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0430-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Apr 17, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Alan Arbesfeld
THEME: New England Chatter
Each of today’s themed answers is a well-known phrase written as though spoken with a NEW ENGLAND accent:
22A. Commercials for a "Star Trek" movie? : SPOCK PLUGS (from “spark plugs”)
24A. Yoga teacher's invitation? : A CALL TO OMS (from “a call to arms”)
36A. Weather forecaster in Phoenix? : HOT SPECIALIST (from “heart specialist”)
51A. Most in-shape person at a cosmetics company? : THE BOD OF AVON (from “the Bard of Avon”)
69A. Ridicule shouted out of a moving car? : PASSING MOCK (“passing mark”)
87A. Quickly added bit of punctuation? : INSTANT COMMA (from “Instant Karma”)
100A. What allowed one physician to get through flu season? : A SHOT IN THE DOC (from “a shot in the dark”)
116A. Regimen with limited intake of corn? : LOW-COB DIET (from “low-carb diet”)
119A. Toddler's cry upon entering the bathroom? : IT'S MY POTTY! (from “It’s My Party”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 23m 35s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Child's play : A SNAP
It’s child’s play, it’s a snap.

15. Attachment letters : PDF
Portable Document Format (PDF) is a file format introduced by Adobe Systems in 1993. PDF documents can be shared between users and read using many different applications, making them more universally accessible than documents saved by one particular program.

19. Star of CBS's "Madam Secretary" : LEONI
Téa Leoni is an American actress. One of Leoni’s early parts was in the great film "A League of Their Own" (a minor role, Racine at first base). She also played the fiancée of Sam Malone from "Cheers" on the spinoff sitcom "Frasier". A leading role on the big screen was opposite Adam Sandler in "Spanglish". My favorite of her more prominent movie roles was as Jane in "Fun with Dick and Jane". Leoni is now playing the title role in the drama series “Madam Secretary”, a show that I really enjoy …

“Madam Secretary" is TV show that first aired in 2014. It is about an ex-CIA analyst who is appointed as US Secretary of State. Téa Leoni plays the title role, ably supported by a favorite actress of mine, Bebe Neuwirth. I like this show …

21. Munich missus : FRAU
Munich is the capital of the German state of Bavaria, and is the third largest city in the country (after Berlin and Hamburg). The city is called “München” in German, a term that derives from the Old German word for “by the monks’ place”, which is a reference to the monks of the Benedictine order who founded the city in 1158.

22. Commercials for a "Star Trek" movie? : SPOCK PLUGS (from “spark plugs”)
Leonard Nimoy played the logical Mr. Spock in the original "Star Trek" television series. Spock has to be the most popular character on the show, and he keeps popping up in "Star Trek" spin offs to this day. Nimoy first worked alongside William Shatner (Captain Kirk) in an episode of "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (I loved that show!), with Nimoy playing a bad guy and Shatner playing an U.N.C.L.E. recruit.

There are two main types of internal combustion engine. Most cars in the US use spark injection engines (gasoline engines) in which a spark plug sparks in order to ignite the fuel-air mixture. A diesel engine, on the other hand, has no spark plug per se, and uses the heat generated by compressing the air-fuel mixture to cause ignition.

24. Yoga teacher's invitation? : A CALL TO OMS (from “a call to arms”)
“Om” is a sacred mystic word from the Hindu tradition. “Om” is sometimes used as a mantra, a focus for the mind in meditation.

26. Head bands? : HALOES
The Greek word “halos” is the name given to the ring of light around the sun or moon, which gives us our word “halo”, used for a radiant light depicted above the head of a saintly person.

33. Flower arrangement : RACEME
A raceme is a long stalk with flowers placed at equal distances from each along its length. It just keeps growing, and new flowers appear at the tip.

36. Weather forecaster in Phoenix? : HOT SPECIALIST (from “heart specialist”)
The city of Phoenix is the capital of the state of Arizona. Home to almost 1.5 million people, Phoenix is the most populous state capital in the country.

44. Where Einstein was born : ULM
Ulm is in the south of Germany and sits on the River Danube. Ulm is famous as home to the tallest church in the world, Ulm Minster, a Gothic building with a steeple that is 530 feet tall, with 768 steps to climb. Ulm is also the birthplace of Albert Einstein, and is where the entire Austrian army surrendered to Napoleon after the Battle of Ulm in 1805.

45. Gorsuch replaced him : SCALIA
Antonin Scalia was appointed to the Supreme Court by President Reagan in 1986, and was the longest serving member of the court on the occasion of his passing in 2016. Justice Scalia’s minority opinions were known for the scathing language that he used to criticize the Court’s majority.

51. Most in-shape person at a cosmetics company? : THE BOD OF AVON (from “the Bard of Avon”)
In 1886, a young man called David McConnell was selling books door-to-door. To enhance his sales numbers he was giving out free perfume to the ladies of the houses that he visited. Seeing as his perfume was more popular than his books, he founded the California Perfume Company in New York City and started manufacturing and selling across the country. The company name was changed to Avon in 1939, and the famous "Avon Calling" marketing campaign was launched in 1954.

The original “bards” were storytellers, poets and composers of music in medieval Britain and Ireland, with the term coming from the Old Celtic word “bardos” that described a poet or singer. I guess the most famous bard was William Shakespeare, the “Bard of Avon”.

54. Strict Sabbath observer of old : ESSENE
The Essenes were a Jewish religious group, most noted these days perhaps as the writers of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

73. Short-lived things : EPHEMERA
“Ephemera” was originally a medical term, used to describe a fever that only lasted a day. The use of the term was expanded in the 17th century to include insects that were short-lived, and by end of the 18th century ephemera were any things of transitory existence.

75. 1998 Sarah McLachlan hit : ADIA
Sarah McLachlan is singer/songwriter from Halifax, Nova Scotia who lives in Vancouver. In 1997, McLachlan married Ashwin Sood, the drummer in her band. The 1998 hit song "Adia", which she co-wrote and recorded, was intended as an apology to her best friend ... for stealing her ex-boyfriend and then marrying him!

76. Casino draw : KENO
The name "Keno" has French or Latin roots, with the French "quine" being a term for five winning numbers, and the Latin "quini" meaning "five each". The game originated in China and was introduced into the West by Chinese immigrants who were working on the first Transcontinental Railroad in the 1800s.

78. Progressive alternative : GEICO
GEICO was founded in 1936 with a very specific mission, to provide auto insurance for employees of the federal government and their families, hence the name Government Employees Insurance Company (GEICO). GEICO is a private company, despite the word “government” in its name. The founders’ idea was to focus on government employees as they believed such a group represented a lower risk profile than the rest of the population. Nowadays any qualifying person can take out a policy with GEICO.

Progressive is a popular auto insurance company, the one that uses the perky character named “Flo” as a spokeswoman. Flo is played by comedian and actress Stephanie Courtney.

81. Pan Am rival : TWA
Trans World Airlines (TWA) was a big carrier in the US, but was perhaps even more recognized for its extensive presence in Europe and the Middle East. For many years, especially after the collapse of Pan Am, TWA was considered the unofficial flag carrier for the US. The company started in 1930, the product of a forced merger of Transcontinental Air Transport and Western Air Express. The Transcontinental and Western Air that resulted (the original meaning of the initialism “TWA”) was what the Postmaster General wanted, a bigger airline to which the Postal Service could award airmail contracts.

83. Gulf War allies : SAUDIS
The Gulf War was a response to Iraq’s invasion and annexation of Kuwait. The first major ground engagement of the conflict was the Battle Khafji. Saddam Hussein ordered his troops to invade Saudi Arabia from Kuwait, resulting in a brief Iraqi occupation of the Saudi city of Khafji. Coalition air and ground forces regained control of the city after just one night.

87. Quickly added bit of punctuation? : INSTANT COMMA (from “Instant Karma”)
Our word "comma" comes into English via Latin from the Greek "komma" meaning "clause in a sentence".

“Instant Karma!” is a John Lennon song that he released in 1970. The song contains a line starting with “We all shine on …”, which Stephen King used as inspiration for the title of his 1977 novel “The Shining”.

93. Suffix with beat : -NIK
The term “beatnik” was coined by journalist Herb Caen in 1958 when he used it to describe the stereotypical young person of the “beat generation” that was oft associated with the writer Jack Kerouac.

94. "Gangsta's Paradise" rapper : COOLIO
Coolio is the stage name of rapper Artis Leon Ivey, Jr. In 2009, Coolio joined fellow-American Le Toya Jackson as one of the house guests in “Celebrity Big Brother” (UK version) and apparently he created quite a stir on the show with some outrageous comments. But Coolio also showed a softer side with a spontaneous and emotional reaction to the election of Barack Obama to the office of US President as he watched the election results coming in live in the Big Brother house.

95. Egyptian ___ (spotted cat breed) : MAU
The Egyptian Mau is an ancient breed of cat. Illustrations of Egyptian Mau cats have been found in artwork that is over 3,000 years old. Maus can run at over 36 mph, making them the fastest breed of domestic cat.

108. Two-time U.S. Open champ : ELS
Ernie Els is a South African golfer. Els a big guy but he has an easy fluid golf swing that has earned him the nickname “The Big Easy”. He is a former World No. 1 and has won four majors: the US Open (1994 & 1997) and the British Open (2002 & 2012).

113. J.Crew competitor : LLBEAN
L.L.Bean (note the lack of spaces in the company name) was founded back in 1912 in Freeport, Maine as a company selling its own line of waterproof boots. The founder, Leon Leonwood Bean, gave his name to the enterprise. Right from the start, L.L.Bean focused on mail-order and sold from a circular he distributed and then from a catalog. Defects in the initial design led to 90% of the first boots sold being returned, and the company made good on its guarantee to replace them or give back the money paid.

119. Toddler's cry upon entering the bathroom? : IT'S MY POTTY! (from “It’s My Party”)
“It’s My Party” is a great song from the sixties that was released by Lesley Gore in 1963 when she was just 16 years of age. “It’s My Party” tells the story of a teenage girl whose boyfriend hooks up with another girl at her own birthday party. The song struck such a chord with the listening audience that Gore recorded a sequel called “Judy’s Turn to Cry” in which the teenage girl gets her revenge, and her boyfriend returns to her.

124. Where "ho" and "hoina" mean "yes" and "no" : NEPAL
Nepal lies to the northeast of India. Today, the state is known as the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal. In 2008, the Communist Party of Nepal won the country's general election. Soon after, the Assembly voted to change the form of government, moving away from a monarchy and creating a secular republic.

