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0101-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Jan 17, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Matthew Sewell
THEME: Rolling in the Aisles
We have a rebus puzzle today, with the letters HA in some squares. In one direction the HA is part of the answer, and in the other the HA is occupying "the aisle” (the space) between words in the answers. Those answers are actually things that feature aisles in real life. With all those HA HAs, we are ROLLING IN THE AISLES, laughing our heads off. Happy New Year, everyone!
24A. Marquee locale : MOVIE THEATER
54A. Capitol group : US SENATE
72A. Passenger jet : AIRLINER
102A. Farmer's market alternative : GROCERY STORE
50D. Hitching post? : WEDDING CHAPEL
3D. Place for bows and strings : ORCHESTRA HALL

57A. Post-op program : REHAB
83A. What might cost you an arm and a leg? : PIRANHA
13D. John Glenn player in "The Right Stuff" : ED HARRIS
44D. Hawaiian "thanks" : MAHALO
73D. Something to tear into, informally? : HANKIE
82D. It lays out the lines of authority : ORG CHART
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 26s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

8. Asylum : REFUGE
"Asylum" (plural "asyla") is a Latin word, meaning "sanctuary".

20. Pope with the longest reign between St. Peter and Pius VI (A.D. 67-1799) : ADRIAN I
Adrian I was pope for almost 24 years, from 772 to 795, which is one of the longest reigns in papal history.

22. On the down-low : COVERT
Something described as “on the down low” is "secret". The phrase “on the DL” can mean “on the down low”. It can also mean “on the disabled list” in sports.

24. Marquee locale : MOVIE THEATER
A marquee is a large sign that is placed over the entrance to a theater. The marquee usually displays the names of the film or play currently showing, as well as the principal actors performing.

29. Companion of Han in "The Force Awakens" : REY
“Star Wars VII: The Force Awakens” is the seventh episode in the “Star Wars” series of films. Several favorite characters return in “Star Wars VII”, including Han Solo (Harrison Ford), Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) and General Leia Organa (or “Princess Leia” in earlier films, played by Carrie Fisher).

30. H.O.V. ___ : LANE
In some parts of the country one sees high-occupancy vehicle lanes (HOV lanes). Out here in California we call them carpool lanes.

31. Sénégal summers : ETES
In French, “été” (summer) is “la saison chaude” (the warm season).

The Republic of Senegal is a country on the far western coast of Africa. For many years Senegal was a French colony, gaining independence in 1960. The capital of Senegal is Dakar, a city located on the Cap-Vert Peninsula that juts out into the Atlantic Ocean.

33. Running figure : TALLY
Back in the mid-1600s, a “tally” was a stick marked with notches that tracked how much one owed or had paid. The term came from the Latin “talea” meaning “stick, rod”.

34. Players last produced in July 2016 : VCRS
Video Cassette Recorder (VCR)

39. Rural postal abbr. : RTE
A global positioning system (GPS) might point out a route (rte.).

41. Samberg and Serkis : ANDYS
Andy Samberg is an actor and comedian who was a “Saturday Night Live” cast member from 2005 until 2012. Samberg also plays the lead on the police sitcom “Brooklyn Nine-Nine”.

Andy Serkis is an English actor whose most famous role perhaps is voicing Gollum in “The Lord of the Rings” series of movies.

42. Home of the Triple-A Mud Hens : TOLEDO
The Toledo Mud Hens are a minor league baseball team affiliated with the Detroit Tigers.

45. Vitamin Shoppe competitor : GNC
General Nutrition Centers (GNC) is a retailer of health and nutrition supplements based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The company was founded in 1935 as a small health food store in downtown Pittsburgh. There are now about 5,000 stores in the US. The GNC slogan is “Live Well”.

46. Vegan sandwich filler : SPROUTS
A vegan is someone who stays away from animal products. A dietary vegan eats no animal foods, not even eggs and dairy which are usually eaten by vegetarians. Ethical vegans take things one step further by following a vegan diet and also avoiding animal products in other areas of their lives e.g. items made from leather or silk.

