Top Line

Search by Date

DD MMM YY or MMDD-YY

Search by Puzzle Number

e.g. 1225-09, 0704-10, 1025-10 etc.

Daily Solution by Email

Enter your email address

0409-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 9 Apr 17, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Byron Walden
THEME: Having Nothing On
Each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase, but with “O ON” added (having “nothing” on).
28A. The ladies-only Western-themed bar I own? : MY GAL SALOON (from “My Gal Sal”)
30A. Inspector Clouseau or Borat? : MOVIE BUFFOON (from “movie buff”)
39A. Decoration in a deli case? : SAUSAGE FESTOON (from “sausage fest”)
57A. Product of a stable of comic strip artists? : HORSE-DRAWN CARTOON (from “horse-drawn cart”)
65A. Scaled-down woodwind? : SMALLMOUTH BASSOON (from “smallmouth bass”)
85A. Audibly upset Belgian francophone? : WAILING WALLOON (from “Wailing Wall”)
97A. Satirical depiction of the story of Noah? : FLOOD LAMPOON (from “flood lamp”)
100A. Most important mounted cavalryman? : MAIN DRAGOON (from “main drag”)
28D. Something seen at Frankenstein's birthday party? : MONSTER'S BALLOON (from “Monster’s Ball”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 25m 18s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

10. Blood enemy : CRIP
The Crips are a street gang with origins in Los Angeles going back to 1969. It is believed that the Crips have up to 35,000 members today across the country, and there is even a presence in the US military both here and abroad. The main rivals of the Crips are the Bloods.

14. Aussie critters : ROOS
The name “kangaroo” comes from the Australian Aborigine term for the animal. There’s an oft-quoted story that the explorer James Cook (later Captain Cook) asked a local native what was the name of this remarkable-looking animal, and the native responded with “kangaroo”. The story is that the native was actually saying “I don’t understand you”, but as cute as that tale is, it’s just an urban myth.

18. Diaper option : CLOTH
“Diaper” is another word that I had to learn when I moved to America. What are called “diapers” over here, we call “nappies” back in Ireland. The term “diaper” is actually the original term that was used in England for the garment, where “diaper” referred to the cloth that was used. The term diaper was brought to the New World where it stuck. Back in Britain, diaper was displaced by the word “nappy”, a diminutive of “napkin”.

20. French director Clément : RENE
René Clément was a director and screenwriter from France. Clément won an Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film on two occasions: “The Walls of Malapaga” (1949) and “Forbidden Games” (1952).

21. Martial art whose name means "sword way" : KENDO
Kendo is a Japanese martial art based on sword fighting.

22. Home for Bilbo Baggins : HOBBIT HOLE
In J. R. R. Tolkien’s fantasy novel “The Hobbit”, the title character is Bilbo Baggins, a hobbit who stumbles across a magical ring and then embarks on a series of adventures.

26. A.L. East team: Abbr. : TOR
The Toronto Blue Jays baseball franchise was founded in 1977. The Blue Jays are the only team based outside the US to have won a World Series, doing so in 1992 and 1993. And since the Montreal Expos relocated to Washington, the Blue Jays are the only Major League Baseball team now headquartered outside of the US.

28. The ladies-only Western-themed bar I own? : MY GAL SALOON (from “My Gal Sal”)
"My Gal Sal" is a song written by composer Paul Dresser. "My Gal Sal" is also the name of the movie recounting Dresser's life made in 1942. It stars Victor Mature as Dresser, and Rita Hayworth as Sally "Sal" Elliott.

30. Inspector Clouseau or Borat? : MOVIE BUFFOON (from “movie buff”)
A lot of people think that the Inspector Clouseau character (played originally by Peter Sellers) is “The Pink Panther”. It’s actually the jewel that was stolen in the original movie. Would you believe there are eleven “Pink Panther” movies in the whole series?

