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0531-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 May 17, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Jacob Stulberg
THEME: Don’t Take the Bait
Each of today’s themed answers is a fish. And, we have a hook on a fishing line (made from letters I and a J) running down the right side of the grid:
3D. Warning for easily provoked types ... or for the answers to the six starred clues? : DON'T TAKE THE BAIT

4A. *Complain : CARP
24A. *Extract with heat, in a way : SMELT
32A. *Weapon with a point : PIKE
44A. *The Mikado in "The Mikado," e.g. : BASS
53A. *Birdcage feature : PERCH
69A. *Shoe part : SOLE

9D. What might tempt the answers to the six starred clues? : IIIIIIIIIIIIIIJ
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 55s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Ice Bucket Challenge, in 2014 : FAD
The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge is a viral phenomenon in which participants are challenged to be filmed having a bucket of ice water poured over their heads. Each participant then gets to nominate up to three other people to do the same. Usually the nominees are given a day or two to comply, but can make a charitable donation is they want to avoid the icy shower. Happily, many participants opt to take the challenge, and also make a donation.

4. *Complain : CARP
The word "carp" used to mean simply "talk" back in the 13th century, with its roots in the Old Norwegian "karpa" meaning "to brag". A century later the Latin word "carpere" meaning "to slander" influenced the use of "carp" so that it came to mean "find fault with".

Carp are freshwater fish that are used as food around the world, although they aren’t very popular in North American kitchens. The ornamental fish that we know as goldfish and koi are all types of carp.

8. "The King and I" setting : SIAM
“Anna and the King of Siam” is a semi-biographical novel written by Margaret Landon and first published in 1944. The book tells the largely true story of Anna Leonowens who spent five years in Siam teaching English to the children and wives of King Mongkut. The novel was adapted as a 1946 movie of the same name starring Irene Dunne and Rex Harrison. Then followed a 1951 stage musical titled “The King and I”. The musical was written as a vehicle for Gertrude Lawrence, who played Anna. Rex Harrison was asked to play the King, but he turned it down and Yul Brynner was cast instead. A movie version of the stage musical was released in 1956, famously starring Yul Brynner and Deborah Kerr.

12. Corp. milestones : IPOS
An initial public offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually).

14. In ___ of : LIEU
As one might perhaps imagine, "in lieu" comes into English from the Old French word "lieu" meaning "place", which in turn is derived from the Latin "locum", also meaning "place". So, "in lieu" means "in place of".

17. W.W. II general Bradley : OMAR
Omar Bradley graduated from West Point in the class of 1915, along with Dwight Eisenhower who also attained the rank of General of the Army. Bradley was the last person to hold the rank of a five-star commissioned officer, and he was the first general to serve as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. I was struck by a quotation from Bradley from later in his life:
Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than about peace, more about killing than we know about living.

18. Katherine of "27 Dresses" : HEIGL
Katherine Heigl is best associated with the television show “Grey’s Anatomy” on which she plays Dr. Izzie Stevens. That’s not a show I ever watched, but I did enjoy the espionage show “State of Affairs” in which Heigl played the lead. I guess I was in the minority though, as NBC cancelled “State of Affairs” after only one season …

24. *Extract with heat, in a way : SMELT
Metals are found in ore in the form of oxides. In order to get pure metal from the ore, the ore is heated and the metal oxides within are reduced (i.e. the oxygen is removed) in the chemical process known as smelting. The oxygen is extracted by adding a source of carbon or carbon monoxide which uses up the excess oxygen atoms to make carbon dioxide, a waste product of smelting (and, a greenhouse gas).

Smelt is the name given to several types of small silvery fish, examples being Great Lake smelts and whitebait smelts.

31. Hunky-dory : A-OK
Our term “A-OK” is supposedly an abbreviation for “A(ll systems are) OK”, and arose in the sixties during the Space Program.

Surprisingly (to me), the term "hunky-dory" has been around a long time, and is documented back in the mid-1800s. Nobody's really sure of its origin, but some say it is an Anglicization of Honcho dori, that back in the day was a street of ill repute in Yokohama, Japan.

39. Swing successor : BEBOP
The jazz term "bebop" probably came from "Arriba! Arriba!", words of encouragement from Latin American bandleaders to their musicians.

44. *The Mikado in "The Mikado," e.g. : BASS
"The Mikado" is a wonderful comic opera by Gilbert and Sullivan, set in the exotic location of Japan. "Mikado" is a former term for the "Emperor of Japan". In the opera, Ko-Ko is the name of the Lord High Executioner of Titipu.

The freshwater and marine species of fish called bass resemble perch. The word “bass” comes from the Middle English “bars” meaning “perch”.

46. Savings option, for short : IRA
Individual retirement account (IRA)

47. Big name in games : HOYLE
Edmond Hoyle was a writer, most famous for documenting the rules and play of card games. In particular, Hoyle first wrote a book on the game of whist that was very popular. Such was the success of Hoyle’s treatises that we use the phrase “according to Hoyle” to mean “according to some respected authority”. When the Poker Hall of Fame was founded in 1979, Edmund Hoyle was one of the first inductees, even though the game of power was invented after he died.

53. *Birdcage feature : PERCH
Perch are carnivorous freshwater fish that are found all over the world. However, perch are particularly common in the Great Lakes and in Lake Erie in particular.

58. Fancy cracker topping : CAVIAR
Caviar is the roe of a large fish that has been salted and seasoned, and especially the roe of a sturgeon. Beluga caviar comes from the beluga sturgeon, found primarily in the Caspian Sea. It is the most expensive type of caviar in the world. 8 ounces of US-farmed beluga caviar can be purchased through Amazon.com for just over $850, in case you’re feeling peckish …

64. Yeats's land : EIRE
Irish poet and dramatist William Butler Yeats won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1923 for “inspired poetry” that gave “expression to a whole nation”. Yeats was Ireland’s first Nobel laureate.

65. Many rural Pennsylvanians : AMISH
The Amish are a group of Christian churches, a subgroup of the Mennonite churches. The Amish church originated in Switzerland and Alsace in 1693 when it was founded by Jakob Ammann. It was Ammann who gave the name to the Amish people. Many Amish people came to Pennsylvania in the 18th century.

66. Site of a famous eviction : EDEN
In the Christian tradition, the “fall of man” took place in the Garden of Eden when Adam and Eve succumbed to the temptation of eating from the tree of knowledge of good and evil. This went against the bidding of God, and was at the urging of the serpent. As a result, Adam and Eve were banished from Eden to prevent them becoming immortal by eating from the tree of life. The first humans had transitioned from a state of innocent obedience to a state of guilty disobedience.

69. *Shoe part : SOLE
The group of flatfish known as soles take their name from “solea”, the Latin word for “sandal”. And, they kind of have that shape.

Down
1. Solid orange ball : FIVE
That would the game of pool.

5. Fire starter? : AIM
Aim … fire!

7. Like baby food, often : PUREED
A “purée” is a food that has been made smooth by straining or blending. “Purée” is a French term, which I believe is now used to mean “pea soup” (more completely written as “purée de pois”). The French verb “purer” means “to strain, clean”, from the Latin “purare” meaning “to purify, clean”.

8. Poet Silverstein : SHEL
Author Shel Silverstein had a varied career and did a lot more than write books. Silverstein was a poet, composer, cartoonist and screenwriter among other things. One of his successful children’s books is “The Giving Tree”, which was first published in 1964. “The Giving Tree” tells of a young boy who has a special relationship with a tree in a forest. The message of the book seems to be that the tree provides the little boy with everything he needs.

27. Spa wear : ROBE
The word “spa” migrated into English from Belgium, as Spa is the name of a municipality in the east of the country that is famous for its healing hot springs. The name “Spa” comes from the Walloon word “espa” meaning “spring, fountain”.

28. Cast aspersions on, in a way : LIBELED
The word "libel", meaning a published or written statement likely to harm a person's reputation, comes into English from the Latin "libellus", the word for a small book. Back in the 1500s "libel" was just a formal written statement, with the more damaging meaning arising in the 1600s.

35. ___ Blaster (toy gun) : NERF
Nerf is soft material used in a whole series of toys designed for “safe” play indoors. The Nerf product is used to make darts, balls and ammunition for toy guns. “NERF” is an acronym, standing for Non-Expanding Recreational Foam.

38. Name on Chinese restaurant menus : TSO
General Tso’s chicken is an American creation, often found on the menu of a Chinese restaurant. The name General Tso may be a reference to General Zuo Zongtang of the Qing Dynasty, but there is no clear link.

45. Mex. miss : SRTA
“Señorita” (Srta.) is Spanish and “Mademoiselle” (Mlle.) is French for “Miss”.

52. Italian city known for its prosciutto and cheese : PARMA
Parma is a city in northern Italy, famous for its ham (prosciutto) and cheese (parmesan).

54. Words to live by : CREDO
A creed or credo is a confession of faith, or a system of belief or principles. “Credo” is Latin for “I believe”.

59. Singer Guthrie : ARLO
Arlo Guthrie is the son of Woody Guthrie. Both father and son are renowned for their singing of protest songs about social injustice. Arlo is most famous for his epic “Alice’s Restaurant Massacree”, a song that lasts a full 18m 34s. In the song Guthrie tells how, after being drafted, he was rejected for service in the Vietnam War based on his criminal record. He had only one incident on his public record, a Thanksgiving Day arrest for littering and being a public nuisance when he was 18-years-old.

63. Former senator and R.N.C. head Martinez : MEL
Mel Martínez served as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development in the cabinet of President George W. Bush. Martínez resigned from that position in 2003 to mount what proved to be a successful campaign to become US Senator for Florida. When he took his seat in 2005, Martínez became the first Cuban-American to serve in the US Senate.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Ice Bucket Challenge, in 2014 : FAD
4. *Complain : CARP
8. "The King and I" setting : SIAM
12. Corp. milestones : IPOS
14. In ___ of : LIEU
15. What used to be yours? : THINE
16. Jacket feature : VENT
17. W.W. II general Bradley : OMAR
18. Katherine of "27 Dresses" : HEIGL
19. Take by force : EXTORT
21. One following statutes to the letter : LEGALIST
23. Hoof, essentially : TOE
24. *Extract with heat, in a way : SMELT
25. "___ All Over Now" (Rolling Stones hit) : IT’S
26. Refrain from singing? : TRA-LA-LA
29. Things hurled at the Olympics : DISCI
31. Hunky-dory : A-OK
32. *Weapon with a point : PIKE
34. Farmyard noise : MOOING
37. "A likely story!" : I BET!
39. Swing successor : BEBOP
41. Level : TIER
42. Doesn't disturb : LETS BE
44. *The Mikado in "The Mikado," e.g. : BASS
46. Savings option, for short : IRA
47. Big name in games : HOYLE
49. Scare the bejeezus out of : TERRIFY
51. Mimic : APE
53. *Birdcage feature : PERCH
55. You, to Yvette : TOI
56. Neighbor of Quebec : LABRADOR
58. Fancy cracker topping : CAVIAR
61. Hazel eyes, e.g. : TRAIT
62. You might prepare one for potential investors : DEMO
64. Yeats's land : EIRE
65. Many rural Pennsylvanians : AMISH
66. Site of a famous eviction : EDEN
67. Pickle flavorer : DILL
68. "Per hour" or "per mile" figure : RATE
69. *Shoe part : SOLE
70. Rapture : JOY

