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0623-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 23 Jun 17, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: James Mulhern & Ashton Anderson
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 11m 01s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. They may make the rounds : AMMO
The word “munitions” describes materials and equipment used in war. The term derives from the Latin “munitionem” meaning “fortification, defensive wall”. Back in the 17th century, French soldiers referred to such materials as “la munition”, a Middle French term. This was misheard as “l’ammunition”, and as a result we ended up importing the word “ammunition” (often shortened to “ammo”), a term that we now use mainly to describe the material fired from a weapon.

15. Coat color : ROAN
A roan horse has an even mixture of white and colored hairs on the body with the head, lower legs, mane and tail having a more solid color.

18. Rambo sort : ONE-MAN ARMY
A “rambo” is very violent and militant person. The term is relatively recent one, coming from the character John Rambo played by Sylvester Stallone in the “Rambo” series of movies. The first Rambo film made was “First Blood” in 1982. The film in turn is based on the 1972 novel of the same name by David Morrell.

22. Many a Wall St. hire : MBA
Master of Business Administration (MBA)

23. Fracking target : SHALE
Shale oil can be extracted from oil shale (!), although the extraction process is more expensive than that used to produce crude oil.

“Fracking” is a familiar term for “hydraulic fracturing”. Fracking involves the injection of chemicals and sand in water at high pressure into a wellbore. This creates cracks in layers of rock deep in the earth allowing perhaps oil or natural gas to flow more freely to the surface.

26. Saint's place : SUPERDOME
The New Orleans Superdome was opened in 1975, and is the largest, fixed-dome structure in the world, covering 13 acres. The seating capacity varies depending on the event being staged, but the Rolling Stones attracted a crowd of more than 87,500 people in 1981. The primary purpose of the structure is to host home games for the New Orleans Saints football team. Famously, in 2005, the Superdome became a shelter of last resort for about 30,000 refugees in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

30. "O" follower : CANADA
Canada’s national anthem “O Canada” was commissioned in 1880 by the Lieutenant Governor of Quebec, so the original words are in French. The first English translation was made in 1906. The current English lyrics have been revised a few times, but the French version remains the same as it did back in 1880.
O Canada! Our home and native land!
True patriot love in all thy sons command.
With glowing hearts we see thee rise,
The True North strong and free!
From far and wide, O Canada,
We stand on guard for thee.
God keep our land, glorious and free!
O Canada, we stand on guard for thee;
O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.

31. Part of Wayne Manor : BATCAVE
Wayne Manor is where Bruce Wayne lives, the alter-ego of Batman. It is a huge manor that lies just outside Gotham City. Looking after the house is the Wayne family servant, Alfred. Beneath the grounds of the manor is an extensive cave system where Bruce Wayne put together his Batcave. Access is to the cave is via a staircase behind a hidden door. The door is opened by moving the hands of a non-functioning grandfather clock to 10:47, the time at which Wayne’s parents were murdered. It is the murder of his parents that sets Bruce off on his journey of crime fighting.

38. Jobs in tech : STEVE
Steve Jobs certainly was a business icon in Silicon Valley. I don't think it is too surprising to learn that the brilliant Jobs didn't even finish his college education, dropping out of Reed College in Oregon after only one semester. Steve Jobs co-founded Apple in 1976, but in 1985 he was basically fired from his own company during the computer sales slump of the mid-eighties. Jobs then founded NeXT Computer, a company focused on supplying workstations to the higher education and business markets. Apple purchased NeXT in 1996, and that's how Jobs found himself back with his original company.

39. Subject of a 1984 mockumentary : SPINAL TAP
“This Is Spın̈al Tap” is a rock musical mockumentary about the fictional band Spinal Tap, directed by the great Rob Reiner. I love Rob Reiner’s work, but this movie … not so much …

46. First name in country : GARTH
Country singer Garth Brooks retired from recording and performing in 2001. He came back out of retirement in 2009, signing a five-year concert deal with the Encore Hotel on the Las Vegas Strip.

47. Part of an embassy address, for short : APO
Army post office (APO)

49. Edible seed of a pumpkin or squash : PEPITA
Pumpkin seeds are also known as pepitas, from the Mexican Spanish term “pepita de calabaza” meaning “little seed of squash”.

53. Rostrum : DAIS
Our word “dais”, meaning “raised platform for a speaker”, comes from the Latin “discus” meaning a “disk-shaped object”. I guess that the original daises had such a shape.

A “rostrum” (plural “rostra”) is an elevated platform, particularly one for public speaking. The original rostrum was the platform used by public speakers in the Forum of ancient Rome.

54. 1983 hit with the line "She's been living in her white bread world" : UPTOWN GIRL
“Uptown Girl” is a 1983 song written and recorded by Billy Joel that tells the story of a working-class man from “downtown” who falls for a wealthy woman from “uptown”. Joel wrote the song for his soon-to-be wife, supermodel Christie Brinkley. That said, he originally wrote the song as “Uptown Girls”, describing his three friends: singer Whitney Houston and models Elle Macpherson and Christie Brinkley. Brinkley played the title character in the music video.

Down
1. "Gunsmoke" actor James : ARNESS
James Arness played the role of Matt Dillon, Marshal of Dodge City, on "Gunsmoke" for twenty years. If you count the occasions when he reprised the role for specials, he actually performed as Matt Dillon over five decades. Did you know that Peter Graves, the actor who played Jim Phelps on "Mission: Impossible", his real name was Peter Arness? He and James were brothers.

2. Kind of pork : MOO SHU
Moo shu pork (also “mu shu pork”) is a traditional dish from northern China, with the main ingredients being shredded pork and scrambled egg. In North America, the dish is served with tortilla-like wrappers that are sometimes referred to as “moo shu pancakes”.

6. Peso : Mexico :: ___ : Korea : WON
The Korean Won, the Chinese Yuan, and the Japanese Yen (all of which are Asian currencies) take their names from the Chinese written character that represents "round shape".

7. Baby animal in a parable in II Samuel : EWE LAMB
A parable is story told to illustrate a lesson or principle. It is similar to a fable, differing in that a fable uses mainly animals as characters, and a parable uses humans.

9. Sycophant : TOADY
A toady is someone who is very servile, and somewhat of a parasite. Derived from “toad-eater” the term originally applied to the assistant of a quack, a seller of useless potions that had no actual benefit to health. The toady would eat an apparently poisonous toad in front of an audience, so that the charlatan could “cure” him or her with one of the potions for sale.

A sycophant is a selfish person, one who flatters. The term comes from the Greek “sykophantes” which originally meant “one who shows the fig”. This phrase described a vulgar gesture made with the thumb and two fingers.

10. Figures usually held in one's head : PINS
One enters a Personal Identification Number (PIN) when using an Automated Teller Machine (ATM). Given that the N in PIN stands for “number”, then PIN number is a redundant phrase. And, given that the M in ATM stands for “machine”, then ATM machine is a redundant phrase as well. Grr …!

11. Like : A LA
The phrase “in the style of” can be translated in “alla” in Italian and “à la” in French.

12. Movie with the 1979 Oscar-winning song "It Goes Like It Goes" : NORMA RAE
“Norma Rae” is a 1979 movie starring Sally Field as Norma Rae Webster in a tale of union activities in a textile factory in Alabama. The film is based on the true story of Crystal Lee Sutton told in a 1975 book called “Crystal Lee, a Woman of Inheritance”.

13. Patriot leader : TOM BRADY
Tom Brady plays quarterback for the New England Patriots. Brady is from San Mateo, California, which isn’t very far from here. He dated actress Bridget Moynahan for a couple of years, and the pair have a child together. Brady has been married to Brazilian supermodel Gisele Bündchen since 2009.

20. Bedsheet material : PERCALE
Percale is a cotton fabric that is often used make bedsheets.

27. Bandmate of Micky, Peter and Michael of the Monkees : DAVY
The Monkees pop group was assembled in 1966 specifically for a planned television series called “The Monkees”. The show aired from 1966 to 1968, and the band continued to perform in concerts until 1970. 20 years after the band was formed, there was a revival in interest for both the show and the band’s music, so the Monkees got together for several reunion tours. The lead singer of the group was Englishman Davy Jones, who passed away in February 2012.

30. Co-star of Ferrell in 2003's "Elf" : CAAN
James Caan is an actor from The Bronx, New York City. He is noted for his appearances in some very big movies such as “The Godfather”, “Misery”, “A Bridge Too Far”, “Rollerball” and more recently “Elf”. Caan is quite the sportsman. He plays golf with an 8 handicap, and is a 6-Dan Black Belt Master of Gosoku Karate.

“Elf” is a comedy movie released for the 2003 Christmas season. “Elf” was directed by Jon Favreau and stars Will Ferrell in the title role, with James Caan supporting and Ed Asner playing Santa Claus. It’s all about one of Santa’s elves who finds out he is human and goes to meet his father in New York City.

Will Ferrell is a comedian and comic actor from Irvine, California who got his big break as a cast member on “Saturday Night Live” (SNL) in the mid-nineties. While appearing on SNL, Ferrell was noted for several impersonations, including President George W. Bush, Neil Diamond, James Lipton, Ted Kennedy and Janet Reno.

32. Benedict X, but not IX or XI : ANTIPOPE
An antipope was someone who had significant support within the Roman Catholic Church and who made a competing claim in opposition to the legitimately elected pope.

33. "Tonight Show" house band : THE ROOTS
The Roots are the house band “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon”.

34. Arm that's tucked away : COVE
That would be an arm of an ocean or sea.

35. Copy illegally : CRIB
A crib is a plagiarism, most commonly the copying of an answer in an examination.

37. Thin tablet : IPAD AIR
The iPad Air is Apple’s 5th-generation table computer. The Air is just 7.5 mm thick, and is 22% lighter than the iPad 2.

39. Nancy's friend in the comics : SLUGGO
8-year-old Nancy Ritz has been in her own comic strip “Nancy” since 1938. Since 1938, her best friend has been the lazy Sluggo Smith. Nancy is actually a little older than she looks. She first appeared in 1933 when the same strip was called “Fritzi Ritz”. Within a few years, Nancy took over as the main character and so the strip was renamed to “Nancy”.

41. Ranking system of a sort : TRIAGE
Triage is the process of prioritizing patients for treatment, especially on a battlefield. The term “triage” is French and means “a sorting”.

42. Verdi opera set in the fifth century : ATTILA
Giuseppe Verdi's opera "Attila" is based on the play “Attila, King of the Huns" written by Friedrich Werner. The opera premiered in 1846 in Venice.

43. Particle beam weapon : PHASER
A MASER is a device that was around long before LASERs came into the public consciousness. A MASER (Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) is similar to a LASER, but microwaves are emitted rather than light waves. When the storyline for "Star Trek" was being developed, the writers introduced a weapon called a "phaser", with the name "phaser" derived from PHoton mASER.

45. Rodeo sight, informally : BRONC
A bronco (also "bronc") is a horse that is untamed. In Mexican Spanish "bronco" is a word for "horse", and in the original Spanish "bronco" means "rough, rude".

48. Female whales : COWS
Male whales are referred to as “bulls”, females are “cows”, and the young are “calves”.

52. Kaplan book subj. : GRE
Passing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is usually a requirement for entry into graduate school here in the US.

