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0425-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 25 Apr 17, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Gary J. Whitehead
THEME: There’s No Place Like Home
Each of today’s themed answers comprises two words, words that are often seen after HOME:
71A. There's no place like it ... or a word that can precede either half of the answer to each starred clue : HOME

17A. *V.I.P.'s security agent : BODYGUARD (“homebody” & “Home Guard”)
22A. *Nintendo hand-held : GAME BOY (“home game” & “homeboy”)
27A. *Place to plug in a USB cable : COMPUTER PORT (“home computer” & “homeport”)
48A. *Multiplex, e.g. : MOVIE THEATER (“home movie” & “home theater”)
56A. *NATO's smallest member, populationwise : ICELAND (“home ice” & “homeland”)
63A. *Where a newspaper's biggest stories go : FRONT PAGE (“homefront” & “home page”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 15s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Country invaded in 2003 : IRAQ
The intent of the 2003 invasion of Iraq, as stated by the US’s President George W. Bush and the UK’s Prime Minister, was “to disarm Iraq of weapons of mass destruction, to end Saddam Hussein’s support for terrorism, and to free the Iraqi people. A month before the invasion took place, three million people gathered in Rome, Italy to protest. That protest was the largest-ever anti-war rally in history.

5. H.S. math class : TRIG
Trigonometry (trig) is a branch of mathematics dealing with triangles, and calculations based on the relationships between a triangle’s angles and the lengths of its sides.

9. Legendary music club in Lower Manhattan, informally : CBGB’S
The music club known as CBCG opened in 1973 intending to feature country, bluegrass and blues music (hence the name “CBGB”, Country, BlueGrass and Blues). The club developed an association in the eighties with New York's underground hardcore punk music.

15. Parks of Alabama : ROSA
Rosa Parks was one of a few brave women in days gone by who refused to give up their seats on a bus to white women. It was the stand taken by Rosa Parks on December 1, 1955 that sparked the Montgomery, Alabama Bus Boycott. President Clinton presented Ms. Parks with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1996. When she died in 2005, Rosa Parks became the first ever woman to have her body lie in honor in the US Capitol Rotunda.

16. Spartan serf : HELOT
The helots were a population of poorly-treated slaves who served the citizens of Sparta.

19. Resort island near Majorca : IBIZA
Ibiza is a Mediterranean island almost 100 miles off the Spanish coast. It is a very popular tourist destination, largely for its legendary nightlife.

The Island of Majorca (“Isla Mallorca” in Spanish) is Spain's largest island, and is located in the Mediterranean Sea. The population of the island ballooned over the past few decades as Majorca became a mecca for tourists from all over Europe.

20. The Rams of the Atlantic 10 Conf. : URI
The University of Rhode Island (URI) was first chartered as an agricultural school, back in 1888. Rhody the Ram was chosen as the school’s mascot in 1923, a nod to URI’s agricultural past. As a result, the school’s sports teams are known as the Rams. URI's main campus is located in the village of Kingston.

22. *Nintendo hand-held : GAME BOY (“home game” & “homeboy”)
The Game Boy is a hugely successful handheld video game player that was released in 1989 by Nintendo. I remember that my my kids were so eager to get hold of the devices when they first came out that I bought a couple of them in a Japanese railroad station, while over there on a business trip.

26. Actress Campbell of "Scream" : NEVE
Neve Campbell is a Canadian actress whose big break in movies came with the “Scream” horror film series, in which she had a leading role. I don’t do horror films, so I haven’t seen any of the “Scream” movies. Nor have I seen the TV series “Party of Five” which launched the acting careers of both Campbell and Jennifer Love Hewitt in the nineties.

27. *Place to plug in a USB cable : COMPUTER PORT (“home computer” & “homeport”)
Universal Serial Bus (USB) is an industry standard dealing with how computers and electronic devices connect and communicate, and deal with electrical power through those connections.

33. "Ditto" : SAME
“Ditto” was originally used in Italian (from Tuscan dialect) to avoid repetition of the names of months in a series of dates. So, “ditto” is just another wonderful import from that lovely land …

37. Does the honors for Thanksgiving dinner : CARVES
Thanksgiving Day was observed on different dates in different states for many years, until Abraham Lincoln fixed the date for the whole country in 1863. Lincoln’s presidential proclamation set that date as the last Thursday in November. In 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt moved the holiday to the fourth Thursday in November, arguing that the earlier date would give the economy a much-needed boost.

38. Short-sheeting, e.g. : PRANK
I remember the first time I fell victim to the prank of "short-sheeting", and very confusing it is too! The idea is to leave the bottom sheet as is, and tuck the top sheet under the mattress at the head of the bed, just as one would do with a bottom sheet. Then fold the foot of the top sheet back up to the head of the bed, and fold it as one would do normally for a top sheet. Don't tell your Mom it was me who told you how to do it though ...

42. Tuscan city : SIENA
Siena is a beautiful city in the Tuscany region of Italy. In the center of Siena is the magnificent medieval square called Piazza del Campo, a paved sloping open area made up of nine triangular sections. The square has to be seen to be believed. Twice a year, the famous bareback horse-race called the Palio di Siena is held in the Piazza.

47. Long, single take, in filmmaking : ONER
A “oner” or “long take” is a continuous take that last much longer than usual, perhaps several minutes. Famously, the Alfred Hitchcock film “Rope” (1948) used only long takes. Hitchcock wanted to shoot the whole film in one take, but had to compromise as a whole roll of film only lasts about 10 minutes. However, he did manage to film “Rope” in just 11 long takes.

56. *NATO's smallest member, populationwise : ICELAND (“home ice” & “homeland”)
Iceland is the most sparsely populated country in the whole of Europe, with two-thirds of the nation's population residing in and around the capital city of Reykjavik. Iceland was settled by the Norse people in AD 874, and was ruled for centuries by Norway and then Denmark. Iceland became independent in 1918, and has been a republic since 1944. Iceland is not a member of the EU but is a member of NATO, having joined in 1949 despite not having a standing army.

62. Sacha Baron Cohen character : BORAT
The full name of the 2006 "mockumentary" is "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan". Borat is played by a British comedian, Sacha Baron Cohen. Not my cup of tea …

66. Actress Gaynor of "South Pacific" : MITZI
Mitzi Gaynor’s most famous role has to be Ensign Nellie Forbush in the movie adaptation of the musical “South Pacific”. It is Gaynor who sings the song “I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Outa My Hair”.

The 1949 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical “South Pacific” is based on stories from the 1947 book “Tales of the South Pacific” by James A. Michener. “South Pacific” really is a classic show featuring some classic songs, like “Bali Ha’i”, “I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Outta My Hair”, “Some Enchanted Evening” and “Happy Talk”.

67. "E pluribus ___" : UNUM
From 1776, “E pluribus unum” was the unofficial motto of the United States. The phrase translates from Latin as “Out of many, one”. It was pushed aside in 1956 when an Act of Congress designated “In God We Trust” as the country’s official motto. “In God We Trust” had appeared on US coins since 1864, but was only introduced on paper currency in 1957.

68. "So ___ walks into ..." : A GUY
Seeing as I’m one of three brothers, I have a favorite “So a guy walks into a bar” joke:
So a guy walks into a bar and orders three beers.

The bartender brings him the three beers, and the man proceeds to alternately sip one, then the other, then the third, until they're gone. He then orders three more and the bartender says, "Sir, I know you like them cold, so you can start with one, and I'll bring you a fresh one as soon as you're low." The man says, "You don't understand. I have two brothers, one in Australia and one in the Ireland. We made a vow to each other that every Saturday night, we'd still drink together. So right now, my brothers have three beers, too, and we're drinking together." The bartender thinks it's a wonderful tradition, and every week he sets up the guy's three beers. Then one week, the man comes in and orders only two. He drinks them and then orders two more. The bartender says sadly, "Knowing your tradition, I'd just like to just say that I'm sorry you've lost a brother."

The man replies, "Oh, my brothers are fine -- I just quit drinking."

69. Fall of winter : SLEET
Apparently "sleet" is a term used to describe two different weather conditions. One is a shower of ice pellets, smaller than hail, and the second is a mixture of rain and snow, with the snow melting as it falls.

Down
1. Fill (with) : IMBUE
“To imbue” is to pervade, to soak in. “Imbue” has the same etymological roots as our word “imbibe”.

3. Love interest of Pacey on "Dawson's Creek" : ANDIE
The television show “Dawson’s Creek” is described as a teen drama. The story revolves around a group of teenagers and follows them through high school and college.

7. Haifa's country: Abbr. : ISR
Haifa is the third-largest city in Israel and the largest city in the north of the country. Haifa is built on the slopes of Mount Carmel, and is a Mediterranean seaport.

9. Monstrous creatures : CHIMERAS
In Greek mythology, a chimera was a female monster with the body of a lioness, a tail that ended in a snake’s head, and the head of a goat that emanated from the lioness’s spine. The term chimera has entered into our modern language and means a fanciful illusion or fabrication.

10. French newborn : BEBE
In Spanish, a “madre's” (mother's) treasure is her “bebe” (baby).

13. "___ With Me" (Sam Smith hit) : STAY
Sam Smith is a singer from London. I think that the only recording I’ve heard of his is “Writing’s on the Wall”, which is the theme song from the 2015 James Bond movie “Spectre”.

18. Purrer in Peru : GATO
In Spanish, a “gato” (cat) might chase a “ratón” (mouse).

23. Opposite of sans : AVEC
In French, “avec” (with) is the opposite of “sans” (without).

28. Dispenser candy : PEZ
PEZ is an Austrian brand name for a particular candy sold in a mechanical dispenser. Famously, PEZ dispensers have molded “heads”, and have become very collectible over the years. The list of heads includes historical figures like Betsy Ross and Paul Revere, characters from “Star Wars” and “Star Trek”, and even British royalty like the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (“William and Kate”). The name PEZ comes from the first, middle and last letters of “Pfefferminz”, the German word for “peppermint”.

31. Artist Magritte : RENE
Belgian artist René Magritte was a surrealist. His most recognized work maybe is “The Son of Man”, a painting he created as a self-portrait. It is the work that shows a man in a bowler hat with his face covered by an apple. The image features prominently in a great movie, the 1999 remake of “The Thomas Crown Affair”.

32. Romanov ruler : TSAR
Peter the Great was perhaps the most successful of the Romanov tsars, and was famous for modernizing Russia and expanding the country’s sphere of influence, creating the Russian Empire. He ruled from 1682 until his death in 1725.