Down
1. Solid orange ball : FIVE
2. Top : APEX
3. Warning for easily provoked types ... or for the answers to the six starred clues? : DON'T TAKE THE BAIT
4. Cardiologist's concern : CLOT
5. Fire starter? : AIM
6. Area : REALM
7. Like baby food, often : PUREED
8. Poet Silverstein : SHEL
9. What might tempt the answers to the six starred clues? : IIIIIIIIIIIIIIJ
10. Unsettling feeling : ANGST
11. Softens : MELTS
13. Bar sight : STOOL
15. "Oh really?" : THAT SO?
20. Take in : REAP
22. Short notice? : GLIMPSE
24. "For heaven's ___!" : SAKE
26. Word before (or synonymous with) end : TAIL
27. Spa wear : ROBE
28. Cast aspersions on, in a way : LIBELED
30. Barracks sight : COT
33. Go down : EBB
35. ___ Blaster (toy gun) : NERF
36. Ash, e.g. : GRAY
38. Name on Chinese restaurant menus : TSO
40. It might be bleeped : OATH
43. Indirect route : BYPATH
45. Mex. miss : SRTA
48. Wears : ERODES
50. Wandered aimlessly : ROVED
51. Where vows may be taken : ALTAR
52. Italian city known for its prosciutto and cheese : PARMA
54. Words to live by : CREDO
57. "All ___" : RISE
58. Part of a rocket : CONE
59. Singer Guthrie : ARLO
60. Bank (on) : RELY
63. Former senator and R.N.C. head Martinez : MEL


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0530-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 May 17, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Neville Fogarty
THEME: Grey Matter
Each of today’s themed answers includes a hidden given name that’s defined by the circled letters in the grid. That given name belongs to a famous GREY:
63A. Brains ... or this puzzle's four shaded names? : GREY MATTER

17A. Horse breed known for dressage [western writer] : LIPIZZANER (giving “Zane Grey”)
27A. Upset stomach remedy [Brontë governess] : MILK OF MAGNESIA (giving “Agnes Grey”)
39A. Like a silhouette [19th-century U.K. prime minister] : REAR-LIT (giving “Earl Grey”)
46A. Really made the point [TV surgeon played by Ellen Pompeo] : HAMMERED IT HOME (giving “Meredith Grey”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 04s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Peruvian of long ago : INCA
The Inca people emerged as a tribe around the 12th century, in what today is southern Peru. The Incas developed a vast empire over the next 300 years, extending along most of the western side of South America. The Empire fell to the Spanish, finally dissolving in 1572 with the execution of Tupac Amaru, the last Incan Emperor.

5. The end : FINIS
“Finis” is “the end, the finish” imported into English via French, as "finis" the French word for ... "finished". Ultimately the term derives from the Latin verb "finire" meaning "to finish, limit" (also giving us "finite").

10. Simoleon : BUCK
“Buck” is a slang term for “dollar”. The term has been around at least since 1856, and is thought to derive from the tradition of using buckskin as a unit of trade with Native Americans during the frontier days.

15. "Don't Cry for Me Argentina" musical : EVITA
“Evita” was the followup musical to "Jesus Christ Superstar" for Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice. Both of these works were originally released as album musicals, and very successful ones at that (I remember buying them when they first came out).

16. Where Nepal is : ASIA
Nepal lies to the northeast of India. Today, the state is known as the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal. In 2008, the Communist Party of Nepal won the country's general election. Soon after, the Assembly voted to change the form of government, moving away from a monarchy and creating a secular republic.

17. Horse breed known for dressage [western writer] : LIPIZZANER (giving “Zane Grey”)
The Lipizzan (also “Lipizanner”) is a breed of horse that was developed for nobles in the Habsburg Empire in the 16th century. The breed is named for an old stud farm located near the village of Lipica (“Lipizza” in Italian) in the Karst region of Slovenia. Today, the Lipizzan is very much associated with the Spanish Riding School of Vienna and its world-famous dressage team.

Zane Grey certainly did hit on the right niche. He wrote romanticized western novels and stories that really lent themselves to the big screen in the days when westerns were very popular movies. Incredibly, 110 films were made based on his work.

19. Rogen of "Neighbors" : SETH
Seth Rogen is a Canadian comedian who got a lot of credit for his supporting role in "The 40-Year-Old Virgin". That led to him being cast as the lead in the 1970 film "Knocked Up". More recently, Rogen co-directed and and co-starred in the movie “The Interview”, which created a huge ruckus in North Korea.

“Neighbors” is a 2014 comedy film starring Seth Rogen and Rose Byrne as a young couple with a newborn child. Zac Efron and Dave Franco play the leaders of a fraternity that moves into the house next door. I am told that hilarity ensues …

21. "Finding Dory" fish : NEMO
Pixar’s 2016 animated feature “Finding Dory” is a sequel to the megahit film “Finding Nemo”. “Finding Dory” seems to have built on the success of its predecessor and had the highest-grossing opening weekend ever in North America for an animated movie.

22. Genesis garden : EDEN
According to the Book of Genesis, Adam and Eve lived in a garden "in" Eden, with Eden being geographically located by reference to four rivers including the Tigris and the Euphrates. Some scholars hypothesize that Eden was located in Mesopotamia, which encompasses much of modern-day Iraq.

23. Raggedy ___ : ANN
Raggedy Ann is a rag doll, created by Johnny Gruelle in 1915 for his daughter, Marcella. He decided to name the doll by combining the titles of two poems by James Whitcomb Riley, “The Raggedy Man” and “Little Orphan Annie”. Gruelle introduced Raggedy Ann in a series of books three years later. Sadly, Marcella died at 13 years of age with her father blaming a smallpox vaccination she was given at school. Gruelle became very active in the movement against mass vaccination, for which Raggedy Ann became a symbol.

27. Upset stomach remedy [Brontë governess] : MILK OF MAGNESIA (giving “Agnes Grey”)
Magnesia is an alternative name for magnesium oxide. Magnesia is used in many cement formulations, and is also used as an antacid. “Milk of magnesia” is a suspension of magnesium hydroxide that was introduced in 1872 by English pharmacist Charles Henry Phillips under the brandname Phillip’s Milk of Magnesia.

Anne was the youngest of the three sisters in the literary Brontë family. Her older sisters wrote novels that are more recognized, but Anne’s two novels do have a following. “Agnes Grey” is based on her own experiences working as a governess. Her other novel, “The Tenant of Wildfell Hall” is written as a long letter from a young man describing the events leading up to his first meeting with his wife-to-be. Anne Brontë’s writing career was cut short in 1849, when she died of pulmonary tuberculosis, at only 29 years of age.

35. Catholic service : MASS
The principal act of worship in the Roman Catholic tradition is the Mass. The term “Mass” comes from the Late Latin word “missa” meaning “dismissal”. This word is used at the end of the Latin Mass in “Ite, missa est” which translates literally as “Go, it is the dismissal”.

38. Modern bookmark : URL
Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

39. Like a silhouette [19th-century U.K. prime minister] : REAR-LIT (giving “Earl Grey”)
A silhouette is an outline, usually of a person’s profile, which has been filled in with a solid color. One theory is that the term comes from the name of the French Minister of Finance in 1759, Étienne de Silhouette. Said minister made major cutbacks in spending to finance the Seven Years War, cutbacks that were not popular with the citizenry. His name came to be used for a cheap way of making someone’s likeness, a “silhouette”.

Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey was British Prime Minister from 1830 to 1834. Beyond his political achievements, Grey lent his name to the Earl Grey blend of tea.

41. Chrysler truck : RAM
Chrysler put ram hood ornaments on all of its Dodge branded vehicles starting in 1933. When the first line of Dodge trucks and vans were introduced in 1981, they were named “Rams” in honor of that hood ornament.

46. Really made the point [TV surgeon played by Ellen Pompeo] : HAMMERED IT HOME (giving “Meredith Grey”)
"Gray's Anatomy" is a very successful human anatomy textbook that was first published back in 1858 and is still in print today. The original text was written by English anatomist Henry Gray, who gave his name to the work. The TV medical drama “Grey's Anatomy” (note “Grey” vs. Gray”) is centered on the character Dr. Meredith Grey, but the show’s title is a nod to the title of the famous textbook.

62. Its logo consists of four interlocking circles : AUDI
The predecessor to today’s Audi company was called Auto Union. Auto Union was formed with the merger of four individual entities: Audi, Horch, DKW and Wanderer. The Audi logo comprises four intersecting rings, each representing one of the four companies that merged.

63. Brains ... or this puzzle's four shaded names? : GREY MATTER
Grey matter and white matter are the two component of the central nervous system. Grey matter is mainly made up of neurons, and white matter is largely made of axons, the projections of the neurons that form nerve fibers.

66. "Storage Wars" network : A AND E
The A&E television network used to be a favorite of mine, with the “A&E” standing for “arts and entertainment”. A&E started out airing a lot of the old classic dramas, as well as biographies and arts programs. Now there seems to be more reality TV, with one of the flagship programs being “Dog the Bounty Hunter”. A slight change of direction I’d say …

“Storage Wars” is a reality TV show about buyers looking for great deals when storage lockers are opened due to non-payment of rent.

70. ___ 360 (game console) : XBOX
The XBox line of video game consoles is made by Microsoft. The original XBox platform was followed by XBox 360 and most recently by XBox One. Microsoft’s XBox competes directly with Sony’s PlayStation and Nintendo’s Wii.

Down
2. Justice Gorsuch : NEIL
Neil Gorsuch was nominated to the Supreme court by the Trump administration, and assumed office in 2017. Gorsuch took the seat on the court that was left vacant with the passing of Justice Antonin Scalia in 2016.

3. Guitarist's key-changing aid : CAPO
A capo is a clamp-like device that is placed around the neck of a guitar to shorten the strings, and hence raise the pitch. The full name, rarely used these days, is "capo tasto", which is Italian for "head tie".

5. Tasseled Turkish topper : FEZ
A fez is a red cylindrical hat worn mainly in North Africa, and by Shriners here in the US. The fez used to be a very popular hat across the Ottoman Empire. The etymology of "fez" is unclear, although it might have something to do with the Moroccan city named Fez.

6. Boxer Drago of "Rocky IV" : IVAN
Dolph Lundgren is an actor and martial artist from Sweden. Lundgren’s debut role was a small one, acting as a KGB henchman in the James Bond movie “A View to a Kill”. His big break was starring opposite Sylvester Stallone in “Rocky IV”, playing a scary Russian boxer named Ivan Drago.

7. Highest figure in sudoku : NINE
Number puzzles similar to our modern-day Sudoku first appeared in French newspapers in the late 1800s. The format that we use today was created by Howard Garns, a 74-year-old freelance puzzle constructor from Connersville, Indiana and first published in 1979. The format was introduced in Japan in 1984 and given the title of “Sūji wa dokushin ni kagiru”, which translates to “the digits are limited to one occurrence”. The rather elaborate Japanese title was eventually shortened to Sudoku. No doubt many of you are fans of Sudoku puzzles. I know I am …

9. Island wrap : SARONG
Sarong is the Malay word for "sheath", and a sarong was originally the garment worn by Malay men and women around their waists. The Malay sarong is actually a tube of fabric, about a yard wide and two-and-a-half yards "long". Many variations of the sarong are worn all over South Asia and the Pacific Islands. I had occasion to wear one in Hawaii many years ago, and found it very ... freeing!