Kaplan Inc. was founded in 1938 by Stanley Kaplan, who started out tutoring students for the New York State Regents Exam in the basement of his parents’ home in Brooklyn. He opened up locations for tuition around the country, and in 1984 sold the company to the Washington Post. Revenue for Kaplan was over 2½ billion dollars in 2009.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. They may make the rounds : AMMO
5. Lounging wear : SWEATPANTS
15. Coat color : ROAN
16. Question often asked after twirling : HOW DO I LOOK?
17. Some O.K.s : NODS
18. Rambo sort : ONE-MAN ARMY
19. Word with hatch or room : ESCAPE
21. Coffee shop freebies : LIDS
22. Many a Wall St. hire : MBA
23. Fracking target : SHALE
24. Circumspect : WARY
25. Amazon icon : CART
26. Saint's place : SUPERDOME
28. Pastel shade : CORAL
29. Low-___ diet : CARB
30. "O" follower : CANADA
31. Part of Wayne Manor : BATCAVE
35. Request to Dad, maybe : CAR KEYS
36. Like a pact with the Devil : UNHOLY
37. Modern-day home of the classical poet Hafez : IRAN
38. Jobs in tech : STEVE
39. Subject of a 1984 mockumentary : SPINAL TAP
44. Flag : TIRE
45. Spill something : BLAB
46. First name in country : GARTH
47. Part of an embassy address, for short : APO
48. "Oh, darn!" : CRUD!
49. Edible seed of a pumpkin or squash : PEPITA
50. Some baby talk : GOO GOO GAGA
53. Rostrum : DAIS
54. 1983 hit with the line "She's been living in her white bread world" : UPTOWN GIRL
55. Look at on the beach, say : OGLE
56. College application components : TEST SCORES
57. Backpacker's pack : GEAR

Down
1. "Gunsmoke" actor James : ARNESS
2. Kind of pork : MOO SHU
3. Antic : MADCAP
4. Marked down : ON SALE
5. One going everywhere on foot? : SHOE
6. Peso : Mexico :: ___ : Korea : WON
7. Baby animal in a parable in II Samuel : EWE LAMB
8. Esteem : ADMIRE
9. Sycophant : TOADY
10. Figures usually held in one's head : PINS
11. Like : A LA
12. Movie with the 1979 Oscar-winning song "It Goes Like It Goes" : NORMA RAE
13. Patriot leader : TOM BRADY
14. Book of celestial maps : SKY ATLAS
20. Bedsheet material : PERCALE
24. Abraded : WORE
25. Bop : CONK
27. Bandmate of Micky, Peter and Michael of the Monkees : DAVY
28. Bloodshed : CARNAGE
30. Co-star of Ferrell in 2003's "Elf" : CAAN
31. Laugh heartily : BUST A GUT
32. Benedict X, but not IX or XI : ANTIPOPE
33. "Tonight Show" house band : THE ROOTS
34. Arm that's tucked away : COVE
35. Copy illegally : CRIB
37. Thin tablet : IPAD AIR
39. Nancy's friend in the comics : SLUGGO
40. Sycophant : LAPDOG
41. Ranking system of a sort : TRIAGE
42. Verdi opera set in the fifth century : ATTILA
43. Particle beam weapon : PHASER
45. Rodeo sight, informally : BRONC
48. Female whales : COWS
49. Buds : PALS
51. Caught : GOT
52. Kaplan book subj. : GRE


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0622-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 22 Jun 17, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Ruth B. Margolin
THEME: Verb Noun to Noun
Our themed answers today are phrases in the format VERB NOUN TO NOUN, where the NOUN is repeated. In the grid we take the VERB NOUN combination and add it to the end of the NOUN, visually giving us VERB NOUN (added) TO NOUN:
20A. Transfer, as in a bucket brigade : HAND PASS HAND (pass hand to hand)
33A. Grin broadly : EAR SMILE EAR (smile ear to ear)
40A. Confront one another head-on : TOE STAND TOE (stand toe to toe)
50A. Rendezvous : FACE MEET FACE (meet face to face)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 13m 51s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2

  • EILAT (Eidat)
  • LIE-INS (die-ins!)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Japanese chess : SHOGI
Shogi is a game that is also known as Japanese Chess. The name “shogi” translates as “general’s board game”.

6. Name attached to a North Carolina "-ville" : ASHE
Samuel Ashe was the Governor of North Carolina from 1795 to 1798. North Carolina’s Ashe County and the cities of Asheboro and Asheville are named in his honor.

14. Hawkeye : IOWAN
Iowa is nicknamed the Hawkeye State in honor of Chief Black Hawk, a leader of the Sauk people during the War of 1812 and the Black Hawk War.

15. Enjoy Wilde or Wilder, say : READ
If you didn’t know Oscar Wilde was Irish, you will when you see the name he was given at birth: Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde!

Laura Ingalls Wilder was an author from Pepin, Wisconsin who is best remembered for her “Little House” series of children’s novels. The series was based on her own childhood in a pioneer family that moved from Wisconsin to Kansas and back again.

23. Israeli resort city : EILAT
Eilat (sometimes “Elat”) the most southerly city in Israel, sitting right at the northern tip of the Red Sea, on the Gulf of Aqaba.

27. One flying during the holiday season, informally : ST NICK
Saint Nicholas of Myra is the inspiration for Santa Claus. Nicholas was the Bishop of Myra (now in modern-day Turkey) during the 4th century AD, and was known for being generous to the poor. Centuries after he died, his remains were desecrated by Italian sailors and moved to Bari in Italy. One legend has it that the relics were moved again centuries later and reburied in the grounds of Jerpoint Abbey in Co. Kilkenny in Ireland, where you can visit the grave today. I choose to believe that Santa Claus’s relics are indeed buried in Ireland …

30. Book of the Bible after Amos : OBADIAH
The Book of Obadiah is the shortest book in the Hebrew Bible, consisting of just one chapter that is divided into 21 verses.

32. ___-Town : CHI
The city of Chicago is sometimes referred to as “Chi-Town”.

36. Menace with four-inch teeth : ORCA
The taxonomic name for the killer whale is Orcinus orca. The use of the name “orca”, rather than “killer whale”, is becoming more and more common. The Latin word “Orcinus” means “belonging to Orcus”, with Orcus being the name for the Kingdom of the Dead.

39. "Je t'___" : AIME
“I love you” translates into “te amo” in Spanish, and into “je t’aime” in French.

43. Typical Scottish Brexit vote : NAE
“Nae” is the Scottish vernacular for "no".

The UK held a referendum in June 2016 in which 52% of voters chose to leave the European Union (EU). The term “Brexit” was used for the vote, a portmanteau of “Britain” and “exit”. The vote has led to some debate about the future of the UK. The Scottish electorate voted for the UK to stay in the EU, and so that revived speculation about Scotland leaving the UK. There’s also some discussion about Northern Ireland’s future in the UK, as the Northern Irish electorate also voted to stay in the EU.

48. Honeydew producer : APHID
Honeydew is a sugary liquid secreted by some insects (such as aphids) when they feed on plant sap.

50. Rendezvous : FACE MEET FACE (meet face to face)
A rendezvous is a meeting, from the French “rendez vous” meaning “present yourselves”.

56. "That's the way the cookie crumbles" : C'EST LA VIE
“C'est la vie” is French for “that's life”.

59. Olympic skater Slutskaya : IRINA
Irina Slutskaya is a Russian figure skater. Slutskaya won the World Figure Skating Championships twice, in 2002 and 2005.

60. Protected, at 58-Down : ALEE
(58D. See 60-Across : SEA)
“Alee” is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing “aweather”.

62. Palindromic tennis champ : SELES
Monica Seles has a Hungarian name as she was born to Hungarian parents, in former Yugoslavia. Seles was the World No. 1 professional tennis player in 1991 and 1992 before being forced from the sport when she was stabbed by a spectator at a match in 1993. She did return to the game two years later, but never achieved the same level of success.

63. Pre-Red head : TSAR
The former Soviet Union (USSR) was created in 1922, not long after the Russian Revolution of 1917 that overthrew the Tsar. Geographically, the new Soviet Union was roughly equivalent to the old Russian Empire, and comprised fifteen Soviet Socialist Republics (SSRs).

64. "Frozen" princess : ELSA
“Frozen" is a 2013 animated feature from Walt Disney Studios that is based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale “The Snow Queen”.

Down
3. John Irving's "A Prayer for ___ Meany" : OWEN
“A Prayer for Owen Meany” is a novel by John Irving, first published in 1989. Although Irving’s work is an independent story, it is written as a homage to “The Tin Drum” by Günter Grass.

4. Who said "The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others" : GANDHI
Mohandas Gandhi was a political and spiritual leader in India in the first part of the 20th century, as the country sought independence from Britain. He was also referred to as “Mahatma”, meaning “great soul”. His remarkable philosophy of nonviolence and living a modest lifestyle was a great inspiration to the Indian people. India (and Pakistan) was granted independence in 1947. Tragically, Gandhi was assassinated the very next year.

5. Where the Robinsons were lost on 1960s TV : IN SPACE
“Lost in Space” is a television sci-fi show that originally ran for three season from 1965 to 1968. There was also a “Lost in Space” movie released in 1998. The show was based on a comic book series called “Space Family Robinson”, which in turn was based on the Johann David Wyss novel “The Swiss Family Robinson”. Some oft-repeated lines from the show were uttered by the Robot character, including:
  • “Warning! Warning!”
  • “That does not compute”
  • “Danger, Will Robinson!”

7. Doctor of letters? : SEUSS
“Dr. Seuss” was the pen name of Theodor Seuss Geisel. Geisel first used the pen name while studying at Dartmouth College and at the University of Oxford. Back then, he pronounced “Seuss” as it would be in German, i.e. rhyming with “voice”. After his books found success in the US, he went with the pronunciation being used widely by the public, quite happy to have a name that rhymed with “Mother Goose”.

9. Ancient Norse work : EDDA
The Poetic Edda and Prose Edda are two ancient works that are the source for much of Norse mythology. Both Eddas were written in the 13th century, in Iceland.

12. Balaam's talking beast : ASS
The ass or donkey is mentioned several times in the Bible. One of the most-quoted biblical stories involving an ass is the story of Balaam. Balaam was a diviner who appears in the Book of Numbers in. In one account, Balaam is held to task by an angel for particularly cruel treatment of an ass.

13. Mr. Rogers : ROY
Cowboy actor and singer Roy Rogers' real name was Leonard Franklin Slye, and his nickname was "King of the Cowboys". Roy Rogers married Dale Evans in 1947. Evans' nickname was "Queen of the West".

19. Either co-star of "Paper Moon" : O’NEAL
“Paper Moon” is a 1973 comedy film that tells the story of a father and daughter during the Great Depression. The onscreen father and daughter are played by real-life father and daughter Ryan and Tatum O’Neal. The original choices for the lead roles were Paul Newman and his daughter Nell Potts, but they left the project after director John Huston also dropped out.

21. Prison guarded by Dementors : AZKABAN
The titles of the seven “Harry Potter books are:
  1. "Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone" ("... Sorcerer's Stone" in the U.S)
  2. "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets"
  3. "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban"
  4. "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire"
  5. "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix"
  6. "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince"
  7. "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows"
I tried reading the first one, and gave up three-quarters of the way through …

24. Some 1960s protests : LIE-INS
A die-in (also “lie-in”) is a protest in which those demonstrating lie on the ground and pretend to be dead. One of the more famous die-ins was held in Washington D.C. in 2007 to protest the Iraq War. There were several thousand protesters, almost two hundred of whom were arrested, including ten veterans of the Iraq War.

25. TripTik, e.g. : AAA MAP
“TripTik” is the brand name for customized travel maps provided by AAA for its members.

27. "Feed your lawn" brand : SCOTTS
Scotts Miracle-Gro Company was founded in 1868 by one Orlando Scott, initially selling seed to the agricultural industry. In the early 1900s, Scotts started to sell to homeowners, mainly supplying lawn seed. The company merged with the gardening company Miracle-Gro in 1955.

28. Place for a frog : THROAT
Having “a frog in one’s throat” is a temporary condition caused by excessive phlegm. The resulting “croaky” voice sounds similar to the sound made by a frog.

29. Christians' ___ Creed : NICENE
What is known today in the Christian tradition as the Nicene Creed, was originally adopted by the first ecumenical council when it met in 325 AD. The meeting took place in the city of Nicaea, which gave its name to this particular profession of faith. Nicaea is the Greek name of the city that is now called Iznik, and it lies in the northwest of Turkey.

31. Juliette of "Chocolat" : BINOCHE
The wonderful Juliette Binoche is a French actress and dancer. Binoche is perhaps most recognized in the US for her Oscar-winning portrayal of Hana in the 1996 movie “The English Patient”. I must say that a favorite Binoche film of mine is the lighter “Dan in Real Life” from 2007.

35. Children's author Hoff : SYD
Syd Hoff wrote the children’s readers “Danny and the Dinosaur” and “Sammy the Seal”. Hoff also drew two syndicated comic strips, “Tuffy” (1939-1949) and “Laugh It Off” (1958-1978).

46. Like Consumer Reports : AD FREE
“Consumer Reports” is a monthly magazine that has been published by Consumers Union since 1936. Consumers Union was established as a non-profit organization with the mission to “test products, inform the public, and protect customers.”

49. Katniss's partner in "The Hunger Games" : PEETA
“The Hunger Games" is a 2008 novel by Suzanne Collins, the first in a trilogy of titles that also includes “Catching Fire” (2009) and “Mockingjay” (2010). “The Hunger Games” was adapted into a very successful movie released in 2012, with the sequels following soon after. Amazon.com reports more sales of “The Hunger Games” series books than even the “Harry Potter” series.

52. Daredevil Knievel : EVEL
Daredevil Evel Knievel contracted hepatitis C from the many blood transfusions that he needed after injuries incurred during stunts. He had to have a liver transplant as a result, but his health declined after that. Knievel eventually passed away in 2007.

