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0331-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Mar 17, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: David C. Duncan Dekker
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 11m 08s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 4

  • ODETS (Owets!)
  • CENI (Cena)
  • PEE DEE (Peewee)
  • COTTI (cotta)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. "Don Juan," for one : EPIC POEM
Lord Byron wrote the poem "Don Juan" based on the legend of Don Juan the libertine. In the poem, he created the character Donna Inez, Don Juan's mother. Supposedly Inez was based on Byron's own wife, Annabella Milbanke.

16. Mammals using echolocation : SHREWS
Shrews are mammals that look like small moles or long-nosed mice. They are the only terrestrial mammals that are known to echolocate, using a series of ultrasonic squeaks to examine their nearby surroundings.

19. "The Flowering Peach" playwright : ODETS
“Two By Two” is a 1970 musical with lyrics that is based on the “The Flowering Peach”, a play by Clifford Odets. Both the musical and play tell the story of Noah and the Great Flood. The musical was only produced one time, on Broadway with Danny Kaye playing the lead.

20. Moo ___ : SHU
Moo shu pork (also “mu shu pork”) is a traditional dish from northern China, with the main ingredients being shredded pork and scrambled egg.

22. Hayek of "Grown Ups" : SALMA
Salma Hayek is a Mexican actress. Hayek was the first Mexican national to be nominated for a Best Actress Oscar, for her portrayal of artist Frida Kahlo in the 2002 movie "Frida".

“Grown Ups" is a 2010 comedy movie written by and starring Adam Sandler. The film revolves around five childhood friends who reunite after thirty years. Sandler plays one of the five, along with Kevin James, Chris Rock, David Spade and Rob Schneider.

26. Dunderhead : SIMP
“Simp” is slang for a simple or foolish person. Not nice …

27. Nancy Sinatra's "If ___ Love Me" : HE’D
Singer Nancy Sinatra has a few big hits to her name, including 1966’s “These Boots Are Made for Walkin’”, 1967’s “Somethin’ Stupid”, and 1967’s “You Only Live Twice” (theme song for the movie). Nancy is the daughter of the great Frank Sinatra, who sang “Somethin’ Stupid” with her as a duet. Frank also passed on “You Only Live Twice” before the song was offered to Nancy.

28. Brown Betty, e.g. : PUDDING
Brown Betty is a simple dessert made from apples (usually) with sweetened crumbs on top, and then baked.

30. Org. with a campaign called "Degrees Not Debt" : NEA
The National Education Association (NEA) is the largest labor union in the country, and mainly represents public school teachers.

34. Jet stream locale : JACUZZI
Jacuzzi is one of those brand names that has become so much associated with the product that it is often assumed to be a generic term. The Jacuzzi company was founded in 1915 by the seven(!) Jacuzzi brothers in Berkeley California. The brothers, who were Italian immigrants, pronounced their name “ja-coot-si”, as one might suspect when one realizes the name is of Italian origin. The company started off by making aircraft propellers and then small aircraft, but suspended aircraft production in 1925 when one the brothers was killed in one of their planes. The family then started making hydraulic pumps, and in 1948 developed a submersible bathtub pump so that a son of one of the brothers could enjoy hydrotherapy for his rheumatoid arthritis. The “hydrotherapy product” took off in the fifties with some astute marketing towards “worn-out housewives” and the use of celebrity spokesman Jack Benny.

37. Romantic visionary : QUIXOTE
The full name of Cervantes’s novel is “The Ingenious Hidalgo Don Quixote of La Mancha”. In the story, Don Quixote is a retired country gentleman who heads out as a knight-errant and who renames himself Don Quixote of la Mancha. In his mind he designates a neighboring farm girl called Aldonza Lorenzo as his lady love, and renames her Dulcinea del Toboso.

38. N.B.A. Hall-of-Famer Mourning : ALONZO
Basketball player Alonzo Mourning played most of his career with the Miami Heat, and in 2009 was the first person to have his number retired. In 2003, Mourning had a kidney replacement, a donation from a cousin that he had not seen in 25 years.

39. Oscar-winning role in "Life Is Beautiful" : GUIDO
Roberto Benigni is an Italian actor and director. Benigni had a major role in "Son of the Pink Panther" in which he played the illegitimate son of Inspector Clouseau played by Peter Sellers. The movie bombed in America, but made it big in Benigni's native country of Italy. His most famous role in here in America is in the 1997 film "Life is Beautiful", an Italian language film that won him the 1997 Oscar for Best Actor (and Benigni also directed the movie).

43. Real pal, for short : BFF
Best friend forever (BFF)

46. Many of its products have legs : IKEA
The furniture chain IKEA was founded by Ingvar Kamprad in 1943, when he was just 17-years-old. IKEA is an acronym standing for Ingvar Kamprad Elmtaryd Agunnaryd (don’t forget now!). Elmtaryd was the name of the farm where Ingvar Kamprad grew up, and Agunnaryd is his home parish in Sweden.

49. Noah of "Falling Skies" : WYLE
Noah Wyle is an actor noted for playing Dr. John Truman Carter III on television’s “ER”. He was highly valued by the show’s producers, earning about $400,000 per episode in 2005, a world record for an actor in a TV drama at that time.

"Falling Skies" is a sci-fi television series about life in Boston after an alien invasion.

50. Plants of the arum family : TAROS
The corm of some taro plants is used to make poi, the traditional Hawaiian dish (that I think tastes horrible). When a taro plant is grown as an ornamental, it is often called Elephant Ears due to the shape of its large leaves.

52. Ft. Sumter battler : REB
Fort Sumter is a fortification lying on an artificially constructed island in Charleston Harbor in South Carolina. In December 1860, when South Carolina seceded from the Union, US Army forces relocated to Fort Sumter deeming it to be a relatively defensible location. On 11 April 1861, confederate forces demanded that the fort be surrendered. When the defenders refused to budge, confederate artillery opened fire at 4:30 in the morning on 12 April 1861, starting the American Civil War.

54. Range that's home to Ha Ha Tonka State Park : OZARKS
The Ozark Mountains aren't really mountains geographically speaking, and the Ozarks are better described by the alternate name, the Ozark Plateau. It's not really certain how the Ozarks got their name, but my favorite theory is that "Ozarks" is the phonetic spelling of "aux Arks", short for "of Arkansas" in French.

56. Units in modern film ratings? : TOMATOES
“Rotten Tomatoes” is a website that mainly provides reviews and ratings of movies, although it now covers TV shows as well. The site was launched in 1998 and takes its name from the practice of audience members throwing rotten tomatoes at a unappreciated performer on stage.

Down
1. 1980s big-city mayor : ED KOCH
Ed Koch was a Democratic Representative in the US Congress from 1969-73, and then Mayor of New York City from 1978-89. From 1997 to 1999 Koch was a “judge” on the TV show “The People’s Court”. And in 2004, he collaborated with his sister Pat Koch, and wrote a children’s book called “Eddie, Harold’s Little Brother”, a tale about Ed’s own childhood experiences.

2. Alphabetically rhyming river name : PEE DEE
The Pee Dee River takes its name from the Pee Dee tribe of Native Americans from the southeast of the United States.

4. Baked, in Bologna : COTTA
Bologna is a city in northern Italy. The city is home to the University of Bologna that was founded way back in 1088. The University of Bologna is the oldest existing university in the world.

5. Grps. supporting the 30-Across : PTAS
Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

6. Wild thing? : OAT
Traditionally, wild oats was a crop that one would regret sowing instead of “good grain”. Young and tempestuous people were rash enough to sow their wild oats, and had yet to comprehend their folly. Over time, to “feel one’s oats” came to mean “be lively and confident”.

8. Modi operandi : METHODS
“Modus operandi” (plural “modi operandi”) is the Latin for “mode of operating”, a term we’ve been using since the mid-1600s. It’s often used by the police when referring to the methods typically employed by a particular perpetrator of a crime, and is usually abbreviated to “M.O.”

9. Common four-year deg. : BSC
Bachelor of Science (BS or BSc)

10. Novelist Jean with the 1966 best seller "Wide Sargasso Sea" : RHYS
Wide Sargasso Sea” was written by Jean Rhys and first published in 1966. It’s a clever work, written as a sort of prequel to Charlotte Bronte’s famous “Jane Eyre”, which dates back to 1847.

21. AK-47 alternative : UZI
The first Uzi submachine gun was designed in the late 1940s by Major Uziel “Uzi” Gal of the Israel Defense Forces, who gave his name to the gun.

The AK-47 rifle is also known as the “Kalashnikov”, after the guns inventor Mikhail Kalashnikov. The AK-47 first saw service with the Soviet Army, starting in 1948.

33. Big name in kitchen utensils : OXO
The OXO line of kitchen utensils is designed to be ergonomically superior to the average kitchen too. The intended user of OXO products is someone who doesn't have the normal range of motion or strength in the hands e.g. someone suffering from arthritis.

34. Cleanup crew : JANITORS
A janitor is someone who takes care of the maintenance or cleaning of a building. An older definition of the term is “doorman”. Our word comes from the Latin “ianitor” meaning “doorkeeper”.

39. Montreal daily : GAZETTE
“The Gazette” is an English-language daily newspaper published in Montreal. “The Gazette” was founded in 1778 and is actually the oldest newspaper in the province of Quebec.

45. Spills it, with "up" : FESSES
The term “fess” is most often seen as part of the phrasal verb “to fess up” meaning “to admit to something”. “Fess” is simply a shortened form of “confess”.

47. Trunk in the trunk : AORTA
The aorta originates in the heart and extends down into the abdomen. It is the largest artery in the body.

51. Hershey bar : SKOR
Skor is a candy bar produced by Hershey’s. “Skor” is Swedish for “shoes”, and the candy bar’s wrapping features a crown that is identical to that found in the Swedish national emblem. What “shoes” have to do with candy, I don’t know …

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "Don Juan," for one : EPIC POEM
9. Look a little here, look a little there : BROWSE
15. Old means of getting discovered : DEMO TAPE
16. Mammals using echolocation : SHREWS
17. Stayed the course : KEPT AT IT
18. Like biorhythms : CYCLIC
19. "The Flowering Peach" playwright : ODETS
20. Moo ___ : SHU
22. Hayek of "Grown Ups" : SALMA
23. John of pro wrestling : CENA
24. Hard stuff to swallow : BOOZE
26. Dunderhead : SIMP
27. Nancy Sinatra's "If ___ Love Me" : HE’D
28. Brown Betty, e.g. : PUDDING
30. Org. with a campaign called "Degrees Not Debt" : NEA
31. Options in a catalog : SIZES
32. In a sound bite, say : QUOTED
34. Jet stream locale : JACUZZI
37. Romantic visionary : QUIXOTE
38. N.B.A. Hall-of-Famer Mourning : ALONZO
39. Oscar-winning role in "Life Is Beautiful" : GUIDO
40. ___ system (GPS device) : NAV
41. Romantic liaison : AFFAIRE
43. Real pal, for short : BFF
46. Many of its products have legs : IKEA
48. Lacking focus : FUZZY
49. Noah of "Falling Skies" : WYLE
50. Plants of the arum family : TAROS
52. Ft. Sumter battler : REB
53. Pet shop purchases : CAGES
54. Range that's home to Ha Ha Tonka State Park : OZARKS
56. Units in modern film ratings? : TOMATOES
58. Convertible : RAGTOP
59. A trivial sum, informally : TWOPENCE
60. Like cream cheese on a bagel : SMEARY
61. Shady bunch? : ELM TREES

Down
1. 1980s big-city mayor : ED KOCH
2. Alphabetically rhyming river name : PEE DEE
3. Loom : IMPEND
4. Baked, in Bologna : COTTA
5. Grps. supporting the 30-Across : PTAS
6. Wild thing? : OAT
7. Series opener : EPISODE I
8. Modi operandi : METHODS
9. Common four-year deg. : BSC
10. Novelist Jean with the 1966 best seller "Wide Sargasso Sea" : RHYS
11. Things in a pod : ORCAS
12. Not near the beginning of : WELL INTO
13. What has different strokes for different folks? : SWIM MEET
14. Bit of antics : ESCAPADE
21. AK-47 alternative : UZI
24. "Go away!" : BUZZ OFF!
25. Probe, to Brits : ENQUIRY
28. ___ topping : PIZZA
29. Leading figure : GUIDE
31. Light of the world : SUN
33. Big name in kitchen utensils : OXO
34. Cleanup crew : JANITORS
35. "Presto chango!" : ALAKAZAM!
36. Media attention : COVERAGE
37. Good practice for the show "It's Academic" : QUIZ BOWL
39. Montreal daily : GAZETTE
42. Winter coat lining : FUR
43. Past : BYGONE
44. Winter coat lining : FLEECE
45. Spills it, with "up" : FESSES
47. Trunk in the trunk : AORTA
49. Well-kept resource : WATER
51. Hershey bar : SKOR
53. Airline V.I.P.: Abbr. : CAPT
55. One wearing sunglasses, stereotypically : SPY
57. Pop enthusiast? : MOM


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0330-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Mar 17, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Lewis E. Rothlein
THEME: Mic Drop
In order to make sense out of today’s themed answers, we need to DROP the MIC:
42D. Dramatic ending to a performance ... or a hint to answering the six starred clues : MIC DROP

15A. *Onetime White House nickname : MICRON (giving “Ron”)
19A. *What may keep a model's weight down? : BALSAMIC (giving “balsa”)
51A. *Anthem writer : MICKEY (giving “Key”)
11D. *Word after North or South : POLEMIC (giving “Pole”)
36D. *Shade of black : COMICAL (giving “coal”)
39D. *Discussion venues : FORMICA (giving “fora”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 11m 55s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

4. Not esto or eso : OTRO
In Spanish, if it’s not “esto” (this) or “eso” (that) then it’s the “otro” (other).

8. Frances Moore ___, author of the best-selling "Diet for a Small Planet" : LAPPE
Author Frances Moore Lappé’s most famous title is 1971’s “Diet for a Small Planet”. The main thesis of this work is that meat production is overly burdensome on the environment, and that world hunger is less an issue of lack of food, and more an issue of food policy.