33. Often-filtered messages : SPAM
Apparently the term "spam", used for unwanted email, is taken from a "Monty Python" sketch. In the sketch (which I've seen) the dialog is taken over by the word Spam, a play on the glut of canned meat in the markets of Britain after WWII. So "spam" is used for the glut of emails that takes over online communication. I can just imagine nerdy Internet types (like me) adopting something from a "Monty Python" sketch to describe an online phenomenon …

34. Jason's ship : ARGO
In Greek mythology, Jason and the Argonauts sailed on the Argo in search of the Golden Fleece. The vessel was called the “Argo” in honor of the ship’s builder, a man named Argus.

35. ___ Levy, Buffalo Bills coach in the Hall of Fame : MARV
Marv Levy is a former American and Canadian Football coach. Levy is probably most noted as a coach from his days with the Buffalo Bills, when the team won four consecutive AFC championships.

41. 1980s Pakistani president : ZIA
Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq was the President of Pakistan from 1978 until he died in 1988. Zia died in a plane crash along with US Ambassador to Pakistan Arnold Lewis Raphel and several other VIPs. The official Pakistani investigation into the cause of the crash concluded that the plane was likely brought down by sabotage. The official US investigation concluded that the crash was an accident.

44. W.W. II-era British gun : STEN
The STEN gun is an iconic armament that was used by the British military. The name STEN is an acronym. The S and the T comes from the name of the gun’s designers, Shepherd and Turpin. The EN comes from the Enfield brand name, which in turn comes from the Enfield location where the guns were manufactured for the Royal Small Arms Factory, an enterprise owned by the British government.

50. Wind tile in mah-jongg : EAST
Mahjong (also “mahjongg” and “mah-jongg”) is the Chinese word for "sparrow". Mahjong is a game that originated in China, and is usually played by four players. There is a myth that the game was developed by the Chinese philosopher, Confucius. The myth also suggests that Confucius was fond of birds, and hence chose the name "sparrow".

53. Insect stage : IMAGO
The imago is an intermediate stage in the development of an insect. All four stages are embryo, larva, pupa and imago.

56. Some old PCs : IBMS
The original IBM Personal Computer is model number 5150, which was introduced to the world on August 12, 1981. The term “personal computer” was already in use, but the success of the IBM 5150 led to the term “PC” being used for all computer products compatible with the IBM platform.

58. Art Deco notable : ERTE
“Erté” was the pseudonym of French (Russian born) artist and designer Romain de Tirtoff. Erté is the French pronunciation of his initials "R.T." Erté’s diverse portfolio of work included costumes and sets for the “Ziegfeld Follies” of 1923, as well as productions of the Parisian cabaret show “Folies Bergère”. Erté's most famous work by far is an image titled “Symphony in Black”. It depicts a tall and slender woman dressed in black, holding a black dog on a leash.

60. Government overthrow : COUP
A coup d'état (often just "coup") is the sudden overthrow of a government, and comes from the French for "stroke of state". The Swiss-German word “putsch” is sometimes used instead of “coup”, with “Putsch” translating literally as “sudden blow”.

64. Single-stranded molecule : RNA
The two most common nucleic acids are deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA), both of which play crucial roles in genetics. The DNA contains the genetic instructions used to keep living organisms functioning, and RNA is used to transcribe that information from the DNA to protein "generators" called ribosomes.

65. Part of a tuba's sound : -PAH
The tuba is the lowest-pitched of all the brass instruments, and one of the most recent additions to the modern symphony orchestra (usually there is just one tuba included in an orchestral line-up). “Tuba” is the Latin word for “trumpet, horn”. Oom-pah-pah …

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Country invaded in 2003 : IRAQ
5. H.S. math class : TRIG
9. Legendary music club in Lower Manhattan, informally : CBGB’S
14. Suffix with refresh or replace : -MENT
15. Parks of Alabama : ROSA
16. Spartan serf : HELOT
17. *V.I.P.'s security agent : BODYGUARD (“homebody” & “Home Guard”)
19. Resort island near Majorca : IBIZA
20. The Rams of the Atlantic 10 Conf. : URI
21. Scholarship money : AID
22. *Nintendo hand-held : GAME BOY (“home game” & “homeboy”)
24. Disgorges : EGESTS
26. Actress Campbell of "Scream" : NEVE
27. *Place to plug in a USB cable : COMPUTER PORT (“home computer” & “homeport”)
33. "Ditto" : SAME
36. Utters, informally : SEZ
37. Does the honors for Thanksgiving dinner : CARVES
38. Short-sheeting, e.g. : PRANK
40. Snoring sound : ZZZ
42. Tuscan city : SIENA
43. Sees eye to eye (with) : AGREES
45. 52, in old Rome : LII
47. Long, single take, in filmmaking : ONER
48. *Multiplex, e.g. : MOVIE THEATER (“home movie” & “home theater”)
51. Stew morsels : PEAS
52. Exchange vows at the altar : SAY “I DO”
56. *NATO's smallest member, populationwise : ICELAND (“home ice” & “homeland”)
60. Stock listings: Abbr. : COS
61. Ariz. neighbor : MEX
62. Sacha Baron Cohen character : BORAT
63. *Where a newspaper's biggest stories go : FRONT PAGE (“homefront” & “home page”)
66. Actress Gaynor of "South Pacific" : MITZI
67. "E pluribus ___" : UNUM
68. "So ___ walks into ..." : A GUY
69. Fall of winter : SLEET
70. What a ponytail partially covers : NAPE
71. There's no place like it ... or a word that can precede either half of the answer to each starred clue : HOME

Down
1. Fill (with) : IMBUE
2. Corporate shuffle, for short : REORG
3. Love interest of Pacey on "Dawson's Creek" : ANDIE
4. Amt. : QTY
5. "What's right is right" and others : TRUISMS
6. Rocky ___ : ROAD
7. Haifa's country: Abbr. : ISR
8. Doohickey : GADGET
9. Monstrous creatures : CHIMERAS
10. French newborn : BEBE
11. Smooth-talking : GLIB
12. Schmo : BOZO
13. "___ With Me" (Sam Smith hit) : STAY
18. Purrer in Peru : GATO
23. Opposite of sans : AVEC
25. Act starter : SCENE I
26. Shows some affection : NUZZLES
28. Dispenser candy : PEZ
29. Religious abode : PRIORY
30. Baker's need : OVEN
31. Artist Magritte : RENE
32. Romanov ruler : TSAR
33. Often-filtered messages : SPAM
34. Jason's ship : ARGO
35. ___ Levy, Buffalo Bills coach in the Hall of Fame : MARV
39. "Don't quit!" : KEEP AT IT!
41. 1980s Pakistani president : ZIA
44. W.W. II-era British gun : STEN
46. Treater's phrase : IT'S ON ME
49. Enjoyed oneself : HAD FUN
50. Wind tile in mah-jongg : EAST
53. Insect stage : IMAGO
54. Use Goo Gone on, perhaps : DEGUM
55. Daisy variety : OXEYE
56. Some old PCs : IBMS
57. Snake's shape : COIL
58. Art Deco notable : ERTE
59. Loaf (around) : LAZE
60. Government overthrow : COUP
64. Single-stranded molecule : RNA
65. Part of a tuba's sound : -PAH


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0424-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 24 Apr 17, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Gary Cee
THEME: Food!
Each of today’s themed items ends with a food item served at a meal:
17A. Gobbledygook : WORD SALAD
30A. Big fat zero : NOTHING BURGER
47A. Habitual tube watchers : COUCH POTATOES
63A. What a shamed person has to "eat" : HUMBLE PIE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 21s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Web designer's code : HTML
HTML is HyperText Markup Language, the language used to write most Internet web pages (including this one).

9. One includes "My cup runneth over" in the Bible : PSALM
The Greek word “psalmoi” originally meant “songs sung to a harp”, and gave us the word “psalms”. In the Jewish and Western Christian traditions, the Book of Psalms contains 150 individual psalms, divided into five sections.

15. Slight amount : IOTA
Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet. We use the word "iota" to portray something very small as it is the smallest of all Greek letters.

17. Gobbledygook : WORD SALAD
“Gobbledygook” is pompous, officious talk. The term is the 1944 invention of US Congressman Maury Maverick from Texas. He said he wanted to come up with a word that was imitative of a turkey.

20. Scot's cap : TAM
A tam o'shanter is a man's cap traditionally worn by Scotsmen. "Tams" were originally all blue (and called "blue bonnets") but as more dyes became readily available they became more colorful. The name of the cap comes from the title character of the Robert Burns poem "Tam O'Shanter".

24. Nebraska's capital before Lincoln : OMAHA
Omaha is the largest city in the state of Nebraska. It is located on the Missouri River, about 10 miles north of the mouth of the Platte River When Nebraska was still a territory Omaha was its capital, but when Nebraska achieved statehood the capital was moved to the city of Lincoln.

26. Grandson of Adam : ENOS
Enos was the son of Seth, and therefore the grandson of Adam and Eve. According to the ancient Jewish work called the Book of Jubilees, Enos married his own sister Noam.

27. Clock-setting std. : GMT
Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) is the time at the Prime Meridian, the meridian that runs through Greenwich in London.

34. Like Jefferson on a list of presidents : THIRD
Thomas Jefferson was the US’s first Secretary of State (under George Washington), the US’s second Vice President (under John Adams), and the US’s third president. Jefferson is a personal hero of mine, I must admit. Anyone interested in biographies of US presidents might like to read Jon Meacham’s “Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power”. I highly recommend it …

35. River through Paris : SEINE
The Seine is the river that flows through Paris. The Seine empties into the English Channel to the north, at the port city of Le Havre.

39. Flower that's also a girl's name : PANSY
The garden flower called the pansy takes its name from the French word “pensée” meaning “thought”. This name was chosen as the flower was often used as a symbol of remembrance.

47. Habitual tube watchers : COUCH POTATOES
“Idiot box” and “boob tube” are nicknames for television.

51. Swiss peak : ALP
There are eight Alpine countries:
  • Austria
  • Slovenia
  • France
  • Switzerland
  • Liechtenstein
  • Germany
  • Monaco
  • Italy

53. Hair that hangs over the forehead : BANGS
“Bangs” is another word that caught me out when I arrived in the US. “Bangs” back in Ireland are called “a fringe”. Apparently the US term is derived from the hair on horses somehow.

61. Capital of South Korea : SEOUL
Seoul is the capital city of South Korea. The Seoul National Capital Area is home to over 25 million people and is the second largest metropolitan area in the world, second only to Tokyo, Japan.

66. Stand on three legs? : EASEL
The word “easel” comes from an old Dutch word meaning “donkey” would you believe? The idea is that an easel carries its load (an oil painting, say) just as a donkey would be made to carry a load.