The full name of the 2006 "mockumentary" is "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan". Borat is played by a British comedian, Sacha Baron Cohen. Not my cup of tea …

33. Peevish : SPLEENY
“To vent one’s spleen” means to vent one’s anger, perhaps by shouting and screaming. This expression is rooted in the humoral medicine of the ancient Greeks. The Greeks believed that a person’s temperament was dictated by the balance of the body’s four “humors”. The spleen produced the humor known as yellow bile, which was associated with an aggressive and energetic personality.

45. Tony who managed two World Series championships for the Cardinals : LA RUSSA
Tony La Russa is a former MLB player and manager. Off the field, La Russa is well known in this part of Northern California as the founder of the Animal Rescue Foundation (ARF) headquartered in the city of Walnut Creek. The ARF is a “no-kill” animal shelter for abandoned dogs and cats. We rescued our pet dog from the ARF some years ago ...

47. Setting for Cardinals home games, briefly : CDT
Central Daylight Time (CDT)

49. Neutral tone : ECRU
The shade called ecru is a grayish, yellowish brown. The word “ecru” comes from French and means “raw, unbleached”. “Ecru” has the same roots as our word “crude”.

50. Parliamentary proceedings, e.g. : ACTA
Actum (plural “acta”) is the Latin word for “deed”. “Acta” is used in English to describe many official records, including minutes, proceedings etc.

51. Romeo or Juliet : TEEN
In Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet”, it is explicitly stated that Juliet is 13 years of age, and the assumption is that Romeo is perhaps a little older.

62. Kentucky college : BEREA
Berea College is located in Berea, Kentucky, just south of Lexington. It is a remarkable university that is focused on providing a low-cost education to students from low-income families. There are no tuition fees and instead students must work at least ten hours a week on campus and in service jobs. Berea was also the first college in the Southern US to become coeducational and the first to become racially integrated.

63. Communication system pioneered by Thomas Gallaudet, for short : ASL
It's really quite unfortunate that American Sign Language (ASL) and British Sign Language (BSL) are very different, and someone who has learned to sign in one cannot understand someone signing in the other.

64. Greek city where Perseus was born : ARGOS
Argos is one of the oldest cities in Greece, and indeed in Europe, having been continuously inhabited for over 7,000 years. In ancient times, Argos was a rival city-state to the powerful Sparta.

75. Eight-time Olympic medalist Apolo Anton ___ : OHNO
Speed-skater Apolo Ohno has won more Winter Olympics medals than any other American. Ohno also did a great job winning the 2007 season of television's "Dancing with the Stars".

77. Art Deco artist : ERTE
“Erté” was the pseudonym of French (Russian born) artist and designer Romain de Tirtoff. Erté is the French pronunciation of his initials "R.T." Erté’s diverse portfolio of work included costumes and sets for the “Ziegfeld Follies” of 1923, as well as productions of the Parisian cabaret show “Folies Bergère”. Erté's most famous work by far is an image titled “Symphony in Black”. It depicts a tall and slender woman dressed in black, holding a black dog on a leash.

78. Belgradian, e.g. : SERB
Belgrade is the capital city of Serbia. The name “Belgrade” translates into “White City”.

85. Audibly upset Belgian francophone? : WAILING WALLOON (from “Wailing Wall”)
The Western Wall (also called “the Wailing Wall”) is a remnant of an ancient wall that surrounded the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem. The wall is a sacred site for the faithful, and has been a place for prayer and pilgrimage for centuries. The term “Wailing” was assigned in English as many Jewish people came to the site to mourn the destruction of the Temple.

90. Mournful work : ELEGY
Perhaps the most famous elegy in the English language is that written by Thomas Gray, completed in 1750. His “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” is the source of many oft-quoted phrases, including:
  • Celestial fire
  • Far from the Madding Crowd
  • Kindred spirit

100. Most important mounted cavalryman? : MAIN DRAGOON (from “main drag”)
A blunderbuss is a muzzle-loading firearm that is an early form of shotgun. The original name for the weapon was the Dutch term “donderbus” meaning thunder pipe”. A handgun version of the weapon was called a “dragon”, and some examples actually had a dragon’s head carved around the muzzle’s head. The fiery muzzle blast was said to imitate the fiery breath of a dragon, hence the name. And, the mounted infantry known as “dragoons” took their name from the “dragon” firearm.