13. HUD secretary Carson : BEN
Ben Carson is a neurosurgeon who made an unsuccessful bid to become the Republican candidate for US president in the 2016 primaries. Subsequently, Carson became Secretary of Housing and Urban Development in President Trump’s administration. He is a lacto-ovo vegetarian, a decision that Dr. Carson made out of concern for his health.

15. *Onetime White House nickname : MICRON (giving “Ron”)
Ron Reagan's views couldn't be any further from those of his father President Ronald Reagan, I’d say. Before the radio network Air America went bust, Ron had a daily 3-hour spot, and these days he makes frequent appearances on MSNBC. Young Reagan is also a good dancer, and for a while was a member of the Joffrey Ballet.

The measurement of length called a micron (plural “micra”) is more correctly referred to a micrometer (or “micrometre”). One micron is equivalent to one millionth of a meter.

16. High-pH : ALKALINE
As we all recall from chemistry class, a pH of 7 is considered neutral. Anything less than 7 is an acid, and anything above 7 is a base.

The “opposite” of an acid is a base. Acids turn litmus paper red, and bases turn it blue. Acids and bases react with each other to form salts. An important subset of the chemicals called bases are the alkalis, the hydroxides of the alkali metals and of ammonium. The term “alkali” is sometimes used interchangeably with “base”, especially if that base is readily soluble in water.

19. *What may keep a model's weight down? : BALSAMIC (giving “balsa”)
Balsa is a very fast growing tree that is native to parts of South America. Even though balsa wood is very soft, it is actually classified as a hardwood, the softest of all the hardwoods (go figure!). Balsa is light and strong, so is commonly used in making model airplanes. Amazingly, in WWII a full-size British plane, the de Havilland Mosquito, was built largely from balsa and plywood. No wonder they called it "The Wooden Wonder" and "The Timber Terror".

25. Rarest state bird : NENE
The bird called a nene is a native of Hawaii, and is also known as the Hawaiian goose. The name "nene" is imitative of its call. When Captain Cook landed on the islands in 1778, there were 25,000 nene living there. By 1950, the number was reduced by hunting to just 30 birds. Conservation efforts in recent years have been somewhat successful.

27. Shamble, e.g. : GAIT
“To shamble” is to walk awkwardly, to shuffle along. The term may derive from the use of “shamble” as a noun meaning a butcher’s shop. A shambling gait might involve the leg’s being someone splayed, resembling the legs on a butchers’ table. As an aside, the most famous old street in York in the north of England is called “the Shambles”. Back in the late 1800s, the relatively short street was home to twenty-five butchers’ show, although all are long gone now.

28. "The Disrobing of Christ" painter, 1579 : EL GRECO
“El Greco” (“the Greek”, in Spanish) was the nickname of the artist whose real name was Domenikos Theotokopoulos. El Greco was born in Crete in 1541, and moved to Venice to study art when he was in his early twenties. A few years later he moved to the city of Toledo in central Spain, where he lived and worked for the rest of his life.

31. Most-nominated woman ever in the Grammys : BEYONCE
Beyoncé Knowles established herself in the entertainment industry as the lead singer with the R&B group Destiny's Child. She launched her solo singing career in 2003, two years after making her first appearance as an actor. In 2006 she played the lead in the very successful movie adaptation of the Broadway musical "Dreamgirls". Beyoncé is married to rap star Jay-Z. She is also referred to affectionately as “Queen Bey”, a play on the phrase “the queen bee”.

35. Watches every penny : SCRIMPS
43. Not getting up until after 10? : KOED
Knocked out (KOed)

44. Something that's long and steep? : LIMO
Long in length, and steep in price.

The word "limousine" derives from the French city of Limoges. The area around Limoges is called the Limousin, and it gave its name to a cloak hood worn by local shepherds. In early motor cars, a driver would sit outside in the weather while the passengers would sit in the covered compartment. The driver would often wear a limousin-style protective hood, giving rise to that type of transportation being called a "limousine". Well, that's how the story goes anyway …

46. Pop singer Halliwell : GERI
Geri Halliwell was nicknamed Ginger Spice when she was with the Spice Girls, because of her red hair. Halliwell was quite a bit older than the rest of the group and so sometimes she was less charitably referred to as “Old Spice”. After launching her solo career, Halliwell released a fabulous 2001 version of the song “It’s Raining Men”, which was originally recorded by the Weather Girls in 1982. Great song …

48. Famed deli seen in Woody Allen's "Manhattan" : ZABAR’S
Zabar’s is a famous food store and deli in Manhattan that shows up a lot in TV shows and movies. Zabar’s ran into a some problems a few years ago when a journalist reported that the store’s lobster salad, which had been a hit for 15 years, did not in fact contain any lobster. The spread is now called “Zabster Zalad”.

51. *Anthem writer : MICKEY (giving “Key”)
The lyrics of “The Star-Spangled Banner” were written first as a poem by Francis Scott Key. Key’s inspiration was the bombarding by the British of the American forces at Fort McHenry that he witnessed during the Battle of Baltimore in September 1814. The words were then set to the tune of a popular British drinking song penned by John Stafford Smith called “The Anacreontic Song”, with the Anacreontic Society being a men’s club in London.

55. It's usually in the 80s or 90s : OCTANE
The difference between a premium and regular gasoline is its octane rating. The octane rating is measure of the resistance of the gasoline to auto-ignition i.e. its resistance to ignition just by virtue of being compressed in the cylinder. This auto-ignition is undesirable as multiple-cylinder engines are designed so that ignition within each cylinder takes place precisely when the plug sparks, and not before. If ignition occurs before the spark is created, the resulting phenomenon is called "knocking". We sometimes use the adjective “high-octane” to mean “intense, dynamic, high-powered”

56. Start of a kids' taunt : LIAR! LIAR!
The full rhyme used by children to deride someone not telling the truth is:
Liar, liar, pants on fire,
Hang them up on the telephone wire.
The rhyme is the source of the title for the 1997 Jim Carrey comedy “Liar Liar”. "Liar Liar" is an amusing film about a lawyer who finds himself only able to tell the truth and cannot tell a lie, all because his son made a birthday wish.

58. "___ homo" : ECCE
According to the Gospel of John, when Pilate presented a scourged and beaten Jesus to the crowd he used the words “Ecce homo”, Latin for “Behold the man”.

61. Florida pro team : RAYS
The Tampa Bay Rays are a relatively “young” franchise, having been formed in 1998. The initial name of the franchise was the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. While known as the Devil Rays, the team finished last in the league in almost every year. The name was changed to the Tampa Bay Rays in 2008, and I am told the Rays started into a streak of winning seasons soon after.

62. About 5 mL : TSP
Teaspoon (tsp.)

Down
1. Capital of Swaziland : MBABANE
The Kingdom of Swaziland is located in southern Africa and is a nation almost completely surrounded by South Africa. Swaziland is quite a small country, only 120 miles long from north to south, and 80 miles from east to west.

3. Vague notion : INKLING
Our word “inkling” apparently comes from the Middle English word “inclen” meaning “to hint”.

4. Start of a Beatles title : OB-LA-
“Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da” is one of many songs credited to Lennon/McCartney that was actually written by just one of the pair. Paul McCartney wrote this one, a song that John Lennon really did not like at all. Apparently Lennon was quite obstructionist during the recording of the song and even walked out at one point.

7. "It's just getting out of ___ and getting into another" (John Lennon on death) : ONE CAR
John Lennon grew up in a modest home in Liverpool in the northwest of England. Named “Mendips”, the house belonged to Lennon’s maternal aunt and her husband. Lennon was raised by his aunt from the age of five, after his mother was persuaded that the arrangement would be of benefit to young John. Mendips was purchased by Lennon’s widow Yoko Ono in 2002, who then handed it over the National Trust, a British conservation organization.

8. Fatty acid, for one : LIPID
Lipids are a groups of naturally occurring molecules, including fats, waxes and fat-soluble vitamins (like A, D and E). Sometimes we use the words “fat” and “lipid” interchangeably but fats are a subgroup of lipids, specifically a group best called triglycerides.

10. Ever-changing : PROTEAN
In Greek mythology, the sea-god Proteus had the ability to take on new shapes to hide himself. This led to our word “protean”, meaning someone or something that is ever-changing and versatile.

11. *Word after North or South : POLEMIC (giving “Pole”)
"Polemic" can also be spelled as "polemical", and either way it describes something controversial. The word comes into English from the Greek "polemos" meaning "war".

17. Something that may be found in a belt : ASTEROID
The vast majority of asteroids in the Solar System are found in the main asteroid belt, which is located between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. Four large asteroids (Ceres, Vesta, Pallas and Hygiea) make up about half the mass of the asteroid belt and are 400-950 km in diameter. The total mass of the belt is just 4% of the mass of our Moon. The larger asteroids are also known as “planetoids”.

27. 2014 psychological thriller based on a Gillian Flynn novel : GONE GIRL
“Gone Girl” is a thriller novel written by Gillian Flynn that was first published in 2012. The story tells of a man whose wife has disappeared, with the reader not being certain if the husband is involved in the disappearance. The book was adapted into a movie of the same name released in 2014, starring Ben Affleck and Rosamund Pike.

39. *Discussion venues : FORMICA (giving “fora”)
The Latin “forum” (plural “fora”) translates as “marketplace, town square”. “The Roman Forum” is the most famous example of such a space. The Forum is at the heart of the city of Rome is surrounded by the ruins of several ancient government buildings, and has been referred to as the most celebrated meeting place in the world.

42. Dramatic ending to a performance ... or a hint to answering the six starred clues : MIC DROP
A “mic drop” takes place when a performer has done particularly well and decides to celebrate by throwing or dropping the microphone to the floor. That doesn’t seem to happen at the performances I tend to frequent …

48. ___ cards (tools used in ESP testing) : ZENER
Zener cards were developed in the early thirties by psychologist Karl Zener, for use in experiments related to extra-sensory perception (ESP). These five simple and distinctive cards replaced the standard deck of cards that had been used in trials up to that point. The five symbols used on the cards are a circle, a cross, three wavy lines, a square and a star.