126. Spanish chess piece : REY
“El rey” is Spanish for “the king”.

127. Chrissie in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame : HYNDE
Chrissie Hynde is the lead singer and guitarist of the rock band the Pretenders. Hynde formed the Pretenders in the late seventies, and despite changes in the band's lineup, Hynde kept the Pretenders going right through the early nineties. Hynde is an enthusiastic vegan and supporter of the animal rights group PETA. If you're in Hynde's home town of Akron, Ohio you can eat at her vegan restaurant, "The VegiTerranean".

Down
2. Gifford's successor on TV : RIPA
When Kelly Ripa secured the co-host spot on morning television with Regis Philbin, she was still acting in “All My Children” in a role she had been playing for over ten years. After a year of holding down two jobs, she eventually gave up the acting gig. Ripa has acted as spokeswoman for several brands over the years, most recently for Electrolux and Rykä.

Kathie Lee Gifford is most famous for working alongside Regis Philbin on the talk show "Live with Regis and Kathie Lee", a stint that lasted for about 15 years.

3. Violators of the Second Commandment : IDOLATERS
In the Christian tradition, the second commandment prohibits the worship of “any graven image”. Usually this means that graven images can be created, but not worshipped.

6. Condiment for pommes frites : SEL
In French, one might put “sel” (salt) on “pommes frites” (French fries).

11. First daughter of the 1960s : LUCI
Luci Baines Johnson is the youngest daughter of President Lyndon Johnson. Luci married Patrick Nugent in Washington, D.C. in 1966, while her father was still in the White House. The Nugents had their marriage annulled by the Catholic Church in 1979 and Luci remarried in 1984, to Ian J. Turpin.

13. A quarter of M : CCL
In Roman numerals, M (1,000) is a quarter of CCL (250).

14. Kenan's former Nickelodeon pal : KEL
“Kenan & Kel” is a sitcom that aired on Nickelodeon from 1996 to 2000. It starred Kenan Thompson (now of “Saturday Night Live”), and Kel Mitchell.

16. Title for Helen Mirren : DAME
Helen Mirren, one of my favorite English actresses, has played three different queens on film and television. She played Queen Elizabeth II on the 2006 film “The Queen”, the title role in the TV drama “Elizabeth I”, and Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the wife of the title character in the 1994 film “The Madness of King George”. Mirren won the “Triple Crown of Acting” for playing:
  • Queen Elizabeth II in “The Queen” (winning Best Actress Oscar)
  • Queen Elizabeth II in “The Audience” (winning Best Actress in a Play Tony)
  • Detective Jane Tennison in “Prime Suspect” (winning Outstanding Lead Actress Emmy)

25. Mother of Helios : THEA
In Greek mythology, Theia (also “Thea” and “Thia”)) is a goddess of the moon. Theia’s brother and consort is Hyperion, the god of the sun. Theia and Hyperion are the parents of Helios (the Sun), Selene (the Moon) and Eos (the Dawn).

31. Scopes Trial org. : ACLU
In 1925, Tennessee passed the Butler Act which made it unlawful for a public school teacher to teach the theory of evolution over the Biblical account of the origin of man. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) sought to challenge this law and found a test case of a Tennessee high school teacher named John Scopes, who was charged with violating the law by presenting to his students ideas put forth by Charles Darwin. Celebrity lawyers descended on the small town of Dayton, Tennessee to argue the case. At the end of a high-profile trial, teacher John Scopes was found guilty as charged and was ordered to pay a fine.

34. Music genre for Steppenwolf and Iron Butterfly : ACID ROCK
Acid rock is a musical genre, a subset of psychedelic rock. The term comes from the influence of the drug LSD (acid) on some compositions in the early days.

35. Elaine ___, cabinet member for both Bush and Trump : CHAO
When President George W. Bush appointed Elaine Chao as Secretary of Labor, he made a bit of history as Chao then became the first Chinese American in history to hold a cabinet post. It turned out that Chao became the only cabinet member to hold her post for President Bush’s full eight years in office. In 1993, Chao married Mitch McConnell, the Republican Leader of the US Senate.

36. Shere who wrote "Women and Love" : HITE
Shere Hite is a German sex educator, although she was born in the US. Hite’s work focuses on sexual experience and what meaning it holds for an individual.

38. Sister of Erato : EUTERPE
In Greek mythology, the muses are the goddesses who inspire the creation of literature and the arts. The number of muses is a subject of debate at times, but the most popular view is that there are nine:
  • Calliope (epic poetry)
  • Clio (history)
  • Erato (lyric poetry)
  • Euterpe (music)
  • Melpomene (tragedy)
  • Polyhymnia (choral poetry)
  • Terpsichore (dance)
  • Thalia (comedy)
  • Urania (astronomy)

39. Things that allow for jumping ahead in line? : TABS
Like most features on our computer keyboards, the tab key is a hangover from the days of typewriters. When using a typewriter, making entries into a table was very tedious, involving lots of tapping on the spacebar and backspace key. So, a lever was added to typewriters that allowed the operator to “jump” across the page to positions that could be set by hand. Later this was simplified to a tab key which could be depressed, causing the carriage to jump to the next tab stop in much the same way that the modern tab key works on a computer.

46. Game with drawings : LOTTO
Originally, Lotto was a type of card game, with “lotto” being the Italian for “a lot”. We’ve used “lotto” to mean a gambling game since the late 1700s.

51. Shire of "Rocky" : TALIA
The actress Talia Shire is best-known for playing Rocky’s wife Adrian in the “Rocky” series of movies. She also played Connie, the daughter of Don Corleone, in “The Godfather” films. Shire is the sister of movie director Francis Ford Coppola and the aunt of actor Nicolas Cage. Her son is the actor Jason Schwartzman.

56. Buffet centerpiece? : EFS
There are two letters F (efs) in the center of the word “buffet”.

Our word “buffet” comes from the French “bufet” meaning “bench, sideboard”. So, a buffet is a meal served from a “bufet”.

60. Sinatra, for one : BARITONE
Frank Sinatra was the only child of Italian immigrants living in Hoboken, New Jersey. Like so many of our heroes, Sinatra had a rough upbringing. His mother was arrested several times and convicted of running an illegal abortion business in the family home. Sinatra never finished high school, as he was expelled for rowdy conduct. He was later arrested as a youth on a morals charge for carrying on with a married woman, which was an offence back then. But Sinatra straightened himself out by the time he was twenty and started singing professionally.

63. Aggravation : AGITA
Agita is another name for acid indigestion, and more generally can mean “agitation, anxiety”.

70. 1920s anarchist in a prominent trial : SACCO
Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were two anarchists, Italian immigrants accused of committing murder during an armed robbery in 1920. Sacco and Vanzetti were arrested the day after the crime. There followed two controversial trials, guilty verdicts and several appeals that went all the way to the US Supreme Court. Despite mounting evidence that the pair was innocent, the guilty verdicts were repeatedly upheld. A lot of the public accepted that Sacco and Vanzetti were not guilty, and many protests were staged. Regardless, the two were executed in the electric chair in 1927.

74. Extinct cousin of the kiwi : MOA
Moas were flightless birds native to New Zealand that are now extinct. The fate of the Moa is a great example of the detrimental effect that humans can have on animal populations. The Maoris arrived in New Zealand about 1300 AD, upsetting the balance of the ecosystem. The Moa were hunted to extinction within 200 years, which had the knock-on effect of killing off the Haast’s Eagle, the Moa’s only predator prior to the arrival of man. Moas were huge creatures, measuring up to 12 feet tall with their necks stretched upwards.

The kiwi is an unusual bird in that it has a highly developed sense of smell and is the only one of our feathered friends with nostrils located at the tip of its long beak.

80. Caffeine source : KOLA
The nut of the kola tree has a bitter taste, and is loaded with caffeine. Despite the taste, the nut is habitually chewed in some cultures, especially in West Africa where the tree is commonly found in the rainforest. Here in the US we best know the kola nut as a flavoring used in cola drinks.

85. "I hate the Moor" speaker : IAGO
Iago is the schemer in Shakespeare's “Othello”. He is a soldier who fought alongside Othello and feels hard done by, missing out on promotion. Iago hatches a plot designed to discredit his rival Cassio by insinuating that Cassio is having an affair with Desdemona, Othello's wife.

The most famous Moor in literature has to be Othello, the title character in William Shakespeare’s tragedy “Othello, the Moor of Venice”. The word “Moor” describes various peoples of North Africa, usually of the Muslim faith. At the height of their geographic influence the Moors occupied much of the Iberian peninsula, calling it Al Andalus (from which modern Andalusia gets its name).

86. Quick and detached, musically: Abbr. : STAC
Staccato is a musical direction signifying that notes should be played in a disconnected form. The opposite of staccato would be legato, long and continuous notes played very smoothly.

88. Special Agent Gibbs's beat : NCIS
NCIS is the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, which investigates crimes in the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. The service gives its name to the CBS TV show "NCIS", a spin-off drama from "JAG" in which the main "NCIS" characters were first introduced. The big star in "NCIS" is the actor Mark Harmon. “NCIS” is now a franchise, with spinoff shows “NCIS: Los Angeles” and “NCIS: New Orleans”.

90. Bris official : MOHEL
A mohel is a man who has been trained in the practice of brit milah (circumcision). Brit milah is known as "bris" in Yiddish. The brit milah ceremony is performed on male infants when they are 8-days old.

99. Activity in a dohyo : SUMO
Sumo is a sport that is practiced professionally only in Japan, the country of its origin. There is an international federation of sumo wrestling now, and one of the organization's aims is to have the sport accepted as an Olympic event.

102. Certain Consumer Reports employee : TESTER
“Consumer Reports” is a monthly magazine that has been published by Consumers Union since 1936. Consumers Union was established as a non-profit organization with the mission to “test products, inform the public, and protect customers.”

103. Beatles song, album or movie : HELP!
“Help!” is a 1965 movie, the second film released by the Beatles. The film’s soundtrack was released under the same title. Personally, I prefered the Beatles’ first movie, “A Hard Day’s Night” …

113. Yankee Sparky who wrote "The Bronx Zoo" : LYLE
Sparky Lyle is a retired MLB relief pitcher who played from 1967 to 1982, winning the Cy Young Award in 1977.

114. Abruzzi bell town : ATRI
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote "The Sicilian's Tale; The Bell of Atri", a narrative poem set in the small town of Atri in the Abruzzo region of Italy.