103. Bush league, for short? : GOP
The Republican Party has had the nickname Grand Old Party (GOP) since 1875. That said, the phrase was coined in the “Congressional Record” as “this gallant old party”. The moniker was changed to “grand old party” in 1876 in an article in the “Cincinnati Commercial”. The Republican Party’s elephant mascot dates back to an 1874 cartoon drawn by Thomas Nast for “Harper’s Weekly”. The Democrat’s donkey was already an established symbol. Nast drew a donkey clothed in a lion’s skin scaring away the other animals. One of the scared animals was an elephant, which Nast labeled “The Republican Vote”.

105. Jean who played Aunt Martha in "Arsenic and Old Lace" : ADAIR
“Arsenic and Old Lace” is a Frank Capra film released in 1944. The movie is based on a 1939 stage play by Joseph Kesselring. The film stars Cary Grant as a completely madcap and frantic Mortimer Brewster. Grant was only the fourth choice for the role, after Bob Hope, Jack Benny and Ronald Reagan. That’s quite an eclectic mix of actors …

110. Food thickener : AGAR
Agar (also “agar-agar”) is a jelly extracted from seaweed that has many uses. Agar is found in Japanese desserts, and can also be used as a food thickener or even as a laxative. In the world of science it is the most common medium used for growing bacteria in Petri dishes.

111. Big name among radio shock jocks : OPIE
“The Opie & Anthony Show” was a talk show broadcast on XM and Sirius satellite radio. Hosts of the show were Opie Hughes and Anthony Cumia. I’ve turned into a bit of grouch in my old age, and I must admit that I find broadcasts like “The Opie & Anthony Show” very puerile and offensive. Past features in the show include “Whip ‘em Out Wednesdays”, “Voyeur Bus” and “T&A with O&A”. Sirius fired Anthony in 2014 after an incident involving racial slurs. The show was then relaunched by Sirius with Cumia being replaced.

113. Environmental bane : SMOG
“Smog” is a portmanteau formed by melding “smoke” and “fog”. The term was first used to describe the air around London in the early 1900s. Several cities around the world have a reputation of being particularly smoggy. For example, the most smog-plagued city in Latin America is Mexico City, which is located in a highland “bowl” that traps industrial and vehicle pollution.

Down
1. Drei + fünf : ACHT
In German, “Drei + fünf” (three + five) is “acht” (eight).

3. 1992 Tim Robbins mockumentary : BOB ROBERTS
Tim Robbins is a Hollywood actor, director and producer. I’d say that Robbins’ best-known roles are the leads in “The Shawshank Redemption” and “The Player”. Robbins also wrote, produced and directed the 1995 movie “Dead Man Walking” starring Susan Sarandon and Sean Penn. Robbins was married for almost thirty years to Susan Sarandon, although they split up in 2009.

4. Horse picker's hangout, for short : OTB
Off-Track Betting (OTB) is the legal gambling that takes place on horse races outside of a race track. A betting parlor can be referred to as an OTB.

6. Indian "masters" : SAHIBS
“Sahib” is most recognized as a term of address used in India, where it is used in much the same way as we use "mister" in English. The term was also used to address male Europeans in the days of the British Raj. The correct female form of address is “sahiba”, but in the colonial days the address used was “memsahib”, a melding of “ma’am” and “sahib”

9. With 36-Across, a Dr. Seuss book : THE …
(36A. See 9-Down : … LORAX)
"The Lorax" is a children's book written by Dr. Seuss. It is an allegorical work questioning the problems created by industrialization, and in particular its impact on the environment. At one point in the story, the Lorax “speaks for the trees, for the trees have no tongues”. “The Lorax” was adapted into an animated film that was released in 2012, with Danny DeVito voicing the title character.