10. The decimal system : BASE TEN
We use a base-ten numbering system, with ten digits (0 – 9).

13. Madeline of "Blazing Saddles" : KAHN
Madeline Kahn was an American actress best known for her comedic roles, especially those directed by Mel Brooks. Kahn also had her own TV sitcom, called “Oh Madeline”. But, it only lasted the one season, in 1983.

18. Prize you don't want on "Let's Make a Deal" : ZONK
The game show “Let’s Make a Deal” first aired way back in 1963. For many years the show was hosted by Monty Hall, from 1963 until 1986, and again briefly in 1991. In more recent years, Wayne Brady took over as host in 2009.

27. An ex of Donald Trump : MARLA
Marla Maples was the second wife of Donald Trump. Maples and Trump dated secretly for a couple of years while Trump was still married to his first wife Ivana. When Ivana discovered the affair, she filed for divorce, and eventually Donald and Marla married. It was Trump’s turn to file for divorce several years later after the National Enquirer outed Marla for having an affair with a Florida bodyguard.

28. Religion with the Five Pillars : ISLAM
Followers of the Muslim tradition believe in the Five Pillars of Islam, five obligatory acts that underpin Muslim life. The Five Pillars are:
  1. The Islamic creed
  2. Daily prayer
  3. Almsgiving
  4. Fasting during the month of Ramadan
  5. The pilgrimage to Mecca (haj) once during a lifetime

29. Olympic symbol : FLAME
A flame is used as the symbol for the Olympic Games in commemoration of the theft of fire for humanity by Prometheus from Zeus in Greek mythology. The symbolic flame was introduced to the Modern Olympics in the 1928 Summer Games in Amsterdam. The tradition of the Olympic torch relay started out as political theater devised and funded by Nazi Germany for the 1936 Summer Games in Berlin.

31. Dwight's opponent in 1952 and '56 : ADLAI
Adlai Stevenson (AES) ran for president unsuccessfully against Dwight D. Eisenhower (DDE) in 1952 and in 1956. Some years after his second defeat, Stevenson served under President Kennedy (JFK) as Ambassador to the United Nations. Stevenson was always noted for his eloquence and he had a famous exchange in a UN Security Council meeting during the Cuban missile crisis. Stevenson bluntly demanded that the Soviet representative on the council tell the world if the USSR was installing nuclear weapons in Cuba. His words were “Don’t wait for the translation, answer ‘yes’ or ‘no’!” followed by “I am prepared to wait for my answer until Hell freezes over!”

35. "Let's go!" to sled dogs : MUSH!
“Mushing” is the use of one or more dogs to pull a sled. “Mush” is thought to come from the French “marche” meaning “go, run”.

39. Clarinet piece : REED
The clarinet is a lovely-sounding instrument, isn’t it? The name comes from the Italian word “clarino” meaning “trumpet” with the “-et” suffix indicating “small”.

40. Sondheim's "___ the Woods" : INTO
“Into the Woods” is Stephen Sondheim musical that premiered in 1986. The storyline uses characters from several fairy tales, including “Little Red Riding Hood”, “Jack and the Beanstalk”, “Rapunzel” and “Cinderella”. The borrowed characters are held together with an underlying original tale about a baker and his wife who long to have a child, but cannot due to a curse placed on them by a witch.

43. Sprint competitor : T-MOBILE
T-Mobile is a German telecommunications company, a subsidiary of Deutsche Telekom. Deutsche Telekom has used the “T” prefix for a number of its services, including T-Com, T-Online and T-Home.

The company that we know today as Sprint has a history that is linked with the Southern Pacific railroad company. Southern Pacific developed a microwave communication system for its internal use across its network using rights-of-way associated with the company’s extensive railway lines. In the early seventies, the company laid huge lengths of fiber optic cable in those rights-of-way, alongside the tracks, primarily for internal use. The railroad sold excess fiber capacity to private companies, allowing those companies to operate long distance telephone service outside of AT&T, which at that time had a long-distance monopoly. Southern Pacific took advantage of changing FCC regulations and started offering voice service directly to consumers. That service was offered under the name SPRINT, an acronym that stood for Southern Pacific Railroad Internal Networking Telephony. Very interesting …

45. Waterproof fabric : GORE-TEX
Gore-Tex is a waterproof fabric that also “breathes”. This is because the pores in Gore-Tex are small enough to keep out water droplets, but large enough to allow water vapor molecules to pass through.

47. Ska relative : REGGAE
Reggae is a genre of music that developed in the late sixties, evolving out of the genres of ska and rocksteady.

48. Dance at a 52-Down : HULA
(52D. Event with 48-Down dancing : LUAU)
The hula is a native dance of Hawaii that uses arm movements to relate a story. The hula can be performed while sitting (a noho dance) or while standing (a luna dance).

51. Shakespeare, for one : BARD
The original bards were storytellers, poets and composers of music in medieval Britain and Ireland, with the term coming from the Old Celtic word “bardos” that described a poet or singer. I guess the most famous bard was William Shakespeare, the Bard of Avon.

53. Pre-service announcement? : AD IN
In tennis, if the score reaches “deuce” (i.e. when both players have scored three points), then the first player to win two points in a row wins the game. The player who wins the point immediately after deuce is said to have the “advantage”. If the player with the advantage wins the next point then that’s two in a row and that player wins the game. If the person with the advantage loses the next point, then advantage is lost and the players return to deuce and try again. If the one of the players is calling out the score then if he/she has the advantage then that player announces “ad in” or more formally “advantage in”. If the score announcer’s opponent has the advantage, then the announcement is “ad out” or “advantage out”. Follow all of that …?

57. One side of a Stevenson character : HYDE
Robert Louis Stevenson’s novella “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” was first published in 1886. There are many tales surrounding the writing of the story including one that the author wrote the basic tale in just three to six days, and spent a few weeks simply refining it. Allegedly, Stevenson’s use of cocaine stimulated his creative juices during those few days of writing.

59. Open ___ (start at the bar, maybe) : A TAB
When we “run a tab” at a bar say, we are “running a tabulation”, a listing of what we owe. Such a use of “tab” is American slang that originated in the 1880s.

60. Mexican moolah : PESO
The coin called a “peso” is used in many Spanish-speaking countries around the world. The coin originated in Spain where the word “peso” means “weight”. The original peso was what we know in English as a “piece of eight”, a silver coin of a specific weight that had a nominal value of eight “reales”.

61. Fearsome dino : T REX
The Tyrannosaurus rex (usually written “T. rex”) was a spectacular looking dinosaur. “Tyrannosaurus” comes from the Greek words “tyrannos” (tyrant) and “sauros” (lizard) and “rex” the Latin for “king”. They were big beasts, measuring 42 feet long and 13 feet tall at the hips, and weighing 7.5 tons.

64. Debussy's sea : MER
“La Mer” is a lovely group of three symphonic sketches for orchestra by the French composer Claude Debussy. Listen to it, and you can feel yourself at the ocean. “La Mer” is French for “The Sea”.

Claude Debussy is one of my favorite composers, one who epitomises the Romantic Era and Impressionist Movement in music. One of my favorite CDs is a collection of some "lighter" Debussy pieces called "Debussy for Daydreaming", and what an evocative collection it is. Included are "Syrinx", "Maid with the Flaxen Hair", "Rêverie" and everyone's favorite, "Clair de Lune".

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Peruvian of long ago : INCA
5. The end : FINIS
10. Simoleon : BUCK
14. Bend to one side : LEAN
15. "Don't Cry for Me Argentina" musical : EVITA
16. Where Nepal is : ASIA
17. Horse breed known for dressage [western writer] : LIPIZZANER (giving “Zane Grey”)
19. Rogen of "Neighbors" : SETH
20. It helps you see plays in replays : SLO-MO
21. "Finding Dory" fish : NEMO
22. Genesis garden : EDEN
23. Raggedy ___ : ANN
25. Bolt go-with : NUT
27. Upset stomach remedy [Brontë governess] : MILK OF MAGNESIA (giving “Agnes Grey”)
35. Catholic service : MASS
36. Dropped a bit : SLID
37. Sluggish : INERT
38. Modern bookmark : URL
39. Like a silhouette [19th-century U.K. prime minister] : REAR-LIT (giving “Earl Grey”)
41. Chrysler truck : RAM
42. Surface for chalk writing : SLATE
44. Intend : MEAN
45. Fortitude : GUTS
46. Really made the point [TV surgeon played by Ellen Pompeo] : HAMMERED IT HOME (giving “Meredith Grey”)
49. Praising poem : ODE
50. Pronoun for two or more : OUR
51. Tell all : BLAB
54. "My goodness!" : GOSH!
58. Sprang : LEAPT
62. Its logo consists of four interlocking circles : AUDI
63. Brains ... or this puzzle's four shaded names? : GREY MATTER
65. Public transit option : RAIL
66. "Storage Wars" network : A AND E
67. Abate : EASE
68. Beach hill : DUNE
69. One starting a story "Back in my day ...," say : ELDER
70. ___ 360 (game console) : XBOX

Down
1. Pains : ILLS
2. Justice Gorsuch : NEIL
3. Guitarist's key-changing aid : CAPO
4. Zoo collection : ANIMALS
5. Tasseled Turkish topper : FEZ
6. Boxer Drago of "Rocky IV" : IVAN
7. Highest figure in sudoku : NINE
8. List component : ITEM
9. Island wrap : SARONG
10. The decimal system : BASE TEN
11. Took advantage of : USED
12. Reference : CITE
13. Madeline of "Blazing Saddles" : KAHN
18. Prize you don't want on "Let's Make a Deal" : ZONK
24. Wine quality : NOSE
26. Collection of textbook chapters : UNIT
27. An ex of Donald Trump : MARLA
28. Religion with the Five Pillars : ISLAM
29. Olympic symbol : FLAME
30. Bogged down : MIRED
31. Dwight's opponent in 1952 and '56 : ADLAI
32. Liquid hospital supply : SERUM
33. Furious : IRATE
34. 20 dispensers : ATMS
35. "Let's go!" to sled dogs : MUSH!
39. Clarinet piece : REED
40. Sondheim's "___ the Woods" : INTO
43. Sprint competitor : T-MOBILE
45. Waterproof fabric : GORE-TEX
47. Ska relative : REGGAE
48. Dance at a 52-Down : HULA
51. Shakespeare, for one : BARD
52. Event with 48-Down dancing : LUAU
53. Pre-service announcement? : AD IN
55. ___ exam : ORAL
56. Text message button : SEND
57. One side of a Stevenson character : HYDE
59. Open ___ (start at the bar, maybe) : A TAB
60. Mexican moolah : PESO
61. Fearsome dino : T REX
64. Debussy's sea : MER


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0529-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 May 17, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Jeff Chen & Seth Geltman
THEME: Prime Time
Each of today’s themed answers ends with a period of TIME. And, those periods of teme get shorter and shorter as we move down through the grid:
63A. When TV viewership peaks ... or a hint to 17-, 24-, 36- and 53-Across : PRIME TIME

17A. Epoch of rare distinction : GOLDEN AGE
24A. Topic of a happy annual report : BANNER YEAR
36A. Something circled on a calendar : RED-LETTER DAY
53A. Period of supreme courage and achievement : FINEST HOUR
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 41s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. TV network whose logo is an eye : CBS
CBS used to be known as the Columbia Broadcasting System. It is the second-largest broadcaster in the world, second only to the BBC in the UK. CBS introduced its “eye” logo in 1951. That logo is based on a Pennsylvania Dutch hex sign.