115. Da's opposite : NYET
“Nyet” is Russian for “no”, and “da” is Russian for “yes”.

121. "No ___!" : MAS
“No mas!” translates from Spanish as “no more!”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Part of a crossword : GRID
5. Child's play : A SNAP
10. Measure, as a runner : CLOCK
15. Attachment letters : PDF
18. Number two : AIDE
19. Star of CBS's "Madam Secretary" : LEONI
20. Eighth of a cup : OUNCE
21. Munich missus : FRAU
22. Commercials for a "Star Trek" movie? : SPOCK PLUGS (from “spark plugs”)
24. Yoga teacher's invitation? : A CALL TO OMS (from “a call to arms”)
26. Head bands? : HALOES
27. Roster shortener : ET ALII
29. Can't stand : HATES
30. Naval agreement : AYE
31. Inclined : ASLOPE
33. Flower arrangement : RACEME
36. Weather forecaster in Phoenix? : HOT SPECIALIST (from “heart specialist”)
40. Auto frame : CHASSIS
43. Serpent's tail? : -INE
44. Where Einstein was born : ULM
45. Gorsuch replaced him : SCALIA
47. Prefix with -partite : TRI-
48. "Louder!" : TURN IT UP!
51. Most in-shape person at a cosmetics company? : THE BOD OF AVON (from “the Bard of Avon”)
54. Strict Sabbath observer of old : ESSENE
55. Word before green or after deep blue : SEA
57. Narrow passage: Abbr. : STR
58. ___ friends : AMONG
59. Worn things : GARB
61. Back biter, maybe : FLEA
64. Standing directly in front of one another : TOE-TO-TOE
66. Big game : BOWL
69. Ridicule shouted out of a moving car? : PASSING MOCK (“passing mark”)
72. Tear apart : REND
73. Short-lived things : EPHEMERA
75. 1998 Sarah McLachlan hit : ADIA
76. Casino draw : KENO
78. Progressive alternative : GEICO
79. "Eww!" : ICK!
81. Pan Am rival : TWA
83. Gulf War allies : SAUDIS
87. Quickly added bit of punctuation? : INSTANT COMMA (from “Instant Karma”)
91. Space saver in a taxi or bus : DROP SEAT
93. Suffix with beat : -NIK
94. "Gangsta's Paradise" rapper : COOLIO
95. Egyptian ___ (spotted cat breed) : MAU
96. Turkish honorific : AGA
97. Tries to mediate : STEPS IN
100. What allowed one physician to get through flu season? : A SHOT IN THE DOC (from “a shot in the dark”)
105. Puts out : DOUSES
107. Articles of faith : TENETS
108. Two-time U.S. Open champ : ELS
109. Unctuous flattery : SMARM
111. Hangs loose : CHILLS
113. J.Crew competitor : LLBEAN
116. Regimen with limited intake of corn? : LOW-COB DIET (from “low-carb diet”)
119. Toddler's cry upon entering the bathroom? : IT'S MY POTTY! (from “It’s My Party”)
122. Where I-15 meets I-70 : UTAH
123. Cookin', after "on" : … A ROLL
124. Where "ho" and "hoina" mean "yes" and "no" : NEPAL
125. Tired (out) : WORE
126. Spanish chess piece : REY
127. Chrissie in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame : HYNDE
128. Backspace over : ERASE
129. Cross condition : SNIT

Down
1. Nasty cut : GASH
2. Gifford's successor on TV : RIPA
3. Violators of the Second Commandment : IDOLATERS
4. They can throw you off : DECOYS
5. High points of a European vacation? : ALPS
6. Condiment for pommes frites : SEL
7. ___-turn : NO U
8. Cartwright who played one of the von Trapp children in "The Sound of Music" : ANGELA
9. Energetic one : PISTOL
10. Come together : COALESCE
11. First daughter of the 1960s : LUCI
12. Studio warning : ON AIR
13. A quarter of M : CCL
14. Kenan's former Nickelodeon pal : KEL
15. Support for a fringe candidate, maybe : PROTEST VOTE
16. Title for Helen Mirren : DAME
17. Something "kicked up" : FUSS
21. Heads for a bar? : FOAMS
23. Remain fresh : KEEP
25. Mother of Helios : THEA
28. Imitative : APISH
31. Scopes Trial org. : ACLU
32. Nitwits : SIMPS
34. Music genre for Steppenwolf and Iron Butterfly : ACID ROCK
35. Elaine ___, cabinet member for both Bush and Trump : CHAO
36. Shere who wrote "Women and Love" : HITE
37. Cross to bear : ONUS
38. Sister of Erato : EUTERPE
39. Things that allow for jumping ahead in line? : TABS
41. Like some transfers : IRON-ON
42. Burned a bit : SINGED
46. Game with drawings : LOTTO
49. Slight : NEGLECT
50. ___ moment : IN A
51. Shire of "Rocky" : TALIA
52. Kind of chance : FAT
53. In the mood : AMOROUS
56. Buffet centerpiece? : EFS
60. Sinatra, for one : BARITONE
62. Squash : END
63. Aggravation : AGITA
65. Just manages : EKES OUT
66. Takes the first step : BEGINS
67. Christmas Day exhortation : OPEN IT!
68. Removed expeditiously : WHISKED AWAY
70. 1920s anarchist in a prominent trial : SACCO
71. Big mouth : MAW
74. Extinct cousin of the kiwi : MOA
77. Go out for a while? : NAP
80. Caffeine source : KOLA
82. Make no bones about : ADMIT
84. Completely convinced about : DEAD SET ON
85. "I hate the Moor" speaker : IAGO
86. Quick and detached, musically: Abbr. : STAC
88. Special Agent Gibbs's beat : NCIS
89. Call wrongly : MISTITLE
90. Bris official : MOHEL
92. Also-___ : RANS
98. Swing site : PORCH
99. Activity in a dohyo : SUMO
101. Site-seeing? : ONLINE
102. Certain Consumer Reports employee : TESTER
103. Beatles song, album or movie : HELP!
104. Pasta picks : ELBOWS
106. Discontinued Toyota line : SCION
109. Put-down : SLUR
110. Speck of dust : MOTE
112. Didn't give way : HELD
113. Yankee Sparky who wrote "The Bronx Zoo" : LYLE
114. Abruzzi bell town : ATRI
115. Da's opposite : NYET
117. "Phooey!" : BAH!
118. Assist with the dishes : DRY
120. Spring for a vacation? : SPA
121. "No ___!" : MAS


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0429-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Apr 17, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Martin Ashwood-Smith
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 14m 32s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

4. English channel : BBC
The marvelous British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is mainly funded by the UK government through a television licence fee that is levied annually on all households watching TV transmissions. Currently the fee is 145 UK pounds, about 230 US dollars.

13. Hannibal's men : THE A-TEAM
“The A-Team” is an action television series that originally ran in the eighties. The A-Team was a group of ex-US special forces personnel who became mercenaries. Star of the show was Hollywood actor George Peppard (as “Hannibal” Smith), ably assisted by Mr. T (as “B.A.” Baracus) and Robert Vaughn (as Hunt Stockwell).

16. 1962 Best Picture setting : ARABIA
"Lawrence of Arabia” is a 1962 movie that recounts the real life story of T. E. Lawrence, a British army officer famous for his role in the Sinai and Palestine Campaign of World War I. The title role in the film is played by Irish actor Peter O’Toole. The role of Sherif Ali ibn el Kharish is played by Omar Sharif.

17. Fault line? : MEA CULPA
Many Roman Catholics are very familiar with the Latin phrase “mea culpa” meaning “my fault”, as it is used in the Latin Mass. The additional term “mea maxima culpa” translates as “my most grievous fault”.

18. Swimming : NATANT
Something described as “natant” is floating or swimming, from the Latin “natare” meaning “to swim”.

20. Bind with a belt : GIRD
The phrase “gird your loins” dates back to Ancient Rome. The expression describes the action of lifting “one’s skirts” and tying them between the legs to allow more freedom of movement before going into battle. Nowadays, “gird your loins” (or sometimes just “gird yourself”) is a metaphor for “prepare yourself for the worst”.

23. Chanel No. 5 competitor : ESTEE
“Estée” is the signature fragrance from the Estée Lauder Company. “Estée” was the second fragrance developed by Estée Lauder herself, and was introduced in 1968. Lauder’s first fragrance was “Youth Dew”, introduced in 1953.

Chanel No. 5 is a perfume that was released by Coco Chanel back in 1921. Chanel had an affinity for the number “5”, and always presented her dress collection on May 5th (the fifth day of the fifth month). When she was presented a selection of experimental scents as potential choices for the first perfume to bear the Chanel name, she chose the sample in the fifth vial. Chanel instructed that the “sample number 5” should keep its name, asserting that it would bring the scent good luck.

29. Ones carrying babies on their backs : KOALAS
The koala bear really does look like a little bear, but it's not even closely related. The koala is an arboreal marsupial and a herbivore, native to the east and south coasts of Australia. Koalas aren’t primates, and are one of the few mammals other than primates who have fingerprints. In fact, it can be very difficult to tell human fingerprints from koala fingerprints, even under an electron microscope. Male koalas are called “bucks”, females are “does”, and young koalas are “joeys”. I’m a little jealous of the koala, as it sleeps up to 20 hours a day …

31. Middle Earth? : CORE
The Earth’s core is divided into two zones, a relatively “solid” inner core and a liquid outer core. Both inner and outer core are comprised mainly of iron and nickel. It is believed that the Earth’s magnetic field is generated by electric currents created by convection currents in the outer core.

36. Fictional spy who first appeared in "Call for the Dead" : GEORGE SMILEY
George Smiley is the protagonist in many of John Le Carré's spy novels.

John Le Carré is the pen name of David Cornwell, an English author famous for his spy novels. Cornwell worked for British Intelligence during the fifties and sixties, even as he was writing his spy thrillers. He left MI6 soon after his most famous 1963 novel "The Spy Who Came in from the Cold", became such a great success.

39. Go the right way? : GEE
“Haw!” is a command given to a trained animal that is hauling something (like a horse or an ox). “Haw!” is used to instruct the animal to turn to the left. The equivalent command for a right turn is “Gee!” Just to confuse things, the same commands are used in the British Isles but with the opposite meanings. That must be pretty unsettling for jet-setting plow horses …

43. Writer with the given names Robert Lawrence : STINE
The author R. L. Stine is sometimes referred to as the Stephen King of children’s literature as he writes horror stories for young people.

51. Capital for King Zog : TIRANA
Tirana is the capital of Albania, and the nation’s largest city.

Zog I served as Prime Minister of Albania from 1922 to 1924, then as President from 1925 to 1928 and finally as King from 1928 to 1939.

55. Setting for Sergei Eisenstein's "Battleship Potemkin" : ODESSA
The city of Odessa (also “Odesa”) in Ukraine was founded relatively recently, in 1794 by Catherine the Great. The city was originally meant to be called Odessos after an ancient Greek city believed to have been located nearby. Catherine liked the way the locals pronounced the name as “Odessa” and so went with the less Greek-sounding name.

"The Battleship Potemkin" is a silent movie made in 1925. A famous scene in the movie takes place in the port of Odessa, when Tsarist soldiers massacre rebels on the giant stairway in the city, now known as the Potemkin Stairs.

