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0725-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 25 Jul 17, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Alex Vratsanos
THEME: Spread the Gospel
Each of today’s themed answers includes several circled letters in the grid. Those circled letters spell out the four gospels of the Christian New Testament:
61A. Evangelize ... or what this puzzle's circled squares do? : SPREAD THE GOSPEL

17A. Was loved by : MEANT THE WORLD TO (giving “Matthew”)
22A. Know-it-all : SMART ALECK (giving “Mark”)
39A. Comment after a fortuitous happening : LUCKY ME! (giving “Luke”)
50A. Frequently going from one post to another : JOB HOPPING (giving “John”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 25s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Discharge, as from a volcano : SPEW
Our word “volcano” comes from “Vulcano”, the name of a volcanic island off the coast of Italy. The island’s name comes from Vulcan, the Roman god of fire. The Romans believed that the island of Vulcano was the chimney of the forge belonging to the god Vulcan. The Romans also believed that the eruptions on Mount Etna in Sicily were caused by Vulcan getting angry and working his forge so hard that sparks and smoke flew out of the top of the volcano.

11. Chrysler truck : RAM
Chrysler put ram hood ornaments on all of its Dodge branded vehicles starting in 1933. When the first line of Dodge trucks and vans were introduced in 1981, they were named “Rams” in honor of that hood ornament.

15. Protective embankment : ESCARP
An escarp or escarpment is a steep slope or cliff. The term is also used for the inner wall of a ditch that is dug around a fortification.

16. He said that ambient music "must be as ignorable as it is interesting" : ENO
Brian Eno was one of the pioneers of the “ambient” genre of music. Eno composed an album in 1978 called “Ambient 1: Music for Airports”, the first in a series of four albums with an ambient theme. Eno named the tracks somewhat inventively: 1/1, 2/1, 2/1 and 2/2.

17. Was loved by : MEANT THE WORLD TO (giving “Matthew”)
The Gospel of Matthew is the first book of the New Testament in the Christian Bible. Despite the book’s title, the author is not named, with the words “according to Matthew” added about two centuries after it was written.

20. Zoë of "Avatar" : SALDANA
American actress Zoë Saldana played the Na’vi princess in “Avatar”, and Uhura in the 2009 movie “Star Trek” (and sequels). Saldana seems to pick the right movies, as she is the only actress to have three different films in the top twenty at the box office for three consecutive weeks (“Avatar”, “The Losers” and “Death at a Funeral”).

22. Know-it-all : SMART ALECK (giving “Mark”)
Apparently the original "smart Alec" (sometimes “Aleck”) was Alec Hoag, a pimp, thief and confidence trickster who plied his trade in New York City in the 1840s.

Mark the Evangelist was the author of the Gospel of Mark and the founder of the Church of Alexandria in Egypt.

25. Jason's vessel, in myth : ARGO
In Greek mythology, Jason and the Argonauts sailed on the Argo in search of the Golden Fleece. The vessel was called the “Argo” in honor of the ship’s builder, a man named Argus.

29. Giga- x 1,000 : TERA-
The prefix “tera-” signifies a trillion, and comes from the Greek word "teras" meaning "monster".

35. Captain Nemo's vessel : NAUTILUS
The Jules Verne sci-fi novel “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea" was first published in 1869-1870 as a serial in a French magazine. Star of the novel (to me) is Captain Nemo’s magnificent submarine called the Nautilus. The distance travelled by the Nautilus is the “20,000 leagues” in the title, not a depth. 20,000 leagues is about three times the circumference of the Earth.

38. Oral health org. : ADA
The American Dental Association (ADA) is the largest and oldest national dental association in the world. Today the ADA is based in Chicago, but the association was founded in Niagara Falls, New York in 1859. The ADA started out as a group of 26 dentists, and it now has more than 152,000 members.

39. Comment after a fortuitous happening : LUCKY ME! (giving “Luke”)
The Gospel of Luke is the third book of the New Testament. It is believed that the author of the Gospel of Luke was the same person who wrote “Acts of the Apostles”, the fifth book of the New Testament.