52. The Green Hornet's masked driver : KATO
In "The Green Hornet" television series, Kato was famously played by Bruce Lee. The Kato role has been cited as a driving force behind the increase in popularity of martial arts in the US during the sixties.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Hosp. procedure : MRI
4. Not esto or eso : OTRO
8. Frances Moore ___, author of the best-selling "Diet for a Small Planet" : LAPPE
13. HUD secretary Carson : BEN
14. Milling byproduct : BRAN
15. *Onetime White House nickname : MICRON (giving “Ron”)
16. High-pH : ALKALINE
18. Support : UPHOLD
19. *What may keep a model's weight down? : BALSAMIC (giving “balsa”)
20. "Hear me out ..." : LISTEN ...
21. Somewhat : A BIT
22. Caught : SNARED
24. Music genre that spawned a fashion style : EMO
25. Rarest state bird : NENE
26. Walked (on) : TROD
27. Shamble, e.g. : GAIT
28. "The Disrobing of Christ" painter, 1579 : EL GRECO
31. Most-nominated woman ever in the Grammys : BEYONCE
33. What it takes decades to grow : OLD
34. Poetic "indeed" : E’EN
35. Watches every penny : SCRIMPS
39. It comes at the end of a sentence : FREEDOM
43. Not getting up until after 10? : KOED
44. Something that's long and steep? : LIMO
46. Pop singer Halliwell : GERI
47. "Baby ___ Want You" (1971 hit by Bread) : I’M A
48. Famed deli seen in Woody Allen's "Manhattan" : ZABAR’S
50. Visiting the nation's capital, for short : IN DC
51. *Anthem writer : MICKEY (giving “Key”)
53. Brought in : IMPORTED
55. It's usually in the 80s or 90s : OCTANE
56. Start of a kids' taunt : LIAR! LIAR!
57. More substantial, as a paycheck : FATTER
58. "___ homo" : ECCE
59. Traffic caution : SLO
60. Elevator stop : FLOOR
61. Florida pro team : RAYS
62. About 5 mL : TSP

Down
1. Capital of Swaziland : MBABANE
2. Put a new tag on : RELABEL
3. Vague notion : INKLING
4. Start of a Beatles title : OB-LA-
5. Adorns : TRIMS
6. Unexpectedly met : RAN INTO
7. "It's just getting out of ___ and getting into another" (John Lennon on death) : ONE CAR
8. Fatty acid, for one : LIPID
9. German cries : ACHS
10. Ever-changing : PROTEAN
11. *Word after North or South : POLEMIC (giving “Pole”)
12. One may close a book : ENDNOTE
15. Rocky Mountain forager : MULE DEER
17. Something that may be found in a belt : ASTEROID
23. Way overcharge, say : ROB
27. 2014 psychological thriller based on a Gillian Flynn novel : GONE GIRL
29. Wood resistant to splitting : ELM
30. Turner of music : CD PLAYER
32. "___-haw!" : YEE
35. Take from the top : SKIM OFF
36. *Shade of black : COMICAL (giving “coal”)
37. Give one's opinion on, say : REACT TO
38. Bro or sis : SIB
39. *Discussion venues : FORMICA (giving “fora”)
40. One with a job to fill? : DENTIST
41. Trials : ORDEALS
42. Dramatic ending to a performance ... or a hint to answering the six starred clues : MIC DROP
45. Padded envelope : MAILER
48. ___ cards (tools used in ESP testing) : ZENER
49. Airheaded : SPACY
52. The Green Hornet's masked driver : KATO
54. Metal containers : ORES


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0329-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Mar 17, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Jules P. Markey
THEME: Middle Age
Today’s themed answers include hidden words somewhere in the MIDDLE, each of which is an AGE:
34A. Crisis time, for some ... or a hint to each of the circled words : MIDDLE AGE

17A. Things that power Teslas : ELECTRIC ENGINES (hiding “ice age”)
27A. Went bonkers : LOST ONE'S MARBLES (hiding “Stone Age”)
44A. Lakeside furniture item : ADIRONDACK CHAIR (hiding “Iron Age”)
57A. Label rarely seen on silk garments : MACHINE WASHABLE (hiding “new age”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 44s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. OPEC, e.g. : BLOC
The OPEC cartel (the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) was formally established in 1960 and has been headquartered in Vienna since 1965. The US is actually the third largest oil producer in the world (after Russia and Saudi Arabia). One reason America isn't in OPEC, even though we are a big producer, is that we import a lot more than we export. But we all probably knew that already …

14. J. E. B. Stuart's superior in the Civil War : R E LEE
General Jeb Stuart fought with the Confederate States Army during the Civil War. The nickname “Jeb” was formed from the initials of Stuart’s full name: James Ewell Brown Stuart.

15. Indian royal : RANI
A ranee (also spelled “rani”) is a queen or a princess, the female equivalent of a raja in India.

16. "Honey wine" : MEAD
Mead is a lovely drink, made from fermented honey and water.

17. Things that power Teslas : ELECTRIC ENGINES (hiding “ice age”)
Ice ages are periods in the Earth’s history when there are extensive ice sheets present in the northern and southern hemispheres. One might argue that we are still in an ice age that began 2.6 million years ago, as evidenced by the presence of ice sheets covering Greenland and Antarctica.

Tesla Motors is a manufacturer of electric vehicles based in Palo Alto, California. Tesla is noted for producing the first electric sports car, called the Tesla Roadster. The company followed the sports car with a luxury sedan, the Model S. The Model S was the world’s best selling plug-in electric vehicle of 2015.

20. Criticism, informally : FLAK
"Flak" was originally an acronym from the German term for an aircraft defense cannon (FLiegerAbwehrKanone). Flak then became used in English as a general term for antiaircraft fire, and ultimately a term for verbal criticism as in "to take flak".

23. SEAL's org. : USN
SEAL is an acronym used by the US Navy’s SEa, Air and Land teams. The SEALs were born out of the Navy’s special warfare groups from WWII, like the Underwater Demolition Teams and the Motor Torpedo Boat Squadrons. The Navy SEAL unit was established soon after President Kennedy’s famous speech in which he announced the plan to put a man on the moon, as in the same speech the president allocated $100m of funding to strengthen special operations forces. The Navy used some of this money to set up guerrilla and counterguerrilla units, which soon became the SEALs.

25. Rudy's coach in "Rudy" : ARA
Ara Parseghian coached the Notre Dame football team from 1964 to 1974, a period known as "The Era of Ara".

26. N.L. East city : ATL
The Atlanta Braves are the only team to have won baseball's World Series in three different home cities. They won as the Boston Braves in 1914, the Milwaukee Braves in 1957 and the Atlanta Braves in 1995.

27. Went bonkers : LOST ONE'S MARBLES (hiding “Stone Age”)
Ancient societies can be classified by the "three-age system", which depends on the prevalence of materials used to make tools. The three ages are:
  • The Stone Age
  • The Bronze Age
  • The Iron Age
The actual dates defined by each age depend on the society, as the timing of the transition from the use of one material to another varied around the globe.

The word “bonkers” meaning “crazy” originated in the fifties. The term might come from navy slang meaning “slightly drunk”, behaving as though one received a “bonk” on the head.

31. Teutonic turndown : NEIN
The Germanic peoples of Northern Europe are often called Teutonic, a term which originated with the Teutons, one of the Germanic tribes that lived in the region in the days of Ancient Greece and Rome.

33. Snaky character : ESS
There’s a letter S (ess) in the word “snaky”, and the letter S itself looks rather snaky.

38. It's an honour: Abbr. : OBE
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is an order of chivalry in the UK that was established in 1917 by King George V. There are five classes within the order, which are in descending seniority:
  • Knight Grand Cross (GBE)
  • Knight Commander (KBE)
  • Commander (CBE)
  • Officer (OBE)
  • Member (MBE)

40. Camera named for a goddess : EOS
I’ve been using Canon EOS cameras for decades now, and have nothing but good things to say about the cameras and the lenses. The EOS name stands for Electro-Optical System, and was chosen because it evokes the name of Eos, the Titan goddess of dawn from Greek mythology.

41. Year the Korean War began : MCML
Korea was occupied by the Japanese military from 1910 until Japan surrendered at the end of WWII in 1945. While the UN was working towards a trusteeship administration for Korea, the Soviet Union managed the Korean Peninsula north of the 38th parallel and the US managed the south. The UN’s plans came to naught as the Cold War dictated the establishment of the two separate states of North Korea and South Korea. North Korea invaded the South in 1950, leading to the Korean War. After three years of fighting, the border between the two states became the demarcation line between the two military forces on the day the Armistice Agreement was signed. That line runs diagonally across the 38th parallel, and is better known as the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ).

44. Lakeside furniture item : ADIRONDACK CHAIR (hiding “Iron Age”)
An Adirondack chair is a wooden chair designed for use outdoors. The original Adirondack chair was designed in 1903 by one Thomas Lee, who was vacationing in Westport, New York in the Adirondack Mountains.

50. Cock-a-___ (dog breed) : POO
Poodle hybrids are sometimes described as “designer dogs”. Examples are the Labradoodle (Labrador retriever and poodle cross), cockapoo (cocker-spaniel and poodle cross) and Jack-A-Poo (Jack Russell and poodle cross).

51. Dorm V.I.P.s : RAS
RAs are resident assistants or resident advisers, the peer leaders found in residence halls, particularly on a college campus.

53. 1974 hit with Spanish lyrics : ERES TU
We have a big event across Europe every year called the Eurovision Song Contest. Each nation enters one song in competition with each other, and then voters across the whole continent decide on the winner. That’s how ABBA got their big break when they won in 1974 with “Waterloo”. In 1973, Spain’s entry was “Eres tú” (the Spanish for “You Are”) sung by the band Mocedades. “Eres tu” came second in the competition, but should have won in my humble opinion.

55. Joe Biden, for 36 yrs. : SEN
Vice President Joe Biden was a US Senator representing the state of Delaware from 1973 until he joined the Obama administration. While he was a senator, Vice President Biden commuted to Washington from Wilmington, Delaware almost every working day. He was such an active customer and supporter of Amtrak that the Wilmington Station was renamed as the Joseph R. Biden Railroad Station in 2011. Biden has made over 7,000 trips from that station, and the Amtrak crews were known to even hold the last train for a few minutes so that he could catch it. Biden earned himself the nickname “Amtrak Joe”.

57. Label rarely seen on silk garments : MACHINE WASHABLE (hiding “new age”)
New-Age music is created to provide a relaxing and stress-free atmosphere. The New Age movement is often said to have begun with the release of an album called “Spectrum Suite” by Steven Halpern in 1975.

61. Simoleon : CLAM
Lettuce, cabbage, kale, dough, scratch, simoleons, clams and moola(h) are all slang terms for money.

63. Crash-probing agcy. : NTSB
The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is responsible for the investigation of major accidents involving transportation. Included in this broad definition is the transportation of fluids in pipelines. The organization is independent in that it has no ties to other government agencies or departments so that its investigations can be viewed as “impartial”. The NTSB also earns a little money for the US as it hires out its investigation teams to countries who don’t have the necessary resources available on their own soil.

Down
6. Game for dummies? : BRIDGE
Four people are needed to play the card game bridge. For each round, one person doesn't participate in the play, and is designated the “dummy”. When playing in my house, he or she goes and gets the drinks ...

7. Spike, as punch : LACE
To lace a drink, is to spike it, by adding perhaps some alcohol or other strong substance.

9. Wide-screen movie format : CINERAMA
Cinerama is a widescreen format that was introduced in some theaters in the fifties. A Cinerama screen is very curved, and it takes three movie projectors operating simultaneously to provide the full image.

12. Hamlet's killer : LAERTES
In William Shakespeare’s play “Hamlet”, Laertes is the son of Polonius and brother of Ophelia. It is Laertes who kills Hamlet using a poisoned sword..

13. 1950s autos with "horse collar" grilles : EDSELS
The Edsel brand of automobile was named for Edsel, son of Henry Ford. Sadly, the name "Edsel" has become synonymous with "failure", which was no fault of Edsel himself who had died several years before the Edsel line was introduced. When the Ford Motor Company introduced the Edsel on 4 September 1957, Ford proclaimed the day to be “E Day”.

24. Literature Nobelist Morrison : TONI
The writer Toni Morrison won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1993. Amongst other things, Morrison is noted for coining the phrase, “our first black President”, a reference to President Bill Clinton.

29. A dance, or a dip : SALSA
The genre of music called salsa is a modern interpretation of various Cuban traditional music styles.

“Salsa” is simply the Spanish for “sauce”.

30. Tree with triangular nuts : BEECH
The small triangular nuts of the beech tree are edible, but are very bitter. The nuts are called "beechmast" or simply "beechnuts".

36. Dim bulb : DODO
The dodo was a direct relative of the pigeon and dove, although the fully-grown dodo was usually three feet tall. One of the reasons the dodo comes to mind when we think of extinction of a species, is that it disappeared not too long ago (last recorded alive in 1681) and humans were the reason for its demise. The dodo lived exclusively on the island of Mauritius and when man arrived, we cut back the forests that were its home. We also introduced domestic animals, such as dogs and pigs, that ransacked the dodo’s nests. The dodo was deemed to be an awkward flightless bird and so the term “dodo” has come to mean a dull-witted person.

37. Sierra and Acadia vehicles : GMCS
GMC is a division of General Motors (GM) established in 1901 that started out as "GMC Truck".