Down
3. Ethel who sang "There's No Business Like Show Business" : MERMAN
Ethel Merman was an actress and singer, one noted for having a very powerful voice. Merman was married and divorced four times, the last time to the actor Ernest Borgnine, albeit for only 32 days in 1964.

“Annie Get Your Gun” is an Irving Berlin musical, first performed on Broadway in 1946. The show is a fictionalized account of the life of sharpshooter Annie Oakley. It was written as a vehicle for Ethel Merman, and when she sang the hit tune “There’s No Business Like Show Business”, she apparently brought down the house.

4. It was often dropped in the '60s : LSD
LSD (known colloquially as “acid”) is short for lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist called Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn’t until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man …

5. "See ya!" : CIAO!
“Ciao” is the Italian for "'bye". "Arrivederci" is more formal, and translates as "goodbye".

6. Woodchuck's escape route : HOLE
The woodchuck is also known as the groundhog, and is one in a group of large ground squirrels called marmots. Repeat after me:
How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

7. Airline app datum, for short : ETA
Expected time of arrival (ETA)

9. Flying horse of Greek myth : PEGASUS
Pegasus is a white, winged stallion of Greek mythology. Pegasus was sired by Poseidon and foaled by Medusa.

11. Notes of a chord played in rapid succession : ARPEGGIO
An arpeggio is a technique in which the notes of a chord are played in sequence, one after the other. “Arpeggio” can be translated from Italian as “broken chord”

13. Club ___ : MED
Club Méditerranée is usually referred to as “Club Med”. It is a French company that started in 1950 with a resort on the Spanish island of Mallorca in the Mediterranean. It was originally a "club" with annual membership dues. Now it is an operator of numerous all-inclusive resorts located all over the world.

32. Plan that might include mutual funds, in brief : IRA
Individual retirement account (IRA)

33. Body of water that separates Africa and Asia : RED SEA
The Red Sea (sometimes called the Arabian Gulf) is a stretch of water lying between Africa and Asia. The Gulf of Suez (and the Suez Canal) lies to north, and the Gulf of Aden to the south. According to the Book of Exodus in the Bible, God parted the Red Sea to allow Moses lead the Israelites from Egypt.

36. Pet safety org. : SPCA
Unlike in most developed countries, there is no "umbrella" organization in the US with the goal of preventing cruelty to animals. Instead there are independent organizations set up all over the nation using the name SPCA. Having said that, there is an organization called the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) that was originally intended to operate across the country, but really it now focuses its efforts in New York City.

46. 2016 prize for Bob Dylan : NOBEL
The real name of singer Bob Dylan is Robert Zimmerman. Zimmerman chose that particular stage name because he was greatly influenced by the poetry of the Welsh poet, Dylan Thomas.

48. Who wrote of "sorrow for the lost Lenore" : POE
“The Raven” is a narrative poem by Edgar Allan Poe that tells of a student who has lost the love of his life, Lenore. A raven enters the student’s bedchamber and perches on a bust of Pallas. The raven can talk, to the student’s surprise, but says nothing but the word “nevermore” (“quoth the raven, ‘Nevermore’”). As the student questions all aspects of his life, the raven taunts him with the same comment, “nevermore”. Finally the student decides that his soul is trapped beneath the raven’s shadow and shall be lifted “nevermore” …

49. Out-of-date : OLD HAT
The use of "old hat" to mean something "out of date, stale" started about 1911. Before that, the term "old hat" meant something very different, and very vulgar. "Old hat" was the name given to a very private part of the female anatomy, the idea being that it was "often felt" (as in a "felt hat"). I just don't know what to say ...

55. Napped leather : SUEDE
Suede is leather made from the underside of the skin, mainly from a lamb. As such it is very soft, although not as durable as leather made from the exterior skin. The soft leather was, and is still used for making gloves. Back in 1859 these gloves were called “gants de Suede” in France, or “gloves of Sweden”. So, the name “suede” comes from the French word for Sweden.

58. F.B.I. worker, informally : G-MAN
The nickname “G-men” is short for “Government Men” and refers to agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

64. Celebrity psychic Geller : URI
Uri Geller's most famous performance is perhaps his uncomfortable failure on "The Tonight Show" with Johnny Carson in 1973. Carson "hijacked" Geller on live television by providing him with spoons to bend and watches to start, none of which had been available to Geller before the show aired. Clever!

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Web designer's code : HTML
5. One wearing an apron and a puffy white hat : CHEF
9. One includes "My cup runneth over" in the Bible : PSALM
14. Has debts : OWES
15. Slight amount : IOTA
16. Like a wolf's howl in the dead of night : EERIE
17. Gobbledygook : WORD SALAD
19. Looked open-mouthed : GAPED
20. Scot's cap : TAM
21. "___ is me!" : WOE
22. Up in arms : IRATE
24. Nebraska's capital before Lincoln : OMAHA
26. Grandson of Adam : ENOS
27. Clock-setting std. : GMT
30. Big fat zero : NOTHING BURGER
34. Like Jefferson on a list of presidents : THIRD
35. River through Paris : SEINE
36. Do laps in a pool : SWIM
39. Flower that's also a girl's name : PANSY
42. Spoonful of medicine, say : DOSE
43. Put forward, as an idea : POSIT
45. Unlocks : OPENS
47. Habitual tube watchers : COUCH POTATOES
51. Swiss peak : ALP
52. Part in a movie : ROLE
53. Hair that hangs over the forehead : BANGS
56. Used a lever on : PRIED
58. "Golly!" : GEE!
60. Promise-to-pay note : IOU
61. Capital of South Korea : SEOUL
63. What a shamed person has to "eat" : HUMBLE PIE
66. Stand on three legs? : EASEL
67. Mideast native : ARAB
68. On the ___ (recuperating) : MEND
69. Lock of hair : TRESS
70. Metal canisters : TINS
71. Hankering : URGE

Down
1. Book consulted by a do-it-yourselfer : HOW-TO
2. Time in Manhattan when it's midnight in Montana : TWO AM
3. Ethel who sang "There's No Business Like Show Business" : MERMAN
4. It was often dropped in the '60s : LSD
5. "See ya!" : CIAO!
6. Woodchuck's escape route : HOLE
7. Airline app datum, for short : ETA
8. On the decline : FADING
9. Flying horse of Greek myth : PEGASUS
10. "Save me a ___!" : SEAT
11. Notes of a chord played in rapid succession : ARPEGGIO
12. Fib : LIE
13. Club ___ : MED
18. Path of mowed grass : SWATH
23. Steal from : ROB
25. It might capture an embarrassing comment : HOT MIC
26. Bit of appended text : ENDNOTE
28. Store department selling suits and ties : MEN’S
29. Obstacle for a drone : TREE
31. Modern and cool : HIP
32. Plan that might include mutual funds, in brief : IRA
33. Body of water that separates Africa and Asia : RED SEA
36. Pet safety org. : SPCA
37. Sheep's coat : WOOL
38. "It's certainly possible ..." : I SUPPOSE ...
40. Hot spring : SPA
41. "The best is ___ to come" : YET
44. What amusement parks provide : THRILLS
46. 2016 prize for Bob Dylan : NOBEL
48. Who wrote of "sorrow for the lost Lenore" : POE
49. Out-of-date : OLD HAT
50. Marksman with an M40 : SNIPER
54. Word cried twice before "gone" : GOING
55. Napped leather : SUEDE
57. Feels remorse over : RUES
58. F.B.I. worker, informally : G-MAN
59. Recedes : EBBS
61. Ready : SET
62. Place for a bud or a stud : EAR
64. Celebrity psychic Geller : URI
65. Down Under bird : EMU


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0423-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 23 Apr 17, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Olivia Mitra Framke
THEME: A Century of Song
There’s a note with today’s puzzle:
When this puzzle is done, draw a line connecting the 11 circled letters, starting and ending in square #28, so as to spell a phrase related to the puzzle's theme.
If we connect the circled letters in the order QUEEN OF JAZZ, we draw the outline of a crown. We also have some themed answers related to the QUEEN OF JAZZ, Ella Fitzgerald:
68A. With 70-Across, nickname for a celebrated performer born on April 25, 1917 : LADY ...
70A. See 68-Across : … ELLA

21A. 1938 #1 hit for 68-/70-Across, which was inspired by a nursery rhyme : A-TISKET, A-TASKET
119A. Notable quote by 68-/70-Across : I SING LIKE I FEEL
15D. Repeated collaborator with 68-/70-Across : LOUIS ARMSTRONG
47D. Signature tune of 68-/70-Across : HOW HIGH THE MOON
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 20s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

12. ___ Coast, scenic area near Capri : AMALFI
Amalfi is a coastal town on the Gulf of Salerno located about 30 miles southeast of Naples. The town gives its name to the popular tourist destination known as the Amalfi Coast.

19. "Dallas" actress ___ J. Wilson : SHEREE
Sheree J, Wilson plays April Stevens Ewing on the prime-time soap “Dallas”. She also plays Alex Cahill-Walker on the TV show “Walker, Texas Ranger”.

20. Mermaids' home in Neverland : LAGOON
Neverland is the fictional location where Peter Pan lives in the works of J. M. Barrie. The name actually evolved in Barrie’s works, starting out as “Peter’s Never Never Never Land”. Also, Barrie used the names “the Never Never Land”, “the Neverland” and “the Neverlands”. Famously, entertainer Michael Jackson renamed Sycamore Valley Ranch as Neverland Valley Ranch when he took ownership in 1988, in a nod to “Peter Pan”.

21. 1938 #1 hit for 68-/70-Across, which was inspired by a nursery rhyme : A-TISKET, A-TASKET
“A-Tisket, A-Tasket” was a hit for Ella Fitzgerald. The song is quite unusual in that the lyrics are taken from a nursery rhyme. In 1938, Ella Fitzgerald and Al Feldman took the words of the rhyme, extended them and created what is now a jazz standard.

23. Listless feelings : ENNUIS
“Ennui” is the French word for boredom, a word that we now use in English. It's one of the few French words we've imported that we haven't anglicized and actually pronounce "correctly".

25. Popular pairing with steak au poivre : CABERNET
The Cabernet Sauvignon grape has been around since the 17th century, and is the result of a chance crossing in southwestern France of the Cabernet franc and Sauvignon blanc grapes.

The traditional French dish called a “pepper steak” or “steak au poivre” is usually a filet mignon coated with cracked peppercorns prior to cooking. The filet is mostly pan-fried, and often a pan sauce is made to cover the steak by adding cognac and heavy cream to the residue left in the bottom of the pan after the steak has cooked. “Poivre” is French for “pepper”.