4. Singer Mitchell who wrote "Woodstock" (but didn't attend) : JONI
“Woodstock” is a song that was written and recorded by Joni Mitchell about the the 1969 Woodstock Festival. Joni Mitchell opted not to attend the festival, and instead wrote the song in a New York City hotel room while watching coverage of the event on television. Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young recorded a cover version of “Woodstock” in 1970 that has proved to be even more successful that Mitchell’s original.

14. The "A" of I.P.A. : ALE
India Pale Ale (IPA) is a style of beer that originated in England. The beer was originally intended for transportation from England to India, hence the name.

15. Former Israeli P.M. Ehud : BARAK
Ehud Barak served as Prime Minister of Israel from 1999 to 2001, taking over from Benjamin Netanyahu. Barak left office after he called a special election for Prime Minister and lost the vote to Ariel Sharon. Barak resigned from the Knesset and took an advisory job with the US company Electronic Data Systems (EDS), and did some security-related work with a private equity company. In 2007, Barak took over leadership of Israel's Labor Party.

16. ___ Tunes (Warner Bros. cartoons) : LOONEY
“Looney Tunes” and “Merrie Melodies” are two series of animated short films produced by Warner Bros. from 1930 until 1969. The list of famous “Looney Tunes” characters includes Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Elmer Fudd, Tweety Bird, and my favorites Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner.

19. Tool for the Grim Reaper : SCYTHE
The Grim Reaper is one of the personifications of death, along with the Hooded One and the Angel of Death. Death has been depicted since the 1400s as a skeleton in a hooded, black cloak and carrying a scythe. The name “Grim Reaper” only dates back to the mid-1800s.

20. Opposites of true believers : INFIDELS
“Infidel” is an English word that was created by the Roman Catholic Church to describe someone who did not believe in the Catholic dogma. The word comes from Latin "infidelis" meaning "unfaithful". During the time of the Crusades, the word "infidel" was used for any non-Christian, and particular the Saracens of North Africa.

23. Archie's wife on "All in the Family" : EDITH
"All in the Family" is an American sitcom, a remake of the incredibly successful BBC show called "Till Death Us Do Part". Both the UK and US versions of the sitcom were groundbreaking in that the storyline brought into focus topics previously considered unsuitable for a television comedy, including racism, homosexuality, women's liberation, menopause and impotence. "All in the Family" is one of only three TV shows that has topped the Nielsen ratings for five consecutive seasons (the other two are "The Cosby Show" and "American Idol"). Stars of the show are:
  • Carroll O’Connor as Archie Bunker
  • Jean Stapleton as Edith Bunker
  • Sally Struthers as Gloria Stivic née Bunker
  • Rob Reiner as Michael Stivic

27. ___ Pieces : REESE’S
Reese's Peanut Butter Cups were invented by Harry Burnett "H.B." Reese. Peanut Butter Cups were originally called penny cups, reflecting the price at which they were sold. Then inflation took over, and maybe that’s why they were broken into smaller “Pieces” …

29. Celestial Seasonings product : TEA
Celestial Seasonings is a company that supplies teas. especially herbal teas and infusions. The company was founded in 1969 in Boulder, Colorado, where it is still based today.

31. Jul. follower : AUG
Gaius Octavius Thurinus (often called Octavian) was the adopted son of Gaius Julius Caesar. After Julius Caesar was assassinated, Octavian came to power in Rome and teamed up with Mark Antony and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus in what was called the Second Triumvirate. When the triumvirate fell apart, especially after Antony’s defeat at Actium, Octavian became more powerful within the Roman Republic. Several years later he wrested sufficient power from the Roman Senate to end the Republic and begin the Roman Empire. As the first Emperor of Rome, Octavian was given the name Caesar Augustus. The month of August, originally called “Sextilis” in Latin, was renamed in honor of Augustus.

33. Dow Jones stat. : AVG
Dow Jones & Company was founded as a publishing house in 1882 by three newspaper reporters, Charles Dow, Edward Jones and Charles Bergstresser. Today, the company’s most famous publication has to be “The Wall Street Journal”. In 1884, Charles Dow started reporting the average dollar value of the stock of eleven companies, an index which spawned a whole host of metrics that carry the Dow Jones name to this day, including the renowned Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA), also known as the “Dow 30”.

36. Something circled on a calendar : RED-LETTER DAY
A red-letter day is a day that is special for some reason. The term comes from the illuminated manuscripts of Medieval times. In such documents, initial letters were often written in red ink, so-called “red letters”.

40. Second-largest Hawaiian island : MAUI
Maui is the second largest of the Hawaiian islands. Maui is sometimes called the “Valley Isle” as it is composed of two volcanoes to the northwest and southeast of the island, each with numerous beautiful valleys carved into them.

42. Aperitif with black currant liqueur : KIR
Kir is a French cocktail made by adding a teaspoon or so of creme de cassis (blackcurrant liqueur) to a glass, and then topping it off with white wine. The drink is named after Felix Kir, the Mayor of Dijon in Burgundy, who used to offer the drink to his guests. My wife is particularly fond of a variant called a Kir Royale, in which the white wine is replaced with champagne.

43. ___ Paulo, Brazil : SAO
São Paulo is the largest city in Brazil. São Paulo is also the city with the highest number of helicopters in the world. This is partly driven by the horrendous traffic jams in São Paulo, but also by the wealthy having a very real fear of being kidnapped on the city’s streets.

44. Darkest part of a shadow : UMBRA
A shadow usually has three distinct parts called the umbra, penumbra and antumbra, with the terms most often used with reference to the shadows cast by celestial bodies. The terms can also be used to describe the levels of darkness in sunspots. The umbra (Latin for “shadow”) is the innermost, darkest part of a shadow. The penumbra (“almost shadow”, from Latin) is a lighter part of a shadow, where part of the light source “leaks” around the body casting the shadow. The antumbra phenomenon is experienced when the object casting the shadow is sufficiently far away from the viewer so that it appears smaller than the light source, with an annular ring around it. When the eye is in the shadow cast by an object that has light passing around it, the eye is in the antumbra.

48. Concepts not meant to be questioned : DOGMAS
A dogma is a set of beliefs, with the plural being “dogmata” (or “dogmas”, if you’re not a pedant like me!)

53. Period of supreme courage and achievement : FINEST HOUR
Soon after Winston Churchill took over as Prime Minister of the UK in 1940, he delivered some stirring speeches that rallied the country in the face of German victories right across Europe. The first of these was his “Blood, toil, tears, and sweat” speech as he reported the formation of a new coalition government designed to unite the country in time of war. The second was his “We shall fight on the beaches” speech, as he reported the successful evacuation of Allied troops from Dunkirk. The third speech concluded with, “This was their finest hour”, words delivered to Parliament just as France fell, and Churchill pledged that the British Commonwealth would fight on, alone if necessary. The last lines of this third speech, from this magnificent orator, were:
… But if we fail, then the whole world, including the United States, including all that we have known and cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new dark age made more sinister, and perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science. Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves, that if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, ‘This was their finest hour’.

56. One-named rap star : DRAKE
Drake is the stage name of rapper Aubrey Graham from Toronto.

58. Fact-gathering org. : CIA
“The World Factbook” is a publication produced by the CIA. It is intended primarily for use by government employees but, as it is in the public domain, it is now used by just about anyone. The first edition of “Factbook” came out in 1962 and, as it was classified, it had limited distribution. It was decided to make “Factbook” public in 1975, and it has been freely available on the World Wide Web since 1994.

63. When TV viewership peaks ... or a hint to 17-, 24-, 36- and 53-Across : PRIME TIME
In the world of television, "prime time" is that part of the day when networks and advertisers bring maximize revenues due to the high number of viewers. Prime time is often defined as 7-10 p.m. Mountain and Central Time, and 8-11 p.m. Pacific and Eastern Time.

65. Houses in Havana : CASAS
Havana is the capital city of Cuba. The city was founded by the Spanish in the early 1500s after which it became a strategic location for Spain’s exploration and conquest of the Americas. In particular, Havana was used as a stopping-off point for treasure-laden ships on the return journey to Spain.

66. TV network whose logo is a peacock : NBC
The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) has had a number of different logos in its history, including the famous peacock with which we are familiar today. The first peacock logo was introduced in the early days of color television and was designed to illustrate how wonderful color television would be, so go buy one! (NBC was owned by RCA, and so had a vested interest in sales of color television sets).

69. "We all ___ little mad sometimes": Norman Bates : GO A
The top 5 movie villains in the American Film Institute’s list “100 Years … 100 Heroes & Villains” are:
  1. Dr. Hannibal Lecter in “The Silence of the Lambs”
  2. Norman Bates in “Psycho”
  3. Darth Vader in “The Empire Strikes Back”
  4. The Wicked Witch of the West in “The Wizard of Oz”
  5. Nurse Ratched in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”

Down
2. Marilyn Monroe, notably : BLONDE
Marilyn Monroe was born in 1926 in LA County Hospital, the child of Gladys Pearl Baker. The young girl was given the name of Norma Jeane Mortenson on her birth certificate, but her mother changed this to Norma Jeane Baker almost immediately. She and her estranged husband, Martin Edward Mortensen, had separated before Baker became pregnant so it is suggested that the Mortensen name was used just to give Norma Jeane "legitimacy". Norma Jeane married a Jim Dougherty when she 16 years old, and took his name to become Norma Jeane Dougherty in 1932. During WWII she was discovered by a photographer and became quite a successful model. The modelling earned her a screen test, at which time it was suggested that Norma Jean change her name yet again. The first name chosen for her by studio executives was Carole Lind (after Carole Lombard and Jenny Lind), but then Norma Jeane chose "Jeane Monroe" for herself, using her mother's maiden name. It didn't take long before the studio intervened again, suggesting that they had too many "Jeans" already. The name Marilyn Monroe was floated as it had a nice ring to it. Along with the new name, Marilyn changed from a brunette to a blonde, and a star was born …

3. Something you reach out and take? : SELFIE
A selfie is a self-portrait, usually one taken with a digital camera or cell phone. A group “selfie” is sometimes referred to as a “groufie” or “wefie”.

5. Toothbrush brand : ORAL-B
The Oral-B toothbrush was introduced to the world in 1950, designed by a California periodontist. The first “model” was the Oral-B 60, a name given to reflect the 60 tufts in the brush. In 1969, the Oral-B was the first toothbrush to get to the moon as it was the toothbrush of choice for the crew of the Apollo 11 spacecraft.

7. Eisenhower, informally : IKE
When the future president was growing up, the Eisenhowers used the nickname "Ike" for all seven boys in the family, as “Ike” was seen as an abbreviation for the family name. “Big Ike” was Edgar, the second oldest boy. “Little/Young Ike” was Dwight, who was the third son born. Dwight had no sisters.