10. Marker maker : CRAYOLA
In the year 2000 the Crayola company, very cleverly I think, held the “Crayola Color Census 2000” in which people were polled and asked for their favorite Crayola colors. President George W. Bush chose “Blue Bell” and Tiger Woods chose “Wild Strawberry”.

16. Ancient theater : ODEON
In Ancient Greece an odeon (also “odeum”) was like a small theater, with "odeon" literally meaning a "building for musical competition". Odea were used in both Greece and Rome for entertainments such as musical shows and poetry readings.

21. Aussie critters : KOALAS
The koala bear really does look like a little bear, but it's not even closely related. The koala is an arboreal marsupial and a herbivore, native to the east and south coasts of Australia. Koalas aren’t primates, and are one of the few mammals other than primates who have fingerprints. In fact, it can be very difficult to tell human fingerprints from koala fingerprints, even under an electron microscope. Male koalas are called “bucks”, females are “does”, and young koalas are “joeys”. I’m a little jealous of the koala, as it sleeps up to 20 hours a day …

42. Tres + cinco : OCHO
In Spanish, “tres + cinco” (three + five) is “ocho” (eight).

44. Georgia senator who helped establish "don't ask, don't tell" : NUNN
Sam Nunn served as a US Senator for the state of Georgia as a Democrat, for 24 years until 1997. Nunn is married to Colleen O'Brien, whom he met for the first time in the US Embassy in Paris where she was working as a spy for the CIA.

The official US policy on gays serving on the military from 1993 to 2011 was known as “don’t ask, don’t tell” (DADT). In effect, this policy outlawed discrimination against closeted gay service members, while at the same time barring openly gay persons from serving in the military. Unauthorized investigations of suspected gay servicemen and servicewomen led to the policy being extended to “don’t ask, don’t tell, don’t pursue, don’t harass”. “Don’t ask, don’t tell” was repealed in 2011.

46. Correo ___ (words on foreign correspondence) : AEREO
The words “Correo Aereo” can be found on some stamps. The phrase translates from Spanish as “Air Mail”.

52. Hairy hunter of Genesis : ESAU
Esau was the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When their mother Rebekah gave birth to the twins "the first emerged red and hairy all over (Esau), with his heel grasped by the hand of the second to come out (Jacob)". As Esau was the first born, he was entitled to inherit his father's wealth (it was his "birthright"). Instead, Esau sold his birthright to Jacob for the price of a "mess of pottage" (a meal of lentils).

55. Elvis ___ Presley : ARON
Elvis Aron Presley (aka “the King”) was the younger of two identical twins. His brother was stillborn, delivered 35 minutes before Elvis. The brother was named Jesse Garon Presley. So, although born a twin, Elvis was raised as an only child.

58. "The BFG" author : DAHL
“The BFG” is a 1982 children’s book by Welsh author Roald Dahl. The initialism in the title stands for “Big Friendly Giant”. Dahl dedicated “The BFG” to his daughter Olivia, who had passed away at the age of 7 in 1962.

59. Automaker that introduced the Rambler : NASH
The Nash Rambler is credited with establishing a new segment in the North American auto market. It is often cited as the first successful American compact car.

61. 2004 Scarlett Johansson film adapted from "Lady Windermere's Fan" : A GOOD WOMAN
Scarlett Johansson is a film actress from New York City. Johansson had an acclaimed lead performance in the 1996 movie “Manny & Lo”, when she was just 12 years old. The earliest films I remember her in, two favorites of mine, are “Girl in a Pearl Earring” and “Lost in Translation”, both from 2013. She has become quite the sex symbol, and is the only woman to have been named “Sexiest Woman Alive” twice by “Esquire” magazine. The media sometimes refer to her as “ScarJo”, a moniker that she apparently dislikes intensely.

62. Apt to go Democratic : BLUE LEANING
On political maps, red states are usually Republican and blue states usually Democrat. The designation of red and blue states is a very recent concept, only introduced in the 2000 presidential election by TV journalist, the late Tim Russert. In retrospect, the choice of colors is surprising, as in other democracies around the world red is usually used to describe left-leaning socialist parties (the reds under the bed!), and blue is used for conservative right-wing parties. In election cycles, swing/battleground states are often depicted in purple.