42. It isn't recorded in a walk-off win : FINAL OUT
That would be baseball.

44. First female speaker of the House : PELOSI
Nancy Pelosi is a former Speaker of the House, the 60th person to hold that position. Ms. Pelosi represents a district not far from here, which covers most of San Francisco. She was the first Californian, the first Italian-American and the first woman to be Speaker of the House. As Speaker, she was also second in line, after the Vice President, to take over if President Obama could not finish his term. That made Nancy Pelosi the highest-ranking female politician in US history.

46. Chuck of "Meet the Press" : TODD
Chuck Todd is a television journalist. Todd was the Chief White House Correspondent for NBC, before taking over as moderator of “Meet the Press” in 2014.

47. Louisa May Alcott's "___ Boys" : JO’S
Louisa May Alcott’s “Jo’s Boys” is a sequel to her novel “Little Men”, which in turn is a sequel to “Little Women”. “Jo’s Boys” is the final book in the trilogy.

49. Erelong : ANON
“Anon” originally meant “at once” and evolved into today’s meaning of “soon” apparently just because the word was misused over time.

50. Frequently going from one post to another : JOB HOPPING (giving “John”)
In the Christian tradition, John the Apostle was one of the twelve followers of Jesus who were called the Apostles. John lived longer than all of the other Apostles and was the only one who did not die a martyr. John wrote the Gospel of John in the New Testament, as well as three Epistles of John and the Book of Revelation.

61. Evangelize ... or what this puzzle's circled squares do? : SPREAD THE GOSPEL
“Gospel” is a term that came to us via Old English. The Old English term is “godspel” meaning “good story”, and referred to the glad tidings announced by Jesus. There are four Gospels in the Christian New Testament: the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John.

67. Gen ___ : XER
The term Generation X originated in the UK where it was the name of a book by Jane Deverson. Her book detailed the results of a study of British youths in 1964, contrasting their lifestyle to those of previous generations. It was Canadian author Douglas Coupland who was responsible for popularizing the term, with his more successful publication “Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture”. By the latest accepted definition, Gen-Xers were born between 1961 and 1981.

69. Craft company with a 2015 I.P.O. : ETSY
Etsy.com is an e-commerce website where you can buy and sell the kind of items that you might find at a craft fair.

Down
1. ___ Club : SAM’S
Sam's Club is owned and operated by Walmart and is named after the company's founder, Sam Walton.

4. House of Elizabeth II : WINDSOR
King George V was ruler of the United Kingdom during WWI. It was George V who changed the Royal Family's name from Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, creating the House of Windsor in 1917. He did this in response to anti-German feeling in Britain during the war.

5. The Hartford competitor : AETNA
When the healthcare management and insurance company known as Aetna was founded, the name was chosen to evoke images of Mt. Etna, the European volcano.

The Hartford investment and insurance company was founded in Hartford, Connecticut in 1810. The company was started by a group of local merchants as a Fire Insurance Company with an initial cash injection of $15,000. The Hartford had an annual revenue of over $26 billion in 2012.

9. Nuisance in an online comments section : TROLL
In Internet terms, a troll is someone who attempts to disrupt online group activities. The fishing term “troll” is used to describe such a person, as he or she throws out off-topic remarks in an attempt to “lure” others into some emotional response. Sad, sad people …

11. Variety show host of 1951-71 : RED SKELTON
Red Skelton was an American comedian who started out in show business as a teenager working with the circus. Skelton had a very successful career on radio before moving to television in the early fifties. His popularity only began to fade in the early seventies, when he had difficulty appealing to younger audiences. Skelton spent less time performing in his latter years, and turned to his other great love … painting.

18. Highlander's headwear : TAM
A tam o'shanter is a man's cap traditionally worn by Scotsmen. "Tams" were originally all blue (and called "blue bonnets") but as more dyes became readily available they became more colorful. The name of the cap comes from the title character of the Robert Burns poem "Tam O'Shanter".