8. Borden milk mascot : ELSIE
Elsie the Cow is the mascot of the Borden Company. Elsie first appeared at the New York World's Fair in 1939, introduced to symbolize the perfect dairy product. She is so famous and respected that she has been awarded the degrees of Doctor of Bovinity, Doctor fo Human Kindness and Doctor of Ecownomics. Elsie was also given a husband named Elmer the Bull. Elmer eventually moved over to the chemical division of Borden where he gave his name to Elmer's Glue.

10. Etch A Sketch or yo-yo : TOY
Etch A Sketch was introduced in 1960. The toy was developed in France by inventor André Cassagnes.

The first yo-yos date back to at least 500 BC. There is even an ancient Greek vase painting that shows a young man playing with a yo-yo. Centuries later Filipinos were using yo-yos as hunting tools in the 1500s. "Yo-yo" is a Tagalog (Filipino) word meaning "come-come" or simply "return".

13. Visine application : EYE DROP
Visine is a brand of eye drops made by Johnson & Johnson, advertised to “get the red out”. The red in the eye is reduced because Visine contains tetrahydrozoline hydrochloride, a vasoconstrictor. The blood vessels creating the redness constrict when Visine is applied, and you “get the red out” as the blood is “squeezed” away from the surface of the eye.

18. Counterparts of dahs in Morse code : DITS
Samuel Morse came up with the forerunner to modern Morse code for use on the electric telegraph, of which he was the co-inventor. Morse code uses a series of dots and dashes to represent letters and numbers. The most common letters are assigned the simplest code elements e.g. E is represented by one dot, and T is represented by one dash. When words are spelled aloud in Morse code, a dot is pronounced as "dit", and a dash is pronounced as "dah".

32. Performer with a fan : GEISHA
The Japanese term “geisha” best translates as “artist” or “performing artist”.

36. Kiss like an Eskimo : RUB NOSES
Although still used in the US, the term “Eskimo” tends to be avoided in Canada and Greenland as there it is considered pejorative.

37. Land of Blarney : EIRE
Blarney is a town in County Cork in the south of Ireland. Blarney is home to Blarney Castle, and inside the castle is the legendary Blarney Stone. "Kissing the Blarney Stone" is a ritual engaged in by oh so many tourists (indeed, I've done it myself!), but it's not a simple process. The stone is embedded in the wall of the castle, and in order to kiss it you have to sit on the edge of the parapet and lean way backwards so that your head is some two feet below your body. There is a staff member there to help you and make sure you don't fall. The Blarney Stone has been labelled as the world's most unhygienic tourist attraction! But once you've kissed it, supposedly you are endowed with the "gift of the gab", the ability to talk eloquently and perhaps deceptively without offending. The term “blarney” has come to mean flattering and deceptive talk.

40. Part of a car's exhaust system : MUFFLER
A muffler is a device attached to an internal combustion engine that is designed to reduce noise from the exhaust. We don’t use the term “muffler” on the other side of the Atlantic, opting instead for “silencer”.

50. Beating at chess : MATING
In the game of chess, when the king is under immediate threat of capture it is said to be "in check". If the king cannot escape from check, then the game ends in "checkmate" and the player in check loses. In the original Sanskrit game of chess, the king could actually be captured. Then a rule was introduced requiring that a warning be given if capture was imminent (today we announce "check!") so that an accidental and early ending to the game doesn't occur.

51. With hands on hips : AKIMBO
“Akimbo” is such a lovely word, I think (as in “arms akimbo”). I failed to dig up anything too exciting about the term’s etymology. It seems to stem from Middle English, “in kekbowe” or “on kenbow” meaning “bend in a curve”. When the arms are held akimbo, the hands are on the hops and the elbows are pointed outward.

54. Neap and ebb : TIDES
Tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon on the oceans. At neap tide, the smaller gravitational effect of the sun cancels out some of the moon's effect. At spring tide, the sun and the moon's gravitational forces act in concert causing more extreme movement of the oceans.

60. Big movie format : IMAX
The IMAX Corporation, which is behind the IMAX film format, is a Canadian company. The impetus for developing the system came after Expo ’67 in Montreal. Back then large format screenings were accomplished using multiple projectors with multiple screens, with images basically stitched together. The team behind the IMAX technology set out to simplify things, and developed a single-camera, single-projector system.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. TV network whose logo is an eye : CBS
4. Singer Mitchell who wrote "Woodstock" (but didn't attend) : JONI
8. Whole : ENTIRE
14. The "A" of I.P.A. : ALE
15. Former Israeli P.M. Ehud : BARAK
16. ___ Tunes (Warner Bros. cartoons) : LOONEY
17. Epoch of rare distinction : GOLDEN AGE
19. Tool for the Grim Reaper : SCYTHE
20. Opposites of true believers : INFIDELS
21. Optima and Cadenza car company : KIA
22. "If only ___ listened ..." : HE’D
23. Archie's wife on "All in the Family" : EDITH
24. Topic of a happy annual report : BANNER YEAR
27. ___ Pieces : REESE’S
29. Celestial Seasonings product : TEA
30. Greet with humility : BOW TO
31. Jul. follower : AUG
33. Dow Jones stat. : AVG
35. Shocked response : GASP!
36. Something circled on a calendar : RED-LETTER DAY
40. Second-largest Hawaiian island : MAUI
42. Aperitif with black currant liqueur : KIR
43. ___ Paulo, Brazil : SAO
44. Darkest part of a shadow : UMBRA
46. Bro, e.g. : SIB
48. Concepts not meant to be questioned : DOGMAS
53. Period of supreme courage and achievement : FINEST HOUR
56. One-named rap star : DRAKE
57. To and ___ : FRO
58. Fact-gathering org. : CIA
59. Do a perfunctory performance : MAIL IT IN
61. Substituted "math" for "mass," say : LISPED
63. When TV viewership peaks ... or a hint to 17-, 24-, 36- and 53-Across : PRIME TIME
64. Timeless, to Shakespeare : ETERNE
65. Houses in Havana : CASAS
66. TV network whose logo is a peacock : NBC
67. Puts back to 0, say : RESETS
68. X-ray ___ (gag gift) : SPEX
69. "We all ___ little mad sometimes": Norman Bates : GO A

Down
1. More evasive with the truth : CAGIER
2. Marilyn Monroe, notably : BLONDE
3. Something you reach out and take? : SELFIE
4. Author Austen : JANE
5. Toothbrush brand : ORAL-B
6. Bothers the conscience of : NAGS AT
7. Eisenhower, informally : IKE
8. Borden milk mascot : ELSIE
9. Like a diet lacking bread or pasta, for short : NO-CARB
10. Etch A Sketch or yo-yo : TOY
11. Blocking someone's path : IN THE WAY
12. Puts back in the oven : REHEATS
13. Visine application : EYE DROP
15. Tousled look of the recently woken : BEDHEAD
18. Counterparts of dahs in Morse code : DITS
21. Scoundrels : KNAVES
25. In apple-pie order : NEAT
26. Mind-body exercise : YOGA
28. Sit and mope : SULK
32. Performer with a fan : GEISHA
34. One finally done with finals? : GRAD
36. Kiss like an Eskimo : RUB NOSES
37. Land of Blarney : EIRE
38. Duo plus one : TRIO
39. Idle drawings : DOODLES
40. Part of a car's exhaust system : MUFFLER
41. "You agree with me?," informally : AM I RITE?
45. Goal for a mountaineer : ASCENT
47. Trumped-up charge : BUM RAP
49. Fortitude : GRIT
50. Beating at chess : MATING
51. With hands on hips : AKIMBO
52. ___ Falls, N.Y. : SENECA
54. Neap and ebb : TIDES
55. Uplift : RAISE
60. Big movie format : IMAX
62. ___-K (early schooling) : PRE
63. Mac alternatives : PCS


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0528-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 May 17, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Andrew Zhou
THEME: In Bad Taste
Each of today’s themed answers is an idiomatic phrase that starts with a verb often found in a RECIPE. The idioms point towards DISASTROUS situations, and so together we have A RECIPE FOR A DISASTER:
106A. What 27-, 39-, 56-, 66-, 79- and 96-Across together make up? : A RECIPE FOR DISASTER

27A. Step 1: Raise hell : STIR UP A HORNET’S NEST
39A. Step 2: Make some literary gaffes : MIX ONE’S METAPHORS
56A. Step 3: Devote energy to something hopeless : BEAT A DEAD HORSE
66A. Step 4: Be a financial wastrel : POUR MONEY DOWN THE DRAIN
79A. Step 5: Look pretty schlubby : CUT A POOR FIGURE
96A. And finally: Has divided loyalties : SERVES TWO MASTERS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 20m 00s (on the nose!)
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. "___ Davis Eyes," 1981 #1 hit : BETTE
Kim Carnes has an incredible raspy voice. Perhaps Carnes’ most famous release was “Bette Davis Eyes”, one of my favorite songs. Back in 1966, she was a member of the New Christy Minstrels, performing alongside Kenny Rogers and Karen Black.

6. Some lookout notices, for short : APBS
An All Points Bulletin (APB) is a broadcast from one US law enforcement agency to another.

10. One thrown for a loop? : LASSO
Our English word “lasso” comes from the Spanish “lazo”, and ultimately from the Latin “laqueum” meaning “noose, snare”.

15. Musical genre for "Gangnam Style" : K-POP
K-pop (Korean pop) is a genre of music from South Korea that emerged in the early nineties. It's a bit beyond me …

PSY is the stage name of South Korean rapper Park Jae-sang. PSY became an international star when his 2102 music video “Gangnam Style” went viral on YouTube. That video had over 1 billion views on YouTube in about six months, making it the most viewed YouTube video clip of all time. I am not one of that billion …

19. Sundance Film Festival local : UTAHN
The Sundance film festival is the largest independent film event in the country, and takes place every year around the Sundance Resort near Provo, Utah. The festival has its roots in the Utah/US Film Festival which started in Salt Lake City in 1978. Management of the festival was taken over by Robert Redford's Sundance Institute in 1985. The festival has became a bit of a media feeding frenzy in recent years, as a lot of A-list celebrities attend. The Festival organizers introduced a "Focus on Film" campaign in 2007 to try to offset some of the madness.

21. Venusian or Jovian : ALIEN
Maybe there are aliens living on Venus (Venusians) or Jupiter (Jovians).

24. Soprano on TV : TONY
The actor James Gandolfini is perhaps best known for playing Mafia boss Tony Soprano in the HBO show “The Sopranos”. For my money, one of Gandolfini’s best performances was in the 2013 romantic comedy “Enough Said”, opposite Julia Louis-Dreyfus. Sadly, Gandolfini passed away just before that film was released.

26. America’s Cup, e.g. : EWER
The America’s Cup is a trophy that has been awarded for yacht racing since 1851. It was first presented to the winner of a race around the Isle of Wight in England that was won by a schooner called “America”. The trophy was eventually renamed to “the America’s Cup” in honor of that first race winner.

31. Opus ___ : DEI
Opus Dei is Roman Catholic institution that was founded in Spain in 1928, and officially approved by the church in 1950. In 2010, Opus Dei had over 90,000 members, mostly lay people. The institution’s mission is to promote certain aspects of the Roman Catholic doctrine. Opus Dei was portrayed as a sinister organization by Dan Brown in his novel “The Da Vinci Code”.