54. Popular tech review site : CNET
c|net is an excellent technology website. c|net started out in 1994 as a television network specializing in technology news. The host of “American Idol”, Ryan Seacrest, started off his career as host of a c|net show.

57. Loop loopers : ELS
Elevated railroad (El)

The historic commercial center of Chicago is known as the Loop. One theory is that the “loop” got its name from the cable loops in the city’s old cable car system.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Japanese chess : SHOGI
6. Name attached to a North Carolina "-ville" : ASHE
10. 1, 2, 3 or R : GEAR
14. Hawkeye : IOWAN
15. Enjoy Wilde or Wilder, say : READ
16. +/- : OR SO
17. Hollows : GLENS
18. Fond of hiking, camping, etc. : OUTDOORSY
20. Transfer, as in a bucket brigade : HAND PASS HAND (pass hand to hand)
22. Initiates badly? : HAZES
23. Israeli resort city : EILAT
27. One flying during the holiday season, informally : ST NICK
30. Book of the Bible after Amos : OBADIAH
32. ___-Town : CHI
33. Grin broadly : EAR SMILE EAR (smile ear to ear)
36. Menace with four-inch teeth : ORCA
38. Poker tournament fee : BUY-IN
39. "Je t'___" : AIME
40. Confront one another head-on : TOE STAND TOE (stand toe to toe)
43. Typical Scottish Brexit vote : NAE
44. Going south : TANKING
45. Joins hands? : CLASPS
47. Place : STEAD
48. Honeydew producer : APHID
50. Rendezvous : FACE MEET FACE (meet face to face)
56. "That's the way the cookie crumbles" : C'EST LA VIE
59. Olympic skater Slutskaya : IRINA
60. Protected, at 58-Down : ALEE
61. Symbol of silence : REST
62. Palindromic tennis champ : SELES
63. Pre-Red head : TSAR
64. "Frozen" princess : ELSA
65. Irascible : TESTY

Down
1. Heaved "ho"? : SIGH
2. Spanish welcome : HOLA
3. John Irving's "A Prayer for ___ Meany" : OWEN
4. Who said "The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others" : GANDHI
5. Where the Robinsons were lost on 1960s TV : IN SPACE
6. Stopped lying : AROSE
7. Doctor of letters? : SEUSS
8. Possesses, once : HATH
9. Ancient Norse work : EDDA
10. "I like the way you think!" : GOOD IDEA!
11. Jump the gun, e.g. : ERR
12. Balaam's talking beast : ASS
13. Mr. Rogers : ROY
19. Either co-star of "Paper Moon" : O’NEAL
21. Prison guarded by Dementors : AZKABAN
24. Some 1960s protests : LIE-INS
25. TripTik, e.g. : AAA MAP
26. N.B.A. long shots : THREES
27. "Feed your lawn" brand : SCOTTS
28. Place for a frog : THROAT
29. Christians' ___ Creed : NICENE
30. Cut : OMIT
31. Juliette of "Chocolat" : BINOCHE
34. What'll give you a leg up? : RUNG
35. Children's author Hoff : SYD
37. Inquire about : ASK AFTER
41. Like some colossal bores : TIDAL
42. Snob : ELITIST
46. Like Consumer Reports : AD FREE
48. Out of order : AMISS
49. Katniss's partner in "The Hunger Games" : PEETA
51. Nursing, say : CARE
52. Daredevil Knievel : EVEL
53. Troubles : AILS
54. Popular tech review site : CNET
55. "Whoa, slow down there, partner!" : EASY!
56. Hipster : CAT
57. Loop loopers : ELS
58. See 60-Across : SEA


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0621-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 21 Jun 17, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Bruce Haight
THEME: Butterfly
We have some grid art today, with the black squares in the middle of the grid depicting four BUTTERFLIES fluttering across the puzzle. Today’s themed answers are found at the top and bottom edges of the grid, and each requires the word BUTTERFLY in order to make sense:
35A. Word that must be added to 1-, 8-, 65- and 66-Across for their clues to make sense [with a visual hint in the grid] : … BUTTERFLY

1A. Insect made of paper : ORIGAMI (butterfly)
8A. Puccini opera : MADAME (Butterfly)
65A. One going from party to party : SOCIAL (butterfly)
66A. Orange, black and white flutterer : MONARCH (butterfly)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 51s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Insect made of paper : ORIGAMI (butterfly)
Origami is the traditional Japanese art form of paper folding. The best-known example of the craft is the paper crane. The word “origami” is derived from “ori“ (folding) and “kami” (paper).

8. Puccini opera : MADAME (Butterfly)
Puccini's "Madama Butterfly" is the most-performed opera in the US. The opera that we see today is actually the second version that Puccini produced. The original version was first staged in 1904 at La Scala in Milan where it received a very poor reception. Puccini reworked the piece, breaking the second act into two new acts and making some other significant changes. The opera was relaunched a few months later and it was a resounding success.

14. Microscopic machine : NANOBOT
Nanorobots (also “nanobots”) are tiny devices that range from 0.1 to 10 micrometers in size. The technology of nanorobotics is in its infancy, but it is hoped that nanobots might be used (for example) in medicine one day. The oft-cited application is the use of nanobots inserted inside the body to identify and destroy cancer cells.

19. Vehicle company with a bulldog logo : MACK
Mack Trucks was founded by John Mack in the early 1900s, after he had spent some years working in companies that made carriages and electric motor cars. Along with his two brothers, Mack started their company to focus on building heavy-duty trucks and engines.

25. Site of a van Gogh bandage : EAR
Vincent van Gogh was visited by fellow-artist Paul Gauguin in Arles in 1888. At one point the two argued quite violently, with van Gogh eventually threatening his friend with a razor blade. In a panic, van Gogh fled the house and made his way to a local brothel. Famously, that night he cut off his own left ear.

28. PC problem solver : IT GUY
Information technology (IT)

30. Component not found on a digital watch : STEM
The stem of a watch is the shaft that projects from the body and which is used to wind the mechanism. Prior to the introduction of stem watches, the timepieces were wound up using a key.

34. Whack jobs : LOONS
The slang term “loon” for a deranged person probably comes from the loud cry of the bird, the loon, but it is also probably influenced by the word “lunatic”.

38. The "O" of the magazine O : OPRAH
The full name of the publication usually called “O”, is “O: The Oprah Magazine”. Since the magazine’s founding in 2000, Oprah has appeared alone on the cover of each issue, with two exceptions. On the April 2009 cover Oprah was shown with First Lady Michelle Obama, and on the December 2009 cover Oprah shared the limelight with Ellen DeGeneres.

41. Calculus calculation : AREA
The Latin word “calculus” was originally used for a reckoning or an account, and originally applied to a pebble that was used to maintain a count. The Latin word came from the Greek for a pebble, “khalix”.

42. Letters on love letters : SWAK
SWAK is an initialism standing for “sealed with a kiss”. SWAK, and the related SWALK (sealed with a loving kiss), are postal acronyms that originated during WWII.

47. Spy org. in Bond movies : KGB
The Komitet gosudarstvennoy bezopasnosti (KGB) was the national security agency of the Soviet Union until 1991. The KGB was dissolved after the agency’s chairman led a failed attempt at a coup d’état designed to depose President Mikhail Gorbachev.

49. Myrna of "The Thin Man" : LOY
The beautiful Myrna Loy was one of my favorite actresses. Her career took off when she was paired up with William Powell in the fabulous “The Thin Man” series of films. Loy also appeared opposite Cary Grant in a couple of films that I like to watch every so often, namely “The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer” (1947) and “Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House” (1948).

50. Seashell seller of a tongue twister : SHE
She sells sea-shells on the sea-shore.
The shells she sells are sea-shells, I’m sure.
For if she sells sea-shells on the sea-shore
Then I’m sure she sells sea-shore shells.

52. Applebee's or Subway : CHAIN
The Applebee’s chain of “Neighborhood Bar & Grill” restaurants was founded in 1980, with the first Applebee's eatery opening in Decatur, Georgia. When it comes to “chain” restaurants, I like Applebee’s …

The SUBWAY chain of fast food restaurants is the largest single-brand restaurant in the world. I’m a big fan of SUBWAY sandwiches, especially the toasted ones …

54. Some native Nigerians : IBOS
The Igbo (or Ibo) people are an ethnic group living in southeastern Nigeria.

56. Willie who's #5 in career home runs : MAYS
Willie Mays’ nickname was the “Say Hey Kid”, although his friends and teammates were more likely to refer to him as “Buck”. When Mays was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, he was asked who was the best player he’d ever seen in the game. He replied, “I don’t mean to be bashful, but I was.”

58. Hank who's #2 in career home runs : AARON
The great Hank Aaron (“Hammerin' Hank” or “the Hammer”) has many claims to fame. One notable fact is that he is the last major league baseball player to have also played in the Negro League.

66. Orange, black and white flutterer : MONARCH (butterfly)
The monarch butterfly has very recognizable orange and black wings, and is often seen across North America. The monarch is the state insect of several US states and was even nominated as the national insect in 1990, but that legislation was not enacted.

Down
4. Wounds at Pamplona, say : GORES
Pamplona, Spain is famous for its San Fermin festival held in July every year, the highlight of which is the Running of the Bulls. Every year, 200-300 people are injured in the bull run, and 15 people have been killed since 1910. If you get to Pamplona two days before the Running of the Bulls, you can see the animal-rights protest event known as the Running of the Nudes. The protesters are as naked as the bulls …

7. Brangelina, once : ITEM
“Brangelina” is a portmanteau used for the super-couple pairing of actors Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie. Other supercouples are/were:
  • Tomkat - Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes
  • Grant ‘n’ Hurley - Hugh Grant and Elizabeth Hurley
  • Posh and Becks - Victoria and David Beckham
  • Bennifer - Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez

9. Presidential nickname : ABE
Abraham Lincoln was the sixteenth President of the US. There are several stories told about how he earned the nickname “Honest Abe”. One story dates back to early in his career as a lawyer. Lincoln accidentally overcharged a client and then walked miles in order to right the wrong as soon as possible.

10. Presidential nickname : DICK
President Richard Milhous Nixon (RMN) used “Milhous” in his name in honor of his mother Hannah Milhous. Richard was born in a house in Yorba Linda, California. You can visit that house today as it is on the grounds of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library. It’s a really interesting way to spend a few hours if you ever get to Yorba Linda …

12. Event that once had a four-minute "barrier" : MILE RUN
The 4-minute barrier for the mile run was first broken in 1954 by Roger Bannister, when he finished in just over 3m 59s. The record for males now stands at 3m 43s. If you plan on running a 4-minute mile, you should probably be warned that this means you have to run the whole race at an average speed of over 15 mph (do the math!).

15. Costa ___ : RICA
Costa Rica is a country in Central America, bordered by Nicaragua in the north, and Panama to the South. Costa Rica is remarkable in my opinion, a leader on the world stage in many areas. It has been referred to as the “greenest” country in the world, the “happiest” country in the world, and has a highly educated populace. In 1949, the country unilaterally abolished its own army … permanently!

26. OK summer hrs. : CDT
Central Daylight Time (CDT)

27. It may be stored on the cloud : DATA
In the world of computing, when one operates “in the cloud”, one’s files and key applications are not stored on one’s own computer, but rather are residing “in the cloud”, on a computer somewhere out on the Internet. I do 90% of my computing in the cloud. That way I don’t have to worry about backing up files, and I can operate from any computer if I have to …

29. Pole workers' creations : TOYS
Those would be Santa’s elves.

31. Degrees for C.F.O.s : MBAS
The world’s first Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree was offered by Harvard’s Graduate School of Business Administration, in 1908.

Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

33. Eldest of the Brady boys : GREG
The character Greg Brady is the oldest Brady son in the sitcom “The Brady Bunch”. Greg was played by Barry Williams in the TV show. It was revealed in spin-offs of the original sitcom that Greg married a nurse and became an obstetrician.

37. Adjective for the Beatles : FAB
The Beatles were described on the sleeve notes of their 1963 album “With the Beatles” as the “fabulous foursome”. The press picked up on the phrase and morphed it into “the Fab Four”.

39. How legal aid lawyers work : PRO BONO
The Latin term “pro bono publico” means “for the public good”, and is usually shortened to “pro bono”. The term applies to professional work that is done for free or at a reduced fee as a service to the public.

44. Pertaining to aircraft technology : AVIONIC
Avionics are electronic systems installed in aircraft. Some of those avionics are collision avoidance systems. Such safety systems may include radar, and equipment that uses transponder signals.