66. Actress Sorvino : MIRA
Mira Sorvino is an American actress, winner of an Oscar for her supporting role in the 1995 Woody Allen movie “Mighty Aphrodite”. Sorvino also played a title role opposite Lisa Kudrow in the very forgettable “Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion”.

71. Beehive, for one : UPDO
That distinctive "beehive" hairstyle is also called a B-52, because the round, beehive-shape also resembles the bulbous nose of a B-52 bomber! The style originated in 1958, and is credited to Margaret Vinci Heldt, the owner of a hair salon in downtown Chicago. I'm not a fan of the beehive, but I do have to say that Audrey Hepburn carried it off in "Breakfast at Tiffany's", as did Dusty Springfield in her heyday.

82. Quarters : basketball :: chukkers : ___ : POLO
A game of polo is divided into periods of play called chukkers (sometimes “chukkas”). The game usually lasts for two hours, and the time between the chukkers is used to change horses.

87. Pays de ___ (Nantes's region) : LA LOIRE
The Loire is the longest river in France. It is so long that it drains one-fifth of the nation’s land mass. The Loire rises in the southeast, in the Cevennes mountain range, then heads north then due west, emptying into the Bay of Biscay at the city of Nantes. The Loire Valley is home to some of France’s most famous wine production, and includes the wine regions of Sancerre, Pouilly-Fumé and Muscadet.

88. Variety of hold 'em : NO LIMIT
The official birthplace of the incredibly popular poker game of Texas hold 'em is Robstown, Texas where the game dates back to the early 1900s. The game was introduced into Las Vegas in 1967 by a group of Texan enthusiasts including Doyle Brunson, a champion often seen playing on TV today. Doyle Brunson published a poker strategy guide in 1978, and this really helped increase the popularity of the game. But it was the inclusion of Texas hold ‘em in the television lineup that really gave the game its explosive surge in popularity, with the size of the prize money just skyrocketing.

93. Frances who played TV's Aunt Bee : BAVIER
Aunt Bee was a character in “The Andy Griffith Show”. The character’s full name was Beatrice Taylor but everyone in Mayberry called her “Aunt Bee”. In the storyline she was the aunt of the protagonist, Sheriff Andy Taylor, and great-aunt to Andy’s son Opie. Aunt Bee was played by actress Frances Bavier.

94. Religious leaders : IMAMS
An imam is a Muslim leader, often the person in charge of a mosque or perhaps a Muslim community.

96. Baldwin offering : PIANO
The Baldwin Piano Company was founded in 1857 by Dwight Hamilton Baldwin from Cincinnati, Ohio. The Baldwin company became the largest manufacturer of keyboard instruments in the US. Sadly, Baldwin pianos haven’t been manufactured in this country since 2008, and the Baldwin brand is now owned by Gibson Guitars.

99. Title opera heroine who is a Druidic high priestess : NORMA
“Norma” is an opera written by Vincenzo Bellini, first performed in 1831. One aria from the work is “Casta diva”, which is one of the most popular arias of the 1800s.

104. ETS offering : PSAT
The Educational Testing Service (ETS) was founded in 1947, and produces standardized tests for students from kindergarten through college. Perhaps most famously, ETS operates the SAT testing process.