56. Clear brandy : EAU DE VIE
Eau de vie is a clear, colorless fruit brandy. “Eau de vie” is French for “water of life”.

57. Brisk competitor : NESTEA
Nestea is a brand of iced tea made by Nestlé. The name is a portmanteau of “Nestlé” and “tea”.

Down
1. PIN money? : ATM FEE
One enters a Personal Identification Number (PIN) when using an Automated Teller Machine (ATM). Given that the N in PIN stands for “number”, then PIN number is a redundant phrase. And, given that the M in ATM stands for “machine”, then ATM machine is a redundant phrase as well. Grr …!

3. Trick-taking card game : HEARTS
Hearts is a fun card game that is in the Whist family of trick-taking games, as are Bridge (my favorite) and Spades.

4. About 252 cals. : BTU
In the world of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), the power of a heating or cooling unit can be measured in British Thermal Units (BTUs). This dated unit is the amount of energy required to heat a pound of water so that the water's temperature increases by one degree Fahrenheit.

5. Like M. Poirot : BELG
Hercule Poirot is Agatha Christie’s renowned detective, a wonderful Belgian who plies his trade from his base in London. Poirot’s most famous case is the “Murder on the Orient Express”. First appearing in “The Mysterious Affair at Styles”, published in 1920, Poirot finally succumbs to a heart condition in the 1975 book “Curtain: Poirot’s Last Case”. Famously, Poirot is fond of using his “little grey cells”.

6. Competitive, in a way : CAPITALISTIC
It is generally agreed that the French politician and historian Louis Blanc coined the term “capitalism” in 1850, although he himself was a socialist. Blanc’s definition for capitalism was the appropriation of capital by some to the exclusion of others. We use the term today to describe an economic system in which trade, industry and production are privately owned and driven by profit.

7. Title of politeness : SAN
The Japanese honorific “-san” is added to the end of names as a title of respect, and can be translated as “Mr.” or “Ms.” The usage is wider than it is in English, though. Sometimes “-san” is added to the name of a company, for example.

9. Pro ___ : RATA
"Pro rata" is a Latin phrase meaning "in proportion".

12. Rubbery compounds : LATEXES
Latex is a naturally occurring polymer made by some plants, that can also be made synthetically. About one in ten of the flowering plants in the world make the milky fluid called latex. It serves as a defense against insects and is exuded when a plant is injured or attacked by insects. Latex is collected commercially and is the source of natural rubber, which can be used to make things such as gloves, condoms and balloons.

30. Guinness adjective : OLDEST
"The Guinness Book of World Records" holds some records of its own. It is the best-selling, copyrighted series of books of all time and is one of the books most often stolen from public libraries! The book was first published in 1954 by two twins, Norris and Ross McWhirter. The McWhirter twins found themselves with a smash hit, and eventually became very famous in Britain hosting a TV show based on world records.

33. Good earth : LOESS
Loess is a wind-blown accumulation of silt. The word is German in origin and was first used to describe silt along the Rhine Valley.

34. Table : SET ASIDE
These "tabling" and "shelving" idioms drive me crazy, because they are often misused. If a topic is shelved, it is set aside. If a topic is tabled, it is brought "off the shelf" and put “on the table” for discussion. I know that language evolves, but I think it should at least make sense …

39. Palace of Nations locale : GENEVA
The Palace of Nations was built as the home of the League of Nations. It is now the home of the United Nations Office in Geneva, Switzerland.

47. Illustrator Thomas : NAST
Thomas Nast was an American caricaturist and cartoonist. Nast was the creator of the Republican Party elephant, the Democratic Party donkey, Uncle Sam and the image of the plump and jocular Santa Claus that we use today.

54. New Left org. : SDS
Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) was an activist group in the sixties. The SDS organized the largest student strike in the history of the United States on 26 April 1968, with about a million students staying away from class that day. The “Students for a Democratic Society” name was revived in 2006 with the foundation of a new US-based student organization with left wing beliefs. Today’s SDS was founded by a pair of high school students from Greenwich Village, New York.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Result of a firing : ASH
4. English channel : BBC
7. It's poorly written : SCRAWL
13. Hannibal's men : THE A-TEAM
16. 1962 Best Picture setting : ARABIA
17. Fault line? : MEA CULPA
18. Swimming : NATANT
19. Shade of green : FERN
20. Bind with a belt : GIRD
22. Certain finish : MATTE
23. Chanel No. 5 competitor : ESTEE
25. Gridlock consequence : TIE-UP
27. Many a Dallas cowboy : TEX
28. Comments that lead people to repeat themselves : EHS
29. Ones carrying babies on their backs : KOALAS
31. Middle Earth? : CORE
32. Dawdles : DILLY-DALLIES
34. Source of feedback : SOUNDING BOARD
36. Fictional spy who first appeared in "Call for the Dead" : GEORGE SMILEY
37. "___ joke" : IT’S A
38. Ranges : STOVES
39. Go the right way? : GEE
42. Mystery in the fossil record : GAP
43. Writer with the given names Robert Lawrence : STINE
44. Tick off : STEAM
46. Jointly : AS ONE
48. Whine lover? : CRAB
50. Undeceived by : ONTO
51. Capital for King Zog : TIRANA
53. Hooter's location : OWL’S NEST
55. Setting for Sergei Eisenstein's "Battleship Potemkin" : ODESSA
56. Clear brandy : EAU DE VIE
57. Brisk competitor : NESTEA
58. Fist pumper's cry : YES!
59. Besides : AND

Down
1. PIN money? : ATM FEE
2. "Jeez Louise!" : SHEESH!
3. Trick-taking card game : HEARTS
4. About 252 cals. : BTU
5. Like M. Poirot : BELG
6. Competitive, in a way : CAPITALISTIC
7. Title of politeness : SAN
8. Swimmer's woe : CRAMP
9. Pro ___ : RATA
10. Slaughterhouse : ABATTOIR
11. Spent a season in the sun? : WINTERED
12. Rubbery compounds : LATEXES
14. Certain eruption : ACNE
15. Famed Pop Art subject : MARILYN MONROE
21. It's pretty obvious : DEAD GIVEAWAY
24. Augmenting, old-style : EKING
26. Functional : USABLE
30. Guinness adjective : OLDEST
31. Modeling medium : CLAY
32. Long-lasting, in commercial names : DURA-
33. Good earth : LOESS
34. Table : SET ASIDE
35. Some fertilized eggs : OOSPORES
36. Unit of explosive capacity : GIGATON
39. Palace of Nations locale : GENEVA
40. Has a home-cooked meal : EATS IN
41. Made a big scene? : EMOTED
43. Import : SENSE
45. Step on a scale : TONE
47. Illustrator Thomas : NAST
49. Down : BLUE
52. Strong, as a bond : AAA
54. New Left org. : SDS


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0428-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Apr 17, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: David Steinberg
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 15m 54s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

14. Literally, "highest city" : ACROPOLIS
Our prefix "acro-" comes from the Greek "akros" meaning "at the top". Examples are “acrophobia” (fear of heights) and “Acropolis” (“city at the top”).

16. Mystical characters : RUNES
A rune is a character in an alphabet that is believed to have mysterious powers. In Norse mythology, the runic alphabet was said to have a divine origin.

18. Highway through the Yukon : ALCAN
The Alaska Highway is also known as the Alaska-Canadian Highway or ALCAN Highway. A highway connecting the contiguous United States to Alaska was proposed in the twenties, but the Canadian authorities didn’t believe the project had much merit as the road would be used by very few of its citizens. The perceived importance of the route increased during WWII and President Roosevelt deemed the road a strategic necessity so he made a deal with Canada. The cost of construction would be born by the US, but the road and related facilities were to be handed over to Canada at the end of the war. The project was accelerated when the Japanese invaded and occupied Kiska and Attu Islands in the Aleutians. The road of course has been improved and is still in use today. The ALCAN Highway forms part of what is popularly known as the Pan-American Highway, which runs from Prudhoe Bay, Alaska to the south of Argentina or Chile depending on how the route is defined.

22. Drummer Starkey : ZAK
Zak Starkey is an English drummer just like his Dad Richard Starkey, better known as Ringo Starr. Zak has performed with the Who and with Oasis.

25. TV boy with spiked hair : BART
Bart Simpson is the main character in television’s “The Simpsons”. Bart’s name was chosen by the writers as it is an anagram of “brat”. Bart is voiced by actress and comedian Nancy Cartwright.

29. Org. since 1902 with 50+ million members : AAA
The American Automobile Association (AAA) is a not-for-profit organization focused on lobbying, provision of automobile servicing, and selling of automobile insurance. The AAA was founded in 1902 in Chicago and published the first of its celebrated hotel guides back in 1917.

32. Intermission starter? : ENTR-
The term “entr'acte” comes to us from French, and is the interval “between two acts” (“entre deux actes”) of a theatrical performance. The term often describes some entertainment provided during that interval.

33. Part of XXX : TIC
When I was growing up in Ireland we played “noughts and crosses” … our name for the game tic-tac-toe.

34. California's Harvey ___ College : MUDD
Harvey Mudd was a mining engineer, and president of Cyprus Mines Corporation. He lent his name to Harvey Mudd College, a science and engineering college in Claremont, California.

35. Santa player in "Elf" : ASNER
“Elf” is a comedy movie released for the 2003 Christmas season. “Elf” was directed by Jon Favreau and stars Will Ferrell in the title role, with James Caan supporting and Ed Asner playing Santa Claus. It’s all about one of Santa’s elves who finds out he is human and goes to meet his father in New York City.

37. Food sticker : TINE
That would be one of the tines (points) on a fork.

38. "Star Wars" nickname : ANI
Anakin “Ani” Skywalker is the principal character in the first six of the "Star Wars" movies. His progress chronologically through the series of films is:
  • Episode I: Anakin is a 9-year-old slave boy who earns the promise of Jedi training by young Obi-Wan Kenobi.
  • Episode II: Anakin is 18-years-old and goes on a murdering rampage to avenge the killing of his mother.
  • Episode III: Anakin is 21-years-old and a Jedi knight, but he turns to the Dark Side and becomes Darth Vader. His wife Padme gives birth to twins, Luke and Leia Skywalker.
  • Episode IV: Darth Vader, comes into conflict with his children, Luke Skywalker and the Princess Leia.
  • Episode V: Darth Vader attempts to coax his son Luke over to the dark side, and reveals to Luke that he is his father.
  • Episode VI: Luke learns that Leia is his sister, and takes on the task of bringing Darth Vader back from the Dark Side in order to save the Galaxy. Vader saves his son from the Emperor's evil grip, dying in the process, but his spirit ends up alongside the spirits of Yoda and Obi-Wan. They all live happily ever after ...