19. Milk: Prefix : LACTI-
The sugar known as lactose is a disaccharide, comprising a molecule of galactose combined with a molecule of glucose. Lactose is a major component in milk, and it is broken down in the body by an enzyme called lactase. The production of lactase used to diminish over time in humans, as babies stopped nursing and transitioned to solid food. Many human populations have evolved to maintain lactose production throughout life, in response to the inclusion of animal milk in the diet. Individuals and populations that do not have the genes enabling lifelong production of lactase are said to be lactose intolerant.

23. What gives you the right to bare arms? : TANK TOP
“Tank top” is another one of those terms that always catches me out, as it has a different meaning on each side of the Atlantic. In the US, a tank top is a sleeveless shirt, something we would call a “vest” back in Ireland (and the US “vest” is what we call a “waist coat”). A tank top in Ireland is a sleeveless sweater, which further adds to the confusion. The name “tank top” is derived from “tank suit”, an old name for a woman’s one-piece bathing suit. The use of “tank” for the bathing suit came from “swimming tank”, an obsolete term used in the 1920s for a swimming pool.

25. Toward the rear : ABAFT
On a boat, the term “abaft” means “towards the stern”.

26. NPR segment? : RADIO
National Public Radio (now just called “NPR”) was established in 1970 after President Johnson signed into law the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967. The station’s first broadcast took place in April of 1971, and was coverage of the US Senate hearings on the Vietnam War. The intent of the act was to provide funding for radio and television broadcasting that wasn’t simply driven by profit. As a longtime fan of the state-funded BBC in the UK, I’d have to agree with that intent …

27. One voting to indict or not : GRAND JUROR
A grand jury is a group of 16-23 citizens who are empowered to investigate potential criminal conduct. Only the US and Liberia use grand juries today, with the rest of the world employing other forms of preliminary hearing. The phrase “grand jury” has its roots in French, with “grand” implying “large”. The 12-person jury used in a criminal trial can be referred to as a “petit” (small) jury.

30. Model-turned-actress Rene : RUSSO
The very talented actress Rene Russo is a native of Burbank, California. Russo went to highschool (with actor/director Ron Howard), but dropped out in tenth grade. At seventeen, she was given the opportunity to train as a model and within a very short time appeared on the cover of “Vogue”. As her modelling jobs slowed down in her early thirties, Russo made a career change and studied theater and acting. I am so glad she did, as Rene Russo is one of my favorite actresses …

34. Hip-hop's Kris Kross or OutKast : DUO
Kris Kross was a teenage rap duo from the nineties. They had a big hit called “Jump” in 1992.

OutKast is a hip hop duo consisting of rappers André 3000 and Big Boi.

36. Call balls and strikes, informally : UMP
Back in the 15th century, “an umpire” was referred to as “a noumpere”, which was misheard and hence causing the dropping of the initial letter N. The term “noumpere” came for Old French “nonper” meaning “not even, odd number”. The idea was that the original umpire was a third person called on to arbitrate between two, providing that “odd number” needed to decide the dispute.

37. End of August? : TEE
The last letter in the word “August” is the letter T (tee).

40. Title canine in a Stephen King book : CUJO
“Cujo” is a Stephen King horror novel, which means that I haven’t read it (I don’t do horror). The character Cujo is a rabid St. Bernard dog which besieges a young couple for three days in their stalled car. King tells us that he lifted the dog’s name from real life, as Cujo was the nickname of Willie Wolfe, one of the men responsible for the 1974 kidnapping of Patty Hearst by the Symbionese Liberation Army.

43. Baked brick : ADOBE
The building material known as adobe has been around a long time, and has been used in dry climates all over the world. The original form of the word “adobe” dates back to Middle Egyptian times, about 2000 BC. The original spelling is “dj-b-t”, and translates as mud (sun-dried) brick.

45. Chef Emeril : LAGASSE
Emeril Lagasse is an American chef, born in Massachusetts. Lagasse first achieved notoriety as executive chef in Commander's Palace in New Orleans. Now famous for his television shows, his cuisine still showcases New Orleans ingredients and influences. Lagasse started using his famous "Bam!" catchphrase in order to keep his crew awake during repeated tapings of his show.

