "___ of a gun!" : SON
24. Cheer made with a pompom : RAH!
25. Moo goo gai pan pan : WOK
26. Brit's teapot cover : COSY
28. Consume : EAT
31. Meal option #2 : SPINACH LASAGNA
35. Broadcasts : AIRS
36. Hawaiian garland : LEI
37. Overdue : LATE
38. Meal option #3 : BLACK BEAN CHILI
43. Pig's home : STY
44. Where hay is stored in a barn : LOFT
45. Path that wheels keep following : RUT
46. French for "him" : LUI
47. Completely finishing this crossword, to you : AIM
48. Residue of burning : ASH
51. Weekly occurrence when 20-, 31- and 38-Across might be consumed : MEATLESS MONDAY
56. Dance to some Johann Strauss music : WALTZ
57. Path for cyclists : BIKE ROUTE
58. Fit to be tied : IRATE
59. La ___ Tar Pits : BREA
60. Blueprint : PLAN
61. Things producing red hair or blue eyes : GENES
62. Stitched : SEWN
63. Sicilian volcano : ETNA

Down
1. In ___ way : HARM’S
2. Freeze over, as airplane wings : ICE UP
3. Colorful flower also known as heartsease : PANSY
4. ___ Lord (Jedi's foe) : SITH
5. Big oaf : PALOOKA
6. One no longer in the pen : EX-CON
7. Raw bar offering : CLAM
8. Belgrade native : SERB
9. Some light foldable tables : TV TRAYS
10. Put on the scale : WEIGH
11. "Understood" : I SEE
12. Cowboy boot attachment : SPUR
13. Faucet : TAP
18. Illegal burning : ARSON
21. ___ Major (Great Bear) : URSA
25. The Dairy State: Abbr. : WISC
26. Peek at someone else's paper, e.g. : CHEAT
27. Actress Lena of "Chocolat" : OLIN
28. Alike, in Paris : EGAL
29. ___-Defamation League : ANTI
30. ___ kwon do (martial art) : TAE
31. Sediment : SILT
32. Say grace, e.g. : PRAY
33. First symbol on a musical staff : CLEF
34. Landed : ALIT
35. Torso muscles, briefly : ABS
39. They're all thumbs : KLUTZES
40. Directive in a pasta recipe : BOIL
41. Like the peninsula seized by Russia in 2014 : CRIMEAN
42. "Mankind's greatest blessing," per Mark Twain : HUMOR
46. Espresso drink : LATTE
47. Like an off-center tie : ASKEW
48. XXX : ADULT
49. The Devil : SATAN
50. "Laughing" animal : HYENA
51. Mother horse : MARE
52. Flair : ELAN
53. Recedes, as the tide : EBBS
54. Father horse : SIRE
55. "Negatory" : NOPE
56. Dome topper? : WIG


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0813-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 13 Aug 17, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Eric Berlin
THEME: The Magic Show
Each of today’s themed answers is a classic magic trick. And, each of those magic tricks has been illustrated somewhere in the grid, at a location cited in the trick’s clue:
23A. Magic trick performed at 78-Down : VANISHING COIN
78D. Provide part of a coverage policy for : (COIN)SURE

47A. Magic trick performed at 119-Across and 104-Down : LINKING RINGS
119A. Skinny sort : ST(RING) BEAN
104D. Vaccine holder : SY(RING)E

67. Magic trick performed at 123- and 124-Across : SAWING A LADY IN HALF
123. First name in jazz : ELLA
124. Bad: Prefix : DYS-
EL(LA/DY)S in which the black square/slash “saws” the word LADY in half

91A. Magic trick performed at 55-Across : CHANGING CARD
55A. ___ duck (Chinese entree) : PEKING (changed to PEACE)
The KING in PEKING has been changed to an ACE

115A. Magic trick performed at 15-, 16- and 17-Down : LEVITATING MAN
15D. English lengths : (M)ETRES
16D. Baseball's Hank : (A)ARON
17D. Physicist Bohr : (N)IELS
The first letters of the three-down answers form MAN, which has been “levitated” above the grid.

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 23m 17s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Bit of a Bollywood soundtrack : RAGA
Raga isn't really a type of music, but has been described as the "tonal framework" in which Indian classical music is composed. Ravi Shankar was perhaps the most famous raga virtuoso (to us Westerners). Western rock music with a heavy Indian influence might be called raga rock.

5. Hawaiian giveaway : LEI
"Lei" is the Hawaiian word for “garland, wreath”, although in more general terms a “lei” is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

8. Home of van Gogh's "The Starry Night," informally : MOMA
The founding of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City was very much driven by Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, the wife of John D. Rockefeller, son of the oil magnate. Working with two friends, Abby managed to get the museum opened in 1929, just nine days after the Wall Street Crash. The MoMA's sculpture garden bears the name of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, and has done so since 1949.