42. Old RR watchdog : ICC
The Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) was set up in 1887 to regulate the railroads and later the trucking industry. The ICC was abolished in 1995 and its functions were absorbed by the Surface Transportation Board.

43. Like some columns : IONIC
The Ionic was one of the three classical orders of architecture, the others being the Doric and the Corinthian. An Ionic column is relatively ornate. It usually has grooves running up and down its length and at the top there is a "scroll" design called a "volute". The scroll motif makes Ionic columns popular for the design of academic buildings. The term “Ionic” means “pertaining to Ionia”, with Ionia being an ancient territory that is located in modern-day Turkey.

46. Court ruling : LET
That would be on a tennis court, perhaps.

47. "Eww, no more!" : TMI
TMI (too much information!)

50. 2012 #1 hit by LMFAO : SEXY AND I KNOW IT
LMFAO was an electronic dance music duo active who were active from 2006 until 2012. The duo’s stage names were Redfoo and SkyBlu, with the former being the uncle of the latter. Never heard of ‘em ...

56. Internet hookup : MODEM
A modem is a device that is used to facilitate the transmission of a digital signal over an analog line. At one end of the line a modem is used to “modulate” an analog carrier signal to encode the the digital information, and at the other end a modem is used to “demodulate” the analog carrier signal and so reproduce the original digital information. This modulation-demodulation gives the device its name: a MOdulator-DEModulator, or “modem”.

57. Like Sprite : LEMON-LIME
Sprite is Coca-Cola’s answer to the very successful soft drink called 7 Up. Sprite was introduced in 1961, and Coca-Cola used its muscle to topple 7 Up from its dominant position in the market. Sprite has been the number-one selling lemon soda since 1978.

58. Hindu aphorisms : SUTRA
The word “sutra” is used in Hinduism for a learned text, one usually meant to be studied by students.

An aphorism is a short and pithy statement that embodies a general truth or insightful observation. Some great examples are:
  • Life is a journey, not a destination (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
  • The average person thinks he isn’t (Larry Lorenzoni)
  • To err is human, to forgive divine (Alexander Pope)
  • Reality is an illusion, albeit a very persistent one (Albert Einstein)
  • Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely (Lord Acton)

59. Producer of red-and-white blooms : AMARYLLIS
Plants of the genus Amaryllis are known as belladonna lilies, although they are only distant cousins of lilies. The shape of the flower of an Amaryllis plant only resembles that of a lily.

Down
3. Ollie's friend on old TV : FRAN
“Kukla, Fran and Ollie” is an early television show that aired from 1947-1957. Kukla and Ollie (Oliver J. Dragon) were puppets and Fran was Fran Allison, usually the only human on the show.

5. Bug exterminator? : CODER
Back in 1947, the famed computer programmer Grace Hopper noticed some colleagues fixing a piece of equipment by removing a dead moth from a relay. She remarked that they were “debugging” the system, and so Hopper has been given credit for popularizing the term.

6. Mount Holyoke grad, e.g. : ALUMNA
Mount Holyoke College is a private school for women located in South Hadley, Massachusetts. It was founded as Mount Holyoke Female Seminary in 1834 as the sister school to Andover Seminary.

8. Sports-themed restaurant : ESPN ZONE
ESPN Zone is a chain of restaurants, albeit a small chain as there are only two of them. The original location was in Baltimore, Maryland but it's closed now. There is one ESPN Zone in the entertainment complex in Downtown Los Angeles called L.A. Live, and there is another not too far away (that I've visited) in Downtown Disney in Anaheim.

13. Application fig. : SSN
Social Security number (SSN)

15. Oenophile's pride : PALATE
In Greek mythology, Oeno was the goddess of wine, giving us “oen-” as a prefix meaning “wine”. For example, oenology is the study of wine and an oenophile is a wine-lover.

20. "The Flies" playwright : SARTRE
Jean-Paul Sartre was a leading French philosopher, as well as a writer and political activist. Sartre also served with the French army during WWII and spent nine months as a prisoner of war having been captured by German troops. He was one of the few people to have been awarded a Nobel Prize and to have then refused to accept it. Sartre was named winner of the prize for Literature in 1964, for his first novel "Nausea". Before his win, Sartre knew that his name was on the list of nominees so he wrote to the Nobel Institute and asked to be withdrawn from consideration. The letter somehow went unread, so he found himself having to refuse the award after he had been selected.

28. Prada competitor : FENDI
Fendi is an Italian fashion house, founded in 1925 by Adele Casagrande. Fendi started out as a fur and leather shop in Rome, and these days is famous for its line of handbags.

30. Communication service since 2004 : GMAIL
Gmail is a free webmail service provided by Google, and my favorite of the free email services. Gmail made a big splash when it was introduced in 2007 because it offered a whopping 1GB of storage whereas other services offered a measly 2-4MB on average.

31. Pablo Picasso's designer daughter : PALOMA
Paloma Picasso is a fashion designer based in Paris. Paloma is the youngest daughter of Spanish artist Pablo Picasso and French author and painter Françoise Gilot.

44. Relative of an alligator : CAIMAN
Caimans are relatively small, crocodile-like reptiles that inhabit Central and South America. That said, the largest species can grow to 13 feet in length, but many are about 3 feet long.

49. Portmanteau garment : SKORT
The garment called a “skort” is a hybrid between shorts and a skirt.

A portmanteau was a large suitcase, one that could be taken apart into two separate pieces. The word “portmanteau” is French for a “travelling bag”, from “porter” (to carry) and “manteau” (a coat, cloak). We also use “portmanteau” to mean a word that has been melded together from two parts (just as the suitcase comprised two parts). This usage was introduced to the world by Humpty Dumpty in Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”. He explained to Alice that the nonsense words in the “Jabberwocky” poem were actually portmanteau words. For example “slithy” comes from from “slimy” and “lithe”.

51. Prefix with -graphic : XERO-
A xerox is a copy made on a xerographic machine. Xerography is a dry photocopying technique that was invented in 1938 by Chester Carlson, although he originally referred to the process as electrophotography. Joseph Wilson commercialized Carlson’s process some years later, coining the term “Xerography” using the Greek words for “dry” and “writing”. Wilson changed the name of his own photographic company to Xerox.

56. Pile at a publisher: Abbr. : MSS
Editors (eds.) might read or edit a manuscript (MS)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Cuckoo : DAFT
5. Showed : CAME
9. Stack (or snack) on a table : CHIPS
14. Literally, "highest city" : ACROPOLIS
16. Mystical characters : RUNES
17. "This place looks horrible!" : WHAT A DUMP!
18. Highway through the Yukon : ALCAN
19. Site where top hats and canes might be checked at the door : GENTLEMEN'S CLUB
21. Make : EARN
22. Drummer Starkey : ZAK
23. Sound that might be made while rubbing the arms : BRR!
25. TV boy with spiked hair : BART
27. In front of, to Shakespeare : AFORE
29. Org. since 1902 with 50+ million members : AAA
30. Throw a long football pass : GO DEEP
32. Intermission starter? : ENTR-
33. Part of XXX : TIC
34. California's Harvey ___ College : MUDD
35. Santa player in "Elf" : ASNER
37. Food sticker : TINE
38. "Star Wars" nickname : ANI
39. Chucklehead : CLOD
40. Rebounded : ECHOED
42. Old RR watchdog : ICC
43. Like some columns : IONIC
45. Lacerate : REND
46. Court ruling : LET
47. "Eww, no more!" : TMI
48. Memo directive : ASAP
50. 2012 #1 hit by LMFAO : SEXY AND I KNOW IT
56. Internet hookup : MODEM
57. Like Sprite : LEMON-LIME
58. Hindu aphorisms : SUTRA
59. Producer of red-and-white blooms : AMARYLLIS
60. Get low : STOOP
61. Practice : WONT
62. No longer a draft, say : SENT

Down
1. Homey : DAWG
2. It hurts : ACHE
3. Ollie's friend on old TV : FRAN
4. Walked unsteadily : TOTTERED
5. Bug exterminator? : CODER
6. Mount Holyoke grad, e.g. : ALUMNA
7. Act out : MIME
8. Sports-themed restaurant : ESPN ZONE
9. Soup go-with : CRACKER
10. Bottom of the sea? : HULL
11. Development period : INCUBATION
12. Dim : PEA-BRAINED
13. Application fig. : SSN
15. Oenophile's pride : PALATE
20. "The Flies" playwright : SARTRE
24. Went pit-a-pat, pit-a-pat : RACED
25. Doesn't stay in the hole, as a ball : BOUNCES OUT
26. Hooked on : ADDICTED TO
28. Prada competitor : FENDI
30. Communication service since 2004 : GMAIL
31. Pablo Picasso's designer daughter : PALOMA
36. Jared Kushner, as a notable example : SON-IN-LAW
37. Where people go to vote : THE POLLS
39. Concierge's handout : CITY MAP
41. Narrow recess : CRANNY
44. Relative of an alligator : CAIMAN
49. Portmanteau garment : SKORT
51. Prefix with -graphic : XERO-
52. Prefix with -graphic : DEMO-
53. Subterfuge : WILE
54. Opposite of "Too rich for me" : I'M IN
55. Word with road or blood : TEST
56. Pile at a publisher: Abbr. : MSS


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0427-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Apr 17, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Todd Gross
THEME: Rate Square
Today’s grid features the letters RATE written in 8 different ways in a 4x4 square at the center in circled letters. Those eight different arrangements are included in eight answers in the puzzle. There are also a couple of other paired answers that reference the arrangement in the middle of the grid:
31A. Do over and over : ITERATE
37A. Mark below a line : CARET
42A. Hotel posting : RATES
46A. Like some allowances : DIETARY
16D. Animals whose tongues flick about 150 times a minute : ANTEATERS
24D. Look piercingly at : STARE INTO
25D. Afghanistan's third-largest city : HERAT
32D. Open again, as a keg : RETAP

1A. With 68-Across, the shaded part of this crossword : CENTRAL
68A. See 1-Across : SQUARES

8A. With 67-Across, what the shaded part of this crossword represents : SUDOKU
67A. See 8-Across : PUZZLE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 13m 41s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

8. With 67-Across, what the shaded part of this crossword represents : SUDOKU
(67A. See 8-Across : PUZZLE)
Number puzzles similar to our modern-day Sudoku first appeared in French newspapers in the late 1800s. The format that we use today was created by Howard Garns, a 74-year-old freelance puzzle constructor from Connersville, Indiana and first published in 1979. The format was introduced in Japan in 1984 and given the title of “Sūji wa dokushin ni kagiru”, which translates to “the digits are limited to one occurrence”. The rather elaborate Japanese title was eventually shortened to Sudoku. No doubt many of you are fans of Sudoku puzzles. I know I am …

17. Eli and Aaron, in the Bible : PRIESTS
In the Bible, Eli is a High Priest of Shiloh, and the teacher of Samuel. As such, his story is told in the Book of Samuel. Eli had two sons, Hophni and Phinehas, both of whom are described as wicked. As a result of their wayward lifestyle, it is prophesied that all of Eli’s male descendents will die before reaching old age.