42. Like many Poe tales : MACABRE
Edgar Allan Poe lived a life of many firsts. Poe is considered to be the inventor of the detective-fiction genre. He was also the first notable American author to make his living through his writing, something that didn’t really go too well for him as he was always financially strapped. In 1849 he was found on the streets of Baltimore, delirious from either drugs or alcohol. Poe died a few days later in hospital at 39 years of age.

44. So-called missing link : APEMAN
The term “missing link” is usually applied to the concept that there existed some form of animal that is a hybrid between apes and humans. The idea that there was some “ape-man” is discounted these days by the scientific community, which now favors the theory of evolution.

48. Dogie catchers : ROPERS
“Dogie” (sometimes “dogy”) is cowboy slang for a motherless calf in a herd.

54. Wooley who sang "The Purple People Eater" : SHEB
As well as having his huge hit in 1958 called "The Purple People Eater", Sheb Wooley played Ben Miller in the movie "High Noon" and co-starred in the TV's "Rawhide", playing the role of Pete Nolan. Wooley also wrote the theme song for the long-running television show "Hee Haw".

56. John Irving title hero : GARP
John Irving's 1978 novel "The World According to Garp" is somewhat biographical. In fact, Irving's mother found parts of the novel difficult to read, recognizing elements of herself in Garp's mother Jenny Fields.

58. C.T.A. transports : ELS
The Chicago "L" is the second largest rapid transit system in the US, with the New York City Subway being the largest. The "L" is also the second oldest, again with the New York City Subway system having the honor of being around the longest. Note that the official nickname for the system is the "L" (originally short for "elevated railroad"), although the term "El" is also in common use (especially in crosswords as "ELS"). The L is managed by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Needing scratching : ITCHY
6. OPEC, e.g. : BLOC
10. Lay off : IDLE
14. J. E. B. Stuart's superior in the Civil War : R E LEE
15. Indian royal : RANI
16. "Honey wine" : MEAD
17. Things that power Teslas : ELECTRIC ENGINES (hiding “ice age”)
20. Criticism, informally : FLAK
21. Laudatory piece : ODE
22. In one piece : ENTIRE
23. SEAL's org. : USN
24. Recess game : TAG
25. Rudy's coach in "Rudy" : ARA
26. N.L. East city : ATL
27. Went bonkers : LOST ONE'S MARBLES (hiding “Stone Age”)
31. Teutonic turndown : NEIN
32. Sharpshooter's asset : AIM
33. Snaky character : ESS
34. Crisis time, for some ... or a hint to each of the circled words : MIDDLE AGE
38. It's an honour: Abbr. : OBE
40. Camera named for a goddess : EOS
41. Year the Korean War began : MCML
44. Lakeside furniture item : ADIRONDACK CHAIR (hiding “Iron Age”)
49. +: Abbr. : POS
50. Cock-a-___ (dog breed) : POO
51. Dorm V.I.P.s : RAS
52. Board hiree, for short : CEO
53. 1974 hit with Spanish lyrics : ERES TU
55. Joe Biden, for 36 yrs. : SEN
56. [OMG!] : GASP!
57. Label rarely seen on silk garments : MACHINE WASHABLE (hiding “new age”)
60. Prelude to a deal : ANTE
61. Simoleon : CLAM
62. Typo, e.g. : ERROR
63. Crash-probing agcy. : NTSB
64. Glimpse : ESPY
65. Gushes : SPEWS

Down
1. Really angry : IREFUL
2. Gets in trouble, in a way : TELLS ON
3. Detox, say : CLEANSE
4. "Darn it!" : HECK!
5. Thus far : YET
6. Game for dummies? : BRIDGE
7. Spike, as punch : LACE
8. Admit ___ : ONE
9. Wide-screen movie format : CINERAMA
10. Words heard in 24-Across, maybe : I’M IT
11. "'Twasn't me" and others : DENIALS
12. Hamlet's killer : LAERTES
13. 1950s autos with "horse collar" grilles : EDSELS
18. Leather often treated to look like morocco : ROAN
19. Make a snarling sound : GNAR
24. Literature Nobelist Morrison : TONI
25. Female pen pal, maybe : AMIE
28. Oven feature : TIMER
29. A dance, or a dip : SALSA
30. Tree with triangular nuts : BEECH
35. Censure publicly : DENOUNCE
36. Dim bulb : DODO
37. Sierra and Acadia vehicles : GMCS
38. Aromatic additive to natural gas : ODORANT
39. Splits in half : BISECTS
42. Like many Poe tales : MACABRE
43. Stays under the radar : LIES LOW
44. So-called missing link : APEMAN
45. ___-Free (contact lens solution) : OPTI
46. Peanut butter choice : CREAMY
47. Jayhawks' home: Abbr. : KANS
48. Dogie catchers : ROPERS
54. Wooley who sang "The Purple People Eater" : SHEB
55. Exchange : SWAP
56. John Irving title hero : GARP
58. C.T.A. transports : ELS
59. Fathers and sons : HES


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0328-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Mar 17, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Ryan Milligan
THEME: Adverbalized Family Names
Today’s themed answers come from the names of celebrities who have family names that our adjectives. Our themed clues make reference to the adverbial form of those adjectives:
20A. "Sorry I'm in your space, it's an actress thing," said ___ : GLENN CLOSELY (from “Glenn Close”)
28A. "Don't interrupt me on my radio show," said ___ : HOWARD STERNLY (from “Howard Stern”)
46A. "Gotta run, pop concert calls," said ___ : TAYLOR SWIFTLY (from “Taylor Swift”)
54A. "Right to the point: You're beautiful, it's true," said ___ : JAMES BLUNTLY (from “James Blunt”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 40s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Nile predator, briefly : CROC
Crocodiles and alligators do indeed bear a resemblance to each other, although they belong to distinct biological families. One of the main ways used to distinguish them is by their teeth and jaws. Both the upper and lower sets of teeth of a crocodile are visible when its mouth is closed, whereas only the upper teeth of an alligator are visible with the mouth shut.

9. Class with masks? : DRAMA
Unless this is a reference to some types of Japanese drama, I’m not sure that I understand the clue/answer.

16. 18th-century mathematician who introduced the function : EULER
Leonhard Euler was a brilliant Swiss mathematician and physicist, a pioneer in the fields of logarithms and graph theory.

17. Designer Gucci : ALDO
Gucci was founded in Rome in 1921, by Guccio Gucci. Guccio's son Aldo took over the company after his father's death in 1953. It was Aldo who established the international presence for the brand and opened the company's first overseas store, in New York City.

18. Nick at ___ : NITE
“Nick at Nite” is the name given to the late-night programming aired on the Nickelodeon channel space. Nick at Nite started broadcasting in 1985 and was conceived as television’s first “oldies” television network.

19. One-named singer who won the 2016 Album of the Year : ADELE
“Adele” is the stage name of English singer Adele Adkins. Adele’s debut album is “19”, named after the age she was during the album’s production. Her second album was even more successful than the first. Called “21”, the second album was released three years after the first, when Adele was three years older. More recently, her third studio album “25”, released in 2015, broke the first-week sales records in both the UK and the US.

20. "Sorry I'm in your space, it's an actress thing," said ___ : GLENN CLOSELY (from “Glenn Close”)
Glenn Close a wonderful actress who has played many varied roles, but is well known for her portrayals of less than wholesome characters. She play the crazy Alex Forrest in “Fatal Attraction”, and Cruella de Vil in “101 Dalmatians”. More recently, Close had a regular role on a TV show called “Damages”. Glenn Close is an avid fan of the New York Mets and regularly sings the national anthem before games.

24. Scottish cap : TAM
A tam o'shanter is a man's cap traditionally worn by Scotsmen. "Tams" were originally all blue (and called "blue bonnets") but as more dyes became readily available they became more colorful. The name of the cap comes from the title character of the Robert Burns poem "Tam O'Shanter".

25. "The Raven" writer's monogram : EAP
“The Raven” is a narrative poem by Edgar Allan Poe that tells of a student who has lost the love of his life, Lenore. A raven enters the student’s bedchamber and perches on a bust of Pallas. The raven can talk, to the student’s surprise, but says nothing but the word “nevermore” (“quoth the raven, ‘Nevermore’”). As the student questions all aspects of his life, the raven taunts him with the same comment, “nevermore”. Finally the student decides that his soul is trapped beneath the raven’s shadow and shall be lifted “nevermore” …

28. "Don't interrupt me on my radio show," said ___ : HOWARD STERNLY (from “Howard Stern”)
Howard Stern is one of the original "shock jocks" who seems now to have found his niche on uncensored satellite radio (SiriusXM).

32. "It gets better" spot, e.g., in brief : PSA
Public service announcement (PSA)

34. DiCaprio, to fans : LEO
Hollywood star Leonardo DiCaprio is from Los Angeles, California. DiCaprio’s mother was visiting a museum in Italy when she was pregnant and felt the first kick of her unborn child. At the moment of that first kick, Mama DiCaprio was looking at a painting by Leonardo da Vinci, and so named her son Leonardo.

39. Lion's prey : GNU
A gnu is also known as a wildebeest, and is an antelope native to Africa. Wildebeest is actually the Dutch word for “wild beast”.

43. Lennon's widow : ONO
John Lennon and Yoko Ono married at the height of the Vietnam War in 1969. The couple decided to use the inevitable publicity surrounding their wedding and honeymoon to promote peace in the world. They honeymooned in the Presidential Suite of the Amsterdam Hilton, inviting the world’s press to join them and to witness their “bed-in”. They spent the week talking about peace, and an end to war. The marriage and bed-in is chronicled by the Beatles in their song “The Ballad of John and Yoko”.

46. "Gotta run, pop concert calls," said ___ : TAYLOR SWIFTLY (from “Taylor Swift”)
Singer Taylor Swift had one of her first gigs at the US Open tennis tournament when she was in her early teens. There she sang the national anthem and received a lot of favorable attention for the performance.

52. Gravestone letters : RIP
Rest in peace (RIP)

53. Govt. org. with a drone registry program : FAA
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was set up in 1958 (as the Federal Aviation Agency). The agency was established at that particular time largely in response to an increasing number of midair collisions. The worst of these disasters had taken place two years earlier over the Grand Canyon, a crash between two commercial passenger airplanes that resulted in 128 fatalities.

54. "Right to the point: You're beautiful, it's true," said ___ : JAMES BLUNTLY (from “James Blunt”)
James Blunt is the stage name of an English singer whose real family name is “Blount”. Before achieving fame in the world of pop music, Blunt was an officer in a cavalry regiment of the British Army, and served as part of the NATO deployment in Kosovo. Blunt’s biggest hit to date is the 2004 song “You’re Beautiful”.

63. Tea type : CHAI
Chai is a drink made from spiced black tea, honey and milk, with "chai" being the Hindi word for "tea". We often called tea "a cup of char" growing up in Ireland, with "char" being our slang word for tea, derived from "chai".

64. Three, in Berlin : DREI
Berlin is the capital and largest city in Germany, and is the second most populous city in the European Union (after London).

65. Mecca resident : SAUDI
Mecca is in the Makkah province of Saudi Arabia. It was the birthplace of Muhammad and is the holiest city in Islam. Every year several million Muslims perform the Hajj, a holy pilgrimage to Mecca.

68. "A man who, when he smells flowers, looks around for a coffin," per H. L. Mencken : CYNIC
H. L. Mencken was a journalist and essayist from Baltimore. Mencken reported on the Scopes trial of 1925 and was the writer who dubbed it the “Monkey Trial”.

69. Rice wine : SAKE
We refer to the Japanese alcoholic beverage made from rice as “sake”. We’ve gotten things a bit mixed up in the West. “Sake” is actually the word that the Japanese use for all alcoholic drinks. What we know as sake, we sometimes refer to as rice wine. Also, the starch in the rice is first converted to sugars that are then fermented into alcohol. This is more akin to a beer-brewing process than wine production, so the end product is really a rice “beer” rather than a rice “wine”.

70. Longings : YENS
The word "yen", meaning "urge", has been around in English since the very early 1900s. It comes from the earlier word "yin" imported from Chinese, which was used in English to describe an intense craving for opium!

Down
1. Carpet style : SHAG
Shag carpet is one with a deep pile, one with a “shaggy” appearance.

4. On the double : PRONTO
The Spanish, Italian (and now English) word “pronto” is derived from the Latin “promptus” meaning “ready, quick”.

11. Lager relative : ALE
Lager is so called because of the tradition of cold-storing the beer during fermentation. "Lager" is the German word for "storage".