“The Starry Night” is a Van Gogh masterpiece depicting what the artist could see from the window of his room in a sanitarium near the village of Saint-Rémy-de-Provence. I am somewhat ashamed to note that one reason I know this painting so well is that I put together a 2,000-piece jigsaw puzzle depicting “The Starry Night” not that long ago ...

19. Greek warrior of myth : AJAX
Ajax was a figure in Greek mythology, and was the cousin of Achilles. Ajaz is an important figure in Homer’s “Iliad”. According to Homer, Ajax was chosen by lot to meet Hector in an epic duel that lasted a whole day. The duel ended in a draw.

20. Person from Calgary or Edmonton : ALBERTAN
Alberta (Alta.) is a big province, about the size of Texas. Alberta is named after Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the fourth child of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Princess Louise also donated her name to Lake Louise, the large glacial lake in the province, now within the bounds of Banff National Park.

26. Concern for wheat farmers : ERGOT
Ergot is a fungus, or actually a group of fungi, that cause disease in rye and related plants. If human eat ergot-contaminated grain, a condition called ergotism can result. Ergotism is the result of consumption of alkaloids produced by the fungi, alkaloids that can cause seizures and manic behavior. It has even been suggested that the hysteria exhibited by the Salem "witches" was perhaps caused by the ingestion of ergot-contaminated rye.

27. Nickname for an Oxford university : OLE MISS
“Ole Miss” is the nickname for the University of Mississippi. The name “Ole Miss” dates back to 1897, the first year a student yearbook was published. The graduating class held a competition to name the yearbook and “Ole Miss” emerged as the winner. The name stuck to the yearbook, and also as a nickname for the school itself. The University of Mississippi sports teams have been known as the Rebels since 1936. Prior to 1936, they were known as the Mississippi Flood.

29. Puzzle-loving group : MENSA
If you ever learned Latin, “mensa” was probably taught to you in lesson one as it’s the word commonly used as an example of a first declension noun. Mensa means “table”. The Mensa organization, for folks with high IQs, was set up in Oxford, England back in 1946. To become a member, you have to have an IQ that is in the top 2% of the population.

30. Sugar found in beer : MALTOSE
Maltose, also known as malt sugar, is a disaccharide made up of two glucose units.

34. Mouselike rodents : VOLES
Vole populations can really increase rapidly. Mama vole is pregnant for just three weeks before giving birth to litters of 5-10 baby voles. Then the young voles become sexually mature in just one month! If you have one pregnant vole in your yard, within a year you could have over a hundred of the little critters.

43. Agcy. that cares what airs : FCC
TV broadcasting is monitored by the Federal Communications Commission. The FCC has been around since 1934, when it replaced the Federal Radio Commission.

46. Mauna ___ : LOA
Mauna Loa on the “Big Island” of Hawaii is the largest volcano on the planet (in terms of volume). The name “Mauna Loa” is Hawaiian for “Long Mountain”.

49. Burden for Jack and Jill : PAIL
The "Jack and Jill" nursery rhyme dates back at least to the 1700s:
Jack and Jill went up the hill
To fetch a pail of water.
Jack fell down and broke his crown,
And Jill came tumbling after.

50. Female org. since the 1850s : YWCA
The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) was founded in the mid-1800s about 50 years after the YMCA, although the two organizations have always been independent of each other. Having said that, some YWCA and YMCA organizations have amalgamated at the local level and often share facilities. The YWCA is quite the organization, and is the largest women's group in the whole world.

52. Lee of Marvel Comics : STAN
Stan Lee did just about everything at Marvel Comics over the years, from writing to being president and chairman of the board. If you like superhero movies based on the characters from Marvel Comics, then you could spend a few hours trying to spot Stan Lee in those films as he has a penchant for making cameo appearances. Lee can be spotted in “X-Men” (2000), “Spider-Man” (2002), “Hulk” (2003), “Fantastic Four” (2005), “Iron Man” (2008) and many other films.

54. Coca-Cola brand : FANTA
The soft drink named "Fanta" has quite an interesting history. As WWII approached, the Coca-Cola plant in Germany had trouble obtaining the ingredients it needed to continue production of the cola beverage, so the plant manager decided to create a new drink from what was available. The new beverage was built around whey (left over from cheese production) and pomace (left over after juice has been extracted from fruit). The inventor asked his colleagues to use their imagination ("Fantasie" in German) and come up with a name for the drink, so they piped up "Fanta!"