51. ___ House (Washington landmark) : BLAIR
Blair House is the official residence for guests of the US President. Blair House is primarily used for foreign heads of government. When such a guest is in residence, the house flies the leader’s national flag and in effect becomes foreign soil for the duration of the stay.

52. Ibsen's "___ Gabler" : HEDDA
“Hedda Gabler” is a play by the great Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen, first published in 1890. Considered one of the greatest theater roles, the title character of Hedda Gabler is sometimes referred to as “the female Hamlet”.

55. Vitamin whose name rhymes with a car engine : B-SIX
The B vitamins were originally thought to be just one vitamin, which was labeled vitamin B. It was then discovered vitamin B was in fact made up of eight distinct vitamins, which today are given distinct numbers (B1, B6, B12 etc). Supplements often contain a mixture of all eight, a combination known as vitamin B complex.

56. Chapel recess : APSE
The apse of a church or cathedral is a semicircular recess in an outer wall, usually with a half-dome as a roof and often where there resides an altar. Originally, apses were used as burial places for the clergy and also for storage of important relics.

59. Dr.'s orders : EEGS
An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a record of electrical activity caused by the firing of neurons within the brain. The EEG might be used to diagnose epilepsy, or perhaps to determine if a patient is "brain dead".

62. Haul on a U-Haul : TOW
The U-Haul company was started by married couple Leonard Shoen and Anna Mary Carty in Ridgefield, Washington in 1945. The Shoens used $5,000 of seed money to build trailers in their garage, and then cleverly recruited gas station owners as franchisees with whom they would split the rental revenue. There are now about 15,000 U-Haul dealers across the country.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Discharge, as from a volcano : SPEW
5. Isn't rigid in one's ways : ADAPTS
11. Chrysler truck : RAM
14. Height: Prefix : ALTI-
15. Protective embankment : ESCARP
16. He said that ambient music "must be as ignorable as it is interesting" : ENO
17. Was loved by : MEANT THE WORLD TO (giving “Matthew”)
20. Zoë of "Avatar" : SALDANA
21. Didn't buy, say : LEASED
22. Know-it-all : SMART ALECK (giving “Mark”)
25. Jason's vessel, in myth : ARGO
28. Underside of an 8-Down : PAD
29. Giga- x 1,000 : TERA-
32. No holds ___ : BARRED
35. Captain Nemo's vessel : NAUTILUS
38. Oral health org. : ADA
39. Comment after a fortuitous happening : LUCKY ME! (giving “Luke”)
41. Sound of reproach : TSK!
42. It isn't recorded in a walk-off win : FINAL OUT
44. First female speaker of the House : PELOSI
46. Chuck of "Meet the Press" : TODD
47. Louisa May Alcott's "___ Boys" : JO’S
49. Erelong : ANON
50. Frequently going from one post to another : JOB HOPPING (giving “John”)
55. Christmas ornament, e.g. : BAUBLE
57. Puts in a box : ENCASES
61. Evangelize ... or what this puzzle's circled squares do? : SPREAD THE GOSPEL
64. Equal at the start? : ISO-
65. Enthusiastic response to "Who wants dessert?" : I DO, I DO!
66. Family history, e.g. : SAGA
67. Gen ___ : XER
68. Like emotions just after a tragedy : RAWEST
69. Craft company with a 2015 I.P.O. : ETSY