In the Bible and the Qur’an, Aaron was the older brother of Moses and was a prophet. Aaron became the first High Priest of the Israelites.

20. ___ Enterprises (bygone TV production company) : MTM
MTM Enterprises was a television production company founded in 1969 by Mary Tyler Moore, originally to produce the “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”. The company subsequently produced the likes of “The Bob Newhart Show”, “Rhoda”, “WKRP in Cincinnati”, “Hill Street Blues” and “St. Elsewhere”. That’s a lot of great television …

21. Home of The Times-Picayune, familiarly : NOLA
The city of New Orleans, Louisiana has the nickname “The Big Easy”. This name might come from the early 1900s when musicians found it relatively “easy” to find work there. The city is also known by the acronym NOLA, standing for New Orleans (NO), LA.

26. Where lakes are loughs : EIRE
“Loch” is the Scottish Gaelic word for “lake”. The Irish Gaelic word is “lough”.

33. Core parts : ABS
The abdominal muscles (abs) are more correctly referred to as the rectus abdominis muscles. They are all called a “six-pack” in a person who has developed the muscles and who has low body fat. In my case, more like a keg …

37. Mark below a line : CARET
The character known as a caret was originally a proofreading mark, used to indicate where a punctuation mark was to be inserted. “Caret” is Latin for “it lacks”.

49. Certain bond, for short : MUNI
A municipal bond (muni) is one that is issued by a city or local government, or some similar agency. Munis have an advantage over other investments in that any interest earned on the bond is usually exempt from state and federal income taxes.

55. Hawaiian fish with a palindromic name : ONO
The wahoo is a cousin of the mackerel, and is known as the ono in Hawaii.

Down
1. Legendary N.Y.C. club, with "the" : COPA
The Copacabana of song is the Copacabana nightclub in New York City (which is also the subject of the Frank Sinatra song "Meet Me at the Copa"). The Copa opened in 1940 and is still going today although it is struggling. The club had to move due to impending construction and is now "sharing" a location with the Columbus 72 nightclub.
Her name was Lola, she was a showgirl
With yellow feathers in her hair and a dress cut down to there
She would merengue and do the cha-cha
And while she tried to be a star
Tony always tended bar
Across the crowded floor, they worked from 8 til 4
They were young and they had each other
Who could ask for more?

3. Long-running TV drama started in 2003 : NCIS
NCIS is the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, which investigates crimes in the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. The service gives its name to the CBS TV show "NCIS", a spin-off drama from "JAG" in which the main "NCIS" characters were first introduced. The big star in "NCIS" is the actor Mark Harmon. “NCIS” is now a franchise, with spinoff shows “NCIS: Los Angeles” and “NCIS: New Orleans”.

4. Annual September TV event : THE EMMYS
The Emmy Awards are the television equivalent of the Oscars from the world of film, the Grammy Awards in music and the Tony Awards for the stage. Emmy Awards are presented throughout the year, depending on the sector of television being honored. The most famous of these ceremonies are the Primetime Emmy Awards and the Daytime Emmy Awards. The distinctive name of "Emmy" is a softened version of the word "immy", the nickname given to the video camera tubes found in old television cameras.

5. Believer in an Ethiopian Zion : RASTA
I must admit that I don’t really know much about Rastafarianism. I do know that a “Rasta”, like Bob Marley, is a follower of the movement. Some say that Rastafarianism is a religion, some not. I also know that it involves the worship of Emperor Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia.

6. "The enemy of ___ is the absence of limitations": Orson Welles : ART
Orson Welles is perhaps best-remembered in the world of film for his role in 1941’s “Citizen Kane”. In the world of radio, Welles is known for 1938’s famous broadcast of “The War of the Worlds”, a broadcast that convinced many listeners that the Earth was indeed being invaded by aliens.

7. Church inits. : LDS
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, often abbreviated to "LDS", is known colloquially as the Mormon Church.

9. Tribe after which the 45th state is named : UTE
The Ute is a group of Native American tribes that now resides in Utah and Colorado. The Ute were not a unified people as such, but rather a loose association of nomadic groups. The word “Ute” means “Land of the Sun”, and “Ute” also gave us the state name “Utah”.

10. Steak ___ : DIANE
Steak Diane is pan-fried filet mignon served in a flambéed sauce made from the juices in the pan along with butter, shallots, cream and brandy. The dish is named after Diana, the Roman goddess of the hunt.

12. Longtime New Yorker writer Pauline : KAEL
Pauline Kael was a film critic who wrote for “The New Yorker” magazine from 1968 to 1991.

13. Part of the body whose name is both English and Latin : ULNA
The radius and ulna are bones in the forearm. If you hold the palm of your hand up in front of you, the radius is the bone on the "thumb-side" of the arm, and the ulna is the bone on the "pinkie-side".

15. ___ Lock (neighbor of Page Up) : NUM
That would be on a computer keyboard.

16. Animals whose tongues flick about 150 times a minute : ANTEATERS
Anteaters tear open ant and termite nests using their sharp claws and then eat up the eggs, larvae and mature ants using their tongues. They have very sticky saliva which coats the tongue hence making the feeding very efficient. The tongue also moves very quickly, flicking in and out of the mouth at about 150 times per minute.

23. Wrestler Flair : RIC
The wrestler Ric Flair’s real name is Richard Fliehr. Perhaps following the lead of his compatriot Jesse Ventura, Flair explored the possibility of running for governor of the state of North Carolina. Dearie, dearie me …

25. Afghanistan's third-largest city : HERAT
Herat is the third largest city in Afghanistan, and is located in the northeast of the country.

27. Cinnabar, e.g. : RED
Cinnabar is the ore from which mercury is extracted. It is a bright red or scarlet mineral in its natural form.

39. First commercial film with stereophonic sound, 1940 : FANTASIA
“Fantasia” was Disney’s third feature length movie, released in 1940. The film had a disappointing critical reception and pushed the Disney company into financial difficulties. RKO took over the film’s distribution in 1946. The folks at RKO cut a full hour off the running time and relaunched the movie into a successful run. If you haven’t seen “Fantasia”, I urge you to do so. It’s a real delight …

Monophonic sound (“mono”) is sound reproduced using just one audio channel, which is usually played out of just one speaker. Stereophonic sound is reproduced using two audio channels, with the sound from each channel played out of two different speakers. The pair of stereo speakers are usually positioned apart from each other so that sound appears to come from between the two. Quadraphonic sound (4.0 surround sound) uses four audio channels with the sound played back through four speakers often positioned at the corners of the room in which one is listening.

41. Lead-in to -tainment : EDU
The word “edutainment” describes educational entertainment, a work that is designed to both educate and to entertain. The Walt Disney Company was the first to embrace the term, using it to describe the “True-Life Adventures” series of films produced from 1948 to 1960.

43. OS part: Abbr. : SYS
Operating system (OS)

47. Daniel ___, first Japanese-American to serve in Congress : INOUYE
Senator Daniel Inouye was a US Senator for the state of Hawaii and was the President pro tem of the Senate (the US Vice President is the President of the Senate). Given this role, he was the highest-ranking Japanese-American in the country’s history as he was third in the line of succession to the office of US President. Senator Inouye passed away in 2012. Honolulu's airport was renamed to Daniel K. Inouye International Airport in 2017 in his honor.

49. "I Love Lucy" neighbor : MERTZ
In the hit television show “I Love Lucy”, Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz play Lucy and Ricky Ricardo. The Ricardos’ best friends are also their landlords, Fred and Ethel Mertz. The Mertz’s are played by William Frawley and Vivian Vance.

51. Utter mess : SNAFU
SNAFU is an acronym standing for Situation Normal: All Fouled Up (well, that’s the “polite” version!). As one might perhaps imagine, the term developed in the US Army, during WWII.

53. Home of Pearl City : OAHU
Pearl City is located in Honolulu, along the north shore of Pearl Harbor.

54. Cameron of "Charlie's Angels" : DIAZ
The Hollywood actress Cameron Diaz started out her professional life as a model. Diaz’s first acting role was in the 1994 film “The Mask”, starring alongside Jim Carrey.

“Charlie’s Angels” is a fun action movie from 2000 that is a spinoff from the iconic TV show of the same name from the seventies. The “Angels” in the movie version are Cameron Diaz, Drew Barrymore and Lucy Liu, with Bill Murray as John Bosley. John Forsythe provides the voice of the unseen “Charlie”, just as he did in the original television show.

56. Big Ten inits. : OSU
Ohio State University (OSU) was founded back in 1870 as the Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College. The athletic teams of OSU are called the Buckeyes, named after the state tree of Ohio. In turn the buckeye tree gets its name from the appearance of its fruit, a dark nut with a light patch thought to resemble a "buck's eye".

The Big Ten is the nation's oldest Division I college athletic conference and today is comprised of not ten, but twelve colleges mainly located in the Midwest. The conference was founded in 1896 and earned the name "Big Nine" in 1899 when Iowa and Indiana joined to bring the number of teams in the conference to nine. The conference name was changed to the Big Ten after Michigan rejoined in 1917. Right after WWII, the University of Chicago dropped out so the conference became known as the Big Nine again until 1949. The official designation of "Big Ten" was adopted in 1987 when the conference (once again with with a complement of ten teams) registered as a not-for-profit corporation. It was decided to keep the official name of Big Ten when Penn State joined in 1990 bringing the number of schools to the level of eleven, and even when the University of Nebraska-Lincoln joined in 2011 as the twelfth team.

59. Scots Gaelic : ERSE
There are actually three Erse languages: Irish, Manx (spoken on the Isle of Man) and Scots Gaelic. In their own tongues, these would be Gaeilge (in Ireland), Gaelg (on the Isle of Man) and Gaidhlig (in Scotland).

60. You might give them props : SETS
That would in the world of acting.

62. Picture frame? : CEL
In the world of animation, a cel is a transparent sheet on which objects and characters are drawn. In the first half of the 20th century the sheet was actually made of celluloid, giving the "cel" its name.