55. ___ duck (Chinese entree) : PEKING
Peking duck is a traditional dish from Beijing. The duck that is served is mainly the skin, skin that has been made very crispy by roasting. In order to get the skin easily away from the meat, after the duck is slaughtered, air is pumped under the skin to separate it from the underlying fat. Sounds very appetizing …

57. "Carmina Burana" composer Carl : ORFF
“Carmina Burana” is a cantata by Carl Orff based on a collection of medieval poems that go by the same name. The name translates as “Songs from Beuern”. The best known movement of the cantata by far is the dramatic “O Fortuna” used at the opening and closing of the piece. One study placed “O Fortuna” as the most often played piece of classical music in the UK over the past 75 years, largely due to its use in television commercials. Famously, the piece appeared in the US in ads for Gatorade and Old Spice aftershave.

59. Grant-making org. : NEA
The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) is an agency funded by the federal government that offers support and financing for artistic projects. The NEA was created by an Act of Congress in 1965. Between 1965 and 2008, the NEA awarded over $4 billion to the arts, with Congress authorizing around $170 million annually through the eighties and much of the nineties. That funding was cut to less than $100 million in the late nineties due to pressure from conservatives concerned about the use of funds, but it is now back over the $150 million mark. I wonder how long that will last though …

65. Feudal vassal : LIEGE
A liege was a feudal lord, one to whom service or allegiance was owed under feudal law. "Liege" was also the term used for one who owed allegiance or service to a lord. Apparently the term is influenced by the Latin verb "ligare" meaning "to tie, bind". So, I guess both lord and servant were "bound" to each other.

71. Word repeated before "everywhere" : WATER
The line “water, water everywhere, nor any drop to drink” is from Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s poem, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”.

72. Online "Very funny!" : LMAO
Laughing my a** off (LMAO)

76. Comic Aziz of "Master of None" : ANSARI
Aziz Ansari is an actor and comedian from Columbia, South Carolina who is best known for playing Tom Haverford on the sitcom “Parks and Recreation”. Ansari also stars in the Netflix comedy-drama series “Master of None”.

85. Greenish-blue hues : CYANS
“Cyan” is short for “cyan blue”. The term comes from the Greek word “kyanos” meaning “dark blue, the color of lapis lazuli”.

87. Musical based on Fellini's "8 1/2" : NINE
Federico Fellini was a film director and scriptwriter from Rimini in Italy. Fellini won more Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film than anyone else.

90. Escape maker : FORD
The Ford Escape is an SUV that was developed jointly with Mazda and introduced in the 2001 model year. The Mazda version of the same vehicle is known as the Tribute.

94. Blue, on some maps: Abbr. : DEM
On political maps, red states are usually Republican and blue states usually Democrat. The designation of red and blue states is a very recent concept, only introduced in the 2000 presidential election by TV journalist, the late Tim Russert. In retrospect, the choice of colors is surprising, as in other democracies around the world red is usually used to describe left-leaning socialist parties (the reds under the bed!), and blue is used for conservative right-wing parties. In election cycles, swing/battleground states are often depicted in purple.

95. Onetime White House nickname : ABE
Abraham Lincoln was the sixteenth President of the US. There are several stories told about how he earned the nickname “Honest Abe”. One story dates back to early in his career as a lawyer. Lincoln accidentally overcharged a client and then walked miles in order to right the wrong as soon as possible.

100. Four-string instrument : UKULELE
The ukulele (uke) originated in the 1800s and mimicked a small guitar brought to the Hawaiian Islands by Portuguese immigrants.

102. Kind of jar : MASON
Mason jars were invented in 1858 in Philadelphia, by a tinsmith named John Landis Mason.

105. Crisp fabric : TAFFETA
Taffeta is a plain woven fabric with a crisp feel that is made from silk or one of several manmade materials. The name “taffeta” ultimately comes from the Persian “taftah” meaning “silk or linen cloth”.

109. Tequila source : AGAVE
Tequila is a spirit made from the blue agave. The drink takes its name from the city of Tequila, located about 40 miles northwest of Guadalajara.

121. Architect Saarinen : EERO
Eliel Saarinen was a Finnish architect who designed entire city districts in Helsinki. He immigrated to the United States where he became famous for his art nouveau designs. He was the father of Eero Saarinen, who was to become even more renowned in America for his designs, including the Dulles International Airport terminal, and the TWA building at JFK.

122. Swiss and others : CHEESES
“Swiss cheese” is a relatively generic term for a type of cheese produced in various countries and not necessarily in Switzerland. What they all have in common though, is a resemblance to the original Swiss Emmental cheese.

125. Prohibitionists : DRYS
The 18th Amendment to the US Constitution was a great victory for the temperance movement (the “dry” movement), and in 1919 ushered in the Prohibition era. Highly unpopular (with the “wet” movement), Prohibition was repealed in 1933 by the 21st Amendment.