27. And the following: Abbr. : ET SEQ
The Latin phrase “et sequens” or “et sequentia” is used in English to mean “and following”, and is abbreviated to “et seq”.

29. Longbow wood : YEW
Yew is the wood of choice for the longbow, a valued weapon in the history of England. The longbow is constructed with a core of yew heartwood (as the heartwood resists compression) that has a sheath of yew sapwood (as the sapwood resists stretching). The yew was in such demand for longbows that for centuries yew trees were in short supply in Britain and the wood had to be imported from all over Europe.

33. Congestion site : SINUS
In anatomical terms a sinus is a cavity in tissue. Sinuses are found all over the body, in the kidney and heart for example, but we most commonly think of the paranasal sinuses that surround the nose.

35. Wyatt of the Old West : EARP
Wyatt Earp is famous as one of the participants in the gunfight at the O.K. Corral. Earp was a city policeman in Wichita, Kansas and also in Dodge City, Kansas. Earp was also deputy sheriff in Tombstone, Arizona where the O.K. Corral gunfight took place. Years later, Earp joined the Alaska Gold Rush and with a partner built and operated the Dexter Saloon in Nome.

37. Extremely loud, in music : FFF
The musical term “pianissimo” is abbreviated to “pp”, and is an instruction to the performer to sing or play very softly. The concept can be extended to “ppp”, short for “pianississimo”, an instruction of play even more softly. The opposite instructions are fortissimo (ff) and fortississimo (fff), instructions to perform very loudly, and even more loudly.

39. Soft drink brand : DAD’S
Dad’s root beer was developed by Ely Klapman and Barney Berns in 1937, and was given the name “Dad’s” in honor of Klapman’s father who used to make root beer for his family at home.

40. Love interest for Anastasia in "Anastasia" : DIMITRI
"Anastasia" is an animated musical from Don Bluth and Gary Goldman. The storyline is based on the urban myth that Anastasia, the youngest daughter of Tsar Nicholas II, survived the family's execution by the Bolsheviks in 1918. Anastasia is voiced by Meg Ryan, although when Anastasia sings, her voice is dubbed by Liz Callaway.

48. Vintner's cask : TUN
A “tun” is a barrel, often a large barrel used in winemaking. The term “tun” came to be a measure of volume, originally 256 gallons of wine. The weight of such a volume of wine was referred to as a “tun”, which evolved into our contemporary unit “ton”.

49. Old car named for an explorer : DE SOTO
The DeSoto brand of car was built by Chrysler from 1928 to 1961. The line was named after the Spanish explorer and conquistador, Hernando de Soto, widely reported as the first European to have crossed the Mississippi River (although Cabeza de Vaca had at least discovered one of the mouths of the Mississippi twenty years earlier).

51. Elder Lannister son on "Game of Thrones" : JAIME
HBO’s “Game of Thrones” is a fantasy television drama that is adapted from a series of novels by George R. R. Martin called “A Song of Ice and Fire”. “Game of Thrones” is actually filmed in and around Belfast, Northern Ireland.

53. Stone Age relics : NEOLITHS
A neolith is a stone tool that was produced during the Neolithic Era, the last part of the Stone Age.

56. Piñata smasher, maybe : NINO
Piñatas originated in Mexico, probably among the Aztecs or Mayans. Today piñatas are usually made from cardboard that is brightly decorated with papier-mâché. Traditionally a piñata was made out of a clay pot, adorned with feathers and ribbons and filled with small treasures. During religious ceremonies the clay pots would be suspended and broken open so that the contents would spill out onto the ground at the feet of a god as an offering.

65. Kama ___ : SUTRA
The “Kama Sutra” is renowned for its descriptions of positions that can be used for sexual intercourse, but the sutra includes many other texts that deal with various matters of a sexual nature including how to woo a woman, the conduct of a "chief wife", the conduct of "other" wives, how to make money as a courtesan and much, much more, as if that isn't enough …

68. With 70-Across, nickname for a celebrated performer born on April 25, 1917 : LADY ...
70. See 68-Across : … ELLA
Ella Fitzgerald, the "First Lady of Song", had a hard and tough upbringing. She was raised by her mother alone in Yonkers, New York. Her mother died while Ella was still a schoolgirl, and around that time the young girl became less interested in her education. She fell in with a bad crowd, even working as a lookout for a bordello and as a Mafia numbers runner. She ended up in reform school, from which she escaped, and found herself homeless and living on the streets for a while. Somehow Fitzgerald managed to get herself a spot singing in the Apollo Theater in Harlem. From there her career took off and as they say, the rest is history.

72. Dog whose tail curls over the back : SPITZ
Spitz-type dogs are those with long thick fur that is usually white. Most spitz-type dogs seem to have originated in the Arctic and/or East Asia. Examples of breed described as spitz-type are the Alaskan Malamute and the Canadian Eskimo Dog.

74. Great Lakes natives : ERIES
The Erie people lived on lands south of Lake Erie. The Erie were sometimes referred to as the Cat Nation, a reference to the mountain lions that were ever-present in the area that they lived. The name “Erie” is a shortened form of “Erielhonan” meaning “long tail”, possibly a further reference to the mountain lion or cat, which was possibly used as a totem. The Erie people gave their name to the Great Lake.

76. Sister of Helios and Selene : EOS
In Greek mythology, Eos is the goddess of the dawn who lived at the edge of the ocean. Eos would wake each morning to welcome her brother Helios the sun. The Roman equivalent of Eos is Aurora.

77. Polish coin : ZLOTY
The zloty is the currency of Poland, with word “zloty” translating into English as “golden”. The zloty has been around since the Middle Ages.

87. Frank : HOT DOG
A hot dog is a sausage served in a split roll. The term “hot dog” dates back to the 19th-century and is thought to reflect a commonly-held opinion that the sausages contained dog meat.

89. Rapa ___ (locale of many monoliths) : NUI
“Rapa Nui” is the Polynesian name for what we are more likely to call Easter Island. The European name was coined by the Dutch explorer Jacob Roggeveen, who came across the island on Easter Sunday in the year 1722. Chilean-owned Easter Island is inhabited and is a location that is remarkably distant from neighboring civilization. The nearest inhabited island is Pitcairn Island, which is almost 1300 miles away.

98. Road offense, for short : DUI
In some states, there is no longer a legal difference between a DWI (Driving While Intoxicated) and a DUI (Driving Under the Influence). Other states retain that difference, so that by definition a DUI is a lesser offence than a DWI.

103. Green who was a four-time vocal coach on "The Voice" : CEELO
CeeLo Green is the stage name of rapper Thomas DeCarlo Callaway. Apparently Green is one of the coaches for the contestants on the singing TV show “The Voice”. That’s all I need to know …

117. Record label that looks like the name of a radio station : K-TEL
K-Tel was founded in 1962 in Winnipeg, Manitoba by one Philip Kives. K-Tel’s recipe for success was the sale of inexpensive goods with a simple sales pitch and mail-order distribution.

118. Lao-tzu follower : TAOIST
Lao Tse (also “Lao-Tzu”) was a central figure in the development of the religion/philosophy of Taoism. Tradition holds that Lao-Tzu wrote the “Tao Te Ching”, a classical Chinese text that is fundamental to the philosophy of Taoism.

122. Five Pillars of Islam, e.g. : TENETS
Followers of the Muslim tradition believe in the Five Pillars of Islam, five obligatory acts that underpin Muslim life. The Five Pillars are:
  1. The Islamic creed
  2. Daily prayer
  3. Almsgiving
  4. Fasting during the month of Ramadan
  5. The pilgrimage to Mecca (haj) once during a lifetime

125. State representatives? : STARS
Legend has it that Betsy Ross made the first American flag for General George Washington. However, this story only surfaced during the centennial celebrations of 1876, and although Betsy Ross was indeed one of several flag makers in Philadelphia in the days of George Washington, sadly there’s no definitive evidence that Ross provided that first stars and stripes.

126. Ride and Field : SALLYS
Sally Ride was a physicist and astronaut, who flew two missions on the space shuttle Challenger. In 1983, she became the first American woman in space, having been preceded by two female cosmonauts (in 1963 and 1982). Ride was 32 years on that first mission, making her the youngest astronaut ever to make it into space. In another first, Ride was the first LGBT astronaut, a fact that was revealed after her death in 2012.

Actress Sally Field first came to the public’s attention in the sixties with title roles in the TV shows “Gidget” and “The Flying Nun”. She has two Best Actress Oscars: one for “Norma Rae” (1979) and one for “Places in the Heart” (1984).

Down
1. Sacred choral works : MOTETS
A motet is a simple musical composition based on a sacred text, usually sung without an accompaniment. The term “motet” is a diminutive form of “mot”, the French for “word”.

2. Melodic passages : ARIOSI
An arioso (plural “ariosi”) is a solo vocal piece in a classical work such as an opera or an oratorio. An arioso's structure lies somewhere between that of a full-blown aria and speech-like recitative.

4. Jan. inits. : MLK
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is a US Federal holiday taking place on the third Monday of each year. It celebrates the birthday of Dr. King, and was signed into law by President Reagan in 1983, and first observed in 1986. However, some states resisted naming the holiday MLK Day, and gave it alternative names (like “Civil Rights Day”). It was officially celebrated as MLK Day in all 50 states from the year 2000 onwards.

5. "Smart" one : ALEC
Apparently the original "smart Alec" (sometimes “Aleck”) was Alec Hoag, a pimp, thief and confidence trickster who plied his trade in New York City in the 1840s.

6. Skewered Asian dish : SATAY
The dish known as “satay” originated in Java, Indonesia and is marinated pieces of meat served on a skewer in a sauce, often a spicy peanut sauce. “Satay” is the Indonesian spelling, and “sate” is the Malay spelling.

9. "Family Matters" ubernerd : URKEL
Steve Urkel is a character on the TV show “Family Matters” that originally aired in the late eighties and nineties. The Urkel character was the archetypal “geek”, played by Jaleel White. Urkel was originally written into the show’s storyline for just one episode, but before long, Urkel was the show’s most popular recurring character.

11. Winter celebration abroad : TET
The full name for the New Year holiday in Vietnam is “Tet Nguyen Dan” meaning "Feast of the First Morning", with the reference being to the arrival of the season of spring. Tet usually falls on the same day as Chinese New Year.

12. Sheltered at sea : ALEE
“Alee” is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing “aweather”.

13. Japanese comic style : MANGA
The Japanese word “manga” means “whimsical pictures” and is an apt term to describe the Japanese style of comic book. Manga publications are more diverse than American comic books and have a larger audience. Manga cover many subjects including romance, sports, business, horror, and mystery.