12. Comical Brooks : MEL
Mel Brooks’ real name is Melvin Kaminsky. Brooks is one of very few entertainers (there are only ten) who has won the “Showbiz Award Grand Slam” i.e. an Oscar, Tony, Grammy and Emmy. He is in good company, as the list also includes the likes of Richard Rogers, Sir John Gielgud, Marvin Hamlisch and Audrey Hepburn.

13. "All we ___ saying is give peace a chance" : ARE
John Lennon and Yoko Ono had a very public honeymoon in a hotels in Amsterdam and then Montreal, when they staged their famous “bed-in” for peace. In answering questions from reporters Lennon found himself often repeating the words “give peace a chance”. While still in bed, he composed his famous song “Give Peace a Chance” and even made the original recording of the song in the Montreal hotel room, with reporters present, and with a whole bunch of friends. The song was released later in 1969 and became a smash hit. Writing credit was initially given to Lennon-McCartney, as was the agreement between John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Later versions of the song were credited just to Lennon, even though Lennon stated that Yoko Ono actually wrote the song with him.

26. Drug whose generic name is naproxen : ALEVE
Aleve is a brand name used for the anti-inflammatory drug Naproxen sodium.

27. Measuring cup material : PYREX
Pyrex is a brand of glassware that was developed by Corning. As well as being used in bakeware and laboratory glassware, Pyrex is often the material of choice for optics in large telescopes used in astronomy. Corning's PYREX (note the capital letters) is made from borosilicate glass, the main ingredients of which are silica and boron trioxide. Such Corning products are only available now outside of the US. Corning divested its consumer products division in 1998, resulting in the formation of World Kitchen. World Kitchen purchased the rights to the "Pyrex" name in the US, and market it as "pyrex" (all lowercase letters). So "PYREX" glassware is made from borosilicate glass, and "pyrex" products are made from cheaper tempered soda-lime glass.

28. Truman and others : HARRYS
Harry Truman wanted to go to West Point having served with the Missouri Army National Guard on active duty in WWI, but he couldn’t get in because of his poor eyesight. Young Truman didn’t have the money to pay for college anywhere else. He did manage to study for two years towards a law degree at the Kansas City Law School in the twenties, but he never finished his schooling. So, Harry S. Truman was the last US President (out of a list of ten) who did not have a college degree.

31. Material in strands : RNA
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

32. Sauce with pine nuts : PESTO
The term “pesto” applies to anything made by pounding. What we tend to know as “pesto” sauce is more properly called “pesto alla genovese”, pesto from Genoa in northern Italy. I love, love pesto sauce …

47. Pacific ___ : RIM
The phrase “Pacific Rim” describes the countries that surround the Pacific Ocean. The related phrase “Pacific Basin” includes the islands in the Pacific Ocean, in addition to the Pacific Rim nations.

50. Tom who coached the Dallas Cowboys for 29 years : LANDRY
Although Tom Landry was a football player, he is best known as the head coach for the Dallas Cowboys. As coach he had a run of 20 consecutive winning seasons, a record that has yet to be broken. Landry had an impressive record during WWII as well. He completed a tour of 30 missions as co-pilot in a B-17 Flying Fortress in Europe, and survived a crash landing in Belgium. In his days with the Dallas Cowboys, Landry was noted for wearing a fedora hat, and there is even an image of that famous hat on his tombstone in Texas State Cemetery. He passed away in the year 2000.

54. Revered "Star Wars" figure : JEDI
The Jedi are the “good guys” in the “Star Wars” series of movies. The most famous Jedi knights from the films are Obi-Wan Kenobi (played by Alec Guinness, and later Ewan McGregor) and Yoda (voiced by Frank Oz). Well, they’re my favorites anyway …

55. Actor LaBeouf : SHIA
Shia LaBeouf is an actor who started out in the Disney television series “Even Stevens”. Adult audiences might be more familiar with his leading role in the 2003 film “Holes”.

56. Illegal pitching motion : BALK
To balk is to stop and refuse to go on. It's not just a baseball term!

59. Nervousness that causes a golfer to miss an easy putt, with "the" : YIPS
The informal term “yips” applies to the nervous twitching that can sometimes spoil and sportsman’s performance, especially a golfer’s putting stroke.

60. Golden State sch. : USC
The University of Southern California (USC) is a private school in Los Angeles. Apart from its excellent academic record, USC is known the success of its athletic program. USC athletes have won more Olympic medals than the students of any other university in the world. The USC marching band is very famous as well, and is known as the “Spirit of Troy”. The band has performed with many celebrities, and is the only college band to have two platinum records.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Even trade : SWAP
5. Nile predator, briefly : CROC
9. Class with masks? : DRAMA
14. Next in line : HEIR
15. Promise : OATH
16. 18th-century mathematician who introduced the function : EULER
17. Designer Gucci : ALDO
18. Nick at ___ : NITE
19. One-named singer who won the 2016 Album of the Year : ADELE
20. "Sorry I'm in your space, it's an actress thing," said ___ : GLENN CLOSELY (from “Glenn Close”)
23. Shirt that might have a crew neck, informally : TEE
24. Scottish cap : TAM
25. "The Raven" writer's monogram : EAP
28. "Don't interrupt me on my radio show," said ___ : HOWARD STERNLY (from “Howard Stern”)
32. "It gets better" spot, e.g., in brief : PSA
34. DiCaprio, to fans : LEO
35. Prefix with galactic and spatial : INTER-
36. Works to get : EARNS
39. Lion's prey : GNU
41. Easily fooled : NAIVE
42. Unit of bacon : STRIP
43. Lennon's widow : ONO
45. ___-Mex : TEX
46. "Gotta run, pop concert calls," said ___ : TAYLOR SWIFTLY (from “Taylor Swift”)
51. Turn-___ : ONS
52. Gravestone letters : RIP
53. Govt. org. with a drone registry program : FAA
54. "Right to the point: You're beautiful, it's true," said ___ : JAMES BLUNTLY (from “James Blunt”)
60. Advocated : URGED
63. Tea type : CHAI
64. Three, in Berlin : DREI
65. Mecca resident : SAUDI
66. Drying oven : KILN
67. Harvest, as crops : REAP
68. "A man who, when he smells flowers, looks around for a coffin," per H. L. Mencken : CYNIC
69. Rice wine : SAKE
70. Longings : YENS

Down
1. Carpet style : SHAG
2. Word said three times before "What have we here?!" : WELL
3. Assistant : AIDE
4. On the double : PRONTO
5. Hide : CONCEAL
6. Inner part of a racetrack : RAIL
7. Palindromic boy's name : OTTO
8. Treasure holders : CHESTS
9. Request for a hand : DEAL ME IN
10. Inspiring 1993 movie about a Notre Dame football team walk-on : RUDY
11. Lager relative : ALE
12. Comical Brooks : MEL
13. "All we ___ saying is give peace a chance" : ARE
21. Just-made : NEW
22. Munch on : EAT
25. Thing that exists : ENTITY
26. Drug whose generic name is naproxen : ALEVE
27. Measuring cup material : PYREX
28. Truman and others : HARRYS
29. Rule laid down by a commission: Abbr. : REG
30. "What should I ___?" : DO NOW
31. Material in strands : RNA
32. Sauce with pine nuts : PESTO
33. The Great Tempter : SATAN
37. Zero, in soccer : NIL
38. Occasional : SPORADIC
40. Prefix with -versal : UNI-
44. Not connected to a computer network : OFFLINE
47. Pacific ___ : RIM
48. What stars are in the night sky : SPECKS
49. Letter after sigma : TAU
50. Tom who coached the Dallas Cowboys for 29 years : LANDRY
54. Revered "Star Wars" figure : JEDI
55. Actor LaBeouf : SHIA
56. Illegal pitching motion : BALK
57. Logician's chart : TREE
58. Not stand completely straight : LEAN
59. Nervousness that causes a golfer to miss an easy putt, with "the" : YIPS
60. Golden State sch. : USC
61. With 62-Down, sci-fi weapon : RAY ...
62. See 61-Down : … GUN


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0327-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Mar 17, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Tom McCoy
THEME: S Takeout
Today’s themed answers are familiar versions of common phrases. Each includes an extra letter S that is not used in the grammatically correct phrase itself:
39A. Police operation ... or, when read another way, what a grammarian would like to do to 18-, 24-, 52- and 65-Across? : STAKEOUT (or “S TAKEOUT”)

18A. "The one thing that's clear to me ..." : ALLS I KNOW … (should be “all I know …”)
24A. Distant : A LONG WAYS OFF (should be “a long way off”)
52A. Narrative connector : AND THEN I SAYS ... (should be “and then I say …)
65A. "What do you think of ...?" : HOWS ABOUT …? (should be “how about …?)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 11s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Set of pictures at a dentist's : X-RAYS
X-rays were first studied comprehensively by the German physicist Wilhelm Röntgen (also "Roentgen"), and it was he who gave the name "X-rays" to this particular type of radiation. Paradoxically, in Röntgen's native language of German, X-rays are routinely referred to as "Röntgen rays". In 1901 Röntgen won the first Nobel Prize in Physics that was ever awarded, recognition for his work on X-rays.

16. "I love," to Cato : AMO
Cato the Elder was a Roman statesman, known historically as “the elder” in order to distinguish him from his great-grandson, Cato the Younger. Cato the Elder’s ultimate position within Roman society was that of Censor, making him responsible for maintaining the census, and for supervising public morality.

Cato the Younger was a politician in the late Roman Republic, noted for his moral integrity. He is also remembered for an extended conflict with Julius Caesar.

17. Perfect world : UTOPIA
The word “Utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More for his book “Utopia” published in 1516 describing an idyllic fictional island in the Atlantic Ocean. More’s use of the name Utopia comes from the Greek “ou” meaning “not” and “topos” meaning “place”. By calling his perfect island “Not Place”, More was apparently making the point that he didn’t think that the ideal could actually exist.

23. Boxing achievements, in brief : TKOS
In boxing, a knockout (KO) is when one of the fighters can't get up from the canvas within a specified time, usually 10 seconds. This can be due to fatigue, injury, or the participant may be truly "knocked out". A referee, fighter or doctor may also decide to stop a fight without a physical knockout, especially if there is concern about a fighter's safety. In this case the bout is said to end with a technical knockout (TKO).

33. Villainous count in the Lemony Snicket books : OLAF
Count Olaf is the main antagonist in “A Series of Unfortunate Events”, the collection of children’s novels penned by Lemony Snicket  (the pen name of Daniel Handler).

35. Obama's successor : TRUMP
When Donald Trump became US president in 2017, he became the oldest person ever to assume the office, as well as the wealthiest. He is also the first US president without prior experience in either the US military or in government.

36. Jason's ship : ARGO
In Greek mythology, Jason and the Argonauts sailed on the Argo in search of the Golden Fleece. The vessel was called the “Argo” in honor of the ship’s builder, a man named Argus.

43. Day-___ paint : GLO
“Dayglo” is a registered trademark used for an ink or paint that glows when exposed to a black light in a darkened room. When Dayglo paint is viewed in daylight the colors can look particularly vivid because they respond to the UV light that is present in sunlight.

44. Japanese soup : MISO
Miso is the name of the seasoning that makes the soup. Basic miso seasoning is made by fermenting rice, barley and soybeans with salt and a fungus to produce a paste. The paste can be added to stock to make miso soup, or perhaps to flavor tofu.

50. Vietnamese soup : PHO
“Pho” is a noodle soup from Vietnam that is a popular street food.

51. What Google's Ngram program tracks, for word usage : TRENDS
Google’s Ngram Viewer searches for words or phrases and charts the frequency of their usage in print media. The database used for the search comprises sources printed between the years 1500 and 2008.

56. Peach pit or walnut : SEED
Our everyday usage of “nut” is often at odds with the botanical definition of the term. Examples of “true nuts” are acorns, chestnuts and hazelnuts. On the other hand, even though we usually refer to almonds, pecans and walnuts as “nuts”, botanically they are classified as “drupes”. Both drupes and true nuts are fruits, the vehicles that flowering plants use to disseminate seeds. True nuts are examples of a “dry fruit”, a fruit that has no fleshy outer layer. Drupes are examples of a “fleshy fruit”, a fruit with a fleshy outer layer that often makes it desirable for an animal to eat. Familiar examples of drupes are cherries, peaches and plums. We eat the fleshy part of these drupes, and discard the pit inside that contains the seed. Other examples of drupes are walnuts, almonds and pecans. The relatively inedible flashy part of these drupes is usually removed for us before they hit our grocery stores shelves. We crack open the pit inside and eat the seed of these drupes. No wonder we use the term “nuts” to mean “crazy”!