45. Starr with a 1998 report : KENNETH
Ken Starr has to be one of the most famous lawyers in recent history, due to his tenure as Independent Counsel when President Bill Clinton was in office. Starr’s original brief was to investigate the suicide of White House Counsel Vince Foster as well as to continue the investigation of the Whitewater controversy in which then-Governor Clinton was accused of applying pressure to arrange an illegal loan to one of his partners in the Whitewater land deal. Famously, Starr’s purview was extended to include an investigation into President Clinton’s extramarital affair with Monica Lewinsky, to determine if the President had lied under oath about his relationship with the young intern.

51. Frans who painted "The Laughing Cavalier" : HALS
Frans Hals was a painter from the Dutch Golden Age who was born in Antwerp but who lived and worked in Haarlem. Hals is best known for his portraits, the most famous of which is probably “The Laughing Cavalier”.

52. Settlement-building board game, informally : CATAN
The Settlers of Catan is a board game that was introduced in 1995, in Germany as “Die Siedler von Catan”. The game is very popular in the US and was called “the board game of our time” by the “Washington Post”. My son plays it a lot, and as a lover of board games, I am going to have to check it out …

53. Sesame-seed-and-honey confection : HALVA
Halvas are sweet confections found in many parts of the world. Halvas are generally flour-based or based on nut-butter like sesame paste. Sounds delicious ...

55. ___ Valley (Reagan Library locale) : SIMI
Nowadays, Simi Valley, California is perhaps best known as home to the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library. The library is a great place to visit, and there you can tour one of the retired Air Force One planes.

60. Stephen of "Citizen X" : REA
Stephen Rea is an Irish actor from Belfast. Rea’s most successful role was Fergus in 1992’s “The Crying Game”, for which performance he was nominated for the Best Actor Oscar. In “The Crying Game”, Fergus was a member of the IRA. In real life, Rea was married to IRA bomber and hunger striker Dolours Price at the time he made the movie.

“Citizen X" is a 1995 TV movie, a crime thriller about a seven-year hunt by Soviet authorities for for a Russian serial killer who murdered 53 women and children. Stars of the film are Stephen Rea, Donald Sutherland and Max von Sydow.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Insect made of paper : ORIGAMI (butterfly)
8. Puccini opera : MADAME (Butterfly)
14. Microscopic machine : NANOBOT
15. Add salt to the wound : RUB IT IN
16. Prepare for a physical : DISROBE
17. Phrase in beer ads : ICE-COLD
18. Got in on the deal : ANTED
19. Vehicle company with a bulldog logo : MACK
21. Had down pat : KNEW
22. "___ were the days" : THOSE
23. Lead-in to sayer : NAY-
24. Modern-___ : ERA
25. Site of a van Gogh bandage : EAR
26. Wares on a band's merch table : CDS
28. PC problem solver : IT GUY
30. Component not found on a digital watch : STEM
32. Hip-hop pal : DAWG
34. Whack jobs : LOONS
35. Word that must be added to 1-, 8-, 65- and 66-Across for their clues to make sense [with a visual hint in the grid] : … BUTTERFLY
38. The "O" of the magazine O : OPRAH
41. Calculus calculation : AREA
42. Letters on love letters : SWAK
46. Much of a marching band : BRASS
47. Spy org. in Bond movies : KGB
48. Night before a big day : EVE
49. Myrna of "The Thin Man" : LOY
50. Seashell seller of a tongue twister : SHE
52. Applebee's or Subway : CHAIN
54. Some native Nigerians : IBOS
56. Willie who's #5 in career home runs : MAYS
58. Hank who's #2 in career home runs : AARON
59. Get millions of hits, say : GO VIRAL
61. Crisis center phone service : HOTLINE
63. Glossy finishes : ENAMELS
64. "Here's the solution!" : I HAVE IT!
65. One going from party to party : SOCIAL (butterfly)
66. Orange, black and white flutterer : MONARCH (butterfly)

Down
1. Like couples at movies, typically : ON DATES
2. Water-repellent headgear : RAIN HAT
3. Yet to come : IN STORE
4. Wounds at Pamplona, say : GORES
5. Home : ABODE
6. Pitchfork-wielding assemblage : MOB
7. Brangelina, once : ITEM
8. Covered with sludge : MUCKY
9. Presidential nickname : ABE
10. Presidential nickname : DICK
11. In a single attempt : AT ONE GO
12. Event that once had a four-minute "barrier" : MILE RUN
13. Lengthwise : ENDWAYS
15. Costa ___ : RICA
20. Test grader's need : ANSWER KEY
26. OK summer hrs. : CDT
27. It may be stored on the cloud : DATA
28. Under the weather : ILL
29. Pole workers' creations : TOYS
31. Degrees for C.F.O.s : MBAS
33. Eldest of the Brady boys : GREG
36. Sounds of hesitation : UHS
37. Adjective for the Beatles : FAB
38. Binds legally or morally : OBLIGES
39. How legal aid lawyers work : PRO BONO
40. Competitor of Duracell and Eveready : RAYOVAC
43. More bushed : WEARIER
44. Pertaining to aircraft technology : AVIONIC
45. Starr with a 1998 report : KENNETH
50. Pint-size : SMALL
51. Frans who painted "The Laughing Cavalier" : HALS
52. Settlement-building board game, informally : CATAN
53. Sesame-seed-and-honey confection : HALVA
55. ___ Valley (Reagan Library locale) : SIMI
57. Leveling wedge : SHIM
60. Stephen of "Citizen X" : REA
62. "How about that!" : OHO!


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0620-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 20 Jun 17, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Jason Flinn
THEME: Airport Terminals
Each of today’s themed answers ends with (TERMINATES with) the name of an AIRLINE (which would be seen at an AIRPORT TERMINAL).
55A. Arrival and departure locales hinted at by 17-, 21- and 50-Across : AIRPORT TERMINALS

17A. One of the premier clubs in the Premier League : MANCHESTER UNITED (giving “United Airlines”)
21A. Southern region where blues developed : MISSISSIPPI DELTA (giving “Delta Air Lines”)
50A. Annual Austin festival : SOUTH BY SOUTHWEST (giving “Southwest Airlines”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 11s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Attire that may leave the chest bare : SARONG
“Sarong” is the Malay word for "sheath", and a sarong was originally the garment worn by Malay men and women around their waists. The Malay sarong is actually a tube of fabric, about a yard wide and two-and-a-half yards long. Many variations of the sarong are worn all over South Asia and the Pacific Islands. I had occasion to wear one in Hawaii many years ago, and found it very ... freeing!

16. Concluding musical section : CODA
In music, a coda is primarily a passage that brings a movement to a conclusion. “Coda” is Italian for “tail”.

17. One of the premier clubs in the Premier League : MANCHESTER UNITED (giving “United Airlines”)
Manchester United is one of the most successful football (soccer) clubs in England, having won more League titles than any other in the history of the game. The club is also famous for a airplane crash known as the 1958 Munich air disaster. The British European flight crashed during takeoff resulting the death of 23 passengers, including eight members of the Manchester United team.

The best soccer teams in England and Wales play in the Premier League. The league was founded in 1992 as the FA Premier League to take advantage of a generous television deal. Today, the Premier League is the most-watched soccer league in the world.

United Airlines (UAL) has a complicated history, but can trace its roots back to Aviation Enterprises, founded in 1944 and later called Texas International. The first use of the “United” name in the company’s history was when airplane pioneer William Boeing merged his Boeing Air Transport with Pratt & Whitney to form the United Aircraft and Transport Corporation (UATC) in 1929. The Air Mail Act of 1934 required that UATC be broken up into United Aircraft (which became United Technologies), the Boeing Aircraft Company and United Air Lines.

19. Native New Zealander : KIWI
Unlike many nicknames for people of a particular country, the name "Kiwi" for a New Zealander isn't offensive at all. The term comes from the flightless bird called the kiwi, which is endemic to New Zealand and is the country's national symbol. "Kiwi" is a Maori word, and the plural (when referring to the bird) is simply "kiwi". However, when you have two or more New Zealanders with you, they are Kiwis (note the "s", and indeed the capital "K"!).

21. Southern region where blues developed : MISSISSIPPI DELTA (giving “Delta Air Lines”)
A river delta is a triangular landform at the mouth of a river created by the deposition of sediment. The most famous “delta” in the United States isn’t actually a delta at all. The Mississippi Delta is an alluvial plain that lies 300 miles north of the river’s actual delta, which is known as the Mississippi River Delta. Very confusing …

Delta was the world’s largest airline for a while (after merging with Northwest Airlines in 2008) and is also the oldest airline still operating in the US. Delta’s roots go back to 1924 before it started carrying passengers and was called Huff Daland Dusters, a crop dusting company based in Macon, Georgia. The name Delta Air Service was introduced in 1928.

28. Swift steeds : ARABS
The Arab (also “Arabian”) breed of horse takes its name from its original home, the Arabian Peninsula. Like any animal that humans have over-bred, the horse falls prey to genetic diseases, some of which are fatal and some of which require the horse to be euthanized.

30. Comics villain ___ Luthor : LEX
Lex Luthor is the arch-nemesis of Superman in comics. Luthor has been portrayed in a number of guises in the comic world as well in movies and on the small screen. For example, he appeared as Atom Man in the 1950 film series “Atom Man vs. Superman”, and was played by actor Lyle Talbot, opposite Kirk Alyn’s Superman.

31. Applesauce : HOKUM
“Hokum” was originally theater slang, meaning “melodramatic, exaggerated acting”. Now the term just means “empty talk”. It is also the root for our word “hokey” meaning “silly, old-fashioned”.

“Applesauce” is slang for “nonsense, rubbish”. Never heard it used outside of crosswords …

34. "Law & Order: SVU" actor : ICE-T
Rapper Ice-T must be sick of having his name come up as an answer in crossword puzzles (I know I am!). Ice-T has been interested in acting for decades and made his film debut in the 1984 movie about breakdancing called “Breakin’”. He has also played Detective Fin Tutuola in the TV show “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” since the year 2000.

35. Diamonds are weighed in them : CARATS
The carat is a unit of mass used in measuring gemstones that is equal to 200 mg.

37. Item swiped by Indiana Jones at the start of "Raiders of the Lost Ark" : IDOL
"Raiders of the Lost Ark" is, in my humble opinion, the best of the Indiana Jones franchise of movies. This first Indiana Jones film was released in 1981, produced by George Lucas and directed by Steven Spielberg. Harrison Ford was Spielberg's first choice to play the lead, but Lucas resisted as he was concerned that he would be too closely associated with the actor (as Ford played Han Solo in "Star Wars", and also appeared in Lucas's "American Graffiti"). Tom Selleck was offered the role but he couldn't get out of his commitments to "Magnum, P.I." Eventually Spielberg got his way and Ford was hired, a good thing I say …

43. Gerontologist's subject : AGING
Gerontology is the study of all aspects of aging, including the biology, psychology and sociology. Geriatrics is the study of diseases encountered in older adults.

47. Hill that's steep on one side and gentle on the other : CUESTA
A cuesta is a hill with a gentle slope on one side and a steep slope on the other. The name “cuesta” is Spanish for “slope of a hill”. The steep slope might be referred to as an escarpment.

50. Annual Austin festival : SOUTH BY SOUTHWEST (giving “Southwest Airlines”)
South by Southwest, also known as SXSW, is an annual festival that has been taking place in Austin, Texas since 1987. SXSW is a melded event, combining a music festival, a film festival and an interactive festival.

Southwest Airlines is the world’s largest low-cost passenger airline. I’ve always admired the Southwest operation and found that the company knows to keep costs under control while maintaining a high level of customer service. One strategy the company used for decades was only to operate Boeing 737 aircraft, which kept maintenance and operating costs to a minimum.

54. Actress Mazar of "Entourage" : DEBI
Debi Mazar plays Shauna Roberts on the HBO series "Entourage". You might have seen her on "Dancing with the Stars" a while back, although she didn't do so well and was eliminated in the third week.

63. CBS show with a "New Orleans" spinoff : NCIS
NCIS is the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, which investigates crimes in the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. The service gives its name to the CBS TV show "NCIS", a spin-off drama from "JAG" in which the main "NCIS" characters were first introduced. The big star in "NCIS" is the actor Mark Harmon. “NCIS” is now a franchise, with spinoff shows “NCIS: Los Angeles” and “NCIS: New Orleans”.

66. Indigenous people of Singapore : MALAYS
The Asian city-state of Singapore takes its name from the Malay word “Singapura” which means “Lion City”. However, lions in the wild never made it to Singapore, so the city is probably misnamed and perhaps should have been called “Tiger City”.

Down
1. Volcano feature : RIM
Our word “volcano” comes from “Vulcano”, the name of a volcanic island off the coast of Italy. The island’s name comes from Vulcan, the Roman god of fire. The Romans believed that the island of Vulcano was the chimney of the forge belonging to the god Vulcan. The Romans also believed that the eruptions on Mount Etna in Sicily were caused by Vulcan getting angry and working his forge so hard that sparks and smoke flew out of the top of the volcano.