48. Calrissian of "The Empire Strikes Back" : LANDO
The character Lando Calrissian was played by actor Billy Dee Williams in two of the “Star Wars” movies.

49. One end of Paris's Champs-Élysées : ARCHWAY
L'Arc de Triomphe de l'Etoile in Paris was built to honor those who fought for France, particularly during the Napoleonic Wars. It is the second largest triumphal arch in the world, after the Arch of Triumph in Pyongyang, North Korea. If you are visiting Paris, don't just take a picture of the arch, be sure to go inside and see the marvelous chambers and carvings, and wander around on top of the arch so that you can enjoy the magnificent view.

The Avenue des Champs-Élysées is one of the most famous streets in the world. It is the main thoroughfare in Paris, home to the Arc de Triomphe and the Place de la Concorde. The name “Champs-Élysées” is French for Elysian Fields, a place where the righteous went after death according to Greek mythology.

54. Capitol group : US SENATE
A capitol is a building in which a legislature meets. Such buildings are often constructed with an impressive dome. The term “capitol” is a reference to the Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus, the most important temple in Ancient Rome, and which sat on top of Capitoline Hill.

56. Designer Saarinen : EERO
Eero Saarinen was a Finnish American architect, renowned in this country for his unique designs for public buildings such as Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Dulles International Airport Terminal, and the TWA building at JFK. The list of his lesser-known, but still impressive, works includes several buildings erected on academic campuses. For example, the Chapel and Kresge Auditorium on the MIT campus, the Emma Hartman Noyes House at Vassar College, the Law School building at the University of Chicago, and Yale’s David S. Ingalls Rink.

59. Rap group inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2016 : NWA
NWA was a hip hop group from Compton, California. The original five group members included rappers who have made a name for themselves as solo acts, including: Dr. Dre and Ice Cube. The story of NWA is told in a 2015 film, also called “Straight Outta Compton". I hear that the movie was well received, although I probably won’t be seeing it …

63. "That Latin Beat!" bandleader : CUGAT
Xavier Cugat was an American bandleader born in Spain, who arrived in the United States via Cuba. He worked in Hollywood on movies, although he was also in charge of the Hotel Orchestra in the Waldorf Astoria in New York City for 16 years. Famously he conducted using just one arm, as he would hold his pet Chihuahua in the other. His fourth marriage was to comic actress Charo, in the first marriage ceremony ever to take place in Caesar's Palace.

66. Drone regulator, for short : FAA
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was set up in 1958 (as the Federal Aviation Agency). The agency was established at that particular time largely in response to an increasing number of midair collisions. The worst of these disasters had taken place two years earlier over the Grand Canyon, a crash between two commercial passenger airplanes that resulted in 128 fatalities.

67. Mrs., in Montreux : MME
The equivalent of “Mrs.” in French is “Mme.” (Madame), in Spanish is “Sra.” (Señora) and in Portuguese is also “Sra.” (Senhora).

68. Magic Johnson, for one : LAKER
The Los Angeles Lakers basketball team started out in 1947 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The team chose the Lakers name in honor of the nickname of Minnesota, “Land of 10,000 Lakes”. The Lakers moved to Los Angeles in 1960.

Magic Johnson’s real name is Earvin Johnson. Johnson was born and grew up in Lansing, Michigan. Earvin earned the nickname “Magic” when playing basketball in high school, after one particularly great performance on the court.

69. Apothecary's container : VIAL
Nowadays, we would call an apothecary a pharmacist. "Apotecaire" is an Old French word from the 13th century meaning simply "storekeeper".

75. Quinze + quinze : TRENTE
In French, twice “quinze” (fifteen) is “trente” (thirty).

77. Actor with the line "Gentlemen, you can't fight in here! This is the War Room!" : SELLERS
Peter Sellers was British comedian and actor, and a genius (in my humble opinion). In Britain, Sellers was famous on the radio as a star on “The Goon Show”, In the rest of the world, Sellers is perhaps best-known for playing Inspector Clouseau in “The Pink Panther” series of films. Like so many of the greatest comic performers it seems, Sellers struggled with depression in his life off-camera.