62. Cuba's capital : HAVANA
Havana is the capital city of Cuba. The city was founded by the Spanish in the early 1500s after which it became a strategic location for Spain’s exploration and conquest of the Americas. In particular, Havana was used as a stopping-off point for treasure-laden ships on the return journey to Spain.

72. Novices : TYROS
A tyro (also “tiro”) is a beginner or a novice. “Tyro” comes into English from Latin, in which “tiro” means “a recruit”.

Down
5. ___ Lanka : SRI
The island nation of Sri Lanka lies off the southeast coast of India. The name “Sri Lanka” translates from Sanskrit into English as "venerable island". Before 1970, Sri Lanka was known as Ceylon, a name given to the country during British rule.

12. FedEx rival : UPS
United Parcel Service (UPS) is based in Sandy Springs, Georgia and has its own airline that operates out of Louisville, Kentucky. UPS often goes by the nickname “Brown”, because of its brown delivery trucks and brown uniforms.

14. ___ Juan, Puerto Rico : SAN
San Juan is the capital city of Puerto Rico. It was founded in 1521 by the Spanish, who called it “Ciudad de Puerto Rico” (Rich Port City).

23. Dance in which one partner might hold a rose between his teeth : TANGO
The dramatic dance called the tango originated in the late 1800s in the area along the border between Argentina and Uruguay. Dancers and orchestras from Buenos Aires in particular traveled to Europe and beyond in the early twentieth century and brought the tango with them. The tango craze first struck Europe in Paris in the 1910s, and from there spread to London and Berlin, crossing the Atlantic to New York in 1913.

27. Old-fashioned wine holder : FLAGON
A flagon is a large jug with a lid that is traditionally used for holding beer or wine.

29. Thorny parts of roses : STEMS
Believe it or not, roses don’t have any thorns. Thorns are derived from shoots, spines are derived from leaves, and prickles are derived from the epidermis. The rose’s defensive barbs are in fact prickles.

30. Group of three : TROIKA
“Troika” is a Russian word meaning “set of three”. “Troika” can apply to a sled or carriage drawn by three horses, or to a folk dance between one man and two women. The term might also apply to a triumvirate of political leaders.

36. Ohio city that was once the Rubber Capital of the World : AKRON
For part of the 1800s, the Ohio city of Akron was the fasting growing city in the country, feeding off the industrial boom of that era. The city was founded in 1825 and its location, along the Ohio and Erie canal connecting Lake Erie with the Ohio River, helped to fuel Akron’s growth. Akron sits at the highest point of the canal and the name “Akron” comes from the Greek word meaning “summit”. Indeed, Akron is the county seat of Summit County. The city earned the moniker “Rubber Capital of the World” for most of the 20th century, as it was home to four major tire companies: Goodrich, Goodyear, Firestone and General Tire.

42. Labourite's opponent, in British politics : TORY
“Tory” comes from the Irish word “tóraí” meaning “outlaw, robber”. The term “tory” was originally used for an Irish outlaw and later became a term of abuse for Irish rebels. At the end of the reign of King Charles II in Britain, there was a political divide with one side being called “Whigs” and the other “Tories”. Historically, the term “Tory” evolved to basically mean a supporter of the British monarchy, and today is used for a member of the British Conservative Party.

48. Big electronics chain : BEST BUY
Best Buy is a retailer specializing in the supply of consumer electronics. Best Buy services include the famous “Geek Squad”, a band of technical experts that will help solve your computer and other consumer electronic problems.

59. Sound to fear in the savanna : ROAR
A savanna (also “savannah”) is a grassland. If there are any trees in a savanna, by definition they are small and widely spaced so that light can get to the grasses allowing them to grow unhindered.

60. Currency of France or Italy : EURO
The Euro is the official currency of most of the states in the European Union, but not all. The list of states not using the Euro includes the UK, Denmark, Sweden and Norway.

61. When planes are due to take off, for short : ETDS
Estimated time of departure (ETD)

64. Biden and Pence, in brief : VPS
Vice President Joe Biden was a US Senator representing the state of Delaware from 1973 until he joined the Obama administration. While he was a senator, Vice President Biden commuted to Washington from Wilmington, Delaware almost every working day. He was such an active customer and supporter of Amtrak that the Wilmington Station was renamed as the Joseph R. Biden Railroad Station in 2011. Biden has made over 7,000 trips from that station, and the Amtrak crews were known to even hold the last train for a few minutes so that he could catch it. Biden earned himself the nickname “Amtrak Joe”.

Mike Pence served as the 50th Governor of Indiana from 2013 until 2017, when he became the 48th Vice President of the US in the Trump administration. Famously, Vice President Pence has described himself as "a Christian, a conservative, and a Republican, in that order”, although he grew up in an Irish Catholic Democrat family.

65. Actor Holbrook : HAL
Hal Holbrook is an actor from Cleveland, Ohio. Although Holbrook is well known for many roles on the big and small screens, he is best known for a series of plays that he developed called “Mark Twain Tonight!”. Holbrook depicts Twain on stage giving recitations from several of Twain’s writings, varying the script for each performance. “Mark Twain Tonight!” was first performed in 1959, and Holbrook still appears in it today, well over 50 years later.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Set of pictures at a dentist's : X-RAYS
6. Crow's sound : CAW
9. Reprieves : LETUPS
15. Event for meeting new people : MIXER
16. "I love," to Cato : AMO
17. Perfect world : UTOPIA
18. "The one thing that's clear to me ..." : ALLS I KNOW … (should be “all I know …”)
20. Picked : CHOSEN
21. Appear : SEEM
22. "Smoking or ___?" : NON
23. Boxing achievements, in brief : TKOS
24. Distant : A LONG WAYS OFF (should be “a long way off”)
29. Narrow water passage : STRAIT
32. "___ day now ..." : ANY
33. Villainous count in the Lemony Snicket books : OLAF
35. Obama's successor : TRUMP
36. Jason's ship : ARGO
37. Pull off perfectly : NAIL
38. Many millennia : EON
39. Police operation ... or, when read another way, what a grammarian would like to do to 18-, 24-, 52- and 65-Across? : STAKEOUT (or “S TAKEOUT”)
43. Day-___ paint : GLO
44. Japanese soup : MISO
46. Boaters' implements : OARS
47. Some woodwinds : OBOES
49. Lose traction on the road : SKID
50. Vietnamese soup : PHO
51. What Google's Ngram program tracks, for word usage : TRENDS
52. Narrative connector : AND THEN I SAYS ... (should be “and then I say …)
56. Peach pit or walnut : SEED
57. Greedy one : HOG
58. Peach or walnut : TREE
62. Cuba's capital : HAVANA
65. "What do you think of ...?" : HOWS ABOUT …? (should be “how about …?)
67. Unscripted comedy, informally : IMPROV
68. Mimic : APE
69. Watch over : GUARD
70. Blue state? : MISERY
71. Fluorescent bulb alternative, for short : LED
72. Novices : TYROS


Down
1. Dec. celebration : XMAS
2. Tick off : RILE
3. What car wheels turn on : AXLE
4. Polite affirmative : YES MA'AM
5. ___ Lanka : SRI
6. Group of books that an educated person is supposed to be familiar with : CANON
7. In the company of : AMONG
8. Blow away : WOW
9. Jealous words of congratulations : LUCKY YOU
10. Cultural spirit : ETHOS
11. "You can't joke about that yet" : TOO SOON
12. FedEx rival : UPS
13. Thanksgiving dessert : PIE
14. ___ Juan, Puerto Rico : SAN
19. Problem with a shoelace : KNOT
23. Dance in which one partner might hold a rose between his teeth : TANGO
25. One might apply gloss to them : LIPS
26. Things for sale : WARES
27. Old-fashioned wine holder : FLAGON
28. Unsuccessful : FAILED
29. Thorny parts of roses : STEMS
30. Group of three : TROIKA
31. Enters hurriedly : RUNS IN
34. Often-unheeded advice from dentists : FLOSS
36. Ohio city that was once the Rubber Capital of the World : AKRON
40. Liable to tip over, maybe : TOP-HEAVY
41. Expressed amazement : AAHED
42. Labourite's opponent, in British politics : TORY
45. "Most likely ..." : ODDS ARE ...
48. Big electronics chain : BEST BUY
51. License plates : TAGS
53. Choir member : TENOR
54. "Fingers crossed!" : I HOPE!
55. Planted, as discord : SOWED
59. Sound to fear in the savanna : ROAR
60. Currency of France or Italy : EURO
61. When planes are due to take off, for short : ETDS
62. That guy : HIM
63. "What ___, chopped liver?" : AM I
64. Biden and Pence, in brief : VPS
65. Actor Holbrook : HAL
66. 10%-er: Abbr. : AGT


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0326-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 Mar 17, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Tracy Gray & Jeff Chen
THEME: Mixed Results
Today’s themed answers each include a color. That color has been MIXED for us using constituent colors in the grid. Those constituent colors are in pairs that cross each other. So, the colors actually in the grid have to be MIXED in order to give the correct color needed to answer the clue correctly. Complicated!
23A. 1970s TV cartoon series, with "The" : PINK PANTHER SHOW (mixing RED into WHITE)
45A. 1973 #1 hit for Jim Croce : BAD, BAD LEROY BROWN (mixing GREEN into RED)
93A. Title creature in a 1958 #1 Sheb Wooley hit : PURPLE PEOPLE EATER (mixing BLUE into RED)
119A. Dystopian film of 1971 : A CLOCKWORK ORANGE (mixing RED into YELLOW)
15D. "Idaho cakes," in diner lingo : HASH BROWNS (mixing RED into GREEN)
19D. B-side of Bruce Springsteen's "Dancing in the Dark" : PINK CADILLAC (mixing WHITE into RED)
66D. Easy-to-peel fruit : MANDARIN ORANGE (mixing RED into YELLOW)
74D. Military decorations featuring George Washington's profile : PURPLE HEARTS (mixing RED into BLUE)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 58s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Martin Van Buren was the first president who wasn't one : WASP
The not-so-nice acronym "WASP",stands for White Anglo-Saxon Protestant. The term is used for Americans with a relatively high position in society, and who are usually of British descent.

Martin Van Buren was the eighth President of the US, and also served as Vice President and Secretary of State under President Andrew Jackson. Although Van Buren was the first president who was born a US citizen, he was the only president whose first language wasn’t English, as he grew up speaking Dutch.

18. Vitamix competitor : OSTER
The Oster brand of small appliances was introduced in 1924 by John Oster. He started out by making manually-powered hair clippers designed for cutting women’s hair, and followed up with a motorized version in 1928. The clippers kept the company in business until 1946 when Oster diversified, buying a manufacturer of liquefying blenders in 1946. The blender was renamed an Osterizer, and was a big hit. Oster was bought up by Sunbeam, which has owned the brand since 1960.

20. Hoity-toity : SNOOTY
Believe it or not, the term "hoity-toity" has been in the English language since the 1660s, but back then it meant "riotous behavior". It began to mean "haughty" in the late 1800s, simply because the “haughty” sounds similar to “hoity”.

21. Shelley's "To the Moon," e.g. : ODE
Percy Bysshe Shelley was an English Romantic poet. Shelley had strong views on vegetarianism. He was dedicated to the cause of all sentient beings, believing that the slaughter of animals by humans for the use of food was a barbaric practice. He wrote a famous essay on the subject called "A Vindication of Natural Diet" in 1813.

22. It's between the Study and Lounge on a Clue board : HALL
Clue is board game that we knew under a different name growing up in Ireland. Outside of North America, Clue is marketed as "Cluedo". Cluedo was the original name of the game, introduced in 1949 by the famous British board game manufacturer Waddingtons. There are cute differences between the US and UK versions. For example, the man who is murdered is called Dr. Black (Mr. Boddy in the US), one of the suspects is the Reverend Green (Mr. Green in the US), and the suspect weapons include a dagger (a knife in the US), a lead pipe (lead piping in the US) and a spanner (a wrench in the US). I think it's a fabulous game, a must during the holidays …

23. 1970s TV cartoon series, with "The" : PINK PANTHER SHOW (mixing RED into WHITE)
The Pink Panther is a character who appears in the main title of most of “The Pink Panther” series of films. The character became so popular that he was featured in a whole series of short films, and even merited his own “The Pink Panther Show”, which was a cartoon series that was shown on NBC on Saturday mornings.

26. World capital whose seal depicts St. Hallvard : OSLO
Hallvard’s Cathedral was built in Oslo, Norway in the first half of the 12th century. In the 1600s, much of Oslo was destroyed in a great fire and so King Christian IV decided to move the city and have it rebuilt a few miles to west. A new cathedral was built, and the old Hallvard’s Cathedral, which was still standing after the fire, fell into disrepair and became a ruin.