107. Going nowhere, metaphorically : DOA
Dead on arrival (DOA)

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Ecclesiastical leader : ABBOT
6. "Get out!" : SCAT!
10. Blood enemy : CRIP
14. Aussie critters : ROOS
18. Diaper option : CLOTH
19. Bridge shape : ARCH
20. French director Clément : RENE
21. Martial art whose name means "sword way" : KENDO
22. Home for Bilbo Baggins : HOBBIT HOLE
24. West Wing worker : AIDE
25. A lot : OFTEN
26. A.L. East team: Abbr. : TOR
27. Contemptible sorts : SWINE
28. The ladies-only Western-themed bar I own? : MY GAL SALOON (from “My Gal Sal”)
30. Inspector Clouseau or Borat? : MOVIE BUFFOON (from “movie buff”)
33. Peevish : SPLEENY
34. Most contemptible : BASEST
35. Blowup: Abbr. : ENL
36. See 9-Down : … LORAX
37. Like some quilt blocks : PRECUT
39. Decoration in a deli case? : SAUSAGE FESTOON (from “sausage fest”)
45. Tony who managed two World Series championships for the Cardinals : LA RUSSA
47. Setting for Cardinals home games, briefly : CDT
48. Vivacity : LIFE
49. Neutral tone : ECRU
50. Parliamentary proceedings, e.g. : ACTA
51. Romeo or Juliet : TEEN
53. ___ booster : EGO
55. Drained of color : ASHEN
56. "Indubitably" : YES
57. Product of a stable of comic strip artists? : HORSE-DRAWN CARTOON (from “horse-drawn cart”)
62. Kentucky college : BEREA
63. Communication system pioneered by Thomas Gallaudet, for short : ASL
64. Greek city where Perseus was born : ARGOS
65. Scaled-down woodwind? : SMALLMOUTH BASSOON (from “smallmouth bass”)
70. Ice cream container : TUB
73. Calendar model : PINUP
74. Suffix with blast- : -ULA
75. Eight-time Olympic medalist Apolo Anton ___ : OHNO
76. Condo V.I.P. : SUPE
77. Art Deco artist : ERTE
78. Belgradian, e.g. : SERB
81. Audiophile's collection : LPS
83. Elizabeth with the memoir "Saving Graces" : EDWARDS
85. Audibly upset Belgian francophone? : WAILING WALLOON (from “Wailing Wall”)
89. Words after "Sure!" : WHY NOT?!
90. Mournful work : ELEGY
91. MSN alternative : AOL
92. Musician in the woodwind section : OBOIST
94. Runs through : IMPALES
97. Satirical depiction of the story of Noah? : FLOOD LAMPOON (from “flood lamp”)
100. Most important mounted cavalryman? : MAIN DRAGOON (from “main drag”)
102. Opposite corner in a romantic triangle : RIVAL
103. Bush league, for short? : GOP
105. Jean who played Aunt Martha in "Arsenic and Old Lace" : ADAIR
106. Important positions : LOCI
107. Alphas : DOMINATORS
109. Son of Gloria on "Modern Family" : MANNY
110. Food thickener : AGAR
111. Big name among radio shock jocks : OPIE
112. So-called "Butterfly Capital of Alabama" : SELMA
113. Environmental bane : SMOG
114. Hand (out) : DOLE
115. Study of the heavens: Abbr. : ASTR
116. Attacked : HAD AT