“Dr. Strangelove” is a black comedy directed and produced by Stanley Kubrick, released in 1964. The big star in the film is the great Peter Sellers, who plays three key roles. The full name of the movie is “Dr. Strangelove or: How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb”.

80. Indra, to Hindus : RAIN GOD
In Hindu mythology, Indra is the King of the gods, Lord of Heaven. He is also the God of War, Storms and Rainfall.

82. Giraffe-like beast : OKAPI
The okapi is closely related to the giraffe, although it does have markings on its legs and haunches that resemble those of a zebra. The okapi’s tongue is long enough to reach back and wash its eyeballs, and can go back even further to clean its ears inside and out.

83. What might cost you an arm and a leg? : PIRANHA
Piranhas are reputed to be able to strip an animal to its bones in seconds, but this is somewhat of a myth. Piranhas are not in fact strict carnivores, and usually are more of a nuisance to fishermen rather than a danger, as they tend to eat bait that has been set to catch other fish. Much of the reputation of the piranha is owed to the description written by President Theodore Roosevelt in his book "Through the Brazilian Wilderness". President Roosevelt was somewhat hoodwinked though, as local fishermen put on a special "show" for him. They dumped hordes of hungry piranhas into a dammed section of a river and then tossed in a sliced up cow. President Roosevelt was pretty impressed by the orchestrated feeding frenzy.

94. Flaky minerals : MICAS
Mica is a mineral, a sheet silicate. Thin sheets of mica are transparent and are used in place of glass in certain applications. This form of mica is called isinglass, and as it has a better thermal performance than glass it is a great choice for "peepholes' in boilers and lanterns. Mica is also used in the electronics industry, making use of its unique electrical and thermal insulating properties.

97. Glue trap brand : D-CON
“d-Con” is a line of rodent control products that has been around for over 50 years.

98. Tolkien meanie : ORC
Orcs are mythical humanoid creatures that appear in the writings of J. R. R. Tolkien. Since Tolkien’s use of orcs, they have also been featured in other fantasy fiction and in fantasy games.

101. Hedge fund pro : ARB
“Arb” is short for an arbitrageur, one who profits from the purchase of securities in one market and the subsequent sale in another, hence taking advantage of price discrepancies across markets.

108. West Coast city known as the Track and Field Capital of the World : EUGENE
Eugene is the second-largest city in Oregon (after Portland). The city is named for its founder, Eugene Franklin Skinner. Skinner arrived in the area in 1846, after which the settlement he established was called Skinner’s Mudhole. The name was changed to Eugene City in 1852, which was shortened to Eugene in 1889.

111. Candy known for its orange wrapping : REESE'S
Reese's Peanut Butter Cups were invented by Harry Burnett "H.B." Reese. Peanut Butter Cups were originally called penny cups, reflecting the price at which they were sold. Then inflation took over, and maybe that’s why they were broken into smaller “Pieces” …

Down
1. George Eliot title surname : MARNER
Silas Marner: The Weaver of Raveloe is a novel written by George Eliot and first published in 1861. There's an excellent BBC TV version of the tale (shown on PBS) starring Ben Kingsley in the title role, with Patsy Kensit playing Eppie, the young orphaned child that Marner takes under his wing.

2. "Swan Lake" role : ODETTE
“Swan Lake” is such a delightfully light and enjoyable ballet by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. “Swan Lake” tells the story of Odette, a princess turned into a swan by a sorcerer. The ballet also features Odile, Odette’s “evil twin”. Odile is disguised to look like Odette with the goal of tricking the prince to fall in love with her. In the ballet, the roles of Odette and Odile are played by the same ballerina. Odette’s love interest is Prince Siegfried, the only character in the ballet to appear in all four acts.

4. Corporation's head tech expert, for short : CIO
Chief Information Officer (CIO)

5. Tort basis : HARM
The word “tort” is a French word meaning “mischief, injury or wrong”. Tort law is generally about negligence, when the action of one party causes injury to another but that action falls outside of the scope of criminal law.