3. Phishing target: Abbr. : SSN
Social Security number (SSN)

Phishing is the name given to the online practice of stealing usernames, passwords and credit card details by creating a site that deceptively looks reliable and trustworthy. Phishers often send out safe-looking emails or instant messages that direct someone to an equally safe-looking website where the person might inadvertently enter sensitive information. “Phishing” is a play on the word “fishing”, as in “fishing for passwords, PIN numbers etc.”

5. Goulashes, e.g. : STEWS
Goulash is a soup or stew that is seasoned with spices, especially paprika. It is a national dish of Hungary, and the term “goulash” comes from the Hungarian word “gulyás”, which actually translates as “herdsman”. The original goulash was a meat dish prepared by herdsman.

6. Pilgrimage site in central Italy : ASSISI
The Italian town of Assisi is in Umbria. Assisi is famous as the birthplace of St. Francis and as the home to the Franciscan religious order. It was also the home to Saint Clare and her order of the Poor Sisters (later known as the Poor Clares).

10. Roamer of the Serengeti : GNU
A gnu is also known as a wildebeest, and is an antelope native to Africa. Wildebeest is actually the Dutch word for “wild beast”.

The Serengeti is a region in Africa, located in northern Tanzania and southwest Kenya. The name “Serengeti” comes from the Maasai language and means “Endless Plains”.

13. 1979 breakout role for Mel Gibson : MAD MAX
“Mad Max” is a series of Australian movies starring Mel Gibson in the title role. Well, Gibson plays the lead in the first three films (“Mad Max”, “The Road Warrior” and “Beyond Thunderdome”) and Tom Hardy plays Max in the fourth movie, “Fury Road”.

Mel Gibson is an actor who was born in America, and not in Australia as many believe. Gibson was born in Peekskill, New York and moved with his family to Sydney, Australia when he was 12 years old.

15. Dominant faith of Iran : SHI’ISM
The Islamic sects of Sunni and Shia Muslims differ in the belief of who should have taken over leadership of the Muslim faithful after the death of the Prophet Muhammad. Followers of the Sunni tradition agree with the decision that the Prophet Muhammad’s confidante Abu Bakr was the right choice to become the first Caliph of the Islamic nation. Followers of the Shia tradition believe that leadership should have stayed within the Prophet Muhammad’s own family, and favoured the Prophet’s son-in-law Ali.

21. When repeated, Hawaiian menu item : MAHI
Mahi-mahi is the Hawaiian name for the dolphin-fish, also called a dorado. The mahi-mahi is an ugly looking creature if ever I saw one …

22. Classic Camaro : IROC
The IROC-Z is a model of Camaro that was introduced by Chevrolet in 1978. The IROC-Z takes its name from a famous stock car race, the International Race of Champions.

23. Sashimi go-with : SAKE
We refer to the Japanese alcoholic beverage made from rice as “sake”. We’ve gotten things a bit mixed up in the West. “Sake” is actually the word that the Japanese use for all alcoholic drinks. What we know as sake, we sometimes refer to as rice wine. Also, the starch in the rice is first converted to sugars that are then fermented into alcohol. This is more akin to a beer-brewing process than wine production, so the end product is really a rice “beer” rather than a rice “wine”.

27. "How sweet ___!" : IT IS
“How sweet it is!” was perhaps Jackie Gleason’s most famous catchphrase. Gleason grew up in Brooklyn, and drivers entering the borough today via the Brooklyn Bridge are greeted by a road sign announcing “How Sweet It Is!”

35. Sandwich usually served with toothpicks : CLUB
The club sandwich is a double-decker affair with three layers of bread and two layers of filling. This style of sandwich has been around since the end of the 19th century, and some say it was invented at an exclusive gambling "club" in Saratoga Springs, New York.

40. Like the group you're in if you're out, for short : LGBT
Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT)

44. Dwellers east of the Urals : ASIANS
The eastern side of the Ural Mountains in Russia is generally regarded as the natural divide between the continents of Europe and Asia.

45. One of the friends on "Friends" : MONICA
Courteney Cox played Monica Geller on the incredibly successful sitcom "Friends". Before "Friends" she played the girlfriend of Michael J. Fox's character on "Family Ties" for a couple of years in the late eighties. Her role in "Friends" was her biggest success, no question, when she and her fellow female costars became the highest paid TV actresses ever, earning a million dollars per episode.

51. County divs. : TWPS
Township (twp.)

52. Melodic subjects in music : TEMAS
“Tema” is Italian for “motif, theme”.

56. Meas. of engine speed : RPM
Revolutions per minute (rpm)

59. Author LeShan : EDA
Eda LeShan wrote several nonfiction books including “When Your Child Drives You Crazy” and “The Conspiracy Against Childhood”. LeShan was also host of the PBS television show “How Do Your Children Grow?”

60. 1977 Steely Dan album : AJA
Steely Dan’s heyday was in the seventies when they toured for a couple of years, although the group mainly focused on studio work. The band was formed in 1972 and broke up in 1981. The core of the band reunited in 1993 and they are still going strong today. Steely Dan’s best-selling album is “Aja” (pronounced “Asia”), which was released in 1977.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Important consideration for investors : RISK
5. Attire that may leave the chest bare : SARONG
11. Barely lit : DIM
14. Demands : INSISTS UPON
16. Concluding musical section : CODA
17. One of the premier clubs in the Premier League : MANCHESTER UNITED (giving “United Airlines”)
19. Native New Zealander : KIWI
20. A wee hour : ONE AM
21. Southern region where blues developed : MISSISSIPPI DELTA (giving “Delta Air Lines”)
28. Swift steeds : ARABS
29. Words said while running out the door, maybe : I'M LATE
30. Comics villain ___ Luthor : LEX
31. Applesauce : HOKUM
32. Die : PERISH
34. "Law & Order: SVU" actor : ICE-T
35. Diamonds are weighed in them : CARATS
37. Item swiped by Indiana Jones at the start of "Raiders of the Lost Ark" : IDOL
41. Conversed : TALKED
43. Gerontologist's subject : AGING
44. Crank (up) : AMP
47. Hill that's steep on one side and gentle on the other : CUESTA
49. Bush - or an anagram of BUSH plus one letter : SHRUB
50. Annual Austin festival : SOUTH BY SOUTHWEST (giving “Southwest Airlines”)
53. Halved : IN TWO
54. Actress Mazar of "Entourage" : DEBI
55. Arrival and departure locales hinted at by 17-, 21- and 50-Across : AIRPORT TERMINALS
63. CBS show with a "New Orleans" spinoff : NCIS
64. Treasured possession : PRIDE AND JOY
65. Pitiful : SAD
66. Indigenous people of Singapore : MALAYS
67. Mill devices : SAWS

Down
1. Volcano feature : RIM
2. ___ moment (shortly) : IN A
3. Phishing target: Abbr. : SSN
4. Does awesomely : KICKS BUTT
5. Goulashes, e.g. : STEWS
6. Pilgrimage site in central Italy : ASSISI
7. Wheel groove : RUT
8. Unfold, poetically : OPE
9. Negative linking word : NOR
10. Roamer of the Serengeti : GNU
11. "Pray continue ..." : DO TELL ...
12. Conceptualize : IDEATE
13. 1979 breakout role for Mel Gibson : MAD MAX
15. Dominant faith of Iran : SHI’ISM
16. French filmdom : CINE
18. Places where lines meet : NODES
21. When repeated, Hawaiian menu item : MAHI
22. Classic Camaro : IROC
23. Sashimi go-with : SAKE
24. Wow : IMPRESS
25. Accept, as a lesser charge : PLEAD TO
26. Component : PART
27. "How sweet ___!" : IT IS
33. Cause of tree damage and downed telephone wires : HIGH WINDS
35. Sandwich usually served with toothpicks : CLUB
36. Answer to the riddle "What force or strength cannot get through / I, with gentle touch, can do" : A KEY
38. Dreadful, as circumstances : DIRE
39. Cross to bear : ONUS
40. Like the group you're in if you're out, for short : LGBT
42. Sneeze sound : ACHOO!
43. Waste container : ASHBIN
44. Dwellers east of the Urals : ASIANS
45. One of the friends on "Friends" : MONICA
46. Foul-smelling : PUTRID
48. Actress Hepburn : AUDREY
51. County divs. : TWPS
52. Melodic subjects in music : TEMAS
56. Meas. of engine speed : RPM
57. ___-la : TRA
58. Up to, informally : ‘TIL
59. Author LeShan : EDA
60. 1977 Steely Dan album : AJA
61. Stove setting for simmering : LOW
62. ___ admin (IT pro) : SYS


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0619-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 19 Jun 17, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Susan Gelfand
THEME: Duets
Each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase and a DUET of sorts. It is a combination comprising the family names of two famous singers referenced in the clue:
37A. Performances by two singers ... like 21- and 49-Across and 3- and 29-Down? : DUETS

21A. Singers Johnny and Fiona? : ROTTEN APPLE (Johnny Rotten & Fiona Apple)
49A. Singers Keith and John? : URBAN LEGEND (Keith Urban & John Legend)
3D. Singers Patti and Tina? : PAGE-TURNER (Patti Page & Tina Turner)
29D. Singers Tori and Al? : KELLY GREEN (Tori Kelly & Al Green)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 33s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Doll-making tribe of the Southwest : HOPI
Many of the Hopi nation live on a reservation that is actually located within the much larger Navajo reservation in Arizona.

14. Mathematician Turing : ALAN
Alan Turing was an English mathematician. He was deservedly well-respected for his code-breaking work during WWII at Bletchley Park in England. However, despite his contributions to cracking the German Enigma code and other crucial work, Turing was prosecuted for homosexuality in 1952. He agreed to chemical castration, treatment with female hormones, and then two years later he committed suicide by taking cyanide. Turing’s life story is told in the 2014 film “The Imitation Game” with Benedict Cumberbatch playing the lead. I thoroughly enjoyed that film …

15. Circa : ABOUT
“Circa” is a Latin word meaning “around, near, about the time of”. We use “circa” directly in English to mean “about the time of”, as well as in derivative words such as “circle” and “circus”.

17. Lively Irish dances : JIGS
The dance known as a “jig” is most associated with Ireland and Scotland. In traditional Irish dancing, the jig is second in popularity only to the reel. The most famous Irish jig is probably “The Irish Washerwoman”. I may not dance a jig, but I sure do know the tune of “The Irish Washerwoman” …

18. Sierra ___ (African land) : LEONE
The Republic of Sierra Leone is a country in West Africa, lying on the Atlantic Coast. The capital city of Freetown was originally set up as a colony to house the “Black Poor” of London, England. These people were mainly freed British slaves of Caribbean descent who were living a miserable life in the run-down parts of London. Perhaps to help the impoverished souls, perhaps to rid the streets of “a problem”, three ships were chartered in 1787 to transport a group of blacks, with some whites, to a piece of land purchased in Sierra Leone. Those who made the voyage were granted British citizenship and protection. The descendants of these immigrants, and others who made the journey over the next 60 years, make up the ethnic group that’s today called the Sierra Leone Creole.

19. Supermodel from Somalia : IMAN
Iman Mohamed Abdulmajid is a supermodel from Somalia who goes simply by the name “Iman” these days. “Iman” is an Arabic word for “faith”. Iman is smart cookie. Imam has a degree in Political Science and is fluent in five languages: Somali, Arabic, Italian, French and English. Iman was married to English rock star David Bowie from 1992 until his death in 2016.

21. Singers Johnny and Fiona? : ROTTEN APPLE (Johnny Rotten & Fiona Apple)
Johnny Rotten is the former stage name of English punk rock singer John Lydon. Lydon was most famous as the lead singer for the Sex Pistols in the seventies. Apparently he was given the name “Rotten” as he had very poor oral hygiene as a teenage, which turned his teeth green. So, one of the Sex Pistols declared, “You’re rotten, you are!”

Fiona Apple is a singer-songwriter and pianist from New York City. “Fiona Apple” is the artist’s real name, although “Apple” is a given name. She was born Fiona Apple McAfee-Maggart.

23. Good dogs for pheasant hunters : SETTERS
The breeds of dog known as setters are all gundogs and are used in hunting game.

25. Billiard stick : CUE
The name of the game billiards comes from the French word “billiard” that originally described the wooden cue stick. The Old French “bille” translates as “stick of wood”.