14. Mass recitation : AGNUS DEI
“Agnus Dei” is Latin for “Lamb of God”, a term used in Christian faiths for Jesus Christ, symbolizing his role as a sacrificial offering to atone for the sins of man.

15. Repeated collaborator with 68-/70-Across : LOUIS ARMSTRONG
Louis Armstrong was born in New Orleans in 1900. Armstrong had a poor upbringing, and only stayed in school till he was 11 years old. The exact origin of Louis’s nickname “Satchmo” seems to be a little unclear. One story is that he used to dance for pennies in New Orleans as a youngster and would hide those pennies in his mouth away from the other kids. For this he earned the nickname “satchel mouth”, which was shortened to “Satchmo”.

18. Big blow : GALE
A gale is a very strong wind that is defined by Beaufort Wind Scale as a wind with speeds from 50 to just over 100 kilometers per hour.

26. Close buds : BFFS
Best friend forever (BFF)

34. Unlikely book club recommendation : SMUT
“Smut” means “dirt, smudge” and more recently “pornographic material”. The term comes from the Yiddish “schmutz”, which is a slang word used in English for dirt, as in “dirt on one's face”.

36. Edith Piaf's "Non, Je Ne Regrette ___" : RIEN
"La Môme Piaf" (the Little Sparrow) was the nickname of France’s most famous singer, Édith Piaf. What a voice this woman had, and what gorgeous ballads she sang. Édith Piaf lived a life that was not without controversy. She was raised by her mother in a brothel in Normandy, and had a pimp as a boyfriend in her teens. She had one child, while very young, born illegitimately and who died at 2-years-old from meningitis. Her singing career started when she was discovered in the Pigalle area of Paris by nightclub owner Louis Leplée. Leplée was murdered soon after, and Piaf was accused of being an accessory to the murder but was later acquitted. During World War II she was branded a traitor by many as she frequently performed for the German occupying forces, although there are other reports of her supporting the resistance movement. Later in her life she was seriously injured in no less than three, near-fatal car accidents, including one with her friend, Charles Aznavour. While recovering from her injuries she became addicted to pain medication, an addiction that lasted for the rest of her life. When she died in 1963 she was denied a Catholic funeral mass because of her lifestyle, but the crowds that turned out for her funeral procession managed to stop all traffic in Paris, the only time that has happened since the end of WWII.

38. Name on a blimp : FUJI
There is an important difference between a "blimp" (like the Goodyear Blimp) and an airship (like a Zeppelin). An airship is a rigid structure with an internal framework that helps maintain the shape of the airbag, whereas a blimp uses the pressure of the helium gas inside the airbag to give it shape.

42. ___ Nast (magazine publisher) : CONDE
Condé Nast has a very large portfolio of publications, including "Vogue", "GQ", "House and Garden", "Golf Digest", "Wired", "Vanity Fair" and "The New Yorker".

50. One-named singer with the 2016 #1 hit "Cheap Thrills" : SIA
Sia is the stage name of Australian singer Sia Furler from Adelaide. Sia is a cousin of Australian Christian Rock musician Peter Furler.

52. Slip in a book : ERRATUM
“Errata” is the past participle of the Latin word “errare” meaning “to err”. We use “errata” (singular “erratum”) to mean a list of errors that have been noted in some publication.

54. Café additive : LAIT
“Café au lait” (coffee with milk) is usually strong drip coffee to which one adds steamed milk. At least that's the way we tend to make in this country.

66. Wrinkly fruit : UGLI
The ugli fruit is a hybrid of an orange and a tangerine, first discovered growing wild in Jamaica where most ugli fruit comes from today. “UGLI” is a trademark name that is a variant of “ugly”, a nod to the fruits unsightly wrinkled rind.

69. Gossipmonger : YENTA
Yenta (also "Yente") is actually a female Yiddish name. In Yiddish theater "yenta" came to mean a busybody, a gossip.

73. Portion of a penny : ZINC
The original one-cent coin was introduced in the US in 1793 and was made of 100% copper. The composition varied over time, and was 100% bronze up to the 1940s. During WWII there was a shortage of copper to make bronze, so the US Mint switched to zinc-coated steel for production of one-cent coins in 1943. The steelie is the only coin ever issued by the US mint that can be picked up by a magnet. Today’s one-cent coin is comprised mainly of zinc.

75. Where Nice is en France : SUD
In French, the city of Nice is in the “sud” (south), “en France” (in France).

77. Tough draws in the game Bananagrams : Z TILES
Bananagrams is a fun game that was introduced in 2006. Bananagrams is a little like Scrabble in that letter tiles are used to make interlocking words.

82. Vegan staple : TOFU
Tofu is another name for bean curd, and is a Japanese word meaning just that … bean that has “curdled”. Tofu is produced by coagulating soy milk, using either salt or something acidic. Once the protein has coagulated, the curds are pressed into the familiar blocks. Personally I love tofu, but my wife, she absolutely hates it …

84. Van Gogh's "Le Café de ___" : NUIT
Vincent Van Gogh was a Dutch post-impressionist painter who seems to have had a very tortured existence. Van Gogh only painted for the last ten years of his life, and enjoyed very little celebrity while alive. Today many of his works are easily recognized, and fetch staggering sums in auction houses. Van Gogh suffered from severe depression for many of his final years. When he was only 37, he walked into a field with a revolver and shot himself in the chest. He managed to drag himself back to the inn where he was staying but died there two days later.

86. Beverage sponsor of the old "Little Orphan Annie" radio show : OVALTINE
Ovaltine is a milk-flavoring product that was developed in Berne, Switzerland in the early 1900s. It is still called by its original name in its native Switzerland, namely “Ovomaltine”. The “ovo-maltine” name reflects the main ingredients back then: eggs and malt.

88. Biblical quartet : GOSPELS
“Gospel” is a term that came to us via Old English. The Old English term is “godspel” meaning “good story”, and referred to the glad tidings announced by Jesus. There are four Gospels in the Christian New Testament: the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John.

94. East German secret police : STASI
The Ministry for State Security in East Germany was commonly referred to as the Stasi. “Stasi” is an abbreviation for “Staatssicherheit”, which translates as “State Security”.

96. Perfumer's liquid : ACETAL
Acetals are a class of organic compounds, the smaller of which are volatile solvents. The simplest of the group is named simply “acetal”, and is a solvent and ingredient used in cosmetics. A much larger example of an acetal is cellulose.

97. Summer piazza treat : GELATO
Gelato (plural “gelati”) is the Italian version of American ice cream, differing in that it has a lower butterfat content than its US counterpart.

99. Near ringer : LEANER
In the game of horseshoes, a ringer is scored when the tossed shoe lands around the target stake. A leaner is almost as good as a ringer, and is scored when a horseshoe lands upright or leans against the stake.

102. Occurrences in the 30s, say : SLEETS
Apparently "sleet" is a term used to describe two different weather conditions. One is a shower of ice pellets, smaller than hail, and the second is a mixture of rain and snow, with the snow melting as it falls.

104. Skating champ Brian : ORSER
Brian Orser is a retired Canadian figure skater. Orser was one of the “combatants” in the Battle of the Brians, the name given to the rivalry between Brian Orser and US skater Brian Boitano. Orser moved onto coaching after retiring from competition. He coached two Olympic champions: Kim Yuna (2010) and yuzuru Hanyu (2014).

109. Polynesian carvings : TIKIS
A tiki is a large carving of wood or stone resembling a human form that is found in Polynesian cultures. The carvings often mark out boundaries surrounding sites that are sacred to the locals.

113. Takeoff figs. : ETDS
Estimated time of departure (ETD)

116. Singer with the 1984 hit "99 Luftballons" : NENA
Nena is a German singer ("Nena" became the name of her band as well) who had a big hit with one of my favorite songs of the eighties "99 Luftballons". The English translation of the German title ("99 Red Balloons") isn't literal, with the color "red" added just so that the title had the right number of syllables for the tune. "Luftballon" is the name given to a child's toy balloon in German.

119. Part of T.G.I.F. : IT’S
“Thank God It’s Friday” (TGIF) is a relatively new expression that apparently originated in Akron, Ohio. It was a catchphrase used first by disk jockey Jerry Healy of WAKR in the early seventies. That said, one blog reader wrote me to say that he had been using the phrase in the fifties.

120. Cuba or Catalina: Abbr. : ISL
Cuba is the largest island in the Caribbean. The exact etymology of the name “Cuba” seems a little unclear. Most believe “Cuba” to be derived from the Taíno terms for “where fertile land is abundant” (cubao) or “great place” (coabana).

Catalina Island off the coast of California is more correctly referred to as Santa Catalina Island. Santa Catalina is one of the Channel Islands of California, and is located in Los Angeles County. Santa Catalina has been a major tourist destination since the early 1920s when William Wrigley, Jr. of chewing gum fame invested millions of dollars to develop needed infrastructure to attract visitors. Wrigley owned the Chicago Cubs at the time, and so he made the Chicago Cubs use the island for spring training, as part of a publicity campaign. The Cubs trained there until 1951.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Italian relatives : MAMMAS
7. Part of the earth : CRUST
12. ___ Coast, scenic area near Capri : AMALFI
18. Brutish sort : GORILLA
19. "Dallas" actress ___ J. Wilson : SHEREE
20. Mermaids' home in Neverland : LAGOON
21. 1938 #1 hit for 68-/70-Across, which was inspired by a nursery rhyme : A-TISKET, A-TASKET
23. Listless feelings : ENNUIS
24. Many August births : LEOS
25. Popular pairing with steak au poivre : CABERNET
26. Charm : BEGUILE
27. And the following: Abbr. : ET SEQ
29. Longbow wood : YEW
30. Detached : ALOOF
32. One for the plus column : ASSET
33. Congestion site : SINUS
35. Wyatt of the Old West : EARP
37. Extremely loud, in music : FFF
39. Soft drink brand : DADS
40. Love interest for Anastasia in "Anastasia" : DIMITRI
42. ___ Reports : CONSUMER
45. Suffix with sheep or hawk : -ISH
48. Vintner's cask : TUN
49. Old car named for an explorer : DE SOTO
51. Elder Lannister son on "Game of Thrones" : JAIME
53. Stone Age relics : NEOLITHS
56. Piñata smasher, maybe : NINO
57. "___ parvis magna" ("Greatness from small beginnings": Lat.) : SIC
58. H.S. big shots : SRS
60. Talk endlessly to : JAW AT
61. Act like : APE
63. Illustrator software maker : ADOBE
65. Kama ___ : SUTRA
67. For grades 1-12, briefly : ELHI
68. With 70-Across, nickname for a celebrated performer born on April 25, 1917 : LADY ...
70. See 68-Across : … ELLA
71. Dreary : GRAY
72. Dog whose tail curls over the back : SPITZ
74. Great Lakes natives : ERIES
76. Sister of Helios and Selene : EOS
77. Polish coin : ZLOTY
78. Promising action on a fishing line : TUG
79. Picks out of a lineup, informally : IDS
81. Letter-shaped fastener : T-NUT
83. Button on the bottom of a multipage form : CONTINUE
85. Ring : PHONE
87. Frank : HOT DOG
89. Rapa ___ (locale of many monoliths) : NUI
90. Sports team V.I.P.s : GMS
91. Set piece? : TV CAMERA
93. Natural history museum sights : FOSSILS
96. Turkish title : AGHA
98. Road offense, for short : DUI
99. The hots : LUST
100. Bluish shades : TEALS
103. Green who was a four-time vocal coach on "The Voice" : CEELO
105. Question asked while extending the hand, maybe : TRUCE?
108. Reassuring touch : PAT
110. Fixture on a fishing dock : SCALE
112. One state symbol of Massachusetts : ELM TREE
114. Introduces slowly : PHASES IN
117. Record label that looks like the name of a radio station : K-TEL
118. Lao-tzu follower : TAOIST
119. Notable quote by 68-/70-Across : I SING LIKE I FEEL
121. Set oneself right, in a way : ATONED
122. Five Pillars of Islam, e.g. : TENETS
123. "Bonehead" and "numbskull," e.g. : INSULTS
124. Solitudinarians : LONERS
125. State representatives? : STARS
126. Ride and Field : SALLYS