Down
6. QB Manning : ELI
Eli Manning plays as quarterback for the New York Giants. Eli’s brother Peyton Manning retired from football as the quarterback for the Denver Broncos in 2015. Eli and Peyton’s father is Archie Manning, who was also a successful NFL quarterback. Eli, Peyton and Archie co-authored a book for children titles “Family Huddle” in 2009. It describes the Mannings playing football together as young boys.

8. Advertising icon who wears a single earring : MR CLEAN
“Mr. Clean” is a brand of household cleaner from Procter & Gamble. “Mr. Clean” is a sold as Maestro Limpio in Mexico, Monsieur Propre in France, and as Monsieur Net in French Canada.

12. Output of N.W.A or DMX : RAP SONGS
NWA was a hip hop group from Compton, California. The original five group members included rappers who have made a name for themselves as solo acts, including: Dr. Dre and Ice Cube. The story of NWA is told in a 2015 film, also called “Straight Outta Compton". I hear that the movie was well received, although hip hop is not my cup of tea …

“DMX” and “Dark Man x” are stage names used by rap artist Earl Simmons. DMX’s biggest hit is “Party Up (Up in Here) released in 1999 (and even I know that song!). DMX seems to get in trouble with the law a lot, an awful lot ...

16. Baseball's Hank : AARON
The great Hank Aaron (“Hammerin' Hank” or “the Hammer”) has many claims to fame. One notable fact is that he is the last major league baseball player to have also played in the Negro League.

17. Physicist Bohr : NIELS
Niels Bohr was a Danish physicist who won his 1922 Nobel Prize for his work on quantum mechanics and atomic structure. Later in his life, Bohr was part of the team working on the Manhattan Project that developed the first atomic bomb. Niels Bohr and Albert Einstein had a series of public debates and disputes in the twenties and thirties. Although the two respected each other very highly, they held very different views on quantum theory, different views on the laws of physics at the atomic level. The passage of time has shown that Bohr won out in those debates.

24. Lesley of "60 Minutes" : STAHL
Lesley Stahl has worked on “60 Minutes” since 1991. She is married to author “Aaron Latham”. As a journalist, it was Latham who wrote the article that inspired the movie “Urban Cowboy”.

31. Lane in Metropolis : LOIS
Lois Lane has been the love interest of Superman/Clark Kent since the comic series was first published in 1938. Lois and Clark both work for the big newspaper in the city of Metropolis called “The Daily Planet”. The couple finally got hitched in the comics (and on television’s “Lois and Clark”) in 1996. But never mind all that … one has to wonder how challenging the crossword is in “The Daily Planet” …

33. Schindler of "Schindler's List" : OSKAR
Oskar Schindler is the protagonist in the Steven Spielberg movie “Schindler’s List”. Schindler was a real person who survived WWII. During the Holocaust, Schindler managed to save almost 1,200 Jews from perishing by employing them in his factories. After the war, Schindler and his wife were left penniless having used his assets to protect and feed his workers. For years the couple survived on the charity of Jewish groups. Schindler tried to make a go of it in business again but never had any real success. He died a pauper in 1974 in Hildesheim, not far from Hanover. His last wish was to be buried in Jerusalem. Schindler was the only former member of the Nazi Party to be buried on Mount Zion.

38. Talkative birds : MACAWS
Macaws are beautifully colored birds of native to Central and South America, and are actually a type of parrot. Most species of macaw are now endangered, with several having become extinct in recent decades. The main threats are deforestation and illegal trapping and trafficking of exotic birds.

51. Onetime honor for cable TV shows : ACE AWARD
The ACE Awards were instituted in 1978, with the acronym standing for “Award for Cable Excellence”. The name of the award was later changed to the Cable ACE Award, and honored excellence in cable television programming. The award was abandoned after the 1997 ceremony as recognition of cable programming at the Emmys made a separate cable TV award redundant.

54. Mozart title character : FIGARO
Figaro is the title character in at least two operas: "The Barber of Seville" by Rossini, and "The Marriage of Figaro" by Mozart. The two storylines are based on plays by Pierre Beaumarchais, with one basically being a sequel to the other.

56. Part of P.E.I. : EDWARD
Prince Edward Island (PEI) is a maritime Canadian province. The island at the center of the province was named for Prince Edward, the fourth son of King George III and the father of Queen Victoria.

62. South American monkey : TITI
Titis are monkeys found in much of South America. Titis have tails that are a little bit longer than the length of their heads and bodies.