36. Wildcat with tufted ears : LYNX
The lynx is a wild cat, of which there are four species. These are:
  • The Eurasian lynx: the biggest of the four species.
  • The Canada lynx: well-adapted to life in cold environments.
  • The Iberian lynx: a native of the Iberian Peninsula in Southern Europe, and the most endangered cat species in the world.
  • The Bobcat: our North American wildcat, the smallest of the four lynxes

42. Desserts with layered fruit and whipped cream : PARFAITS
A parfait is a frozen dessert made from sugar, syrup, egg and cream. The American version of this popular French dessert is a layered creation, featuring parfait cream, ice cream and flavored gelatins topped with whipped cream and possibly a liqueur. The term “parfait” is French for “perfect”.

45. Rap's ___ Wayne : LIL’
Lil' is a short form of the word "little". There are a whole slew of rappers named Lil' something, like Lil' Wayne, Lil' J, and Lil' Kim.

49. Singers Keith and John? : URBAN LEGEND (Keith Urban & John Legend)
Keith Urban is a country singer from Australia, who was actually born in New Zealand. Urban moved to Nashville, Tennessee in 1992. He married Australian actress Nicole Kidman in 2006.

“John Legend” is the stage name of singer-songwriter John Stephens. Sorry … I’ve never heard of him outside of the occasional crossword …

54. GPS option: Abbr. : RTE
A global positioning system (GPS) might point out a route (rte.).

56. Glittery jewelry : BLING
Bling-bling (often simply “bling”) is the name given to all the shiny stuff sported by rap stars in particular i.e. the jewelry, watches, metallic cell phones, even gold caps on the teeth. The term comes from the supposed “bling” sound caused by light striking a shiny metal surface.

60. Ryan of "Boston Public" : JERI
Jeri Ryan's most famous role is that of the de-assimilated Borg known as Seven of Nine, on "Star Trek: Voyager". I haven't seen that show, so I know Ryan from a supporting role on the legal drama "Shark", playing opposite James Woods. She also plays Ronnie Cooke on "Boston Public".

Down
1. Ones who've traveled to Mecca : HAJIS
A Haji (also “Hajji”) is the term used for someone who has made a pilgrimage to Mecca, and it is sometimes also used as a form of address for such a person. The journey itself goes by the name “haj” or “hajj”.

2. Martini garnish : OLIVE
The term "martini" probably takes it name from the "Martini & Rossi" brand of dry vermouth, although no one seems to be completely sure. What is clear is that despite the Martini name originating in Italy, the martini drink originated in the US. The original martini was made with gin and sweet vermouth, but someone specifying a “dry” martini was given gin and dry vermouth. Nowadays we use dry vermouth for all martinis and the term "dry" has become a reference to how little vermouth is included in the drink. Famously, Noel Coward liked his drink very dry and said that a perfect martini is made by "filling a glass with gin then waving it in the general direction of Italy". The German-American journalist and satirist H. L. Mencken referred to the martini as “the only American invention as perfect as a sonnet”.

3. Singers Patti and Tina? : PAGE-TURNER (Patti Page & Tina Turner)
“Patti Page” is the stage name of Clara Ann Fowler, the best-selling female artist in the 1950s. Patti Page’s signature song is “Tennessee Waltz”, a big hit for her that spent 13 weeks at number one in the charts in 1950. She also had a number one with “(How Much Is That) Doggie in the Window” in 1953.

“Tina Turner” is the stage name used by Anna Mae Bullock, the “Queen of Rock ‘n’ Roll”. Turner has always loved Europe and moved there in the eighties. She now splits her time between her homes in England, France and Switzerland.

5. In abundance : GALORE
Our word “galore”, meaning “in great numbers”, comes from the Irish phrase “go leór” that translates as “sufficiently, enough”.

7. Stolen stuff : LOOT
“Loot” is the name given to anything taken by dishonesty or force, particularly during war. The term came into English from the Hindi “lut” meaning “goods taken from an enemy”.

8. Debussy's "Clair de ___" : LUNE
“Clair de lune” is the beautiful third movement from Claude Debussy’s piano work called the “Suite bergamasque”. “Clair de lune” is French for “moonlight”.

10. Motions left or right on Tinder : SWIPES
Tinder is a matchmaking app that uses Facebook profiles. Users “swipe” photos of potential matches, either to the right (“like”) or to the left (“not interested”). Users who “match” each other can then chat within the app.

12. Like the president's office : OVAL
Although there have been several “oval offices” used by US presidents in the White House, the current Oval Office was designed and constructed at the bequest of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The room has four doors: one door opens onto the Rose Garden; a second door leads to a small study and dining room; a third opens onto the main corridor running through the West Wing; the fourth door opens to the office of the president’s secretary.

13. Trait transmitter : GENE
A gene is a section of a chromosome that is responsible for a particular characteristic in an organism. For example, one gene may determine eye color and another balding pattern. We have two copies of each gene, one from each of our parents, with each copy known as an allele.

22. May or Polly of fiction : AUNT
Aunt May and Uncle Ben Parker are characters in the spider-Man universe created by Marvel Comics. The couple’s nephew is Peter Parker, aka Spider-Man.

Mark Twain’s famous character Tom Sawyer had a few family members. He had an Aunt Polly, an Aunt Sally Phelps, a cousin Mary and half-brother Sid.

24. Colorful cereal : TRIX
Trix is a corn-based breakfast cereal that has been around since 1954, produced by General Mills. Ads for the cereal featured Trix Rabbit, who would try hard to get hold of bowls of the cereal. He would always get caught though, and be admonished with, “Silly rabbit, Trix are for kids!” With 46% sugar content, the rabbit probably wouldn’t have liked it anyway …

29. Singers Tori and Al? : KELLY GREEN (Tori Kelly & Al Green)
Kelly green is a strong yellowish green, and was given its name back in the early 1900s. The name was apparently chosen because green is popular in Ireland, and Kelly is a common Irish family name.

Tori Kelly is one of those singer-songwriters who gained attention by posting videos on YouTube. She then competed in the reality TV show “American Idol”, although she didn’t do very well.

Al Green is a gospel and soul music singer. Green was born in Arkansas, where he started out as a gospel singer and moved into R&B. In 1974, he was assaulted by a girlfriend who burned him badly on much of his body by pouring boiling grits over him (and then she committed suicide). The incident changed Green’s life and he turned to the church, becoming a pastor in Memphis in 1976. He continued to record music, but never really enjoyed the same success that he had in the early seventies with hits like “Let’s Stay Together” and “I’m Still In Love With You”.

33. Heroine of Jean Auel's "The Clan of the Cave Bear" : AYLA
Ayla is a little Cro-Magnon girl who is orphaned and then adopted by a Neanderthal tribe, as told in "The Clan of the Cave Bear", the first of a series of novels written by Jean Auel that set in prehistoric times. I haven't read any of Auel’s books myself, but they are on my reading to-do list as my wife recommends them. They sound interesting …

38. ___ of one's existence : BANE
Today we tend to use the word “bane” to mean anathema, a source of persistent annoyance. A few centuries ago, a bane was a cause of harm or death, perhaps a deadly poison.

41. James ___ (007) : BOND
The character James Bond was the creation of writer Ian Fleming. Fleming “stole” the James Bond name from an American ornithologist. The number 007 was “stolen” from the real-life, 16th century English spy called John Dee. Dee would sign his reports to Queen Elizabeth I with a stylized "007" to indicate that the reports were for “her eyes only”. There’s an entertaining miniseries that aired on BBC America called “Fleming: The Man Who Would Be Bond” that details Ian Fleming’s military career, and draws some nice parallels between Fleming’s experiences and aspirations and those of his hero James Bond. Recommended …

44. Watches episode after episode of a TV series, say : BINGES
I’m a big fan of binge-watching, the practice of watching perhaps two or three (even four!) episodes of a show in a row. My wife and I will often deliberately avoid watching a recommended show live, and instead wait until whole series have been released on DVD or online. I’m not a big fan of “tune in next week …”

47. Arcade pioneer : ATARI
At one point, the electronics and video game manufacturer Atari was the fastest growing company in US history. However, Atari never really recovered from the video game industry crash of 1983.

Our word “arcade” comes from the Latin “arcus” meaning “arc”. The first arcades were passages made from a series of arches. This could be an avenue of trees, and eventually any covered avenue. I remember arcades lined with shops and stores when I was growing up on the other side of the Atlantic. Arcades came to be lined with lots of amusements, resulting in amusement arcades and video game arcades.

49. Colored part of the eye : UVEA
The uvea is the middle of the three layers that make up the eyeball. The iris is the colored part of the eye with an aperture in the center that can open or close depending on the level of light hitting the eye.

51. Pear variety : BOSC
Bosc is a cultivar of the European Pear grown in the northwest of the United States. The Bosc is that pear with a skin the color of a potato, with a long neck. I always seem to use the potato as my point of reference. How Irish am I …?

57. Dance club bookings, in brief : DJS
The world’s first radio disc jockey (DJ) was one Ray Newby of Stockton, California who made his debut broadcast in 1909, would you believe? When he was 16 years old and a student, Newby started to play his records on a primitive radio located in the Herrold College of Engineering and Wireless in San Jose. The records played back then were mostly recordings of Enrico Caruso.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Doll-making tribe of the Southwest : HOPI
5. Greatly annoys : GALLS
10. Long, tedious effort : SLOG
14. Mathematician Turing : ALAN
15. Circa : ABOUT
16. Surfer's catch : WAVE
17. Lively Irish dances : JIGS
18. Sierra ___ (African land) : LEONE
19. Supermodel from Somalia : IMAN
20. "From what ___ seen ..." : I’VE
21. Singers Johnny and Fiona? : ROTTEN APPLE (Johnny Rotten & Fiona Apple)
23. Good dogs for pheasant hunters : SETTERS
25. Billiard stick : CUE
26. Craving : URGE
27. Feature of the easily offended : THIN SKIN
32. 2015 climate accord city : PARIS
34. "Thou ___ not ..." : SHALT
35. French summer : ETE
36. Wildcat with tufted ears : LYNX
37. Performances by two singers ... like 21- and 49-Across and 3- and 29-Down? : DUETS
38. Extinguished, as birthday candles, with "out" : BLEW
39. Soccer stadium cry : OLE!
40. Dirt, dust, soot, etc. : GRIME
41. Soothing ointments : BALMS
42. Desserts with layered fruit and whipped cream : PARFAITS
44. Like fish that are difficult to eat : BONY
45. Rap's ___ Wayne : LIL’
46. Salt's partner in potato chip flavoring : VINEGAR
49. Singers Keith and John? : URBAN LEGEND (Keith Urban & John Legend)
54. GPS option: Abbr. : RTE
55. "Va-va-___!" : VOOM
56. Glittery jewelry : BLING
57. Negotiator's goal : DEAL
58. Alleviate : EASE
59. Put out, as a statement : ISSUE
60. Ryan of "Boston Public" : JERI
61. Parabola shapes : ARCS
62. Heads of France : TETES
63. Huff : SNIT

Down
1. Ones who've traveled to Mecca : HAJIS
2. Martini garnish : OLIVE
3. Singers Patti and Tina? : PAGE-TURNER (Patti Page & Tina Turner)
4. Opposite of outs : INS
5. In abundance : GALORE
6. Conspires with : ABETS
7. Stolen stuff : LOOT
8. Debussy's "Clair de ___" : LUNE
9. Aids in sign-lettering : STENCILS
10. Motions left or right on Tinder : SWIPES
11. Home furnishing product with a shade : LAMP
12. Like the president's office : OVAL
13. Trait transmitter : GENE
21. Govt. rules : REGS
22. May or Polly of fiction : AUNT
24. Colorful cereal : TRIX
27. "___ fightin' words!" : THEM’S
28. Despise : HATE
29. Singers Tori and Al? : KELLY GREEN (Tori Kelly & Al Green)
30. See 31-Down : … ITEM
31. With 30-Down, brief article in a paper : NEWS ...
32. Sit (down) hard : PLOP
33. Heroine of Jean Auel's "The Clan of the Cave Bear" : AYLA
34. Attire not usually seen on casual Friday : SUIT
37. Tool part used to create holes : DRILL BIT
38. ___ of one's existence : BANE
40. Profit : GAIN
41. James ___ (007) : BOND
43. Bad thing to go down in : FLAMES
44. Watches episode after episode of a TV series, say : BINGES
46. Event location : VENUE
47. Arcade pioneer : ATARI
48. Ignited again : RELIT
49. Colored part of the eye : UVEA
50. Plane engine's sound when taking off : ROAR
51. Pear variety : BOSC
52. Otherwise : ELSE
53. Main point of an idea : GIST
57. Dance club bookings, in brief : DJS


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0618-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 18 Jun 17, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Sam Trabucco
THEME: Silent Treatment
Each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase that includes a silent letter. That silent letter is circled in the grid, and must be completely dropped to make sense of the clue:
23A. Reversals of reversals in sentences? : DOUBLE (K)NOTS
41A. Donates shelter to some beavers? : GIVES A DAM(N)
57A. Soup, black bread and, for the wealthy, meat? : RENAISSANCE FA(I)RE
81A. Kings and queens bringing their steeds to a halt? : REI(G)NING MONARCHS
98A. "Excuse me, but my partner's and my kids go first!" : AFTER (H)OURS
119A. Feast consisting entirely of Hawaiian foodstuffs? : TARO(T) SPREAD
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 26m 58s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Chimp relatives : ORANGS
Orangutans (also “orangs”) are arboreal creatures, in fact the largest arboreal animals known to man. They are native to Indonesia and Malaysia, living in the rain forests. Like most species in rain forests these days, orangutans are endangered, with only two species surviving. The word “orangutan” is Malay, meaning “man of the forest”.