63. CPR offerer : EMS
An emergency medical technician (EMT) might administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. With 68-Across, the shaded part of this crossword : CENTRAL
8. With 67-Across, what the shaded part of this crossword represents : SUDOKU
14. Orange place : ORCHARD
15. Seafaring : NAUTICAL
17. Eli and Aaron, in the Bible : PRIESTS
18. Having a perfect record : UNBEATEN
19. A business might have one that's fixed : ASSET
20. ___ Enterprises (bygone TV production company) : MTM
21. Home of The Times-Picayune, familiarly : NOLA
22. Reed section? : MARSH
26. Where lakes are loughs : EIRE
28. You might go for one at the beach : SWIM
31. Do over and over : ITERATE
33. Core parts : ABS
36. "Well, isn't that something!" : OH MY!
37. Mark below a line : CARET
38. Note just above C : D-FLAT
40. Terminate : CEASE
42. Hotel posting : RATES
44. "Right back ___!" : AT YA
45. Manual opener : KEY
46. Like some allowances : DIETARY
48. Peeping, say : NOSY
49. Certain bond, for short : MUNI
50. "Hey, buddy!" : PSSST!
52. "Inner-city" for "black," to some people : CODE
55. Hawaiian fish with a palindromic name : ONO
57. Scruffs : NAPES
61. Tops off? : HAIRCUTS
63. Gap in a tape, maybe : ERASURE
65. Cross words : I HATE YOU!
66. Like a selfish attitude : ME-FIRST
67. See 8-Across : PUZZLE
68. See 1-Across : SQUARES

Down
1. Legendary N.Y.C. club, with "the" : COPA
2. Drops the ball : ERRS
3. Long-running TV drama started in 2003 : NCIS
4. Annual September TV event : THE EMMYS
5. Believer in an Ethiopian Zion : RASTA
6. "The enemy of ___ is the absence of limitations": Orson Welles : ART
7. Church inits. : LDS
8. Turn in : SUBMIT
9. Tribe after which the 45th state is named : UTE
10. Steak ___ : DIANE
11. Numerical prefix : OCTO-
12. Longtime New Yorker writer Pauline : KAEL
13. Part of the body whose name is both English and Latin : ULNA
15. ___ Lock (neighbor of Page Up) : NUM
16. Animals whose tongues flick about 150 times a minute : ANTEATERS
23. Wrestler Flair : RIC
24. Look piercingly at : STARE INTO
25. Afghanistan's third-largest city : HERAT
27. Cinnabar, e.g. : RED
28. Punch : SOCK
29. "So much fu-u-u-u-un!" : WHEE!
30. "Possibly" : I MAY
32. Open again, as a keg : RETAP
33. Quartet part : ALTO
34. American Pharoah and others : BAYS
35. Canine command : STAY
39. First commercial film with stereophonic sound, 1940 : FANTASIA
41. Lead-in to -tainment : EDU
43. OS part: Abbr. : SYS
47. Daniel ___, first Japanese-American to serve in Congress : INOUYE
49. "I Love Lucy" neighbor : MERTZ
51. Utter mess : SNAFU
52. Computer ___ : CHIP
53. Home of Pearl City : OAHU
54. Cameron of "Charlie's Angels" : DIAZ
56. Big Ten inits. : OSU
58. Sound of contentment : PURR
59. Scots Gaelic : ERSE
60. You might give them props : SETS
62. Picture frame? : CEL
63. CPR offerer : EMS
64. Necessary: Abbr. : REQ


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0426-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 Apr 17, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Trenton Charlson
THEME: Dos Equis
Each of today’s themed answers includes DOS EQUIS (two letters X).
64A. Beer brand whose logo hints at the answers to 17-, 19-, 38-, 43- and 61-Across : DOS EQUIS

17A. "Sanford and Son" star of 1970s TV : REDD FOXX
19A. High-end shampoo brand : NEXXUS
38A. Shot blocker? : ANTI-VAXXER
43A. BP rival : EXXONMOBIL
61A. Sister chain of Marshalls : TJ MAXX
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 8m 15s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Police alert, for short : APB
An All Points Bulletin (APB) is a broadcast from one US law enforcement agency to another.

8. Candy often used in science fair volcanoes : MENTOS
Mentos are mints made by the Italian confectioner Perfetti Van Melle. You might have seen video of Mentos mints being dropped into bottle containing a carbonated drink. The surface of the mint causes an explosive release of carbon dioxide resulting in a geyser of foam that can shoot many feet up into the air.

14. Proactiv target : ACNE
The Proactiv range of skincare products were introduced in 1995 by two dermatologists who met up with each other while studying at Stanford. Proactiv is market to people suffering with acne. There are quite a few folks who complain about the direct marketing approach to sales used for the products. Customers are “members” of a club, and the products keep coming until a subscription is canceled.

15. Sound that might be heard in a 16-Across : COO
16. It's for the birds : AVIARY
An aviary is a large cage that houses birds. “Avis” is Latin for bird.

17. "Sanford and Son" star of 1970s TV : REDD FOXX
Redd Foxx was the stage name of John Elroy Sanford, best known for starring in "Sanford and Son". "Sanford and Son" was an American version of a celebrated hit BBC sitcom that I grew up with in Ireland, called "Steptoe and Son".

19. High-end shampoo brand : NEXXUS
Nexxus is a brand of hair-care products that was developed by Alberto-Culver, and which now is made by Unilever.

25. Warning letters next to a link : NSFW
The abbreviation “NSFW” stands for “not safe/suitable for work”. It’s Internet slang used to describe online content that is best not viewed at work.

37. Brand in the pet food aisle : ALPO
Alpo is a brand of dog food first produced by Allen Products in 1936, with “Alpo” being an abbreviation for “Allen Products”. Lorne Greene used to push Alpo in television spots, as did Ed McMahon and Garfield the Cat, would you believe?

38. Shot blocker? : ANTI-VAXXER
“Anti-vaxxers” is a term that applies to members of the anti-vaccination movement.

42. Grenache, for one : VIN ROSE
Rosé wines get their color from the skins of the grapes, although the intensity of the color is not sufficient to make them red wines. Of the varying type of rosé wines available, we are most familiar with sweet White Zinfandels. Personally I am fond of the really dry Provençal rosé wines.

Grenache is red wine grape variety, and the major constituent of wines from the Chateauneuf-du-Pape region in France (my favorites). Grenache is also used to make rosé wines in the Cotes du Rhone region (also a favorite of mine).

43. BP rival : EXXONMOBIL
The Exxon Corporation was a descendant of John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil Company. Exxon merged with Mobil (yet another descendant of Standard Oil) in 1999 to form ExxonMobil.

BP is an oil and gas company headquartered in London, UK. BP started out as the Anglo-Persian Oil Company in 1909 with the remit of exploiting oil discovered in Iran. The company name was changed to British Petroleum in 1954, and today the name used is simply “BP”.

45. ___ Domini : ANNO
The designations Anno Domini (AD, “year of Our Lord”) and Before Christ (BC) are found in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The dividing point between AD and BC is the year of the conception of Jesus, with AD 1 following 1 BC without a year “0” in between. The AD/BC scheme dates back to AD 525, and gained wide acceptance soon after AD 800. Nowadays a modified version has become popular, with CE (Common/Christian Era) used to replace AD, and BCE (Before the Common/Christian Era) used to replace BC.

46. Coastal indentation : RIA
A drowned valley might be called a ria or a fjord, with both formed as sea level rises. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

47. "The Times They Are a-Changin'" songwriter : DYLAN
“The Times They Are A-Changin’” is the title track of a 1964 Bob Dylan album. Dylan wrote the song in 1963 as a deliberate attempt to create and anthem of change to suit the times. Sadly, he was right. President John F. Kennedy was assassinated just one month after Dylan recorded the song.

48. Big name in vacuum cleaners : DYSON
Dyson vacuum cleaners do not use a bag to collect dust. James Dyson invented the first vacuum cleaner to use cyclonic separation in 1979, frustrated at the poor performance of his regular vacuum cleaner. As Dyson cleaners do not use bags, they don’t have to deal with collection bags that are blocked with fine dust particles, even after emptying. Cyclonic separation uses high speed spinning of the dust-containing air so that the dust particles are thrown out of the airflow into a collection bin. We have a Dyson now, and should have bought it years ago …

51. Hostility, in British slang : AGGRO
"Aggro" is term that we use a lot in Ireland, probably more so than in the UK. It can mean an “annoyance” (and short for “aggravation”) but is more often used to mean "trouble", as in someone caused trouble, created aggro.

56. Cuneiform discovery site : AMARNA
Armana is an archaeological site on the east bank of the Nile River in Egypt, almost 200 miles south of Cairo. The ancient city is also known as el-Armana, and Tel el-Armana, although the use of "Tel" is apparently incorrect. "Tel" commonly appears in names in the region (Arabic for "hill"), but should not apply to Amarna as the site is perfectly flat.

Cuneiform writing is a very early form of written expression that uses characters that are variants of a wedge shape. The first form of cuneiform writing was developed in Sumer (in modern-day Iraq), and was largely a system of pictographs. Over time, the number of characters decreased and became smaller and simpler, until they eventually evolved into the characters that we use in alphabetic writing today.

61. Sister chain of Marshalls : TJ MAXX
TJ Maxx is a chain of department stores in the US, with outlets in Europe as well. Over in the UK, the stores are known as TK Maxx.

64. Beer brand whose logo hints at the answers to 17-, 19-, 38-, 43- and 61-Across : DOS EQUIS
Dos Equis lager was originally brewed in 1897, and back then was called "Siglo XX" (20th century) to celebrate the arrival of the new century. The name was changed later to simply "Dos Equis" (two exes).

67. Artist Jean who pioneered in Dadaism : ARP
Jean Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn’t the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both “Hans” and “Jean” translate into English as “John”. In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all of his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. Arp was sent home …

Dadaism thrived during and just after WWI, and was an anti-war, anti-bourgeois and anti-art culture. The movement began in Zurich, Switzerland started by a group of artists and writers who met to discuss art and put on performances in the Cabaret Voltaire, frequently expressing disgust at the war that was raging across Europe.

68. Relative of a tangelo : UGLI
The ugli fruit is a hybrid of an orange and a tangerine, first discovered growing wild in Jamaica where most ugli fruit comes from today. “UGLI” is a trademark name that is a variant of “ugly”, a nod to the fruits unsightly wrinkled rind.

The fruit called a tangelo is a hybrid between a tangerine and either a grapefruit or a pomelo (which gives its the name). A pomelo is a very large, pear-shaped citrus fruit native to Southeast Asia. The Jamaican form of tangelo is known as the ugli fruit.

69. Brewers' fermenting agents : YEASTS
Yeasts are unicellular microorganisms in the Fungi kingdom. The species of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for centuries in the making of wine and beer, and in breadmaking. Saccharomyces cerevisiae converts carbohydrates into carbon dioxide and alcohol in the process of fermentation. When making beer and wine, the carbon dioxide and alcohol may be captured by the liquid. When making bread, the carbon dioxide and alcohol is driven off by heat.

71. On the briny : ASEA
The “briny” is the sea, from “brine” meaning “salty water”. The term “briny” was originally used for “tears”.