9. University associated with the Carter Center : EMORY
Emory is a private school in Atlanta, Georgia with a focus on graduate research. The school was named after a Methodist Episcopal bishop called John Emory, who was very popular at the time of the school's founding in 1836.

11. Weapon in some Call of Duty games : UZI
The first Uzi submachine gun was designed in the late 1940s by Major Uziel “Uzi” Gal of the Israel Defense Forces, who gave his name to the gun.

“Call of Duty” is a incredibly successful series of video games that started out life on computers and is now available for gaming consoles and handhelds. The first version of this war game was set in WWII, but other versions feature the likes of “Modern Warfare” and “Black Ops”.

13. John Glenn player in "The Right Stuff" : ED HARRIS
Ed Harris is a very talented actor, noted for two great performances in movies about the Space Program. Harris played John Glenn in “The Right Stuff” in 1983, his “breakthrough” role. Twelve years later he had a “stellar” performance as flight director Gene Kranz in “Apollo 13”.

John Glenn was Marine Corps pilot, astronaut and US Senator. As an astronaut, Glenn was the first American to orbit the earth, in 1962. He later became the oldest person to fly in space, in 1998 at the age of 77.

The 1983 movie “The Right Stuff” was adapted from a 1979 book of the same name by Tom Wolfe. It tells the story of the group of test pilots who were selected as the first astronauts, those who flew in space in the Project Mercury program.

15. Fawn's mother : DOE
A male deer is usually called a buck, and a female is a doe. However, the male red deer is usually referred to a stag. The males of even larger species of deer are often called bulls, and females cows. In older English, male deer of over 5 years were called harts, and females of over 3 years were called hinds. The young of small species are known as fawns, and of larger species are called calves. All very confusing …

17. Early explosive device : PETARD
In days of old, a petard was a small bomb that was used to breach fortified gates and walls. The phrase “hoisted by his own petard” comes from Shakespeare’s “Hamlet”, and is a reference to a petard detonating prematurely and blowing up (“hoisting”) the bomber.

34. Like some salsa : VERDE
"Salsa verde" is simply Spanish for "green sauce".

35. "Antigone" antagonist : CREON
“Antigone” is a tragedy written by Greek playwright Sophocles and first performed in 442 BC. Antigone is the daughter of King Oedipus of Thebes, born out of the incestuous relationship with his mother Jocasta.

36. Judge's seat : BANC
“Banc” is the French word for bench or seat.

40. Capital of Belarus : MINSK
Minsk is the capital of Belarus, formerly known as the Belorussian Soviet Socialist Republic. One of Minsk’s more infamous residents was Lee Harvey Oswald, who lived there from 1960 to 1962.

43. Fog might push it back, briefly : ETD
Estimated time of departure (ETD)

44. Hawaiian "thanks" : MAHALO
In Hawaiian, “mahalo” means “thank you” and “mahalo nui loa” translates as “thank you very much”.

46. Attacks from above : STRAFES
We’ve been using “strafe” to mean an attack on a ground position from low-flying aircraft since WWII. Prior to that, the word was used by British soldiers to mean any form of attack. It was picked up from the German word for “punish” as it was used in “Gott strafe England” meaning, “May God punish England”.

48. Exam with a section known as "Logic Games," for short : LSAT
Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

55. Sin of those in Dante's fifth circle : ANGER
In Dante’s “Inferno”, Hell is represented as nine circles of suffering. The nine circles of Hell are:
  1. Limbo
  2. Lust
  3. Gluttony
  4. Greed
  5. Anger
  6. Heresy
  7. Violence
  8. Fraud
  9. Treachery

58. Quarters followers : SEMIS
That might be in a sports competition.

62. Chic : SMART
“Chic” is a French word meaning “stylish”.

64. Instruments played close to the chest, informally : UKES
The ukulele (uke) originated in the 1800s and mimicked a small guitar brought to the Hawaiian Islands by Portuguese immigrants.