28. It might give you a shock : EEL
Electrophorus electricus is the biological name for the electric eel. Despite its name, the electric "eel" isn't an eel at all, but rather what is called a knifefish, a fish with an elongated body that is related to the catfish. The electric eel has three pairs of organs along its abdomen, each capable of generating an electric discharge. The shock can go as high as 500 volts with 1 ampere of current (that's 500 watts), and that could perhaps kill a human.

29. Missile Command maker : ATARI
“Missile Command” is a fun arcade game that was introduced by Atari in 1980. Playing the game involves protecting six cities that are being attacked by ballistic missiles. The original game’s design featured six cities in California, namely Eureka, San Francisco, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles and San Diego.

30. Scintilla : WHIT
A “scintilla” is a small amount. The term can also be used to describe a spark or a flash (as in “to scintillate”). The term came into English from Latin, in which language it means “spark, particle of fire, atom”.

31. Filmer in a stadium : SKYCAM
Skycam is a brand name, which now tends to be used generically. “Skycam” refers to that TV camera mounted on cables over say a football field that allows for some very cool shots as the camera seems to swoop down to the play to follow the action, almost like it's part of a video game.

33. Noodle dish : RAMEN
Ramen is a noodle dish composed of Chinese-style wheat noodles in a meat or fish broth flavored with soy or miso sauce. Ramen is usually topped with sliced pork and dried seaweed.

45. 1973 #1 hit for Jim Croce : BAD, BAD LEROY BROWN (mixing GREEN into RED)
“Bad, Bad Leroy Brown” is a song written and first performed by Jim Croce; a number-one hit for him in 1973.

51. Téa of "Madam Secretary" : LEONI
Téa Leoni is an American actress. One of Leoni’s early parts was in the great film "A League of Their Own" (a minor role, Racine at first base). She also played the fiancée of Sam Malone from "Cheers" on the spinoff sitcom "Frasier". A leading role on the big screen was opposite Adam Sandler in "Spanglish". My favorite of her more prominent movie roles was as Jane in "Fun with Dick and Jane". Leoni is now playing the title role in the drama series “Madam Secretary”, a show that I really enjoy …

“Madam Secretary" is TV show that first aired in 2014. It is about an ex-CIA analyst who is appointed as US Secretary of State. Téa Leoni plays the title role, ably supported by a favorite actress of mine, Bebe Neuwirth. I like this show …

56. First and last word of the Musketeers' motto : ALL
“All for one, and one for all” is a motto associated with the title characters in the Alexandre Dumas novel “Three Musketeers”. Actually, it is the motto of the Three Musketeers along with their comrade d’Artagnan …

Alexandre Dumas’ “Three Musketeers” are Athos, Porthos and Aramis, although the hero of the novel is their young protégé is D’Artagnan. A musketeer was an infantry soldier who was equipped with a musket. Funnily enough, the three “musketeers” really don’t use their muskets, and are better known for prowess with their swords.

70. Jury-rigged : STOPGAP
“To jury-rig” (sometimes “jerry-rig”) is to execute a makeshift repair or to manufacture a temporary contrivance. The term comes from sailing ships in which a jury rig is an improvised mast and yards that is erected as a replacement when the original mast is damaged or lost.

82. James of NBC's "The Blacklist" : SPADER
“The Blacklist” is an entertaining, albeit a little formulaic, crime drama TV show starring James Spader and Megan Boone. Spader plays a successful criminal who surrenders to the FBI in order to help catch a “blacklist” of high-profile criminals.

84. One side in golf's Ryder Cup : USA
The Ryder Cup trophy was donated to the game of golf by Samuel Ryder, an English entrepreneur. Ryder made his money selling garden seeds in small packets. He only took up golf when he was in his fifties but became quite the enthusiast and eventually donated the trophy in 1927, when it was valued at 100 guineas. The Ryder Cup is a biennial tournament played between teams from the US and Europe.

90. Pennsylvania's "Gem City" : ERIE
Erie is a city in the very north of Pennsylvania, right on the southern shore of Lake Erie. The city takes its name from the Erie Native American tribe that resided in the area. Erie is nicknamed the Gem City, a reference to the “sparkling” Lake Erie.

92. Director Kurosawa : AKIRA
Akira Kurosawa was an Oscar-winning Japanese film director. His most famous movie to us in the West has to be "The Seven Samurai", the inspiration for "The Magnificent Seven" starring Yul Brynner, and indeed a basis for "Star Wars: The Clone Wars".

93. Title creature in a 1958 #1 Sheb Wooley hit : PURPLE PEOPLE EATER (mixing BLUE into RED)
As well as having his huge hit in 1958 called "The Purple People Eater", Sheb Wooley played Ben Miller in the movie "High Noon" and co-starred in the TV's "Rawhide", playing the role of Pete Nolan. Wooley also wrote the theme song for the long-running television show "Hee Haw".

99. Figure skating jump : LUTZ
In figure skating, a Lutz is a toe-pick-assisted jump that one starts skating backwards and ends skating backwards (there’s more to it that I don’t really understand!). The maneuver is named after Alois Lutz, an Austrian skater who first performed it in competition way back in 1913. Lutz wowed the crowd with a single jump, and today both men and women are landing triple Lutz jumps. No one has landed a clean quadruple Lutz in competition.

106. Control groups : JUNTAS
A junta is a group of military officers that rule a country, usually after having seized power forcibly. “Junta” is a Spanish word meaning “council”.

110. Captain of the Pequod : AHAB
Captain Ahab is the obsessed and far from friendly captain of the Pequod in Herman Melville's "Moby-Dick". The role of Captain Ahab was played by Gregory Peck in the 1956 John Huston film adaptation. Patrick Stewart played Ahab in a 1998 miniseries in which Peck made another appearance, as Father Mapple.

111. Actor Reeves : KEANU
Keanu Reeves is a Canadian actor whose most celebrated roles were a metalhead in "Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure" (1989), a cop in "Speed" (1994) and the protagonist Neo in "The Matrix" series of films. Although Reeves is a Canadian national, he was born in Beirut, Lebanon. Reeves has some Hawaiian descent, and the name "Keanu" is Hawaiian for "the coldness".

118. Cameo, for one : PART
Even in my day, a cameo role was more than just a short appearance in a movie (or other artistic piece). For the appearance to be a cameo, the actor had to playing himself or herself, and was instantly recognizable. With this meaning it's easy to see the etymology of the term, as a cameo brooch is one with the recognizable carving of the silhouette of a person. Nowadays, a cameo is any minor role played by a celebrity or famous actor, regardless of the character played.

119. Dystopian film of 1971 : A CLOCKWORK ORANGE (mixing RED into YELLOW)
“A Clockwork Orange” is a novella by Anthony Burgess, first published in 1962. The story is about a young teenager named Alex, who leads a small gang on violent rampages each night. The story has been adapted for the big and small screens, most famously in a 1971 film by Stanley Kubrick. It’s way too violent for me …

122. Rihanna album featuring "Work" : ANTI
The singer Rihanna was born and grew up on the island of Barbados and moved to the US when she was 16-years-old to pursue a singing career. “Rihanna” is her stage name, as she was born Robyn Rihanna Fenty. The name “Rihanna” is derived from the Welsh name “Rhiannon”.

123. Juice brand whose middle letter is represented as a heart : POM
POM Wonderful is a privately-held company that has been making fruit juice drinks since 2002. The main product line is pomegranate juice, hence the company name.

124. Tushy : HEINIE
The slang term “heinie”, meaning “rear end”, is probably a contraction of “hind end”.

“Tush” is a slang term for the backside, an abbreviation of “tochus” that comes from the Yiddish “tokhes”.

125. Biggest employer in Moline, Ill. : DEERE
Moline is a city in Illinois located on the border with Iowa. The biggest employer in town by far is John Deere, which has its headquarters there.

129. Wild Turkey and Jim Beam : RYES
Wild Turkey is a brand of Kentucky straight bourbon whiskey that has been distilled in and around Lawrenceburg, Kentucky since 1869. Wild Turkey’s Master Distiller is Jimmy Russell, who is now the longest-serving master distiller in the whole world.

Jim Beam is the world's highest-selling brand of bourbon. Jim Beam whiskey has roots going back to around 1795 when Jacob Beam sold his first corn whiskey. The whiskey took on the name "bourbon", possibly after Bourbon County in Kentucky.

Down
2. Word both before and after "to" : ASHES
“Ashes to ashes, dust to dust” is a phrase used in the Anglican tradition during a burial service.

4. Little Rascals' ring-eyed pooch : PETEY
Hal Roach made a whole series of comedy shorts with “The Little Rascals”, also known as “Our Gang”. The gang included a Pit Bull Terrier that we should remember, as he had that distinctive ring around his eye. When the dog first appeared on screen, he was called “Pansy”, but the name was soon changed to “Pete the Pup”, or sometimes simply “Petey”.

5. Big airport inits. : TSA
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is the agency that employs the good folks that check passengers and baggage at airports.

6. Hathaway of "The Intern" : ANNE
“The Intern” is an entertaining comedy released in 2015 starring Robert De Niro in the title role, a 70-year-old retired executive who joins a senior citizen intern program. De Niro’s young boss is played by Anne Hathaway. The initial plan had been to cast Michael Caine and Tina Fey as leads, but things worked out just fine with the “replacements”, I’d say …

10. Image on the back of a dollar bill : PYRAMID
Conspiracy theorists love to point out "suspicious" symbols on the one-dollar bill. The pyramid on the bill is unfinished, with 13 steps. The number 13 has been associated with the occult, but it is also the number of original colonies that declared independence from Britain forming the United States. Not so suspicious after all …

11. Lindsay of "Freaky Friday" : LOHAN
"Freaky Friday" is a well-known children's novel, written by Mary Rodgers and published in 1972. The basic story is that one Friday, a mother and her teenage daughter have their bodies switched due to the effects of an enchanted fortune cookie. Hilarity ensues! In the 2003 screen adaptation, Jamie Lee Curtis plays the mother, and Lindsay Lohan the daughter.

14. Hearty soups : CHOWDERS
The type of soup known as “chowder” may be named for the pot in which it used to be cooked called a “chaudière”, a French term.

15. "Idaho cakes," in diner lingo : HASH BROWNS (mixing RED into GREEN)
Diner lingo, the verbal slang used by the staff, can be very colorful. Here are a few examples:
  • Adam & Eve on a raft: two poached eggs on toast
  • Adam & Eve on a raft and wreck ’em: two scrambled eggs on toast
  • Burn one: put a hamburger on the grill
  • Burn one, take it through the garden and pin a rose on it: hamburger with lettuce, tomato and onion
  • Down: on toast
  • Whiskey down: on rye toast
  • Cluck and grunt: ham and eggs

16. Slapstick sidekick of old comedy : OLLIE
Oliver Hardy was born Norvell Hardy in 1892 in Harlem, Georgia. Hardy used the stage name “Oliver” as a tribute to his father Oliver Hardy. His early performances were credited as “Oliver Norvell Hardy”, and off camera his nickname was “Babe Hardy”. Hardy appeared in several films that also featured the young British actor Stan Laurel, but it wasn’t until 1927 that they teamed up to make perhaps the most famous double act in the history of movies. The Laurel and Hardy act came to an end in 1955. That year, Laurel suffered a stroke, and then later the same year Hardy had a heart attack and stroke from which he never really recovered.

19. B-side of Bruce Springsteen's "Dancing in the Dark" : PINK CADILLAC (mixing WHITE into RED)
“Dancing in the Dark” is a 1984 Bruce Springsteen song, and his biggest hit. If you take a look at the music video released at the same time, it features Springsteen performing the song on stage. At the end of the video, the singer brings a fan on stage and dances with her, and that fan is played by actress Courtney Cox.

34. Actress Peet : AMANDA
The actress Amanda Peet studied acting with the celebrated Uta Hagen at Columbia University. Peet has appeared in a number of successful films including “The Whole Nine Yards” and “Syriana”. I remember her best from what I thought was a great TV show (but no one seemed to agree!) called “Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip”.

43. Zen master's query : KOAN
The concept of “koan” appears in the Zen Buddhist tradition. A koan is a story, question or perhaps a statement that is used as an aid to meditation. It often takes the form of a problem or riddle that has no logical solution and is intended to help the meditator break free of reason and develop intuition.