Down
1. Sacred choral works : MOTETS
2. Melodic passages : ARIOSI
3. Accidentally hit "reply all" on, say : MISSEND
4. Jan. inits. : MLK
5. "Smart" one : ALEC
6. Skewered Asian dish : SATAY
7. Arctic food fish : CHAR
8. Close again, as a purse : RESNAP
9. "Family Matters" ubernerd : URKEL
10. Manage : SEE TO
11. Winter celebration abroad : TET
12. Sheltered at sea : ALEE
13. Japanese comic style : MANGA
14. Mass recitation : AGNUS DEI
15. Repeated collaborator with 68-/70-Across : LOUIS ARMSTRONG
16. Thwarted : FOILED
17. Maps of Alaska and Hawaii, often : INSETS
18. Big blow : GALE
19. Flight attendant : STEWARD
22. Red as ___ : A BEET
26. Close buds : BFFS
28. "Enough already!" : QUIT IT!
31. Be ___ use : OF NO
34. Unlikely book club recommendation : SMUT
36. Edith Piaf's "Non, Je Ne Regrette ___" : RIEN
38. Name on a blimp : FUJI
41. Gets some air : INHALES
42. ___ Nast (magazine publisher) : CONDE
43. Good name for an Irish carpenter? : O’TOOLE
44. Bubs : MACS
45. For laughs : IN JEST
46. Arctic young 'un : SEAL PUP
47. Signature tune of 68-/70-Across : HOW HIGH THE MOON
50. One-named singer with the 2016 #1 hit "Cheap Thrills" : SIA
52. Slip in a book : ERRATUM
54. Café additive : LAIT
55. Trade jabs (with) : SPAR
57. Flavors : SEASONS
59. Approve : SAY YES
62. Hollywood job title : EDITOR
64. Freedom Caucus, e.g. : BLOC
66. Wrinkly fruit : UGLI
69. Gossipmonger : YENTA
73. Portion of a penny : ZINC
75. Where Nice is en France : SUD
77. Tough draws in the game Bananagrams : Z TILES
80. No fun, as a party : DEAD
82. Vegan staple : TOFU
84. Van Gogh's "Le Café de ___" : NUIT
86. Beverage sponsor of the old "Little Orphan Annie" radio show : OVALTINE
87. One in line? : HEIR
88. Biblical quartet : GOSPELS
92. Silence : MUTE
94. East German secret police : STASI
95. Quantity of toys on Santa's sleigh : SACKFUL
96. Perfumer's liquid : ACETAL
97. Summer piazza treat : GELATO
99. Near ringer : LEANER
101. Nowadays : LATELY
102. Occurrences in the 30s, say : SLEETS
104. Skating champ Brian : ORSER
106. Sore : UPSET
107. Setting for a fine meal : CHINA
109. Polynesian carvings : TIKIS
111. Bracket shapes : ELLS
113. Takeoff figs. : ETDS
115. Three-stripers: Abbr. : SGTS
116. Singer with the 1984 hit "99 Luftballons" : NENA
119. Part of T.G.I.F. : IT’S
120. Cuba or Catalina: Abbr. : ISL


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0422-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 22 Apr 17, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Adam Fromm
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 15m 40s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Skye, the Small Isles, etc. : HEBRIDES
The Hebrides is a group of islands just off the west coast of Scotland. The Hebrides are divided into two main groups: the Inner and Outer Hebrides.

16. Armpit, to a doctor : AXILLA
“Axilla” is the anatomical name for armpit, not to be confused with “maxilla”, the upper jawbone.

18. With wacky irreverence : ZANILY
Something described as “zany” is clownish and bizarre. “Zany” can also be a noun, a term used for a clown or a buffoon. The original noun was “Zanni”, a Venetian dialect variant of Gianni, short for Giovanni (John). Zanni was a character who appeared in comedy plays of the day, and was someone who aped the principal actors.

19. 2002 "documentary" with "Don't try this at home" contents : JACKASS THE MOVIE
“Jackass” is a reality show that originally aired on MTV from 2000 to 2001. The show features a group of men doing stunts in which they usually get injured to some extent. The leader of the group is called Johnny Knoxville, who appears in the stunts and who also created the show. Not my cup of tea …

24. Like an ascot, perhaps : PREPPY
An Ascot tie is a horrible-looking (I think!), wide tie that narrows at the neck, which these days is only really worn at weddings. The tie takes its name from the Royal Ascot horse race at which punters still turn up in formal wear at Ascot Racecourse in England.

29. Jeep model : CHEROKEE
The Jeep Cherokee is an SUV with some legs. The original SJ model was produced from 1974 until 1983, with derivative models very much alive today.

32. Le Monde material : PAPIER
“Papier” is French for “paper”.

“Le Monde” is a newspaper published each evening in France. “Le Monde” is one of the two most famous French papers, along with “Le Figaro”.

36. First hit for the Police : ROXANNE
The Police were a trio formed in London in 1977, with Sting being the most famous member and the lead singer. The band’s long list of hits includes “Roxanne” (1977), “Message in a Bottle” (1979), “Walking on the Moon” (1979) and “Every Breath You Take” (1983). The Police broke up in 1986, but their reunion tour of 2007/2008 made them the world’s highest-earning musicians for the year 2008.

39. Psychological mediator : EGO
Sigmund Freud created a structural model of the human psyche, breaking it into three parts: the id, the ego, and the super-ego. The id is that part of the psyche containing the basic instinctual drives. The ego seeks to please the id by causing realistic behavior that benefits the individual. The super-ego almost has a parental role, contradicting the id by introducing critical thinking and morals to behavioral choices.

48. Hit 1959 Broadway play starring Sidney Poitier : A RAISIN IN THE SUN
“A Raisin in the Sun” is a 1961 film starring Sidney Poitier that is based on a 1959 play of the same name by Lorraine Hansberry. The film follows the lives of an African-American family from Chicago as they struggle with the decision about what to do with an insurance payout following the death of the family’s patriarch.

The Hollywood actor Sidney Poitier was born in Miami, but grew up in the Bahamas. Poitiers breakthrough role in movies came with 1955’s “Blackboard Jungle”, in which he played an incorrigible high school student. I find it interesting that one of Poitier’s most respected performances found him playing a teacher of a rough set of students in 1967’s “To Sir, with Love”. Off the screen, Poitier entered the diplomatic service for the Bahamas, serving as the nation’s non-resident ambassador to Japan from 1997 until 2007.

55. Book after Proverbs: Abbr. : ECCLES
Ecclesiastes is a book in the Hebrew Bible and in the Old Testament. The term “ecclesiastes” is usually translated as “teacher” or “preacher”, although a more literal translation is “gatherer”.

56. Only woman aboard the Argo, it's said : ATALANTA
In Greek mythology, Atalanta was a virgin huntress who had no interest in getting married, despite the urging of her father. Atalanta had several suitors, and eventually agreed to a foot race with them. The terms were that if she won the race, she need not marry. If she lost the race, she would marry the winner. Atalanta managed to outrun the field, except for Hippomenes. Hippomenes emerged victorious due to cunning rather than speed.

58. "Jezebel" costume : RED DRESS
“Jezebel” is a movie starring Bette Davis and Henry Fonda released in 1938. Davis plays a headstrong young Southern woman who breaks societal rules by brazenly wearing a red dress at a lavish ball, instead of the white dress "required" for single women. That one act of rebellion is sufficent for her fiancé (played by Fonda) to break the engagement. Some say that Davis was offered the part in “Jezebel” as compensation for losing out to Vivien Leigh for the role of Scarlett O’Hara in “Gone with the Wind”.

Ahab was a King of Israel, but the power behind his throne was his wife Jezebel, a Phoenician princess. Jezebel's god was Ba'al, and she used her influence to get temples of Ba’al built in Israel. Jezebel’s name is still associated with the worship of false prophets, and the term "jezebel" can be used to describe a wicked, shameless woman.

Down
1. Faithful pilgrim : HAJJI
A Haji (also “Hajji”) is the term used for someone who has made a pilgrimage to Mecca, and it is sometimes also used as a form of address for such a person. The journey itself goes by the name “haj” or “hajj”.

4. Singer with a recurring role on "General Hospital" : RICK SPRINGFIELD
Rick Springfield is a musician and singer-songwriter, and also an actor, from Sydney, Australia. Springfields biggest hit was “Jessie’s Girl”, released in 1981. As an actor, Springfield is known for playing Dr. Noah Drake on the daytime soap “General Hospital”.

The daytime soap opera “General Hospital” is the longest running such drama still in production in the US, and is second-longest running soap in the world (the UK’s famous “Coronation Street” heads the list).

5. Guts, in part : ILEA
The human ileum (plural “ilea”) is the lowest part of the small intestine, found below the jejunum and above the cecum of the large intestine.