68. Imitates Sylvester the Cat : LISPS
Sylvester J. Pussycat was also known as Puddy Tat, and was a character who appeared in “Looney Tunes” and “Merrie Melodies” cartoons. Sylvester was the cat who was often trying to get the better of Tweety Bird, Speedy Gonzales and Hippety Hopper. Sylvester’s trademark line is the exclamation “Sufferin’ succotash!”, which emphasizes the characters pronounced lisp.

73. Something to tear into, informally? : HANKIE
A “kerchief” is a triangular or square piece of cloth used as a covering for the head. So, a handkerchief (“hand-kerchief”) is a square piece of cloth held in the hand and used for personal hygiene.

76. Yemeni capital : RIAL
"Rial" is the name of the currency of Yemen (as well as Iran, Oman, Cambodia and Tunisia).

80. It comes in tubes : RIGATONI
Rigatoni is a tubular pasta that is relatively short with ridges along its length.

84. Nag to death : BADGER
“To badger” is to harass. The term comes from the cruel practice of “badger-baiting”, which dates back to medieval times. Badger-baiting is a blood sport in which a dog is used as “bait” for a badger in its den, to draw him out into the open. The den is an artificial structure built to resemble a natural badgers’ den, complete with a tunnel entrance. The dog is sent down the tunnel causing the badger and dog to lock their jaws on each other. The badger and dog are then removed from the den by pulling on the dog’s tale. I am ashamed to say that badger-baiting is still practiced (illegally) in Ireland, with ten convictions in the courts over the past 20 years.

86. Straight man : STOOGE
We use the term “stooge” these days to for an unwitting victim, or perhaps the straight man in a comedy duo. The first “stooges” were simply stage assistants, back in the early 1900s.

87. Boy's name that's an Indiana city : GARY
The city of Gary, Indiana is located just 25 miles from downtown Chicago and falls within the Chicago metropolitan area (also known as “Chicagoland”). Gary was founded by US Steel in 1906, as the company selected it as the site for a new steel plant. The name “Gary” was chosen in honor of Elbert H. Gary, who was the key player in setting up US Steel in 1901.

88. Brazilian supermodel Bündchen : GISELE
Gisele Bündchen is a fashion model from Brazil. Bündchen does quite well for herself as she has been the highest-paid model in the world for several years now and has amassed a fortune of about $150 million. She was romantically involved with Leonardo DiCaprio for about five years and now is married to Tom Brady, the quarterback for the New England Patriots.

90. Vital lines : AORTAE
The aorta originates in the heart and extends down into the abdomen. It is the largest artery in the body.

99. Elephant pluckers of myth : ROCS
The mythical roc is a huge bird of prey, reputedly able to carry off and eat elephants. The roc was said to come from the Indian subcontinent. The supposed existence of the roc was promulgated by Marco Polo in the accounts that he published of his travels through Asia.

103. Venice-to-Trieste dir. : ENE
The city of Venice in northeast Italy is built in a saltwater lagoon on the Adriatic Coast, on 117 small islands. The classic transportation along the waterways is the gondola, but this is really only used for tourists these days, as well as on ceremonial occasions. The locals rely on the motorized water-buses.

Trieste is a city-port on the northeastern coast of Italy, and is almost completely surrounded by the country of Slovenia. Trieste was home for many years to Irish author James Joyce.

104. ___ Paulo : SAO
São Paulo is the largest city in Brazil. São Paulo is also the city with the highest number of helicopters in the world. This is partly driven by the horrendous traffic jams in São Paulo, but also by the wealthy having a very real fear of being kidnapped on the city’s streets.

105. Volunteer State sch. : TSU
Tennessee State University (TSU) was established in 1912 in Nashville. It was founded as the Agricultural and Industrial State Normal School, and was originally intended as a school for African Americans. There was a court-ordered merger in 1979 with the traditionally white University of Tennessee at Nashville.

Tennessee uses the nickname “Volunteer State” as during the War of 1812 volunteer soldiers from Tennessee fought with valor, especially during the Battle of New Orleans.