Down
1. ___ Club : SAM’S
2. Defendant's entry : PLEA
3. Shortening for a bibliographer : ET AL
4. House of Elizabeth II : WINDSOR
5. The Hartford competitor : AETNA
6. Note in the E major scale : D-SHARP
7. Fly through, as a test : ACE
8. Hound's "hand" : PAW
9. Nuisance in an online comments section : TROLL
10. Shopping trip one may later regret : SPREE
11. Variety show host of 1951-71 : RED SKELTON
12. Cost to get in : ANTE
13. Emotional state : MOOD
18. Highlander's headwear : TAM
19. Milk: Prefix : LACTI-
23. What gives you the right to bare arms? : TANK TOP
24. "There will come ___ ..." : A DAY
25. Toward the rear : ABAFT
26. NPR segment? : RADIO
27. One voting to indict or not : GRAND JUROR
30. Model-turned-actress Rene : RUSSO
31. Welcome at the front door : ASK IN
33. Certain office desk setup : ELL
34. Hip-hop's Kris Kross or OutKast : DUO
36. Call balls and strikes, informally : UMP
37. End of August? : TEE
40. Title canine in a Stephen King book : CUJO
43. Baked brick : ADOBE
45. Chef Emeril : LAGASSE
48. Is a leadfoot : SPEEDS
51. ___ House (Washington landmark) : BLAIR
52. Ibsen's "___ Gabler" : HEDDA
53. Gold standard? : INGOT
54. Pvt.'s superior : NCO
55. Vitamin whose name rhymes with a car engine : B-SIX
56. Chapel recess : APSE
58. Dustup : SPAT
59. Dr.'s orders : EEGS
60. Knock dead at the comedy club : SLAY
62. Haul on a U-Haul : TOW
63. Rush : HIE


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0724-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 24 Jul 17, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Peter Gordon
THEME: End on End
Each of today’s themed answers begins with the same sequence of letters with which it also ends:
28A. Ramen product : OODLES OF NOODLES
56A. "Sesame Street" Muppet with wings and a magic wand : ABBY CADABBY
6D. Competing with the goal of victory : IN IT TO WIN IT
7D. Daredevil in the Motorcycle Hall of Fame : EVEL KNIEVEL
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 54s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Green condiment served with sushi : WASABI
Sometimes called Japanese horseradish, wasabi is a root used as a condiment in Japanese cooking. The taste of wasabi is more like mustard than a hot pepper in that the vapors that create the “hotness” stimulate the nasal passages rather than the tongue. Personally, I love the stuff …

7. Hyphen's longer cousin : EN DASH
In typography, there are em dashes and en dashes. The em dash is about the width of an "m" character, and an en dash about half that, the width of an "n' character. An en dash is used, for example, to separate numbers designating a range, as in 5-10 years. The em dash seems to be going out of style, and indeed the application I am using to write this paragraph won't let me show you one!

13. Boxer George who lost the Rumble in the Jungle : FOREMAN
The Rumble in the Jungle was the celebrated 1974 fight between Muhammad Ali and George Foreman that took place in Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of the Congo). The fight was set in Zaire because of financial arrangements between promoter Don King and Zaire’s President Mobutu Seko. Ali coined the term “Rope-a-dope” to describe his incredibly successful strategy in the contest. From the second round onwards, Ali adopted a protected stance on the ropes letting Foreman pound him with blows to the body and head, with Ali using his arms to dissipate the power of the punches. He kept this up until the eighth round and then opened up and downed the exhausted Foreman with a left-right combination. I hate boxing but I have to say, that was an fascinating fight …

21. "Exodus" hero : ARI
“Exodus” is a wonderful novel written by American writer Leon Uris that was first published in 1947. The hero of the piece is Ari Ben Canaan, played by Paul Newman in the 1960 film adaptation directed by Otto Preminger.

25. "TiK ___" (Ke$ha hit) : TOK
Kesha (formerly “Ke$ha”) is the stage name used by singer Kesha Rose Sebert.

28. Ramen product : OODLES OF NOODLES
Ramen is a noodle dish composed of Chinese-style wheat noodles in a meat or fish broth flavored with soy or miso sauce. Ramen is usually topped with sliced pork and dried seaweed. The term “ramen” is a also used for precooked, instant noodles that come in single-serving, solid blocks.

36. Ouzo flavoring : ANISEED
Ouzo is an aperitif from Greece that is colorless and flavored with anise. Ouzo is similar to pastis from France and also has a flavor like sambuca from Italy.