6. "Mine!" : DIBS!
The phrase “to have dibs on” expresses a claim on something. Apparently, the term “dibs” is a contraction of “dibstone”, which was a knucklebone or jack used in a children’s game.

7. Slaughter of the Cardinals : ENOS
Enos Slaughter has a remarkable playing record in Major League Baseball over a 19-year career. Slaughter’s record is particularly remarkable given that he left baseball for three years to serve in the military during WWII.

9. Achievements in large-scale topiary : MAZES
Topiary is the practice of training and clipping perennial plants into clearly defined shapes.

11. Historic conflict in and around the Yellow Sea : SINO-JAPANESE WAR
There were two Sino-Japanese Wars. The first was fought in 1894-95 over control of Korea. The second was fought between 1931 and 1945, eventually becoming part of WWII.

13. ___ Kemper, star of TV's "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt" : ELLIE
The actress Ellie Kemper’s big break came with the role of Erin Hannon, a receptionist on the sitcom “The Office”. More recently, Kemper has be playing the title role on the Netflix comedy series “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”.

14. Leo with the 1977 #1 hit "When I Need You" : SAYER
Leo Sayer is a British singer who was big in the seventies with hits such as “You Make Me Feel Like Dancing” and “When I Need You”. Sayer now lives in Australia.

20. Any I, e.g.: Abbr. : HWY
The US Interstate System is more correctly known as the Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways, a nod to President Eisenhower who championed the construction. The President had come to recognise the value of the German autobahn system in his experiences during WWII, and resolved to give the US a similar infrastructure. In real terms, the US Interstate construction project is said to have been the largest public works project since the Pyramids of Egypt.

25. What may involve the calf muscles? : RODEO
“Rodeo” is a Spanish word that is usually translated as “round up”.

28. Saw : MAXIM
A “saw” is an old saying, one that is often repeated and is very familiar. The term “old saw” is actually a tautology, as by definition a “saw” is “old”.

29. Its logo is based on a Pennsylvania Dutch hex sign : CBS
CBS used to be known as the Columbia Broadcasting System. It is the second-largest broadcaster in the world, second only to the BBC in the UK. CBS introduced its “eye” logo in 1951. That logo is based on a Pennsylvania Dutch hex sign.

31. "The Sopranos" actress : EDIE FALCO
The actress Edie Falco won three Emmy Awards for playing Carmela Soprano on HBO’s outstanding drama series called “The Sopranos”. Falco also won an Emmy in 2010 for playing the title role in “Nurse Jackie”, an excellent black comedy.

32. Slow sort, informally : POKE
Back in the early 1800s, a “poke” was a device attached to domestic animals such as pigs or sheep to keep them from escaping their enclosures. The poke was like a yoke with a pole, and slowed the animal down, hence the term “slowpoke”.

33. Patootie : END
Back in the 1920s, the term “patootie” was used for a sweetheart, a very pretty girl. Somehow, the term has evolved into slang for the posterior, rear end.

34. ___ Motors, old Lansing manufacturer : REO
The REO Motor Company was founded by Ransom Eli Olds (hence the name REO). The company made cars, trucks and buses, and was in business from 1905 to 1975 in Lansing, Michigan. Among the company’s most famous models were the REO Royale and the REO Flying Cloud.

42. Robert of "Spenser: For Hire" : URICH
Robert Urich was an actor famous for starring in television’s “Vega$” and “Spenser: For Hire”. Urich appeared in many television shows, starring in fifteen, which is a record for any actor.

43. A little tight : TIPSY
The term “tipsy” comes from the verb “to tip” meaning “to overturn, knock over”, and has been meaning “drunk” since the late 1500s.

46. Round abodes : YURTS
A “yurt” is a wood-framed dwelling that is used by nomads in the steppes of Central Asia. Although a yurt is a substantial structure, it is also extremely portable.

47. Dancer Pavlova and others : ANNAS
Anna Pavlova was a Russian ballerina who performed in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Pavlova became so successful that she was the first ballerina to pull together her own company and tour the world. Her most famous role was “The Dying Swan” that she danced to the beautiful “Le cygne” from Saint-Saëns’ “Carnival of the Animals”. Pavlova eventually left Russia for good and settled in England.

50. ___ the Great of children's literature : NATE
The “Nate the Great” series of children's novels was written (mainly) by Marjorie Sharmat. Nate is like a young Sherlock Holmes, with a dog for a sidekick called Sludge. Some of the books have been adapted for television.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Skye, the Small Isles, etc. : HEBRIDES
9. Fiddles (with) : MESSES
15. Eaglelike : AQUILINE
16. Armpit, to a doctor : AXILLA
17. Brown-bag lunch item : JUICE BOX
18. With wacky irreverence : ZANILY
19. 2002 "documentary" with "Don't try this at home" contents : JACKASS THE MOVIE
21. Varieties : ILKS
22. Sounds of pity : AWS
23. Fan sound : JEER
24. Like an ascot, perhaps : PREPPY
28. Put a dent in, say : MAR
29. Jeep model : CHEROKEE
32. Le Monde material : PAPIER
35. "No, you don't want to do that" : BAD IDEA
36. First hit for the Police : ROXANNE
37. Performed beautifully : SHINED
38. Managing : MAKING DO
39. Psychological mediator : EGO
40. "Drop dead, loser" : BITE ME
41. Strike sharply : CUFF
43. Change one's tone? : TAN
44. "Don't ___ thing" : SAY A
48. Hit 1959 Broadway play starring Sidney Poitier : A RAISIN IN THE SUN
53. Jam producer : PILEUP
54. Bowed with adversity : CAREWORN
55. Book after Proverbs: Abbr. : ECCLES
56. Only woman aboard the Argo, it's said : ATALANTA
57. Third-rate : SHODDY
58. "Jezebel" costume : RED DRESS

Down
1. Faithful pilgrim : HAJJI
2. Congruent : EQUAL
3. Riviera, e.g. : BUICK
4. Singer with a recurring role on "General Hospital" : RICK SPRINGFIELD
5. Guts, in part : ILEA
6. "Mine!" : DIBS!
7. Slaughter of the Cardinals : ENOS
8. Record of affairs? : SEX TAPE
9. Achievements in large-scale topiary : MAZES
10. Bar ___ : EXAM
11. Historic conflict in and around the Yellow Sea : SINO-JAPANESE WAR
12. Reducing to splinters : SLIVERING
13. ___ Kemper, star of TV's "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt" : ELLIE
14. Leo with the 1977 #1 hit "When I Need You" : SAYER
20. Any I, e.g.: Abbr. : HWY
25. What may involve the calf muscles? : RODEO
26. Managed, with "out" : EKED
27. Shade of green : PEA
28. Saw : MAXIM
29. Its logo is based on a Pennsylvania Dutch hex sign : CBS
30. Derisive reply : HAH!
31. "The Sopranos" actress : EDIE FALCO
32. Slow sort, informally : POKE
33. Patootie : END
34. ___ Motors, old Lansing manufacturer : REO
36. Tattle : RAT
38. Subcompact : MINICAR
40. International treaty subject : BAN
41. Coastline features : CAPES
42. Robert of "Spenser: For Hire" : URICH
43. A little tight : TIPSY
45. Simultaneously : AS ONE
46. Round abodes : YURTS
47. Dancer Pavlova and others : ANNAS
49. Went after, in a way : SUED
50. ___ the Great of children's literature : NATE
51. Like many folk songs: Abbr. : TRAD
52. Stood fast : HELD


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0421-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 21 Apr 17, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Damon J. Gulczynski
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 16m 05s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Areas where clerics are seated : APSES
The apse of a church or cathedral is a semicircular recess in an outer wall, usually with a half-dome as a roof and often where there resides an altar. Originally, apses were used as burial places for the clergy and also for storage of important relics.

11. Beldam : HAG
A beldam is an old woman, especially an ugly one. The term was originally used for a grandmother. In Old English, the prefix “bel-” is used to express a relationship (as in “grandmother”), and “dam” is used in the sense of “mother”.

14. Thin layer of foam at the top of an espresso : CREMA
Espresso is made by forcing extremely hot water, under pressure, through finely ground coffee beans. The result is a thick and concentrated coffee drink, which contains quite a lot of solids and a lot of foam. An espresso machine was first patented in 1884 in Italy, although it was a machine to make the beverage in bulk. The first patent for a machine that made individual measures was applied for in 1901, also in Italy.

16. The Jazz, on sports tickers : UTA
The Utah Jazz professional basketball team moved to their current home in Salt Lake City in 1979. As one might guess from the name, the team originated in New Orleans, but only played there for five seasons. New Orleans was a tough place to be based because venues were hard to come by, and Mardi Gras forced the team to play on the road for a whole month.

18. Business circles? : PIE CHARTS
A “pie chart” can also be referred to as a “circle graph”. It is often stated that Florence Nightingale invented the pie chart. While this is not in fact true, she is due the credit for popularizing it, and for developing the pie chart variation known as the polar area diagram. The earliest known pie chart appears in a book published in 1801 by Scottish engineer William Playfair.

20. "Our remedies ___ in ourselves do lie": Shak. : OFT
"Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie" is a line from William Shakespeare’s play “All’s Well That Ends Well”.

25. Bit of work : ERG
An erg is a unit of mechanical work or energy. It is a small unit, as there are 10 million ergs in one joule. it has been suggested that an erg is about the amount of energy required for a mosquito to take off. The term comes from "ergon", the Greek word for work.

26. Brand that's a shortened description of its flavor : NILLA
As one might expect, “Nilla” is a shortened form of “vanilla”. However, you won’t find any vanilla in Nilla brand cookies or wafers. They have always been flavored with vanillin, which is synthetic vanilla. Is nothing sacred …?

27. "Heavens to Murgatroyd!" : GREAT SCOTT!
No one seems to know for sure who the Scott is in the exclamation “great Scott!”. One theory is that the reference is to the commander-in-chief of the US Army during the Civil War, General Winfield Scott. Scott weighed in at 300 pounds later in his life, and was so obese that he could not ride a horse.

Remember the catchphrase made famous by the cartoon character Snagglepuss, “Heavens to Murgatroyd!”? Snagglepuss stole that line from a 1944 movie called, “Meet the People” in which it was first uttered by none other than Bert Lahr, the actor who played the cowardly lion in “The Wizard of Oz”.

31. James, Jimmy or John : DEAN
In his short life, James Dean starred in three great movies: "East of Eden", "Rebel Without a Cause" and "Giant", for which he received two posthumous Best Actor Oscar nominations (the only person to do so). On a fateful day in September 1955, Dean set off in Porsche for a race in Salinas, California. While driving to the race he was given a speeding ticket. Two hours later Dean was involved in a near head-on collision and was pronounced dead on arrival at a hospital in Paso Robles, California.