107. Card game cry : UNO
In my youth I remember being taught a great card game, by a German acquaintance of mine, called Mau Mau. Years later I discovered that Uno is basically the same game, but played with a purpose-printed deck instead of the regular deck of playing cards that’s used for Mau Mau. I hear that Mau Mau is derived from the game called Crazy Eights.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Sponged : MOOCHED
8. Asylum : REFUGE
14. Takes from page to screen, say : ADAPTS
20. Pope with the longest reign between St. Peter and Pius VI (A.D. 67-1799) : ADRIAN I
21. Left speechless : AMAZED
22. On the down-low : COVERT
23. They may be sealed or broken : RECORDS
24. Marquee locale : MOVIE THEATER
26. Degree in math : NTH
27. Gruesome : MACABRE
29. Companion of Han in "The Force Awakens" : REY
30. H.O.V. ___ : LANE
31. Sénégal summers : ETES
33. Running figure : TALLY
34. Players last produced in July 2016 : VCRS
36. Epic singers : BARDS
37. Kicks back : RESTS
39. Rural postal abbr. : RTE
40. Worthiness : MERIT
41. Samberg and Serkis : ANDYS
42. Home of the Triple-A Mud Hens : TOLEDO
44. Gets bogged down : MIRES
45. Vitamin Shoppe competitor : GNC
46. Vegan sandwich filler : SPROUTS
48. Calrissian of "The Empire Strikes Back" : LANDO
49. One end of Paris's Champs-Élysées : ARCHWAY
53. Worked as a stockbroker : TRADED
54. Capitol group : US SENATE
56. Designer Saarinen : EERO
57. Post-op program : REHAB
58. Main stem : STALK
59. Rap group inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2016 : NWA
60. Pulled off : DID
61. Like an unswept hearth : ASHY
62. Brawl : SET-TO
63. "That Latin Beat!" bandleader : CUGAT
65. Advantage : EDGE
66. Drone regulator, for short : FAA
67. Mrs., in Montreux : MME
68. Magic Johnson, for one : LAKER
69. Apothecary's container : VIAL
70. She, in Spanish : ELLA
72. Passenger jet : AIRLINER
75. Quinze + quinze : TRENTE
77. Actor with the line "Gentlemen, you can't fight in here! This is the War Room!" : SELLERS
79. Fits snugly : NESTS
80. Indra, to Hindus : RAIN GOD
81. Developer's purchase : LOT
82. Giraffe-like beast : OKAPI
83. What might cost you an arm and a leg? : PIRANHA
84. Washroom feature : BASIN
87. Totally captivates : GRIPS
88. Muzzle : GAG
89. One who knows all the shortcuts, maybe : LOCAL
92. Fill in for : ACT AS
93. Game box specification : AGES
94. Flaky minerals : MICAS
96. "Mind ... blown!" : WHOA!
97. Glue trap brand : D-CON
98. Tolkien meanie : ORC
99. Beverage with a floral bouquet : ROSE TEA
101. Hedge fund pro : ARB
102. Farmer's market alternative : GROCERY STORE
106. Admit : OWN UP TO
108. West Coast city known as the Track and Field Capital of the World : EUGENE
109. Mischievous sort : RASCAL
110. Miles away : NOT NEAR
111. Candy known for its orange wrapping : REESE'S
112. Muss up : TOUSLE
113. Things always underfoot : INSOLES