59. Costume worn by Michelle Pfeiffer in "Batman Returns" : CATSUIT
Catwoman is a supervillain who is usually depicted as an adversary of Batman in comics. In the sixties television show “Batman”, Catwoman was first portrayed by actress Julie Newmar, but then the more memorable Eartha Kitt took over, with the marvelously “feline voice”. On the big screen, Catwoman has been played by Lee Meriwether in “Batman” (1966), by Michelle Pfeiffer in “Batman Returns” (1992), by Halle Berry in “Catwoman” (2004) and by Anne Hathaway in “The Dark Knight Rises” (2012).

62. Parisian palace : ELYSEE
The Élysée Palace is the official residence of the French President, and is near the Champs-Élysées in Paris. In the 1800s, there used to be a tunnel between the Élysée Palace and the nearby Tuileries Palace, a tunnel used quite often by Napoleon Bonaparte. While Napoleon lived in the Tuileries Palace, he would meet his mistresses in the Élysée Palace. He was ever the soul of discretion ...

67. "Rabbit Is Rich" Pulitzer winner : UPDIKE
The 1960 novel by John Updike called “Rabbit Run” tells the story of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom as he tries to escape from his constraining, middle-class life. “Rabbit Run” is the first in a series of novels from Updike that feature the “Rabbit” character, the others being:
“Rabbit Redux”
“Rabbit is Rich”
“Rabbit at Rest”
“Rabbit Remembered”

72. P.D. dispatch : APB
An All Points Bulletin (APB) is a broadcast from one US law enforcement agency to another.

73. Epstein-___ virus : BARR
The virologists Michael Anthony Epstein and Yvonne Barr discovered what’s now called the Epstein-Barr virus. It is in the herpes family and is one of the most common viruses found in humans. Epstein-Barr causes glandular fever, and is associated with some forms of cancer.

74. Military decorations featuring George Washington's profile : PURPLE HEARTS (mixing RED into BLUE)
The Purple Heart is a military decoration awarded by the President to members of the US military forces who have been wounded or killed while serving. Today’s Purple Heart was originally called the Badge of Military Merit, an award that was established by George Washington 1782 while he was commander-in-chief of the Continental Army. The Purple Heart is a heart-shaped medal with a gold border bearing a profile of President Washington, and a purple ribbon.

78. Jolly Roger, in "Peter Pan" : BRIG
A brig, short for brigantine, is a type of ship. It was the use of brigantines as prison ships that led to the use of “brig” as the word for a jail or prison cell on a seagoing vessel.

In J. M. Barrie's play and novel about Peter Pan, Captain Hook and his crew sail on the pirate ship called the Jolly Roger.

79. Indian city whose name is an anagram of some Indian music : AGRA
Agra is a medieval city on the banks of the river Yamuna in India. Agra was also the capital of the Mughal Empire from 1556 to 1658. The city is home to three UNESCO World Heritage Sites:
  • The Taj Mahal: the famous mausoleum built in memory of Mumtaz Mahal.
  • Agra Fort: the site where the famous Koh-i-Noor diamond was seized.
  • Fatehpur Sikri: a historic city that’s home to well-preserved Mughal architecture.

Raga isn't really a type of music, but has been described as the "tonal framework" in which Indian classical music is composed. Ravi Shankar was perhaps the most famous raga virtuoso (to us Westerners). Western rock music with a heavy Indian influence might be called raga rock.

80. Bona fide : REAL
“Bona fide(s)” translates from the Latin as "in good faith", and is used to indicate honest intentions. It can also mean that something is authentic, like a piece of art that is represented in good faith as being genuine.

94. South American prairie : LLANO
"Llano" is the Spanish word for "plain".

95. Harem servants, often : EUNUCHS
The word "eunuch" comes from the Greek words "eune" meaning "bed" and "ekhein" meaning "to keep", so literally a eunuch is a bed-keeper. Indeed, in many early cultures a eunuch was a slave who had been castrated at an early age to render him "safe", and who was then given lowly domestic tasks such as making the master's bed, bathing him etc.

96. One of the geeks on "The Big Bang Theory" : RAJ
Raj Koothrappali is a character on the sitcom “The Big Bang Theory” who is played by British-Indian actor Kunal Nayyar. Nayyar is married to Neha Kapur, a former Miss India.

101. Former Big Apple mayor Giuliani : RUDY
Rudy Giuliani became known around the world as he stepped up and led his city during the terrible days following the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York. His actions that September earned him a number of accolades. He was named as “Time” magazine’s person of the year, and was given an honorary knighthood by Queen Elizabeth II.

102. Fruit tree : PAPAW
The papaw (also “pawpaw”) tree is native to North America and has a fruit that looks similar to a papaya. Papaw probably gets its name from the word papaya, but papaw and papaya are two distinct species.

103. 1953 hit film set in Wyoming : SHANE
The classic 1953 western movie called “Shane” was based on the novel of the same name by Jack Schaefer published in 1949. Alan Ladd had a rough end to his life. In 1962 he was found unconscious in a pool of blood with a bullet wound in his chest, an abortive suicide attempt. Two years later he was found dead, apparently having died from an accidental overdose of drugs and sedatives. He was 50 years old.

104. Animal with striped legs : OKAPI
The okapi is closely related to the giraffe, although it does have markings on its legs and haunches that resemble those of a zebra. The okapi’s tongue is long enough to reach back and wash its eyeballs, and can go back even further to clean its ears inside and out.

107. City with a University of Texas campus : TYLER
Tyler, Texas is nicknamed “Rose Capital of the World” as it plays a major role in the US’s rose-growing industry and is home to the country’s largest rose garden. The city is named for President John Tyler in recognition of the support he gave to the admission of Texas into the United States.

108. "Revelations" choreographer : AILEY
Alvin Ailey was a dancer who formed his own group in New York in 1958, the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. The most famous work that Ailey choreographed was called “Revelations”. President Barack Obama awarded Ailey the Presidential Medal of Freedom, posthumously in 2014.

112. "The Wealth of Nations" subj. : ECON
Adam Smith was a pioneer in the field of “political economy”, an original term used for the study of production and trade and their relationship with law, government and the distribution of wealth. Adam Smith’s great work is called “The Wealth of Nations”, published in 1776. The book was a big hit within his own lifetime and went a long way to earning him the reputation as the father of modern economics and capitalism. Smith coined the phrase “the invisible hand of the market”, describing his assertion that a marketplace tends to self-regulate.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Martin Van Buren was the first president who wasn't one : WASP
5. Get ready for a long drive : TANK UP
11. I.M. chuckle : LOL
14. Martial arts move : CHOP
18. Vitamix competitor : OSTER
20. Hoity-toity : SNOOTY
21. Shelley's "To the Moon," e.g. : ODE
22. It's between the Study and Lounge on a Clue board : HALL
23. 1970s TV cartoon series, with "The" : PINK PANTHER SHOW (mixing RED into WHITE)
26. World capital whose seal depicts St. Hallvard : OSLO
27. Pull out : SECEDE
28. It might give you a shock : EEL
29. Missile Command maker : ATARI
30. Scintilla : WHIT
31. Filmer in a stadium : SKYCAM
33. Noodle dish : RAMEN
35. Rushes on banks? : SEDGES
37. Medicinal plant : ALOE
39. Possible subject of a French scandal : AMIE
40. German article : DER
41. "Who ___ you?" : ASKED
45. 1973 #1 hit for Jim Croce : BAD, BAD LEROY BROWN (mixing GREEN into RED)
51. Téa of "Madam Secretary" : LEONI
52. Pull (in) : REIN
53. Philosopher who wrote "To be sane in a world of madmen is in itself madness" : ROUSSEAU
55. It may carry a virus : EMAIL
56. First and last word of the Musketeers' motto : ALL
57. Pour, as wine : DECANT
60. Degree in math? : NTH
61. Wrestler's wear : SINGLET
63. Claw : TEAR AT
65. Tickles : AMUSES
68. Target protector, perhaps : MALL COP
70. Jury-rigged : STOPGAP
72. Monastery head's jurisdiction : ABBACY
75. Feudal lords : LIEGES
77. Practice mixology : TEND BAR
81. Chum : PAL
82. James of NBC's "The Blacklist" : SPADER
84. One side in golf's Ryder Cup : USA
86. Song of mourning : DIRGE
87. Big, husky sorts : BRUISERS
90. Pennsylvania's "Gem City" : ERIE
92. Director Kurosawa : AKIRA
93. Title creature in a 1958 #1 Sheb Wooley hit : PURPLE PEOPLE EATER (mixing BLUE into RED)
97. Buick model : REGAL
98. Planter's aid : HOE
99. Figure skating jump : LUTZ
100. It's a wrap : SARI
102. False start? : PSEUDO-
105. Words of defiance : CAN SO!
106. Control groups : JUNTAS
110. Captain of the Pequod : AHAB
111. Actor Reeves : KEANU
113. Onetime acquisition of G.E. : RCA
116. Shipping coolant : DRY ICE
118. Cameo, for one : PART
119. Dystopian film of 1971 : A CLOCKWORK ORANGE (mixing RED into YELLOW)
122. Rihanna album featuring "Work" : ANTI
123. Juice brand whose middle letter is represented as a heart : POM
124. Tushy : HEINIE
125. Biggest employer in Moline, Ill. : DEERE
126. Bridge position : WEST
127. Drop-___ : INS
128. GPS, e.g., in military lingo : SAT NAV
129. Wild Turkey and Jim Beam : RYES

Down
1. Bowls over : WOWS
2. Word both before and after "to" : ASHES
3. Retriever's retrieval, maybe : STICK
4. Little Rascals' ring-eyed pooch : PETEY
5. Big airport inits. : TSA
6. Hathaway of "The Intern" : ANNE
7. Point out : NOTE
8. Cabbage variety : KOHLRABI
9. Rice-Eccles Stadium player : UTE
10. Image on the back of a dollar bill : PYRAMID
11. Lindsay of "Freaky Friday" : LOHAN
12. Sign of decay : ODOR
13. Civil rights icon John : LEWIS
14. Hearty soups : CHOWDERS
15. "Idaho cakes," in diner lingo : HASH BROWNS (mixing RED into GREEN)
16. Slapstick sidekick of old comedy : OLLIE
17. Movie review revelations : PLOTS
19. B-side of Bruce Springsteen's "Dancing in the Dark" : PINK CADILLAC (mixing WHITE into RED)
24. Toll : PEAL
25. Shade of gray : STEEL
32. Gaggle : geese :: ___ : emus : MOB
34. Actress Peet : AMANDA
36. Big name in ice cream : EDY'S
38. Rank between viscount and marquess : EARL
41. What may be brewing : ALES
42. Interstate hauler : SEMI
43. Zen master's query : KOAN
44. Conundrum : ENIGMA
46. Shoulder muscle : DELTOID
47. Lyre-plucking Muse : ERATO
48. Howard of Hollywood : RON
49. Delighting? : OUTAGE
50. Letter header : DATE
54. Stammered syllables : UHS
56. Delta hub, in brief : ATL
58. European language : ERSE
59. Costume worn by Michelle Pfeiffer in "Batman Returns" : CATSUIT
62. Parisian palace : ELYSEE
64. French for "sword" : EPEE
66. Easy-to-peel fruit : MANDARIN ORANGE (mixing RED into YELLOW)
67. "Rabbit Is Rich" Pulitzer winner : UPDIKE
69. Hug : CLASP
71. Org. that usually meets in evenings : PTA
72. P.D. dispatch : APB
73. Epstein-___ virus : BARR
74. Military decorations featuring George Washington's profile : PURPLE HEARTS (mixing RED into BLUE)
76. Welcomes : GREETS
78. Jolly Roger, in "Peter Pan" : BRIG
79. Indian city whose name is an anagram of some Indian music : AGRA
80. Bona fide : REAL
83. ___ Bowl : PRO
85. Matches, at a table : SEES
88. "Hmm ... probably not" : I DOUBT IT
89. Burned rubber : SPED
91. Comic's asset : RAZOR WIT
94. South American prairie : LLANO
95. Harem servants, often : EUNUCHS
96. One of the geeks on "The Big Bang Theory" : RAJ
101. Former Big Apple mayor Giuliani : RUDY
102. Fruit tree : PAPAW
103. 1953 hit film set in Wyoming : SHANE
104. Animal with striped legs : OKAPI
105. Difficult conditions for sailing : CALMS
107. City with a University of Texas campus : TYLER
108. "Revelations" choreographer : AILEY
109. Hit pay dirt : SCORE
112. "The Wealth of Nations" subj. : ECON
114. Its state song is "Yankee Doodle": Abbr. : CONN
115. Opera highlight : ARIA
117. ___ milk : EWE’S
120. Mauna ___ : KEA
121. Bandleader Eubanks, familiarly : KEV


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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