33. ___ Picchu : MACHU
Machu Picchu is known as “The Lost City of the Incas”, and it can be visited on a mountain ridge in Peru, 50 miles northwest of the city of Cuzco in the southeast of the country. The name Machu Picchu means “old peak”. The Inca Trail to Machu Picchu originates about 50 miles from Cusco on the Urubamba River in Peru. It can take travelers about 5 days to trek the full length of the trail, passing through many Incan ruins before reaching the Sun Gate on Machu Picchu mountain. The trail was becoming greatly overused, forcing the Peruvian government to limit the number of people on the trail each day to 500. Book early …

47. Reciprocal in trigonometry : COSECANT
The most familiar trigonometric functions are sine, cosine and tangent (abbreviated to “sin, cos and tan”). Each of these is a ratio, a ratio of two sides of a right-angled triangle. The “reciprocal” of these three functions are secant, cosecant and cotangent. The reciprocal functions are simply the inverted ratios, the inverted sine, cosine and tangent. These inverted ratios should not be confused with the “inverse” trigonometric functions e.g. arcsine, arccosine and arctangent. These inverse functions are the reverse of the sine, cosine and tangent. For example, the arctangent can be read as “What angle is equivalent to the following ratio of opposite over adjacent?”

50. Undecided, on a sked : TBA
Something not yet on the schedule (“sked” or “sched.”) is to be advised/announced (TBA).

51. Many residents of Holmes County, Ohio : AMISH
The Amish are a group of Christian churches, a subgroup of the Mennonite churches. The Amish church originated in Switzerland and Alsace in 1693 when it was founded by Jakob Ammann. It was Ammann who gave the name to the Amish people. Many Amish people came to Pennsylvania in the 18th century.

55. ___ rock : GLAM
I remember the days of glam rock so well, as it was a hugely popular genre of music in the British Isles during the early seventies. Artistes wore the wildest of clothes, big hair, shiny outfits and really high platform boots. Names associated with glam rock are T. Rex, David Bowie, Roxy Music and Gary Glitter.

60. One who's been tapped on the shoulder : SIR
Kneel, and the Queen might “dub thee a knight” if you’re lucky. “Dub” is a specific term derived from Old English that was used to mean “make a knight”. As the knight was also given a knightly name at the same time, “dub” has come to mean “give someone a name”.

61. West Coast news inits. : LAT
The “Los Angeles Times” newspaper started out life in 1881 as the “Los Angeles Daily Times”. The paper has a turbulent history, especially in the early 1900s when management and unions were at loggerheads. In 1910, two union members bombed the “Los Angeles Times” building causing a fire that killed 21 newspaper employees.

62. Numbers after a decimal point: Abbr. : CTS
When writing an amount of money, the two digits to the right of the decimal point signify a number of cents (cts.).

65. Activewear brand : AVIA
The Avia brand name for athletic shoes was chosen as "avia" is the Latin word for "to fly", and suggests the concept of aviation. Avia was founded in Oregon in 1979.

66. Step 4: Be a financial wastrel : POUR MONEY DOWN THE DRAIN
A “wastrel” is a spendthrift, someone who “wastes” resources.

77. Address not in a phone book : URL
Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

79. Step 5: Look pretty schlubby : CUT A POOR FIGURE
A “schlub” is a clumsy, stupid person. The term comes into English via Yiddish, possibly from the Polish “żłób“ meaning “blockhead”.

88. Eliot's "Silas ___" : MARNER
“Silas Marner: The Weaver of Raveloe” is a novel written by George Eliot and first published in 1861. There's an excellent BBC TV version of the tale (shown on PBS) starring Ben Kingsley in the title role, with Patsy Kensit playing Eppie, the young orphaned child that Marner takes under his wing.

90. Employer of the Bond girl in "The Spy Who Loved Me," for short : KGB
The Komitet gosudarstvennoy bezopasnosti (KGB) was the national security agency of the Soviet Union until 1991. The KGB was dissolved after the agency’s chairman led a failed attempt at a coup d’état designed to depose President Mikhail Gorbachev.

92. Actress Gardner : AVA
Ava Gardner is noted for her association with some big movies, but also for her association with some big names when it came to the men in her life. In the world of film, she appeared in the likes of “Mogambo” (1953), “On the Beach” (1959), “The Night of the Iguana” (1964) and “Earthquake” (1974). The men in her life included husbands Mickey Rooney, Artie Shaw and Frank Sinatra. After her marriages had failed (and perhaps before!) she had long-term relationships with Howard Hughes and bullfighter Luis Miguel Dominguin whom she met through her friend Ernest Hemingway.

102. 1990s tennis phenom : SELES
Monica Seles has a Hungarian name as she was born to Hungarian parents, in former Yugoslavia. Seles was the World No. 1 professional tennis player in 1991 and 1992 before being forced from the sport when she was stabbed by a spectator at a match in 1993. She did return to the game two years later, but never achieved the same level of success.

103. Company with a lightning bolt in its logo : RCA
During WWI, the US government actively discouraged the loss of certain technologies to other countries, including allies. The developing wireless technologies were considered to be particularly important by the army and navy. The government prevented the General Electric Company from selling equipment to the British Marconi Company, and instead facilitated the purchase by GE of the American Marconi subsidiary. This purchase led to GE forming the Radio Corporation of America that we know today as RCA.

104. Lee on a set : ANG
Taiwanese director Ang Lee sure has directed a mixed bag of films, mixed in terms of genre but not in terms of quality. He was at the helm for such classics as "Sense & Sensibility" (my personal favorite), "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon", "Hulk", "Brokeback Mountain" and "Life of Pi".

119. A Wayans brother : DAMON
The Wayans family is known as the First Family of Entertainment as it is replete with actors, directors, screenwriters and comedians. I hate to admit it, but I don’t think I know any of them!

120. Israeli magazine holders : UZIS
The first Uzi submachine gun was designed in the late 1940s by Major Uziel “Uzi” Gal of the Israel Defense Forces, who gave his name to the gun.

122. Buddha, for one : YOGI
Gautama Buddha was the sage on whose teachings the Buddhist tradition was founded. It is generally believed that the Buddha was born as Siddhartha Gautama in Kapilavastu in present-day Nepal, in about 563 BCE.

125. Zac of "Dirty Grandpa" : EFRON
Zac Efron is an actor from San Luis Obispo, California. Apparently Efron is a heartthrob to “tweenyboppers”. His big break was in the Disney hit movie “High School Musical”.

129. Hospital opening? : STENT
In the world of medicine and surgery, a stent is an artificial tube inserted inside a vessel in the body, say an artery, so that it reduces the effects of a local restriction in the body’s conduit.

Down
2. Nouveau-Mexique, e.g. : ETAT
In French, “le Nouveau-Mexique” (New Mexico) is a US “état” (state).

4. Like a bronze medalist : THIRD BEST
In the Ancient Olympic Games, the winner of an event was awarded an olive wreath. When the games were revived in 1896, the winners were originally given a silver medal and an olive branch, with runners-up receiving a bronze medal and a laurel branch. The tradition of giving gold, silver and bronze medals began at the 1904 Summer Olympic Games held in St. Louis, Missouri.

6. Resort in the Wasatch Mountains : ALTA
Alta ski resort actually lies within the Salt Lake City Metropolitan Area. The first ski lift in the resort was opened way back in 1939. Today, Alta is one of only three ski resorts in the country that prohibits snowboarding (along with Deer Valley, Utah and Mad River Glen, Vermont. The ski resort of Snowbird located next to Alta has been in operation since 1971.

8. Chimpanzee variety : BONOBO
The Bonobo used to be called the Pygmy Chimpanzee, and is a cousin of the Common Chimpanzee. The Bonobo is an endangered species, found in the wild only in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in Africa. Along with the Common Chimpanzee, the Bonobo is the closest species to humans genetically.

9. William who wrote "The Confessions of Nat Turner" : STYRON
“The Confessions of Nat Turner” is a 1976 novel by William Styron. It is written as a first-person narrative by slave and rebellion leader Nat Turner, and is based on a real document, a “confession” told by Turner to attorney Thomas Gray while he awaited trial.

Nat Turner was a slave in Virginia who led a slave rebellion in 1831 that led to the deaths of over a hundred people. Half of the casualties were white,and half were black. The 55 white deaths took place on the day of the rebellion as a growing mob of slaves traveled from house-to-house freeing fellow slaves but also killing any white people they came across; men, women and children. The rebellion was suppressed within two days by a white militia. Slaves involved in the rebellion were tried for insurrection and related crimes, and a total of 56 blacks were executed on suspicion of involvement in the uprising. In the aftermath, life for slaves became even more difficult as any freedoms that they had earned were largely curtailed.

12. Family in a computer game : SIMS
SimCity is a very clever computer game. Players build and grow cities and societies by creating the conditions necessary for people (the Sims) to move in and thrive. "SimCity" was launched in 1989, and to this day it is consistently ranked as one of the greatest computer games of all time.

13. Trump spokesman Spicer : SEAN
Sean Spicer became White House press secretary when President Donald Trump assumed office on January 20th, 2017. Prior to taking his position with the Trump administration, Spicer had served as the communications director for the Republican National Committee since 2011.

15. Bellyache : KVETCH
The word "kvetch" comes to us from Yiddish, with "kvetshn" meaning "to complain" or "squeeze".

28. High-grade cotton : PIMA
Pima is a soft cotton that is very durable and absorbent. Pima cotton is named after the Pima Native Americans who first cultivated it in this part of the world.

29. C.E.O. of the Planetary Society starting in 2010 : NYE
That would be “Bill Nye the Science Guy”. Bill’s show ran on PBS for four years from 1993-97.

35. Pope who initiated the First Crusade : URBAN II
Otho de Lagery (also Odo) took office as Pope Urban II in 1088. It was Pope Urban II who started the First Crusade, the military expedition by Roman Catholic Europe to occupy the Holy Lands. The First Crusade lasted from 1096 to 1099.

36. One crossing the line? : SCAB
We first started calling strikebreakers "scabs" in the early 1800s, and before that a scab was a person who refused to join a trade union (back as early 1777). The word probably comes from the use of "scab" as a symptom of a skin disease, and so is a term that is meant to insult.

46. Nonvoting member in the U.S. House of Representatives : SAMOAN
There are sixteen US territories in all, but only five of them are inhabited:
  • Puerto Rico
  • Guam
  • Northern Mariana Islands
  • US Virgin Islands
  • American Samoa
Examples of US territories with no permanent or native inhabitants are Wake Island and Midway Islands.

57. Best-selling Canadian singer of all time (with 200+ million record sales) : DION
French-Canadienne singer Céline Dion first came to international attention when she won the 1988 Eurovision Song Contest, in which she represented Switzerland in the competition that was hosted in Dublin, Ireland. She is now the the best-selling Canadian artist of all time.

63. James who wrote "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" : THURBER
James Thurber was a cartoonist, author and humorist who was noted for his wit. One of Thurber’s most famous works is the 1939 short story “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”.

64. Medieval toiler : SERF
A serf was a member of the lowest feudal class, someone attached to land owned by a lord. "Serf" comes from the Latin "servus", meaning "slave".