Down
1. George Eliot title surname : MARNER
2. "Swan Lake" role : ODETTE
3. Place for bows and strings : ORCHESTRA HALL
4. Corporation's head tech expert, for short : CIO
5. Tort basis : HARM
6. Wrap up around : END AT
7. Tosses : DISCARDS
8. Not stay on topic : RAMBLE
9. University associated with the Carter Center : EMORY
10. Go-to choice, slangily : FAVE
11. Weapon in some Call of Duty games : UZI
12. "I didn't know that!" : GEE!
13. John Glenn player in "The Right Stuff" : ED HARRIS
14. Sore : ACHY
15. Fawn's mother : DOE
16. Winter fall? : AVALANCHE
17. Early explosive device : PETARD
18. Modish : TRENDY
19. With 25-Down, financial regulator's requirement : STRESS ...
25. See 19-Down : .... TEST
28. Meteorological lead-in to stratus : ALTO-
32. Resolutely supported : STOOD BY
34. Like some salsa : VERDE
35. "Antigone" antagonist : CREON
36. Judge's seat : BANC
38. Zig or zag : SLUE
40. Capital of Belarus : MINSK
43. Fog might push it back, briefly : ETD
44. Hawaiian "thanks" : MAHALO
45. "Brilliant!" : GREAT!
46. Attacks from above : STRAFES
47. Exclusive event before public availability : PRESALE
48. Exam with a section known as "Logic Games," for short : LSAT
49. Fighting tooth and nail : AT WAR
50. Hitching post? : WEDDING CHAPEL
51. Japanese "thanks" : ARIGATO
52. Made peak calls? : YODELED
54. Unmitigated : UTTER
55. Sin of those in Dante's fifth circle : ANGER
58. Quarters followers : SEMIS
62. Chic : SMART
63. "Pretty please?" : CAN'T I?
64. Instruments played close to the chest, informally : UKES
65. "Still, after all this time ..." : EVEN NOW ...
68. Imitates Sylvester the Cat : LISPS
71. Results of treaties : ALLIANCES
73. Something to tear into, informally? : HANKIE
74. Bounds : LEAPS
75. Nautical sealer : TAR
76. Yemeni capital : RIAL
78. Immense spans : EONS
80. It comes in tubes : RIGATONI
82. It lays out the lines of authority : ORG CHART
83. Show anxiety, in a way : PACE
84. Nag to death : BADGER
85. Build up, as interest : ACCRUE
86. Straight man : STOOGE
87. Boy's name that's an Indiana city : GARY
88. Brazilian supermodel Bündchen : GISELE
90. Vital lines : AORTAE
91. Slogs away : LABORS
94. Kind of fiber : MORAL
95. Attach, as a patch : SEW ON
98. They're found in veins : ORES
99. Elephant pluckers of myth : ROCS
100. Marching band? : ANTS
103. Venice-to-Trieste dir. : ENE
104. ___ Paulo : SAO
105. Volunteer State sch. : TSU
107. Card game cry : UNO


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6 comments :

Dave Kennison said...

37:03, no errors. I didn't find this one particularly easy. I got the mechanics of the theme well enough to make the theme entries, but it took me a minute or two after I was done to fully understand the rationale behind it.

Lou Sander said...

We missed a few letters due to not knowing LANDO and something else. The puzzle wasn't too easy, but we really admired the cleverness of the cluing and of the theme. We figured out the theme early on, which made things easier. A hard puzzle, but fun to figure out. We really enjoyed being reminded of Dr. Strangelove, a VERY funny film.

ibbill said...

We have never seen Star Wars. The 2 clues filled in for us.

Soon as we saw this one we went directly to google.

35. "Antigone" antagonist : CREON
“Antigone” is a tragedy written by Greek playwright Sophocles and first performed in 442 BC. Antigone is the daughter of King Oedipus of Thebes, born out of the incestuous relationship with his mother Jocasta.

All in all a little tough for us newbies but okay.

BruceB said...

38:01, no errors. Good puzzle, challenging but just enough hand holds to enable me to climb the wall.

108A EUGENE, Oregon has become the track and field capital because of the presence of the University of Oregon, and more recently due to the largesse of one of its most famous alums Phil Knight. Knight is the founder of athletic equipment company Nike, and has donated well over 100 million dollars to U of O athletics.

Anonymous said...

39:43, no errors. Much as I hate rebuses, I have to admit this one actually was clever, with the aisles appearing amid two-word things that actually *have* aisles.

Tom M. said...

Fun puzzle. Erred at REY/ACHY crossing with an "e" instead of the "Y". My POD's (People of the Day): Ed HARRIS, Peter Sellers, and the very lovely GISELE Bundchen.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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