Down
2. Drink brand with a polar bear symbol : ICEE
Slush Puppie and ICEE are brands of frozen, slushy drinks. Ostensibly competing brands, ICEE company now owns the Slush Puppie brand.

6. Curse : POX
A “pock” is an eruptive mark on the skin, usually caused by an infectious disease. The Middle English plural form “pokkes” gave rise to our term “pox”.

8. Oodles of : MANY
It's thought that the term "oodles", meaning “a lot”, comes from "kit and caboodle".

10. U.S. president who becomes the president of future Earth on "Futurama" : NIXON
“Futurama” is a Fox animated sci-fi show that was co-created by cartoonist Matt Groening, who also created “The Simpsons”. I simply don’t understand either show …

12. Sch. in Tulsa : ORU
Oral Roberts University (ORU) is a private school in Tulsa, Oklahoma. ORU was founded relatively recently, in 1963 by the late televangelist Oral Roberts. The campus includes a Prayer Tower at its center, a spectacular glass and steel structure designed by architect Frank Wallace. The tower includes an observation deck, and is a popular tourist attraction. The school’s sports teams are known as the Oral Roberts Golden Eagles.

13. Part of GPS: Abbr. : SYS
Global positioning system (GPS)

18. Decree : FIAT
A "fiat" is an arbitrary rule that is imposed, and is the Latin for "let it be done".

24. Tourist transports in Venice : GONDOLAS
The city of Venice in northeast Italy is built in a saltwater lagoon on the Adriatic Coast, on 117 small islands. The classic transportation along the waterways is the gondola, but this is really only used for tourists these days, as well as on ceremonial occasions. The locals rely on the motorized water-buses.

26. Fifth-century invaders of England : SAXONS
Germanic tribes invaded Great Britain from the early 5th century and created the nation that we now call England. The Anglo-Saxons (sometimes simply “Saxons”), as these tribes came to be called, held sway in the country until 1066, the year of the Norman Conquest. The Anglo-Saxons were descendants of three Germanic tribes:
  • The Angles, from Angeln in Northern Germany (and the tribe that gave the name “England”).
  • The Saxons, from Lower Saxony and Holland.
  • The Jutes, from the Jutland peninsula in Denmark.

27. California city whose name is Spanish for "ash tree" : FRESNO
Fresno is the largest inland city in the whole state of California. The city was named for the many ash trees that lined the San Joaquin River, as “fresno” is the Spanish for “ash tree”.

29. City 20 miles NW of 27-Down : MADERA
The California city of Madera was founded in 1876 by the California Lumber Company. “Madera” is a Spanish word meaning “lumber”.

30. Quack medicine offering : ELIXIR
An elixir is a solution of alcohol and water that is used to deliver a medicine. The term “elixir” can also be used to mean a medicine that has the power to cure all ills.

A “quack” is a person who pretends to have knowledge that he or she does not in fact possess. The term especially applies to someone fraudulently pretending to have medical skills. Our modern word is an abbreviation of “quacksalver”, an archaic term with Dutch roots that translates as “hawker of salve”, Back in the Middle Ages, quacksalvers would shout out (quack) as they sold their pseudo-medical wares.

31. Culmination of a challenging H.S. course : AP EXAM
The Advanced Placement (AP) program offers college-level courses to kids who are still in high school. After being tested at the end of the courses, successful students receive credits that count towards a college degree.

32. Manhattan neighborhood next to the East Village : NOHO
NoHo is short for North of Houston (street), and is the equivalent area to SoHo, South of Houston, both of which are in New York City.

The East Village is a neighborhood of Manhattan lying between Broadway and the East River, extending from 14th Street in the northeast to Houston Street in the southwest. The area was known simply as the northern part of the Lower East Side until the 1960s, when the moniker “East Village” was applied in an effort to distinguish it from the Lower East Side and its less desirable reputation. The name chosen leveraged the established image of the neighboring Greenwich Village as Manhattan’s Bohemian capital.

35. Degree of expertise in martial arts : DAN
The “dan” ranking system is used in several Japanese and Korean martial arts. The dan ranking indicates a level of proficiency, and often only applies to practitioners who have already earned a black belt.

38. West Point team : ARMY
West Point is a military reservation in New York State, located north of New York City. West Point was first occupied by the Continental Army way back in 1778, making it the longest, continually-occupied military post in the country. Cadet training has taken place at the garrison since 1794, although Congress funding for a US Military Academy (USMA) didn’t start until 1802. The first female cadets were admitted to West Point in 1976, and today about 15% of all new cadets are women.

39. Discovery of Wilhelm Roentgen, which earned him the first Nobel Prize in Physics in 1901 : X-RAY
X-rays were first studied comprehensively by the German physicist Wilhelm Röntgen (also "Roentgen"), and it was he who gave the name "X-rays" to this particular type of radiation. Paradoxically, in Röntgen's native language of German, X-rays are routinely referred to as "Röntgen rays". In 1901 Röntgen won the first Nobel Prize in Physics that was ever awarded, recognition for his work on X-rays.

44. Second-largest Arabic-speaking city after Cairo : BAGHDAD
According to the University of Baghdad, the name "Baghdad" dates way back, to the 18th-century BC (yes, BC!). The name can be translated into English from the language of ancient Babylon as "old garden" (bagh) and "beloved" (dad).

48. Taj Mahal feature : DOME
The most famous mausoleum in the world has to be the Taj Mahal in Agra, India. The Taj Mahal was built after the death of the fourth wife of Shah Jahan, Mumtaz Mahal (hence the name of the mausoleum). The poor woman died in childbirth delivering the couple's 14th child. When Shah Jahan himself passed away 35 years later, he was buried beside his wife Mumtaz, in the Taj Mahal.

50. Poetry competitions : SLAMS
A poetry slam is a competition in which poets read their own work (usually), with winners being chosen by members of audience. Apparently the first poetry slam took place in Chicago in 1984. Now there is a Nation Poetry Slam that takes place each year, with representatives from the US, Canada and France.

59. River along which 56-Across is located : NILE
(56A. Cuneiform discovery site : AMARNA)
Depending on definition, the Nile is generally regarded as the longest river on the planet. The Nile forms from two major tributaries, the White Nile and the Blue Nile, which join together near Khartoum, the capital of Sudan. From Khartoum the Nile flows north, traveling almost entirely through desert making it central to life for the peoples living along its length.

60. It's on one side of the Urals : ASIA
The eastern side of the Ural Mountains in Russia is generally regarded as the natural divide between the continents of Europe and Asia.

63. Extinct relative of the kiwi : MOA
Moas were flightless birds native to New Zealand that are now extinct. The fate of the Moa is a great example of the detrimental effect that humans can have on animal populations. The Maoris arrived in New Zealand about 1300 AD, upsetting the balance of the ecosystem. The Moa were hunted to extinction within 200 years, which had the knock-on effect of killing off the Haast’s Eagle, the Moa’s only predator prior to the arrival of man. Moas were huge creatures, measuring up to 12 feet tall with their necks stretched upwards.

The kiwi is an unusual bird in that it has a highly developed sense of smell and is the only one of our feathered friends with nostrils located at the tip of its long beak.

65. Hockey legend Bobby : ORR
Bobby Orr is regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time. By the time he retired in 1978 he had undergone over a dozen knee surgeries. At 31 years of age, he concluded that he just couldn't skate anymore. Reportedly, he was even having trouble walking.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Perspective : VIEW
5. Police alert, for short : APB
8. Candy often used in science fair volcanoes : MENTOS
14. Proactiv target : ACNE
15. Sound that might be heard in a 16-Across : COO
16. It's for the birds : AVIARY
17. "Sanford and Son" star of 1970s TV : REDD FOXX
19. High-end shampoo brand : NEXXUS
20. General reply? : YES, SIR
21. Put one's foot down : SAY NO
23. Subject of some "management" courses : ANGER
25. Warning letters next to a link : NSFW
29. Had in mind : MEANT
33. Rowed : OARED
36. Equal : ARE
37. Brand in the pet food aisle : ALPO
38. Shot blocker? : ANTI-VAXXER
40. Zealot : DIEHARD
42. Grenache, for one : VIN ROSE
43. BP rival : EXXONMOBIL
45. ___ Domini : ANNO
46. Coastal indentation : RIA
47. "The Times They Are a-Changin'" songwriter : DYLAN
48. Big name in vacuum cleaners : DYSON
49. Branches : ARMS
51. Hostility, in British slang : AGGRO
53. Collar attachment : LEASH
56. Cuneiform discovery site : AMARNA
61. Sister chain of Marshalls : TJ MAXX
64. Beer brand whose logo hints at the answers to 17-, 19-, 38-, 43- and 61-Across : DOS EQUIS
66. Dormmate, e.g. : ROOMIE
67. Artist Jean who pioneered in Dadaism : ARP
68. Relative of a tangelo : UGLI
69. Brewers' fermenting agents : YEASTS
70. Like some humor or spells : DRY
71. On the briny : ASEA

Down
1. "Your mileage may ___" : VARY
2. Drink brand with a polar bear symbol : ICEE
3. Objectives : ENDS
4. Unites : WEDS
5. ___ squash : ACORN
6. Curse : POX
7. Prime theater location : BOX SEAT
8. Oodles of : MANY
9. Still : EVEN
10. U.S. president who becomes the president of future Earth on "Futurama" : NIXON
11. Burden : TAX
12. Sch. in Tulsa : ORU
13. Part of GPS: Abbr. : SYS
18. Decree : FIAT
22. Making it big : ARRIVING
24. Tourist transports in Venice : GONDOLAS
26. Fifth-century invaders of England : SAXONS
27. California city whose name is Spanish for "ash tree" : FRESNO
28. "It's a date!" : WE’RE ON!
29. City 20 miles NW of 27-Down : MADERA
30. Quack medicine offering : ELIXIR
31. Culmination of a challenging H.S. course : AP EXAM
32. Manhattan neighborhood next to the East Village : NOHO
34. Black-hearted : EVIL
35. Degree of expertise in martial arts : DAN
38. West Point team : ARMY
39. Discovery of Wilhelm Roentgen, which earned him the first Nobel Prize in Physics in 1901 : X-RAY
41. "So what?" : AND?
44. Second-largest Arabic-speaking city after Cairo : BAGHDAD
48. Taj Mahal feature : DOME
50. Poetry competitions : SLAMS
52. Hoarse : RASPY
54. Way out : EXIT
55. Lines of a plane : AXES
57. Light blue : AQUA
58. Bearskins, maybe : RUGS
59. River along which 56-Across is located : NILE
60. It's on one side of the Urals : ASIA
61. Take a shot : TRY
62. Average guy : JOE
63. Extinct relative of the kiwi : MOA
65. Hockey legend Bobby : ORR


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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