66. Grand viziers, e.g. : PASHAS
A pasha was a high-ranking official in the Ottoman Empire, and was roughly equivalent to the English rank of lord.

70. Some money set aside : ESCROW
One type of escrow account is held by a trusted third party for two parties who have some contractual arrangement, an arrangement that is often in dispute. The third party only releases the funds when both parties have fulfilled their contractual obligations.

82. "Hop-o'-My-Thumb" villain : OGRE
“Hop-o’-My-Thumb” is a fairy tale from France. The story is also called “Little Thumbling” and tells of a small boy going up against an ogre.

84. It has a noted school of theater, film and television : UCLA
The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) gets more applications from potential students than any other university in the country. UCLA also has more students enrolled than any other university in the state.

85. Pulitzer winner Armantrout and others : RAES
Rae Armantrout is a poet who teaches at the University of California, San Diego. Armantrout was the 2010 winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry.

86. "Frozen" princess : ELSA
“Frozen" is a 2013 animated feature from Walt Disney Studios that is based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale “The Snow Queen”.

95. Ad Council output, for short : PSAS
Public service announcement (PSA)

97. Pickle brand : VLASIC
Apparently, Vlasic invented the glass-packed, shelf-stable pickle. The company adopted the stork mascot in the late sixties, with the stork originally carrying a baby. The mascot was a play on the perception that pregnant women have a higher than average appetite for pickles.

100. Whom Kala reared : TARZAN
Kala is the fictional ape that rescues the infant Tarzan from the dangerous leader of the apes. In the Edgar Rice Burroughs novel, Kala is killed a few years later by a hunter, for which Tarzan exacts the ultimate revenge. In the 1999 Disney adaptation of the story, Kala doesn’t die.

105. Altar approaches : NAVES
In large Christian churches, the nave is the main approach to the altar, and is where most of the congregation are seated.

107. Some G.I. wear, for short : CAMO
Our word “camouflage” (often abbreviated to “camo”) evolved directly from a Parisian slang term “camoufler” meaning “to disguise”. The term was first used in WWI, although the British navy at that time preferred the expression “dazzle-painting” as it applied to the pattern painted on the hulls of ships.

108. Little hellions : IMPS
A hellion is a mischievous and wild person. “Hellion” is a North American term, probably derived for the word that we use for the same thing on the other side of the Atlantic, which is “hallion”.

111. Character with the aria "When I am laid in earth" : DIDO
The opera “Dido and Aeneas” was written by English Baroque composer Henry Purcell. The story was taken from Virgil’s epic poem “Aeneid” and tells of the love affair between Dido, the Queen of Carthage, and Aeneas, the Trojan hero.

112. "Vidi" : I SAW
The oft-quoted statement "Veni, vidi, vici" ("I came, I saw, I conquered") is believed by many to have been written by Julius Caesar. The words date back to 47 BC and refer to the short war between Rome and Pharnaces II of Pontus.

114. Major before going to B-school, maybe : ECON
A “B-school” is a business school.

117. Bagel topper : LOX
Lox is a brine-cured salmon fillet, finely sliced. The term "lox" comes into English via Yiddish, and derives from the German word for salmon, namely “Lachs”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "___ Davis Eyes," 1981 #1 hit : BETTE
6. Some lookout notices, for short : APBS
10. One thrown for a loop? : LASSO
15. Musical genre for "Gangnam Style" : K-POP
19. Sundance Film Festival local : UTAHN
20. Sack : LOOT
21. Venusian or Jovian : ALIEN
22. Pointer for a weather person? : VANE
23. Vertical part of a plane : Y-AXIS
24. Soprano on TV : TONY
25. Drifting sort : NOMAD
26. America's Cup, e.g. : EWER
27. Step 1: Raise hell : STIR UP A HORNET’S NEST
31. Opus ___ : DEI
32. "Golly!" : BOY!
33. ___ Picchu : MACHU
36. Wild guess : STAB
39. Step 2: Make some literary gaffes : MIX ONE’S METAPHORS
47. Reciprocal in trigonometry : COSECANT
49. Targets of a cleanse : TOXINS
50. Undecided, on a sked : TBA
51. Many residents of Holmes County, Ohio : AMISH
52. Movie release day, often: Abbr. : FRI
54. Had pants? : GASPED
55. ___ rock : GLAM
56. Step 3: Devote energy to something hopeless : BEAT A DEAD HORSE
59. Prefix with second : NANO-
60. One who's been tapped on the shoulder : SIR
61. West Coast news inits. : LAT
62. Numbers after a decimal point: Abbr. : CTS
65. Activewear brand : AVIA
66. Step 4: Be a financial wastrel : POUR MONEY DOWN THE DRAIN
74. Doxycycline target : ACNE
75. Refusals : NOS
76. When doubled, a drink with vodka, peach schnapps and cranberry juice : WOO
77. Address not in a phone book : URL
78. ___ film : STAG
79. Step 5: Look pretty schlubby : CUT A POOR FIGURE
87. Partner of hems : HAWS
88. Eliot's "Silas ___" : MARNER
90. Employer of the Bond girl in "The Spy Who Loved Me," for short : KGB
91. Where 84-Down is, colloquially : SOCAL
92. Actress Gardner : AVA
93. Figure out : DECODE
94. Zoology class : REPTILES
96. And finally: Has divided loyalties : SERVES TWO MASTERS
101. Org. involved in a probe : NASA
102. 1990s tennis phenom : SELES
103. Company with a lightning bolt in its logo : RCA
104. Lee on a set : ANG
106. What 27-, 39-, 56-, 66-, 79- and 96-Across together make up? : A RECIPE FOR DISASTER
116. "Such is life" : ALAS
119. A Wayans brother : DAMON
120. Israeli magazine holders : UZIS
121. "Pipes" : VOICE
122. Buddha, for one : YOGI
123. Made some calls : UMPED
124. "Ain't I sumthin'!" : TA-DA!
125. Zac of "Dirty Grandpa" : EFRON
126. ___ asst. : EXEC
127. Tweets, e.g. : POSTS
128. Bank deposit? : SNOW
129. Hospital opening? : STENT

Down
1. Totally believes : BUYS
2. Nouveau-Mexique, e.g. : ETAT
3. Prepare to take off : TAXI
4. Like a bronze medalist : THIRD BEST
5. Follow : ENSUE
6. Resort in the Wasatch Mountains : ALTA
7. "Oh, nuts!" : POOH!
8. Chimpanzee variety : BONOBO
9. William who wrote "The Confessions of Nat Turner" : STYRON
10. Running track part : LANE
11. Much : A LOT
12. Family in a computer game : SIMS
13. Trump spokesman Spicer : SEAN
14. TV-watching option : ON DEMAND
15. Bellyache : KVETCH
16. Handle roughly : PAW
17. With 18-Down, distribution limitation, informally : ONE ...
18. See 17-Down : … PER
28. High-grade cotton : PIMA
29. C.E.O. of the Planetary Society starting in 2010 : NYE
30. Depletes : SAPS
34. Stream coming down a mountain? : HOT LAVA
35. Pope who initiated the First Crusade : URBAN II
36. One crossing the line? : SCAB
37. "The Complete Works of William Shakespeare," e.g. : TOME
38. It spans 11 time zones : ASIA
40. Conflagration : INFERNO
41. More, in ads : XTRA
42. Navigator's aid : STAR
43. Shaded growth : MOSS
44. Anticipate : EXPECT
45. Lace : TIE
46. Nonvoting member in the U.S. House of Representatives : SAMOAN
48. Gulf : CHASM
53. Without forethought : IDLY
54. Begin fighting : GO TO WAR
55. Growl like a dog : GNAR
57. Best-selling Canadian singer of all time (with 200+ million record sales) : DION
58. Duped : HAD
63. James who wrote "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" : THURBER
64. Medieval toiler : SERF
66. Grand viziers, e.g. : PASHAS
67. Scales span them : OCTAVES
68. Napping, so to speak : UNAWARE
69. Rules and ___ : REGS
70. Some money set aside : ESCROW
71. Doo-___ : WOP
72. Recess : NOOK
73. Like minor celebrities : D-LIST
80. Repeal : UNDO
81. Be swarming (with) : TEEM
82. "Hop-o'-My-Thumb" villain : OGRE
83. Melting : GOING SOFT
84. It has a noted school of theater, film and television : UCLA
85. Pulitzer winner Armantrout and others : RAES
86. "Frozen" princess : ELSA
88. Really not O.K. : MESSED UP
89. Part of a musical : ACT
93. Ovine : sheep :: cervine : ___ : DEER
95. Ad Council output, for short : PSAS
97. Pickle brand : VLASIC
98. Pound sound : ARF!
99. Talent seekers : SCOUTS
100. Whom Kala reared : TARZAN
105. Altar approaches : NAVES
107. Some G.I. wear, for short : CAMO
108. Little hellions : IMPS
109. Brooke or Brooks : POET
110. Closes : ENDS
111. Character with the aria "When I am laid in earth" : DIDO
112. "Vidi" : I SAW
113. Fade : TIRE
114. Major before going to B-school, maybe : ECON
115. Big figure in Manhattan? : RENT
116. Response that's often repeated : AYE
117. Bagel topper : LOX
118. ___-appropriate : AGE


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0527-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 May 17, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Damon J. Gulczynski
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 24m 27s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. "The Aviator" actor, 2004 : ALDA
Alan Alda has had a great television career, especially of course on “M*A*S*H”. Alda won his first Emmy in 1972, for playing Hawkeye Pierce on “M*A*S*H”. He won his most recent Emmy in 2006 for his portrayal of Presidential candidate Arnold Vinick in “The West Wing”. When it comes to the big screen, my favorite of Alda’s movies is the 1978 romantic comedy “Same Time, Next Year” in which he starred opposite Ellen Burstyn.

“The Aviator” is a great 2004 film, a biographical piece about much of the life of aviation pioneer Howard Hughes. Leonardo DiCaprio plays the title role, with Cate Blanchett playing a very credible Katharine Hepburn, Hughes' lover with whom he lived for quite some time. Blanchett won a very much deserved Oscar for Best Supporting Actress for her performance. Alan Alda received an Oscar nomination as a supporting actor, playing Senator Owen Brewster, a thorn in the side for Howard Hughes.

9. Fictional swordsman : ATHOS
Alexandre Dumas’ “Three Musketeers” are Athos, Porthos and Aramis, although the hero of the novel is their young protégé is D’Artagnan. A musketeer was an infantry soldier who was equipped with a musket. Funnily enough, the three “musketeers” really don’t use their muskets, and are better known for prowess with their swords.

15. Province of NW Spain : LEON
León is a province in the autonomous community of Castile and León in the northwest of Spain. The province’s capital is the city of León, which was founded as Roman military encampment around 29 BC.

16. Word that's its own synonym when its first two letters are replaced with "w" : CHARY
To be “chary” is to be hesitant, unwilling to proceed. To be “wary” is the same thing.

17. "At the ___" (subtitle of a 1978 hit) : COPA
The Copacabana of the 1978 Barry Manilow song is the Copacabana nightclub in New York City (which is also the subject of the Frank Sinatra song "Meet Me at the Copa"). The Copa opened in 1940 and is still going today although it is struggling. The club had to move due to impending construction and is now "sharing" a location with the Columbus 72 nightclub.
Her name was Lola, she was a showgirl
With yellow feathers in her hair and a dress cut down to there
She would merengue and do the cha-cha
And while she tried to be a star
Tony always tended bar
Across the crowded floor, they worked from 8 til 4
They were young and they had each other
Who could ask for more?