Down
1. Drei + fünf : ACHT
2. Sign of spring : BLOOM
3. 1992 Tim Robbins mockumentary : BOB ROBERTS
4. Horse picker's hangout, for short : OTB
5. Melodramatic NBC hit starting in 2016 : THIS IS US
6. Indian "masters" : SAHIBS
7. Hybrid bakery treats : CRONUTS
8. Roman ___ : A CLEF
9. With 36-Across, a Dr. Seuss book : THE ...
10. Marker maker : CRAYOLA
11. Time on the throne : REIGN
12. "___ Club" (#1 hit for 50 Cent) : IN DA
13. Removes, as a sticker : PEELS OFF
14. They can provoke knee-jerk reactions : REFLEX TESTS
15. Reaching new heights in ballet? : ON TOE
16. Ancient theater : ODEON
17. Little lad : SONNY
21. Aussie critters : KOALAS
23. Quick series of social media posts : TWEETSTORM
28. Something seen at Frankenstein's birthday party? : MONSTER'S BALLOON (from “Monster’s Ball”)
29. Shopping ___ : SPREE
31. Empty spaces : VACUA
32. Rhubarb with deep roots? : FEUD
36. Welcoming necklace : LEI
37. DVD remote button : PLAY
38. Go a mile a minute : RACE
40. Woe for some 51-Acrosses : ACNE
41. Shine : GLOW
42. Tres + cinco : OCHO
43. Two-tone treat : OREO
44. Georgia senator who helped establish "don't ask, don't tell" : NUNN
46. Correo ___ (words on foreign correspondence) : AEREO
52. Hairy hunter of Genesis : ESAU
54. Big do : GALA
55. Elvis ___ Presley : ARON
57. Pitch in : HELP
58. "The BFG" author : DAHL
59. Automaker that introduced the Rambler : NASH
60. Witch : CRONE
61. 2004 Scarlett Johansson film adapted from "Lady Windermere's Fan" : A GOOD WOMAN
62. Apt to go Democratic : BLUE LEANING
65. Spit out : SPEW
66. Actress Sorvino : MIRA
67. One opposed : ANTI
68. Big brass : TUBA
69. Middling : SO-SO
70. Work out spectacularly : TURN TO GOLD
71. Beehive, for one : UPDO
72. Overcome : BEST
76. Authority : SAY-SO
78. Villainous visage : SNEER
79. Vegetarian sandwich filling : EGG SALAD
80. Train syst. : RWY
82. Quarters : basketball :: chukkers : ___ : POLO
84. Abrupt, disconcerting reaction : WHIPLASH
86. After-dinner volunteer's words : I'LL DRY
87. Pays de ___ (Nantes's region) : LA LOIRE
88. Variety of hold 'em : NO LIMIT
93. Frances who played TV's Aunt Bee : BAVIER
94. Religious leaders : IMAMS
95. ___ President : MADAM
96. Baldwin offering : PIANO
97. Central : FOCAL
98. Gets ready to do push-ups, say : DROPS
99. Title opera heroine who is a Druidic high priestess : NORMA
101. Kind of boots : GO-GO
104. ETS offering : PSAT
107. Going nowhere, metaphorically : DOA
108. Women's club event : TEA


Return to top of page

6 comments :

Dave Kennison said...

58:50, no errors, but I struggled the whole way; there was hardly any part of this one that didn't hold me up for at least for a bit. And the last letter I entered was a educated guess - the "E" at the intersection of BAVIER and OPIE, neither of which I knew - and it worked. I'm ready for a Monday puzzle now ... :-)

Lou Sander said...

We agree with Dave Kennison. It was pretty hard. We had to look up AGOODWOMAN, and we ended up missing ACTA (we had ACTS). A good workout, but tough.

Anonymous said...

39:25 and 5 errors. I felt this one was chock-full of extreme esoterica (BLASTULA??? **Really?**) and the inane theme made it that much more difficult.

What does "Having Nothing On" have to do with words ending in OON? the first O just can't be a "zero" because 'somebody just SAYS SO.' I really detest this sort of forced attempt at humor or cleverness, because it is NEITHER.

Just plain, garden-variety STUPID.

BruceB said...

50:08, 2 errors, 31D VACUI, 50A ACTI. Difficult slog for me as well. Couple of 'OK whatever' moments, like SPLEENY and TWEET STORM. I have heard of 'venting ones spleen' but never heard SPLEENY. Familiar with 'twitter storm', not TWEET STORM.

50/50 guess for me whether plural of ACTUM or VACUUM would end with A or I, guessed wrong.

I am familiar with Frances BAVIER to the extent that I remember her last name sounded French, started with B and ended with IER. But could have easily entered Bouvier if it fit the boxes.

I liked the theme to the extent that was necessary to fill the grid, and helpful in solving the puzzle. Too many themes are invisible.

Tom M. said...

Yes, not easy. But theme was easy to see and helpful in the solving.

Carelessly botched the TUB-SUPE pair, and didn't check it out after thinking I was done. Went back and saw I had cUp and S[blank]P[blank].



Glenn said...

5 errors, 76 minutes. And if I'm not mistaken, the *only* five errors I made on the NYT puzzles this week. Too much guessing and too much strangeness on this one for it to be anywhere enjoyable.

Adsense Wide Skyscraper

About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

Blog Archive