The Jimmy Dean brand of sausage was introduced in 1969 by singer and actor Jimmy Dean. Although he was at the height of his singing and acting career in 1950s and 1960s, I best remember Dean for playing reclusive billionaire Willard Whyte in the 1971 James Bond film “Diamonds Are Forever”.

John Dean was White House Counsel in the Nixon administration, and someone who was deeply embroiled in the Watergate scandal. Dean pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice in the resulting trial and became a key witness for the prosecution. Dean served only four months in jail, which was time already served of a one-to-four years sentence in a minimum-security prison.

33. Omegas represent them : OHMS
The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every schoolkid knows as Ohm's Law.

35. Savage of "Savage Love" : DAN
Dan Savage is an author and journalist who is famous for writing a sex advice column under the title “Savage Love”. “Savage Love” is directed towards the gay community and is syndicated in several dozen newspapers across the world.

36. Cousin of a fjord : RIA
A drowned valley might be called a ria or a fjord, with both formed as sea level rises. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

38. Post cereal with an apostrophe in its name : OH’S
There used to be two varieties of Oh's made by Quaker Oats Company. One was Honey Nut Oh's, later known as Crunchy Nut Oh's, but it was phased out. The second type was called Crunchy Graham Oh's, and it is still available today as Honey Graham Oh's.

41. Familia members : TIAS
In Spanish, a “tía” (aunt) is a member of “la familia” (the family).

47. Toon who wears a red hair bow : HELLO KITTY
Hello Kitty is a female bobtail cat, a character and a brand name launched in 1974 by the Japanese company Sanrio. Folks can overpay for stationary, school supplies and fashion accessories with the Hello Kitty character emblazoned thereon.

49. Zhou ___ : ENLAI
Zhou Enlai (also “Chou En-Lai”) was the first government leader of the People’s Republic of China and held the office of Premier from 1949 until he died in 1976. Zhou Enlai ran the government for Communist Party Leader Mao Zedong, often striking a more conciliatory tone with the West than that of his boss. He was instrumental, for example, in setting up President Nixon’s famous visit to China in 1972. Zhou Enlai died just a few months before Mao Zedong, with both deaths leading to unrest and a dramatic change in political direction for the country.

51. Mac : Scottish :: ___ : Arabic : IBN
In Arabic names, “ibn” is a word meaning “son of”. The words “bin” and “ben” are also used for “son of”. The word “bint” means “daughter of”. Similarly, in Hebrew “ben” is used to mean “son of”, and “bat” is used to mean “daughter of”.

53. Type for who this clue will be annoying? : GRAMMAR NAZI
Yep, I cringed when I saw “who” in the clue instead of “whom”. I’m a bad person …

58. Iconic part of Nancy Sinatra's early attire : GO-GO BOOTS
The original go-go boot from the sixties comes to the knee and has a low heel. Prior to the sixties, boots really weren’t worn much by women other than as protection against bad weather. Now they are a fashion statement.

59. Kennedy colleague : ALITO
Associate Justice Samuel Alito was nominated to the US Supreme Court by President George W. Bush. Alito is the second Italian-American to serve on the Supreme Court (Antonin Scalia was the first). Alito studied law at Yale and while in his final year he left the country for the first time in his life, heading to Italy to work on his thesis about the Italian legal system.

Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy of the US Supreme Court was appointed by President Reagan in 1988. Although Justice Kennedy’s decisions are viewed as largely conservative, after Sandra Day O’Connor has retired he has been considered by many as the “swing vote” on the court.

62. Year abroad : ANNEE
“Année” is a French word for “year”.

64. Pres. whose given birth name was David : DDE
Future US president Eisenhower was born in Denison, Texas in 1890 and given the name David Dwight, but by the time he made it to the White House he was going by the name Dwight D. Eisenhower (DDE). Growing up, his family called him Dwight, and when "Ike" enrolled in West Point he himself reversed the order of his given names.

Down
2. Perfunctory : PRO FORMA
The Latin term “pro forma” translates as “as a matter of form”, and is used in English to describe actions or documents that are considered merely a formality. In the world of accounting, a pro forma financial statement indicates hypothetical figures based on previous operations, and are as estimates before actual results become available.

4. Producer of a deep drumming call : EMU
The large flightless birds called emus make sounds by manipulating inflatable necks sacs. The sac is about a foot long, has a thin wall and allows the bird to emit a booming sound. The type of sound emitted is the easiest way to differentiate between male and female emus.

5. Boobs : SAPS
“Sap” is slang for a fool, someone easily scammed. The term arose in the early 1800s in Britain when it was used in “saphead” and “sapskull”. All these words derive from “sapwood”, which is the soft wood found in tree trunks between the bark and the heartwood at the center.

7. Pungent cheese : ASIAGO
Asiago is a crumbly cheese that is named for the region in northeastern Italy from where it originates.

10. "___ Brand" (Nathaniel Hawthorne tale) : ETHAN
Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote the short story "Ethan Brand - A Chapter from an Abortive Romance", in 1850.

12. Verdi opera based on a historic invader : ATTILA
Giuseppe Verdi's opera "Attila" is based on the play “Attila, King of the Huns" written by Friedrich Werner. The opera premiered in 1846 in Venice.

24. Nobelist Hammarskjöld : DAG
Dag Hammarskjold was the second secretary-general of the United Nations, right up until his death in a plane crash in Rhodesia in 1961. The crash was considered suspicious at the time as the bodyguards were found to have bullet wounds when they died, but this was put down to bullets exploding in the fire after the crash.

30. Shark-jumping sitcom character : THE FONZ
The phrase “jumping the shark” has been used since 1977 to describe the moment in the life of a TV show when it starts to decline in popularity. The expression comes from a scene in the hit sitcom “Happy Days” when the character Fonzie gets on water skis and is seen literally jumping over a shark. “Happy Days” never recovered.

38. Bull, essentially : OPTIMIST
The terms "bull" and "bear" markets come from the way in which each animal attacks. A bull thrusts his horns upwards (an "up" market), whereas a bear swipes with his paws downward (a "down" market).

41. Latin lover's words : TE AMO
“I love you” translates into “te amo” in Spanish, and into “je t’aime” in French.

43. One may be essential : OIL
Essential oils are concentrated liquids containing volatile chemical compounds that have a smell or odor. The term “essential” oil comes from the fact that it contains the “essence” of a plant’s fragrance.

48. Doorframe part : LINTEL
A lintel is a structural beam that spans an opening in a wall, usually a door or a window.

50. Repeated boast in a 1987 #1 hit : I’M BAD!
The song "Bad" was written and sung by Michael Jackson, and released in 1987. The song is about being tough on the streets, being “bad”.

55. Author Jaffe : RONA
Rona Jaffe was an American novelist perhaps most famous for two of her books, “The Best of Everything” and “Mazes and Monsters”. “The Best of Everything” was published in 1958 and has been compared with the HBO television series “Sex and the City” as it depicts women in the working world. “Mazes and Monsters” was published in 1981 and explores a role-playing game similar to Dungeons & Dragons and the impact it has on players.

56. Foot type : IAMB
An iamb is a metrical foot containing an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable. Robert Frost's "Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening" consists of lines made up of four sequential iambs e.g. "Whose woods / these are / I think / I know". With a sequence of four iambs, the poem's structure is described as iambic tetrameter.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Areas where clerics are seated : APSES
6. Play's counterpart : PAUSE
11. Beldam : HAG
14. Thin layer of foam at the top of an espresso : CREMA
15. Selling point : ASSET
16. The Jazz, on sports tickers : UTA
17. Add, British-style : TOT UP
18. Business circles? : PIE CHARTS
20. "Our remedies ___ in ourselves do lie": Shak. : OFT
21. Character assassination, for one : SMEAR TACTIC
23. Collapse : FOLD
25. Bit of work : ERG
26. Brand that's a shortened description of its flavor : NILLA
27. "Heavens to Murgatroyd!" : GREAT SCOTT!
31. James, Jimmy or John : DEAN
32. "Heavens to Murgatroyd!" : OMIGOSH!
33. Omegas represent them : OHMS
35. Savage of "Savage Love" : DAN
36. Cousin of a fjord : RIA
37. ___ party : TEA
38. Post cereal with an apostrophe in its name : OH’S
41. Familia members : TIAS
42. Genre for Miriam Makeba and Ladysmith Black Mambazo : AFROPOP
44. Quiet (down) : PIPE
47. Toon who wears a red hair bow : HELLO KITTY
49. Zhou ___ : ENLAI
51. Mac : Scottish :: ___ : Arabic : IBN
52. They open in the morning : LIDS
53. Type for who this clue will be annoying? : GRAMMAR NAZI
57. It's stretched out in yoga class : MAT
58. Iconic part of Nancy Sinatra's early attire : GO-GO BOOTS
59. Kennedy colleague : ALITO
61. Café freebie : EAU
62. Year abroad : ANNEE
63. Unlikely donor : MISER
64. Pres. whose given birth name was David : DDE
65. Does business : DEALS
66. Alternative nickname for Liz : BETSY

Down
1. Hurricane or flood : ACT OF GOD
2. Perfunctory : PRO FORMA
3. Get cozy : SETTLE IN
4. Producer of a deep drumming call : EMU
5. Boobs : SAPS
6. Law school, so it's said : PAPER CHASE
7. Pungent cheese : ASIAGO
8. One who might need an ID : USER
9. Broken-off branch : SECT
10. "___ Brand" (Nathaniel Hawthorne tale) : ETHAN
11. Rush : HURTLE
12. Verdi opera based on a historic invader : ATTILA
13. Stranded motorist's boon : GAS CAN
19. Eating things : ACIDS
22. Promised one : MESSIAH
24. Nobelist Hammarskjöld : DAG
28. Rings : TORI
29. A batter receives four for a grand slam : TOTAL BASES
30. Shark-jumping sitcom character : THE FONZ
34. Beauty ___ : MARK
38. Bull, essentially : OPTIMIST
39. Highly anticipated social events : HOT DATES
40. Work with intelligence? : SPY STORY
41. Latin lover's words : TE AMO
43. One may be essential : OIL
44. Classified : PEGGED
45. Foray : INROAD
46. Hound : PLAGUE
48. Doorframe part : LINTEL
50. Repeated boast in a 1987 #1 hit : I’M BAD!
54. Super : A-ONE
55. Author Jaffe : RONA
56. Foot type : IAMB
60. Get down, in a way : LIE


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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