64. Old war zone, briefly : NAM
By some definitions, the official involvement of Americans in the Vietnam War started in 1955. At that time, President Eisenhower deployed a Military Assistance Advisory Group to assist in the training of the South Vietnamese Army. American involvement in the conflict officially ended in 1973 with the signing of an agreement that came out of the Paris Peace Accords.

74. Director of 1957's "12 Angry Men" : LUMET
As a movie director, Sidney Lumet had a great string of celebrated films to his name including “12 Angry Men”, “Dog Day Afternoon”, “Network” and “The Verdict”. Although nominated for the Academy Award for Best Director for each of these films, he never won an individual Oscar. However, the Academy gave Lumet the recognition he deserved in 2004 by presenting him with an Honorary Award.

76. Name on some boxes of film : AGFA
Agfa was founded in Germany in 1867 as a company focused on the manufacture of dyes. The full name of the enterprise was Aktiengesellschaft für Anilinfabrikation, shortened to Agfa, and translating as “Corporation for Aniline (a dye) Production”. Agfa merged with the Belgian company Gevaert in 1894, getting them into the photographic business. Agfa 35mm film hasn’t been produced for a few years now, but there is still inventory out there and purists are buying it when they can.

86. Dweller in a virtual "City" : SIM
SimCity is a very clever computer game. Players build and grow cities and societies by creating the conditions necessary for people (the Sims) to move in and thrive. "SimCity" was launched in 1989, and to this day it is consistently ranked as one of the greatest computer games of all time.

96. Furs from rabbits : CONIES
Cony (or "coney") is an old English word for rabbit or rabbit fur, and Coney Island in New York takes its name from the same root. The Dutch used the name "Conyne Eylandt" (Rabbit Island) after the large population of rabbits that was hunted there.

101. Stand-up comic Williams : KATT
Katt Williams is a comedian and rapper from Cincinnati, Ohio. Williams also works as an actor and is known for playing Money Mike in the 2002 comedy film “Friday After Next”.

103. Literary collection: Abbr. : ANTH
Strictly speaking, an “anthology” is a collection of poetic works, although the meaning has broadened over time to cover any literary collection, or even a collection of ideas, comments, complaints etc. The term derives from the Greek “anthologia”, a word for a collection of short poems by several authors. The literal meaning is “flower collection” from “anthos” and “logia”, so an anthology is a book containing “flowers” of verse.

104. Vaccine holder : SYRINGE
A vaccine is a modified virus that causes a particular disease, which is administered to an individual to stimulate the immune system into developing immunity. British physician Edward Jenner came up with the first vaccine, injecting people with the cowpox virus in order to prevent smallpox. The term “vaccination” comes from the Latin “vaccinus” meaning “from cows”, with “vacca” translating as “cow”.

108. Stuntman Knievel : EVEL
Daredevil Evel Knievel contracted hepatitis C from the many blood transfusions that he needed after injuries incurred during stunts. He had to have a liver transplant as a result, but his health declined after that. Knievel eventually passed away in 2007.

114. Fannie or Ginnie follower : MAE
The Federal National Mortgage Association is commonly called Fannie Mae, a play on the initialism FNMA. Fannie Mae was founded in during the Great Depression as part of President Roosevelt’s New Deal.