20. N.E.A. member?: Abbr. : ASSN
The National Education Association (NEA) is the largest labor union in the country, and mainly represents public school teachers.

25. Md or Rn fig. : AT NO
Dmitri Mendeleev was a Russian chemist. When Mendeleev classified elements according to their chemical properties, he noticed patterns and was able to group elements into his famous 1869 Periodic Table. So powerful was his table that he actually predicted the properties of some elements that had not even been discovered in 1869. Element number 101 is mendelevium (Md) and was named after Mendeleev.

Radon (Rn) is a radioactive gas, a byproduct produced when uranium decays naturally in the earth. Radon gas can collect and accumulate in buildings and rooms that are particularly well insulated with very little air exchange. The danger is very real, as radon is listed as the second most frequent cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoke.

26. Notable 1973 defendant : WADE
Roe v. Wade was decided in a US District Court in Texas in 1970, and reached the Supreme Court on appeal. The basic decision by the Supreme Court was that a woman's constitutional right to privacy applied to an abortion, but that this right had to be balanced with a state's interest in protecting an unborn child and a mother's health. The Court further defined that the state's interest became stronger with each trimester of a pregnancy. So, in the first trimester the woman's right to privacy outweighed any state interest. In the second trimester the state's interest in maternal health was deemed to be strong enough to allow state regulation of abortion for the sake of the mother. In the third trimester the viability of the fetus dictated that the state's interest in the unborn child came into play, so states could regulate or prohibit abortions, except in cases where the mother's life was in danger. I'm no lawyer, but that's my understanding of the initial Supreme Court decision …

31. Dickens character "with a dead lull about her" : HAVISHAM
Miss Havisham is a character in “Great Expectations”, the novel by Charles Dickens. Miss Havisham is a wealthy spinster who as a younger woman fell in love with a man named Compeyson. Sadly, Compeyson was a swindler after her riches who defrauded her and left her at the altar.

35. Occasional meat eater : FLEXITARIAN
A flexitarian is a semi-vegetarian, someone whose diet is largely plant-based but who occasionally eats meat.

37. Carl Sagan's sequel to "Cosmos" : PALE BLUE DOT
“Pale Blue Dot” is a book about the cosmos by Carl Sagan. The title of the book is taken from the famous “Pale Blue Dot” photograph taken by the Voyager 1 spacecraft from almost 4 million miles from the Earth. In the photo, our planet appears as a tiny “pale blue dot”. NASA had Voyager 1 take the photograph, at the request of Carl Sagan.

44. Great Trek figure of the 1830s : BOER
“Boer” is the Dutch and Afrikaans word for “farmer”, a word that was used to describe the Dutch-speaking people who settled parts of South Africa during the 1700s.

45. Spring's cyclic counterpart : NEAP
Tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon on the oceans. At neap tide, the smaller gravitational effect of the sun cancels out some of the moon's effect. At spring tide, the sun and the moon's gravitational forces act in concert causing more extreme movement of the oceans.

47. Company behind Hitchcock's "Notorious" : RKO
The RKO Pictures studio was formed when RCA (RADIO Corporation of America) bought the KEITH-Albee-ORPHEUM theaters (and Joe Kennedy’s Film Booking Offices of America). The RKO initialism then comes from the words “Radio”, “Keith” and “Orpheum”.

“Notorious” is an interesting Hitchcock film made in 1946 starring Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman. I find it interesting as it is such a different dramatic role for Cary Grant, and a more gritty role for the lovely Ingrid Bergman, and the great Claude Rains is in there for good measure. It's a story of espionage, love and intrigue set in Rio de Janeiro where there is a group of German Nazis hiding out after WWII. Definitely worth a rental if you've never seen it …

49. James and Jones of jazz : ETTAS
Etta James was best known for her beautiful rendition of the song “At Last”. Sadly, as she disclosed in her autobiography, James lived a life that was ravaged by drug addiction leading to numerous legal and health problems. Ms. James passed away in January 2012 having suffered from leukemia.

Etta Jones was a jazz singer, sometimes known as the "jazz musician's jazz singer". Because she has a similar name to Etta James, Jones was often confused with the more popular singer. Jones never really had any huge commercial success though, despite the respect that she engendered within the inner sanctums of the jazz world.

52. Dungeons & Dragons race : OGRES
Dungeons & Dragons is a complex role-playing game (RPG) introduced in 1974 by Tactical Studies Rules Incorporated (TSR). Dungeons & Dragons was probably the first of the modern role-playing games to be developed, and the most successful. It is still played by lots of people today, including my youngest son …

54. "___ it up and spit it out" ("My Way" lyric) : I ATE
The song “My Way” has lyrics that were written by Paul Anka in 1969, but the tune itself was composed two years earlier by Claude François and Jacques Revaux. The song had been released with completely different lyrics in France as “Comme d’habitude” (“As Usual”). When Anka heard the song on television in Paris he sought out and obtained the rights to use it himself, for free. Supposedly, “Comme d’habitude” has been recorded in more languages, by more artists, than any other song in the contemporary repertoire.
And now, the end is near
And so I face the final curtain
My friend, I'll say it clear
I'll state my case, of which I'm certain
I've lived a life that's full
I traveled each and every highway
And more, much more than this, I did it my way

57. Trailer segment : CLIP
The term “trailer” was originally used in the film industry to describe advertisements for upcoming features. These trailers were originally shown at the end of a movie being screened, hence the name. This practise quickly fell out of favor as theater patrons usually left at the end of the movie without paying much attention to the trailers. So, the trailers were moved to the beginning of the show, but the term “trailer” persisted.

58. Color close to puce : PLUM
The name of the purple shade known as "puce" has a strange derivation. "Puce" came into English from French, in which language "puce" means "flea". Supposedly, puce is the color of a flea!

59. Like many towels : TERRY
Terry cloth is a fabric designed to absorb lots of liquid. The fabric has relatively large loops of thread that improve the absorption properties. The larger the loop, the more thread, the better the absorption.

61. Play award? : ESPY
The ESPY Awards are a creation of the ESPN sports television network. One difference with similarly named awards in the entertainment industry is that ESPY winners are chosen solely based on viewer votes.

Down
2. See how many hits you get, say : EGOSURF
We've all done it, googling our own names to see what comes up. It's called “egosurfing”.

4. Pulitzer-winning novelist Jennifer : EGAN
Jennifer Egan is an author who grew up in San Francisco. Egan’s 2010 work “A Visit from the Goon Squad” won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. Usually termed a novel, “A Visit from the Goon Squad” is structured in such a way that it is sometimes described as a collection of linked short stories.

6. 1994-2000 TV talk show : LEEZA
Leeza Gibbons has her own radio show called “Hollywood Confidential”, and used to have her own talk show on NBC television that aired from 1994 to 2000. Gibbons is the founder of a nonprofit group called Leeza’s Place which supports people giving care to patients with memory disorders. Since 2007 she has been a board member of California’s stem cell research agency, appointed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger.

11. "Girls" girl played by Lena Dunham : HANNAH
Lena Dunham is a co-star in the HBO series “Girls”, and is also the show’s creator. Dunham garnered a lot of attention for herself during the 2012 US Presidential election cycle as she starred in an ad focused on getting out the youth vote. In the spot she compared voting for the first time with having sex for the first time.

12. Portmanteau in the frozen food aisle : ORE-IDA
Ore-Ida frozen foods are all made using potatoes. The company is located in Oregon, just across the border from Idaho. “Ore-Ida” is a melding of the two state names.

40. Knuckle-headed antic? : NOOGIE
A “noogie” is that childish move where someone rubs his (and it's always a guy!) knuckles into a person's head to create a little soreness.

43. Like centerfolds, typically : BOSOMY
In the magazine world, a centerfold is large illustration that is folded to form the central spread of a publication. Famously, Hugh Hefner used the centerfold of “Playboy” magazine for a large color photograph of a nude model, and since then the term “centerfold” has been used for a model who has featured in such a layout. Playboy’s first centerfold model was Marilyn Monroe.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Honor in a big way : FETE
5. "The Aviator" actor, 2004 : ALDA
9. Fictional swordsman : ATHOS
14. Stoked : AGOG
15. Province of NW Spain : LEON
16. Word that's its own synonym when its first two letters are replaced with "w" : CHARY
17. "At the ___" (subtitle of a 1978 hit) : COPA
18. Fellow : GENT
19. Relatives of kites : ERNES
20. N.E.A. member?: Abbr. : ASSN
21. Language related to Hopi : AZTEC
23. Terse response to an order : ON IT
24. "Well, yeah!" : DUH!
25. Md or Rn fig. : AT NO
26. Notable 1973 defendant : WADE
27. Establishes : ERECTS
31. Dickens character "with a dead lull about her" : HAVISHAM
33. University in Melbourne : FLORIDA TECH
35. Occasional meat eater : FLEXITARIAN
37. Carl Sagan's sequel to "Cosmos" : PALE BLUE DOT
39. Gloss : ANNOTATE
42. Quick to put up, in a way : PREFAB
44. Great Trek figure of the 1830s : BOER
45. Spring's cyclic counterpart : NEAP
47. Company behind Hitchcock's "Notorious" : RKO
48. One making bank-to-bank transfers? : BOAT
49. James and Jones of jazz : ETTAS
51. Battles : VIES
52. Dungeons & Dragons race : OGRES
54. "___ it up and spit it out" ("My Way" lyric) : I ATE
55. What's more : ALSO
56. Totally occupy : TIE UP
57. Trailer segment : CLIP
58. Color close to puce : PLUM
59. Like many towels : TERRY
60. One of two areas on a football line : SLOT
61. Play award? : ESPY

Down
1. Front : FACADE
2. See how many hits you get, say : EGOSURF
3. Five-star : TOP-SHELF
4. Pulitzer-winning novelist Jennifer : EGAN
5. Fountain growth : ALGA
6. 1994-2000 TV talk show : LEEZA
7. "Who'da thunk it?!" : DON'T THAT BEAT ALL?!
8. During pregnancy : ANTENATAL
9. Crush : ACE
10. Be subtly and snarkily insulting : THROW SHADE
11. "Girls" girl played by Lena Dunham : HANNAH
12. Portmanteau in the frozen food aisle : ORE-IDA
13. Word with sound or storm : SYSTEM
22. Part of many a scandal : COVER-UP
28. Peddler of religious literature : COLPORTEUR
29. Attempt to cure : TREAT
30. Like many major highways : SIX-LANE
32. Less genial : ICIER
34. Science of nutrition : DIETETICS
36. Basic : NO-FRILLS
38. Starts to practice : TAKES UP
39. Jim ___, one-handed Yankee who pitched a no-hitter in 1993 : ABBOTT
40. Knuckle-headed antic? : NOOGIE
41. Like Mars vis-à-vis Jupiter : NEARER
43. Like centerfolds, typically : BOSOMY
46. Grill setting : PATIO
50. 9/ : SEPT
51. Use an e-cig : VAPE
53. Bug catcher, maybe : SPY


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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