The Common Chimpanzee is a species of ape, a member of the Hominidae family (along with gorillas, humans and orangutans). The human and chimpanzee branches of the Hominidae family tree diverged 4-6 million years ago, making the chimp our closest living relatives in the animal kingdom.

7. Free spot, for short : PSA
Public service announcement (PSA)

14. Pac-12 team : UTES
The Utah Utes are the athletic teams of the University of Utah.

19. Rihanna's 2016 ___ World Tour : ANTI
The singer Rihanna was born and grew up on the island of Barbados and moved to the US when she was 16-years-old to pursue a singing career. “Rihanna” is her stage name, as she was born Robyn Rihanna Fenty. The name “Rihanna” is derived from the Welsh name “Rhiannon”.

21. Puma alternative : AVIA
The Avia brand name for athletic shoes was chosen as "avia" is the Latin word for "to fly", and suggests the concept of aviation. Avia was founded in Oregon in 1979.

22. QB Tony : ROMO
Tony Romo is a quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys. Romo is also an avid amateur golfer and has even tried (albeit unsuccessfully) to qualify for the US Open golf championship.

27. Org. involved in an annual open house : PTA
Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

29. Shell containers : OIL TANKS
Royal Dutch Shell is the fourth largest company in the world in terms of revenue (Walmart is the largest) and is headquartered in the Hague, in the Netherlands. The company was formed in 1907 with the merger of the Royal Dutch Petroleum Company and Shell Transport and Trading company of the UK. The two companies merged in order to compete globally with the biggest US oil company of the day, John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil. Shell Oil Company is a US-based subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell that is headquartered in Houston, Texas.

31. Railroad name starting in 1832 : ERIE
The Erie Railroad operated from 1832 to 1960, and connected New York City with Lake Erie. The Erie Railroad was largely built as compensation for the towns in the Southern Tier of New York who lost business when the Erie Canal was completed in 1825.

40. Small egg : OVULE
As we all remember from botany class (don’t we?), an “ovule” is a small structure in many plants that develops into the seed after fertilization.

41. Donates shelter to some beavers? : GIVES A DAM(N)
Beavers build dams so that they can live in and around the slower and deeper water that builds up above the dam. This deeper water provides more protection for the beavers from predators such as bears. Beavers are nocturnal animals and do all their construction work at night.

48. Crop-damaging rodent : VOLE
Vole populations can really increase rapidly. Mama vole is pregnant for just three weeks before giving birth to litters of 5-10 baby voles. Then the young voles become sexually mature in just one month! If you have one pregnant vole in your yard, within a year you could have over a hundred of the little critters.

51. New pony : FOAL
There are lots of terms to describe horses of different ages and sexes, it seems:
  • Foal: horse of either sex that is less that one year old
  • Yearling: horse of either sex that is one to two years old
  • Filly: female horse under the age of four
  • Colt: male horse under the age of four
  • Gelding: castrated male horse of any age
  • Stallion: non-castrated male horse four years or older
  • Mare: female horse four years or older

53. One following the dotted lines? : PAC-MAN
The Pac-Man arcade game was first released in Japan in 1980, and is as popular today as it ever was. The game features characters that are maneuvered around the screen to eat up dots and earn points. The name comes from the Japanese folk hero "Paku", known for his voracious appetite. The spin-off game called Ms. Pac-Man was released in 1981.

66. John or James : APOSTLE
In the Christian tradition, John the Apostle was one of the twelve followers of Jesus who were called the Apostles. John lived longer than all of the other Apostles and was the only one who did not die a martyr. John wrote the Gospel of John in the New Testament, as well as three Epistles of John and the Book of Revelation.

James, son of Zebedee was one the Twelve Apostles of Jesus. James was the brother of fellow Apostle John. James was the only Apostle whose martyrdom was recorded in the New Testament, so it is generally believed that he was the first Apostle to die a martyr to his faith.

68. ___ Raton, Fla. : BOCA
The name of the city of Boca Raton in Florida translates from Spanish as “Mouse Mouth”. There doesn’t seem to be a definitive etymology of the name but one plausible explanation is a nautical one. “Boca”, as well as meaning “mouth” can mean “inlet”. “Ratón”, as well as meaning “mouse” was also used to describe rocks that chewed away at a ship’s anchor cable. So possibly Boca Raton was named for a rocky inlet.

70. Part of E = mc^2 : MASS
In Albert Einstein's famous equation E=mc^2, “E” stands for energy, “m” stands for mass, and “c” stands for the speed of light.

76. Based on theoretical deduction : A PRIORI
In the world of philosophy, one can have “a priori” knowledge or “a posteriori” knowledge. A priori (“from the earlier) knowledge is independent of experience, it is just known or assumed. For example, one might say that “all boys are males” is a priori knowledge. A posteriori knowledge relies on experience or some empirical evidence. For example, one might say that “boys are more likely to diagnosed with ADD” is a posteriori knowledge.

80. Road sign silhouette : DEER
A silhouette is an outline, usually of a person’s profile, which has been filled in with a solid color. One theory is that the term comes from the name of the French Minister of Finance in 1759, Étienne de Silhouette. Said minister made major cutbacks in spending to finance the Seven Years War, cutbacks that were not popular with the citizenry. His name came to be used for a cheap way of making someone’s likeness, a “silhouette”.

84. Nelson who wrote "The Man With the Golden Arm" : ALGREN
Nelson Algren was an author from Detroit who is best known today for his 1949 novel “The Man with the Golden Arm”. The famous novel won the National Book Award and was made into a celebrated 1955 film of the same name starring Frank Sinatra. Algren also wrote a novel called “A Walk on the Wild Side”, the title of which was used in a great 1972 Lou Reed song.

86. James who wrote "A Death in the Family" : AGEE
James Agee was a noted American film critic and screenwriter. Agee wrote an autobiographical novel “A Death in the Family” that won him his Pulitzer in 1958, albeit posthumously. He was also one of the screenwriters for the 1951 classic movie “The African Queen”.

87. Freddy once hailed as "the next Pelé" : ADU
Freddy Adu is an American soccer player who grew up in Ghana. Adu signed for D.C. United in 2004 when he was only 14 years old. That made him the youngest athlete ever to sign a professional contract in the US.

88. Husband to Emilia in "Othello" : IAGO
Emilia and Iago are characters in William Shakespeare’s play “Othello”. Emilia and Iago are a married couple, although Iago kills Emilia late in the play.

90. Golfer Ernie : ELS
Ernie Els is a South African golfer. Els a big guy but he has an easy fluid golf swing that has earned him the nickname “The Big Easy”. He is a former World No. 1 and has won four majors: the US Open (1994 & 1997) and the British Open (2002 & 2012).

94. Popeye creator E. C. ___ : SEGAR
Elzie Segar was a cartoonist who went by the name E. C. Segar. Segar was the man who created the strip “Thimble Theater”, home of the character Popeye.

102. "___, Escher, Bach" (Pulitzer-winning book) : GODEL
Douglas Hofstadter is an American academic, and a winner of a Pulitzer Prize for his book “Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid”, first published in 1979.

110. Gchat notes, e.g. : IMS
Even though instant messaging (sending IMs) has been around since the 1960s, it was AOL who popularized the term “instant message” in the eighties and nineties. The “AOL Instant Message” service was known as AIM.

“Gchat” is a common name for the Google Talk instant messaging service. Google Talk offers both text and voice communication as well as a plugin that allows video chat. All of this works seamlessly with Gmail, my personal favorite email client. That said, much of this functionality seems to have been replaced with the Google Hangouts service.

111. Medical professional on TV : DR OZ
Mehmet Oz is a cardiothoracic surgeon, and a TV personality known simply as “Dr. Oz”. Oz appeared as a health expert for several seasons on “The Oprah Winfrey Show”. Now he has his own “The Dr. Oz Show” on radio and television that is backed by Winfrey’s Harpo Productions.

113. Part of a classic diner sign : NEON TUBE
The basic design of neon lighting was first demonstrated at the Paris Motor Show in 1910. Such lighting is made up of glass tubes containing a vacuum into which has been introduced a small amount of neon gas. When a voltage is applied between two electrodes inside the tube, the neon gas “glows” and gives off the familiar light.

116. WSJ competitor : NYT
“The New York Times” (NYT) has been published since 1851. These days a viable alternative to buying the paper is to read the news online. NYTimes.com is the most popular online newspaper website in the country.

“The Wall Street Journal” (WSJ) is a daily newspaper with a business bent that is published in New York City by Dow Jones & Company. The WSJ has a larger US circulation than any other newspaper, with “USA Today” coming in a close second place.

118. Icelandic saga : EDDA
The Poetic Edda and Prose Edda are two ancient works that are the source for much of Norse mythology. Both Eddas were written in the 13th century, in Iceland.

119. Feast consisting entirely of Hawaiian foodstuffs? : TARO(T) SPREAD
The corm of some taro plants is used to make poi, the traditional Hawaiian dish (that I think tastes horrible). When a taro plant is grown as an ornamental, it is often called Elephant Ears due to the shape of its large leaves.

Tarot cards have been around since the mid-1400s, and for centuries were simply used for entertainment as a game. It has only been since the late 1800s that the cards have been used by fortune tellers to predict the future. The list of tarot cards includes the Wheel of Fortune, the Hanged Man and the Lovers.

125. Illinois college town : URBANA
Urbana is an Illinois city that is home to most of the campus of the University of Illinois. The city was named in 1833 after Urbana, Ohio, the hometown of State Senator John Vance who provided the names for both the surrounding county of Champaign and the county’s seat of justice, Urbana.

126. James of R&B : ETTA
Etta James was best known for her beautiful rendition of the song “At Last”. Sadly, as she disclosed in her autobiography, James lived a life that was ravaged by drug addiction leading to numerous legal and health problems. Ms. James passed away in January 2012 having suffered from leukemia.

128. Sot's woe : DTS
The episodes of delirium that can accompany withdrawal from alcohol are called Delirium Tremens (the DTs). The literal translation of this Latin phrase is "trembling madness".

Down
1. Cronies : OLD PALS
A crony is a friend or companion. The term originated as slang in Cambridge University in England in the 1600s. “Crony” is probably derived from the Greek “khronios” meaning “long-lasting”.

6. Lead-in to phonic : STEREO-
Monophonic sound (“mono”) is sound reproduced using just one audio channel, which is usually played out of just one speaker. Stereophonic sound is reproduced using two audio channels, with the sound from each channel played out of two different speakers. The pair of stereo speakers are usually positioned apart from each other so that sound appears to come from between the two. Quadraphonic sound (4.0 surround sound) uses four audio channels with the sound played back through four speakers often positioned at the corners of the room in which one is listening.

7. Greek god depicted on the cover of "The Wind in the Willows" : PAN
In Greek mythology, Pan was a lecherous god, one who fell in love with Echo the mountain nymph. Echo refused Pan’s advances so that he became very angry. Pan’s anger created a “panic” (a word derived from the name “Pan”) and a group of shepherds were driven to kill Echo.

"The Wind in the Willows" is a classic children's novel first published in 1908. Featured in the story are characters such as Mole, Ratty, Mr. Toad and Mr. Badger. The story's author was Kenneth Grahame, a man who held the exalted position of Secretary of the Bank of England.

8. Onetime rap moniker : SNOOP LION
The rap star Snoop Dogg’s real name is Cordozar Calvin Broadus. He is the most famous protege of the notorious rapper Dr. Dre. Sadly, Snoop Dogg has had numerous run-ins with police all round the world, even after he started to live the good life that came with his fame. Snoop Dogg has also been known as “Snoop Doggy Dogg”, and more recently as “Snoop Lion”.