Ginnie Mae is the familiar nickname for the Government National Mortgage Association (GNMA), a government-owned corporation created in 1968 with the objective of promoting home ownership. The “Ginnie Mae” nickname is derived from the GNMA abbreviation.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Bit of a Bollywood soundtrack : RAGA
5. Hawaiian giveaway : LEI
8. Home of van Gogh's "The Starry Night," informally : MOMA
12. Walgreens competitor : RITE AID
19. Greek warrior of myth : AJAX
20. Person from Calgary or Edmonton : ALBERTAN
22. Source of material for a baseball bat : ASH TREE
23. Magic trick performed at 78-Down : VANISHING COIN
25. Company accountant's responsibility : PAYROLL
26. Concern for wheat farmers : ERGOT
27. Nickname for an Oxford university : OLE MISS
29. Puzzle-loving group : MENSA
30. Sugar found in beer : MALTOSE
34. Mouselike rodents : VOLES
36. Sometimes-stinky pair : GYM SHOES
39. Adds to : AUGMENTS
43. Agcy. that cares what airs : FCC
46. Mauna ___ : LOA
47. Magic trick performed at 119-Across and 104-Down : LINKING RINGS
49. Burden for Jack and Jill : PAIL
50. Female org. since the 1850s : YWCA
52. Lee of Marvel Comics : STAN
53. Pals around (with) : HANGS
54. Coca-Cola brand : FANTA
55. ___ duck (Chinese entree) : PEKING
57. "Carmina Burana" composer Carl : ORFF
59. Grant-making org. : NEA
60. Like most doors : HINGED
61. Followed closely, as a set of rules : HEWED TO
63. Zest source : RIND
65. Feudal vassal : LIEGE
67. Magic trick performed at 123- and 124-Across : SAWING A LADY IN HALF
71. Word repeated before "everywhere" : WATER
72. Online "Very funny!" : LMAO
73. Basic gymnastics flips : AERIALS
76. Comic Aziz of "Master of None" : ANSARI
79. "Is that true about me?" : AM I?
81. Movies with big budgets and no audience : DUDS
83. At the proper moment : ON CUE
84. Simple percussion instrument : GOURD
85. Greenish-blue hues : CYANS
87. Musical based on Fellini's "8 1/2" : NINE
89. Ready to take part : GAME
90. Escape maker : FORD
91. Magic trick performed at 55-Across : CHANGING CARD
94. Blue, on some maps: Abbr. : DEM
95. Onetime White House nickname : ABE
96. Apt anagram of IS A CHARM : CHARISMA
97. Eight-line poems : TRIOLETS
99. Hullabaloo : NOISE
100. Four-string instrument : UKULELE
102. Kind of jar : MASON
105. Crisp fabric : TAFFETA
109. Tequila source : AGAVE
113. "Whenever you want" : ANYTIME
115. Magic trick performed at 15-, 16- and 17-Down : LEVITATING MAN
119. Skinny sort : STRING BEAN
120. Hydrogen has one : ELECTRON
121. Architect Saarinen : EERO
122. Swiss and others : CHEESES
123. First name in jazz : ELLA
124. Bad: Prefix : DYS-
125. Prohibitionists : DRYS


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0812-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 12 Aug 17, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Kameron Austin Collins
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 29m 22s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Cambridge student, informally : CANTAB
The term “Cantabrigian” is used for things pertaining to the city of Cambridge. Often, the term is narrowed to refer to things associated with Cambridge University in particular. “Cantabrigian” comes from the Latin “Cantabrigia”, the medieval name for the city, from the Anglo-Saxon name “Cantebrigge”. The term is frequently shortened to “Cantab”.

7. Militant sort : RAMBO
A rambo is very violent and militant person. The term is relatively recent one, coming from the character John Rambo played by Sylvester Stallone in the “Rambo” series of movies. The first Rambo film made was “First Blood” in 1982. The film in turn is based on the 1972 novel of the same name by David Morrell.

14. Mystery writer ___ Jackson Braun : LILIAN
Lilian Jackson Braun was the author of the “The Cat Who” series of mystery novels. The main characters in the stories are an ex-reporter named James Qwilleran and his Siamese cats called KoKo and Yum-Yum.

15. Start of a big fight? : THRILLA
Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier had three memorable fights. The first was billed as the “Fight of the Century” and took place in 1971 in Madison Square Garden. It was a fight between two great boxers, both of whom were undefeated up till that point. Frazier won in a unanimous decision after fifteen rounds. A couple of years later, in 1973, Frazier lost his title to George Foreman. Ali and Frazier had a non-title rematch in 1974, with Ali coming out ahead this time, also in a unanimous decision. Later that year, Ali grabbed back the World Heavyweight Title in “The Rumble in the Jungle”, the famous “rope-a-dope” fight against George Foreman. That set the stage for the third and final fight between Ali and Frazier, “The Thrilla in Manila”. Ali won the early rounds, but Frazier made a comeback in the middle of the fight. Ali took control at the end of the bout, so much so that Frazier wasn’t able to come out of his corner for the 15th and final round. He couldn’t come out of his corner because both of his eyes were swollen shut, giving Ali a victory due to a technical knockout (TKO).

16. Champagne is one : TOPONYM
A toponym is a name that comes from a place or region. For example, New Jersey is named for the island of Jersey in the English Channel, and Indianapolis is named for the state of Indiana.

The ancient Olympic Games were held in a sanctuary called Olympia, which was located in a valley on the Peloponnesos peninsula in southern Greece. The games took their name from Olympia, and not Mount Olympus (a common misconception). Mount Olympus was home to Zeus and the other Olympian gods, and is located in central Greece.

Andes Chocolate Mints were first produced by a company called Andy’s Candies, established in 1921 by Andrew Kanelos in Chicago. Kanelos learned that men didn’t like giving boxes of candy to their wives and girlfriends if there was another man’s name on the box, so he changed his business to Andes Candies, for the South American mountain range.

20. Dreamer of myth : LOTUS-EATER
The lotus-eaters were a race of people that featured in Greek mythology. The lotus flowers and fruits that were consumed were supposedly narcotic and addictive, and so the lotus-eaters enjoyed a life largely asleep in peaceful apathy.

21. Brand of change-counting machines : COINSTAR
Coinstar is a brand of coin-cashing kiosk that can be found at various locations, such as grocery stores and banks. Users can cash in their collections of loose change for a voucher, with the Coinstar operator deducting a fee. I tend to avoid the fee by opting to receive an Amazon.com gift voucher for the full amount of the coins.

23. TV Gold? : ARI
Ari Gold is a fictional character in the HBO series “Entourage”. “Entourage” tells the story of a rising film star, Vincent Chase (played by Adrian Grenier), a native of New York but now learning to handle himself in Hollywood. Vincent’s Hollywood agent is Ari Gold, played by Jeremy Piven.

26. Applesauce-topped nosh : LATKE
A latke is a delicious potato pancake (I'm Irish ... so anything made with potato is delicious!).

27. Prestigious research university : EMORY
Emory is a private school in Atlanta, Georgia with a focus on graduate research. The school was named after a Methodist Episcopal bishop called John Emory, who was very popular at the time of the school's founding in 1836.

30. Colorful summer treats : ICE POPS
The term “ice pop” has largely been supplanted in the US by "popsicle", as the Popsicle brand of ice pop became so popular. We still use "ice pop" in Ireland, and in the UK the same thing is called an "ice lolly", and in Australia it's an "ice block".

33. Turkish pooh-bah : AGA
“Aga” (also “agha”) is a title that was used by both civil and military officials in the Ottoman Empire.

The term "pooh-bah" (also “poobah”), meaning an ostentatious official, comes from the world of opera. Pooh-Bah is a character in the wonderful Gilbert & Sullivan comic opera "The Mikado". Famously, Pooh-Bah holds many, many offices, including that of "Lord High Everything Else".

36. Founder of two automobile companies : RANSOM OLDS
Ransom Eli Olds was a pioneer in the automotive industry, and the founder of the Oldsmobile and REO brands. Olds introduced the first modern stationary assembly line (Henry Ford’s famous innovation was the moving assembly line).

Down
5. Gudrun's victim, in Norse myth : ATLI
Atli is a character in the Volsunga Saga of 13th century Icelandic lore. It is believed that the Atli character is loosely based on Attila the Hun. According to myth, Atli was murdered by his wife Gudrun.

7. Jack's sobriquet, with "the" : RIPPER
Jack the Ripper was one of the names given to a serial killer who terrorized the Whitechapel district of London in 1888. The murders were particularly gruesome, and were all directed towards female prostitutes that worked in the area. The victims had their throats cut and then had their abdominal organs mutilated and sometimes removed. Eleven women were killed, and the murderer was never apprehended.

A sobriquet is an affectionate nickname. “Sobriquet” is French for “nickname”.

8. "___ From Hawaii" (1973 Elvis concert) : ALOHA
"Aloha from Hawaii" was a concert broadcast in 1973, live from Honolulu, with Elvis Presley as the headline act. The show cost $2.5 million to produce, making it the most expensive entertainment special up to that time. It was aired in over 40 countries worldwide and to this day it holds the record for being the most-watched broadcast by a single entertainer. The album containing music from the show was also a big hit, the first chart-topping album for Elvis since 1965.

9. Some ancient Cretan statues : MINOTAURS
Minos was the King of Crete in Greek mythology, and the son of Zeus and Europa. Minos had an elaborate labyrinth built under the island, designed by the architect Daedalus and his son Icarus (who famously died trying to escape from the island by “flying” away). In the labyrinth, King Minos kept the Minotaur, a dreadful creature with the head of a bull on the body of a man.

13. Big band singer Vic : DAMONE
Vic Damone is a singer from Brooklyn, New York. As a young man Damone started taking voice lessons, inspired by his favorite singer, Frank Sinatra. Decades later, Sinatra said that Damone had “the best pipes in the business”.

18. Crafts site : ETSY
Etsy.com is an e-commerce website where you can buy and sell the kind of items that you might find at a craft fair.

21. Suffragist Carrie Chapman ___ : CATT
Carrie Chapman Catt founded the League of Women Voters and the International Alliance of Women. Catt was also very close to Susan B. Anthony and succeeded Anthony as head of the National American Woman Suffrage Association.

22. Sitcom world : ORK
“Mork & Mindy” is a sitcom that originally aired from 1978 to 1982. The title characters were played by Robin Williams and Pam Dawber. Mork is an alien from the planet Ork who reports back to his superior called Orson. Orson is played by voice actor Ralph James. Ralph James was also known for providing the voice of Mr Turtle in famous Tootsie Pop commercials in the seventies. Nanu nanu!

27. Mass readings : EPISTLES
By definition, an epistle is a writing sent by one person to a group of people, with the name “epistle” coming from the Greek word for “a letter”. The 21 epistles of the New Testament are letters from various of the Apostles to groups of Christians, with most of them being written by Paul.