10. Tomb raider ___ Croft : LARA
Lara Croft was introduced to the world as the main character in a pretty cool video game (I thought, back then) called “Tomb Raider” in 1996. Lara Croft moved to the big screen in 2001 and 2003, in two pretty awful movie adaptations of the game’s storyline. Angelina Jolie played Croft, and she did a very energetic job.

11. "The Terrible" czar : IVAN IV
The Grand Prince of Moscow Ivan IV became known as Ivan the Terrible. The name "terrible" is a translation from Russian, and perhaps creates the wrong impression about the man. The Russian word is "Grozny", which is more akin to "strict" and "powerful" rather than "cruel" or "abominable".

20. Part of las Filipinas : ISLA
When the Spanish explorer Ruy Lopez de Villalobos discovered the islands of Leyte and Samar, he called them Felipinas, after King Philip II of Spain. Eventually, the name was used for the whole archipelago, becoming what we now call in English, the Philippines.

34. Bacteria-battling drug : SULFA
“Sulfa drug” is a common term for sulphonamides. Many sulfa drugs have antibacterial properties, and were the first antimicrobial drugs developed. The first sulphonamide introduced to treat bacterial infections was named Prontosil, and was developed by Bayer AG in Germany.

36. Intoxicating Polynesian drink : KAVA
Kava is a plant found in the western Pacific. Its roots are used to make an intoxicating drink also called kava, which acts as a sedative.

39. Cloud's purpose : DATA STORAGE
In the world of computing, when one operates “in the cloud”, one’s files and key applications are not stored on one’s own computer, but rather are residing “in the cloud”, on a computer somewhere out on the Internet. I do 90% of my computing in the cloud. That way I don’t have to worry about backing up files, and I can operate from any computer if I have to …

43. #1 Presley hit : DON'T BE CRUEL
“Don’t Be Cruel” was recorded by Elvis Presley in 1956. “Don’t Be Cruel” was released as an A-side, but the B-side turned out to be more successful; a tune called “Hound Dog” …

45. Court orders : WRITS
A writ is an order issued by some formal body (these days, usually a court) with the order being in “written” form. Warrants and subpoenas are examples of writs.

50. Big fashion inits. : YSL
Yves Saint-Laurent (YSL) was a French fashion designer, actually born in Algeria. Saint-Laurent started off working as an assistant to Christian Dior at the age of 17. Dior died just four years later, and as a very young man Saint-Laurent was named head of the House of Dior. However, in 1950 Saint-Laurent was conscripted into the French Army and ended up in a military hospital after suffering a mental breakdown from the hazing inflicted on him by his fellow soldiers. His treatment included electroshock therapy and administration of sedatives and psychoactive drugs. He was released from hospital, managed to pull his life back together and started his own fashion house. A remarkable story …

56. ___ culpa : MEA
Many Roman Catholics are very familiar with the Latin phrase “mea culpa” meaning “my fault”, as it is used in the Latin Mass. The additional term “mea maxima culpa” translates as “my most grievous fault”.

57. Frothing at the mouth : RABID
“Rabies” is actually the Latin word for “madness”. The name is a good choice for the viral disease, as once the virus spreads to the brain the infected person or animal exhibits very tortured and bizarre behavior including hydrophobia, a fear of water. The virus is passed on to humans most often through a bite from an infected dog. It is curable if it is caught in time, basically before symptoms develop. Once the virus passes up the peripheral nervous system to the spine and the brain, there isn’t much that can be done. We can also use the derivative term “rabid” figuratively, to mean extremely violent, to have extreme views.

58. Lyric poem : EPODE
An epode is a lyric poem made up of couplets in which the first line is long, and the second line much shorter. The form was invented by the Greek poet Archilochus, and was most famously used by the Roman poet Horace.

60. Start of the Marines' motto : SEMPER
“Semper Fidelis” (often abbreviated to “semper fi”) is the motto of the United States Marine Corps (USMC). The phrase is Latin and means “Always Faithful”. The US Marine Corps isn’t the only military unit using “Semper Fidelis” as a motto. It’s also used by the Portuguese Marine Corps, the Republic of China Marine Corps and the Swiss Grenadiers.

71. Singer India.___ : ARIE
India.Arie is an American soul and R&B singer who was born India Arie Simpson in Denver, Colorado.

74. Some Mardi Gras wear : BEADS
“Mardi Gras” translates from French as “Fat Tuesday”, and gets its name from the practice of eating rich foods on the eve of the fasting season known as Lent. Lent starts on the next day, called Ash Wednesday.

76. S. Amer. land : ARG
Argentina is the second largest country in South America (after Brazil), and geographically is the world’s largest Spanish-speaking nation. The name “Argentina” comes from the Latin “argentum”, the word for “silver”. It is thought that the name was given by the early Spanish and Portuguese conquerors who also named the Rio de la Plata (the “Silver River”). Those early explorers got hold of lots of silver objects that they found among the native population.

77. Inlets : RIAS
A drowned valley might be called a ria or a fjord, with both formed as sea level rises. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

79. Genetic material : RNA
The two most common nucleic acids are deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA), both of which play crucial roles in genetics. The DNA contains the genetic instructions used to keep living organisms functioning, and RNA is used to transcribe that information from the DNA to protein "generators" called ribosomes.

83. Gettysburg general : MEADE
George Meade was a career army officer with a depth of experience in civil and military operations even before the onset of the Civil War. During the war he rose to the level of commander of the Army of the Potomac, and is best remembered for leading the Union forces that defeated General Robert E. Lee at Gettysburg in 1863.

91. Exam for future attys. : LSAT
Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

93. Warehouse : DEPOT
Our term “depot”, meaning a station or warehouse, derives from the word “dépôt”, French for “deposit” or “place of deposit”.

95. Native of Conakry : GUINEAN
Guinea lies north of Liberia on the west African coast. Like much of Africa, it was for many years a French Colony (as “French Guinea”). Guinea declared independence in 1958, but has suffered from autocratic rule since then, and is now of the poorest countries in Africa.

96. Little raider : ARMY ANT
Army ants are a collection of over two hundred different species of ants. Each species is known for aggressively raiding a certain area en masse, foraging for food. Army ants also stay on the move, never building permanent nests.

112. It follows epsilon : ZETA
Zeta is the sixth letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a precursor of our Roman letter Z. The word “zeta” is also the ancestor of the name “zed”, which became “zee”, the pronunciation that we use here in the US.

121. Stat for Lou Gehrig or Manny Ramirez : RBI
Run batted in (RBI)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Chimp relatives : ORANGS
7. Free spot, for short : PSA
10. Mouth pieces : LIPS
14. Pac-12 team : UTES
18. Asian plumlike fruit : LOQUAT
19. Rihanna's 2016 ___ World Tour : ANTI
21. Puma alternative : AVIA
22. QB Tony : ROMO
23. Reversals of reversals in sentences? : DOUBLE (K)NOTS
25. Ribald : RACY
26. Making the honor roll, e.g. : GOAL
27. Org. involved in an annual open house : PTA
28. Directional suffix : -ERN
29. Shell containers : OIL TANKS
31. Railroad name starting in 1832 : ERIE
32. Golf ball's path : ARC
33. Result of waves hitting rocks : SEA SPRAY
35. "Don't worry about me!" : I'M OK!
37. With 73-Across, a symbol of Massachusetts : ELM ...
38. Laundry unit : LOAD
40. Small egg : OVULE
41. Donates shelter to some beavers? : GIVES A DAM(N)
44. Bedding in a horse's stall : STRAW
46. Name that's Hebrew for "my God" : ELI
47. Relative of "POW!" : BAM!
48. Crop-damaging rodent : VOLE
49. "Don't give up!" : TRY!
51. New pony : FOAL
53. One following the dotted lines? : PAC-MAN
57. Soup, black bread and, for the wealthy, meat? : RENAISSANCE FA(I)RE
62. Neutrogena dandruff shampoo : T/GEL
66. John or James : APOSTLE
67. "What nerve!" : THE IDEA!
68. ___ Raton, Fla. : BOCA
69. Gear for a hike : BOOTS
70. Part of E = mc^2 : MASS
73. See 37-Across : … TREE
74. Not quite leaders of the pack : BETAS
75. Social Security fig. : ID NO
76. Based on theoretical deduction : A PRIORI
78. Like concrete that's shaped in advance : PRECAST
80. Road sign silhouette : DEER
81. Kings and queens bringing their steeds to a halt? : REI(G)NING MONARCHS
84. Nelson who wrote "The Man With the Golden Arm" : ALGREN
86. James who wrote "A Death in the Family" : AGEE
87. Freddy once hailed as "the next Pelé" : ADU
88. Husband to Emilia in "Othello" : IAGO
90. Golfer Ernie : ELS
92. Tiny bit : TAD
94. Popeye creator E. C. ___ : SEGAR
98. "Excuse me, but my partner's and my kids go first!" : AFTER (H)OURS
102. "___, Escher, Bach" (Pulitzer-winning book) : GODEL
104. Tackle box item : LURE
105. When repeated, "All right, that's enough!" : NOW
106. Up (for), paradoxically : DOWN
107. Better than normal : ABOVE PAR
110. Gchat notes, e.g. : IMS
111. Medical professional on TV : DR OZ
113. Part of a classic diner sign : NEON TUBE
115. "Listen up, Luis!" : OYE!
116. WSJ competitor : NYT
117. Fantasy game role : OGRE
118. Icelandic saga : EDDA
119. Feast consisting entirely of Hawaiian foodstuffs? : TARO(T) SPREAD
122. Flight destination? : NEST
123. "Enough!" : STOP!
124. Word with pink or cow : -SLIP
125. Illinois college town : URBANA
126. James of R&B : ETTA
127. Ring ___ : TOSS
128. Sot's woe : DTS
129. Like elves' ears : POINTY

Down
1. Cronies : OLD PALS
2. Plant disease whose two words differ by only one letter : ROOT ROT
3. Amphibious auto : AQUA-CAR
4. Essence of an idea : NUB
5. Powerful winds : GALES
6. Lead-in to phonic : STEREO-
7. Greek god depicted on the cover of "The Wind in the Willows" : PAN
8. Onetime rap moniker : SNOOP LION
9. Clothe : ATTIRE
10. Tomb raider ___ Croft : LARA
11. "The Terrible" czar : IVAN IV
12. When repeated, plea to a stage magician : PICK ME!
13. Powers to decide : SAY-SOS
14. Goad : URGE
15. "Ugh, that hits close to home!" : TOO REAL!
16. "Shoot over your response" : EMAIL ME
17. Very serious : SOLEMN
20. Part of las Filipinas : ISLA
24. Scoundrel : KNAVE
30. Popular rapper with a feline-sounding name : TYGA
34. Bacteria-battling drug : SULFA
36. Intoxicating Polynesian drink : KAVA
39. Cloud's purpose : DATA STORAGE
42. Hurt : IMPAIR
43. #1 Presley hit : DON'T BE CRUEL
45. Court orders : WRITS
47. "Ugh!" : BLEH!
50. Big fashion inits. : YSL
52. Follows, as advice : ACTS ON
54. One might represent a representative : AIDE
55. Sleazeball : CREEPO
56. ___ culpa : MEA
57. Frothing at the mouth : RABID
58. Lyric poem : EPODE
59. Who has ever won a debate over the internet? : NO ONE
60. Start of the Marines' motto : SEMPER
61. Honoring grandly : FETING
63. Did so-so at school : GOT A C
64. Digital currency : ECASH
65. Hangs in there : LASTS
71. Singer India.___ : ARIE
72. One of 56 in 1776 : SIGNER
74. Some Mardi Gras wear : BEADS
76. S. Amer. land : ARG
77. Inlets : RIAS
79. Genetic material : RNA
82. "Oh, boohoo!" : GET OVER IT!
83. Gettysburg general : MEADE
85. Head of an estate : LORD
88. "Hmm ... it's escaping me" : I FORGET
89. "If all else fails ..." : AT WORST ...
91. Exam for future attys. : LSAT
93. Warehouse : DEPOT
95. Native of Conakry : GUINEAN
96. Little raider : ARMY ANT
97. Athlete's time off : REST DAY
98. Single shot awarded for being fouled while scoring, in basketball lingo : AND ONE
99. Straight : HONEST
100. Had because of : OWED TO
101. Start of a Spanish count : UNO DOS ...
102. Clear one's head? : GO BALD
103. Confines due to injury : LAYS UP
108. Qualifying words : BUTS
109. Facsimile, for short : REPRO
112. It follows epsilon : ZETA
114. Fuzzes : NAPS
120. Photo ___ : OPS
121. Stat for Lou Gehrig or Manny Ramirez : RBI


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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