28. Cozy footwear, for short : MOC
“Moc” is short for “moccasin”, a type of shoe. The moccasin is a traditional form of footwear worn by members of many Native American tribes.

29. Vintage military plane : WARBIRD
Warbirds are vintage military aircraft that are operated by civilian organizations, often at airshows.

30. Reality winners beginning in 2002 : IDOLS
Fox’s “American Idol” is a spin-off show that was created after the amazing success of the British television show “Pop Idol”. Neither program(me) would be my cup of tea …

37. Places to cool it? : SILLS
“Sill plate” or simply “sill” is an architectural term for a bottom horizontal member to which vertical members are attached. A windowsill is a specific sill plate that is found at the bottom of a window opening.

38. Major storm detritus : LIMBS
Detritus is the loose material that results from the process of erosion. The usage of the term has evolved to man any accumulated material or debris. “Detritus” is Latin for “a wearing away”.

40. Arthur ___, inventor of the crossword puzzle : WYNNE
Arthur Wynne is generally credited with the invention of what we now known as a crossword puzzle. Wynne was born in Liverpool, England and emigrated to the US when he was 19-years-old. He worked as a journalist and was living in Cedar Grove, New Jersey in 1913 when he introduced a “Word-Cross Puzzle” in his page of puzzles written for the “New York World”. The first book of crossword puzzles was published by Shuster & Shuster, in 1924. The collection of puzzles was a huge hit, and crosswords were elevated to the level of “a craze” in 1924 and 1925.

42. "Casablanca" lover : ILSA
Ilsa Lund was played by Ingrid Bergman in the 1942 movie "Casablanca". I love the words of one critic describing the chemistry between Bogart and Bergman in this film: "She paints his face with her eyes". Wow …

43. Chanel rival : COTY
Coty is a producer of beauty products that was founded in 1904 in Paris.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Cambridge student, informally : CANTAB
7. Militant sort : RAMBO
12. Scrubbed : ABORTED
14. Mystery writer ___ Jackson Braun : LILIAN
15. Start of a big fight? : THRILLA
16. Champagne is one : TOPONYM
17. One difficult to tie down : COMMITMENTPHOBE
19. Billing units: Abbr. : HRS
20. Dreamer of myth : LOTUS-EATER
21. Brand of change-counting machines : COINSTAR
23. TV Gold? : ARI
24. ___ New York (upscale department store chain) : BARNEYS
25. Short but not necessarily sweet : CURT
26. Applesauce-topped nosh : LATKE
27. Prestigious research university : EMORY
29. Split : WENT
30. Colorful summer treats : ICE POPS
33. Turkish pooh-bah : AGA
34. Placated, with "to" : MADE NICE
36. Founder of two automobile companies : RANSOM OLDS
38. Some postgraduate study : LAW
41. Ability to learn and adapt neurologically : BRAIN PLASTICITY
44. Says without saying : IMPLIES
45. Bad sign : ILL OMEN
46. Muddied : ROILED
47. Antinuke pact topic : TEST BAN
48. Habiliments : DRESS
49. Bully's reply : SAYS ME!

Down
1. Dateable one : CATCH
2. Not fancy at all : ABHOR
3. Typical results : NORMS
4. Fit : TRIM
5. Gudrun's victim, in Norse myth : ATLI
6. Weight-watchers watch it : BELTLINE
7. Jack's sobriquet, with "the" : RIPPER
8. "___ From Hawaii" (1973 Elvis concert) : ALOHA
9. Some ancient Cretan statues : MINOTAURS
10. Candle scent popular at Christmas : BAYBERRY
11. Deservingly : ON MERIT
13. Big band singer Vic : DAMONE
14. Mucho : LOTSA
16. Fasteners with flat tops : T-NUTS
18. Crafts site : ETSY
21. Suffragist Carrie Chapman ___ : CATT
22. Sitcom world : ORK
24. Fruity dessert : BANANA PIE
25. Get along : COPE
26. Greaves, e.g. : LEG ARMOR
27. Mass readings : EPISTLES
28. Cozy footwear, for short : MOC
29. Vintage military plane : WARBIRD
30. Reality winners beginning in 2002 : IDOLS
31. That, in France : CELA
32. Breaks things off : ENDS IT
34. Media of exchange : MONIES
35. Superexcited : AMPED
37. Places to cool it? : SILLS
38. Major storm detritus : LIMBS
39. Elite group : A-TEAM
40. Arthur ___, inventor of the crossword puzzle : WYNNE
42. "Casablanca" lover : ILSA
43. Chanel rival : COTY


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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