38. "Thar ___ blows!" : SHE
“Thar she blows!” is a phrase that originated on whaling ships. A lookout spotting a whale surfacing to breathe might see the spray from the blowhole caused by the expulsion of carbon dioxide. Thar (there) she blows!

41. Churchgoers, collectively : LAITY
Anything described as laic (or “laical, lay”) is related to the laity, those members of the church who are not clergy. The term "laic" ultimately comes from the Greek "laikos" meaning "of the people".

43. Mo. when daylight saving time ends : NOV
November is the eleventh month in our calendar. The name comes from the Latin “novem” meaning “nine”, as November was the ninth month in the ancient Roman calendar.

44. Milo of "The Verdict" : O’SHEA
Milo O'Shea was a great Irish character actor from Dublin who has appeared in everything from "Romeo and Juliet" to "The West Wing". O’Shea passed away in 2013, in New York City.

1982’s “The Verdict” is an entertaining courtroom drama movie that stars Paul Newman as a struggling alcoholic lawyer. The storyline involves a medical malpractice case involving a woman in persistent vegetative state. As a bonus, if you keep a careful eye out, you’ll see Bruce Willis as an extra in one of his first on-screen appearances.

46. Taj Mahal city : AGRA
The most famous mausoleum in the world has to be the Taj Mahal in Agra, India. The Taj Mahal was built after the death of the fourth wife of Shah Jahan, Mumtaz Mahal (hence the name of the mausoleum). The poor woman died in childbirth delivering the couple's 14th child. When Shah Jahan himself passed away 35 years later, he was buried beside his wife Mumtaz, in the Taj Mahal.

52. Former full-size Buick : LESABRE
The Buick Special was a car produced by General Motors in various forms from 1936, making a final brief appearance in 1975. The Buick Special was given the name “LeSabre” in 1959, and a “Skylark” option was introduced in 1961. The engine was changed from a V8 in 1962, making the Buick Special the first American production car to use a V6.

55. N'awlins sandwiches : PO’ BOYS
A po' boy is a submarine sandwich from Louisiana. There are a lot of theories about where the name came from, and none sound too convincing to me. A po' boy differs from a regular submarine sandwich in that it uses Louisiana French bread, which is soft in the middle and crusty on the outside.

Apparently the “N’awlins” pronunciation of “New Orleans” is common, but is usually uttered by tourists. Locals are more likely to say “New Awlins”.

63. Punk rock's ___ Pop : IGGY
Iggy Pop is a punk rock performer from Muskegon, Michigan. When he was in high school, he was a drummer for a local band called the Iguanas, and so was given the nickname “Iggy”. He was vocalist for a band called the Stooges.

66. Figure skating jump : AXEL
An axel is a forward take-off jump in figure skating. The maneuver was first performed by Norwegian Axel Paulsen at the 1882 World Figure Skating championships.

71. Annoying insect : GNAT
Gnats are attracted to the smell of rotting food, and to vinegar. Simple homemade traps that use vinegar are often constructed to attract and kill gnats.

Down
2. ___ Palmer (drink made with lemonade and iced tea) : ARNOLD
The drink named for golfer Arnold Palmer is made from lemonade and ice tea. The drink named for fellow golfer John Daly is also made from lemonade and ice tea, but with vodka added …

7. Daredevil in the Motorcycle Hall of Fame : EVEL KNIEVEL
Daredevil Evel Knievel contracted hepatitis C from the many blood transfusions that he needed after injuries incurred during stunts. He had to have a liver transplant as a result, but his health declined after that. Knievel eventually passed away in 2007.

8. Church area : NAVE
In large Christian churches, the nave is the main approach to the altar, and is where most of the congregation are seated.

10. Clothing retailer ___ Taylor : ANN
There was no actual person called Ann Taylor associated with the Ann Taylor line of clothes. The name was chosen by the marketing professionals because "Ann" was considered to be "very New England" back in 1954 when the stores first opened, and "Taylor" suggested that clothes were carefully "tailored".

11. Capital of Minnesota : ST PAUL
Saint Paul that is the state capital of Minnesota, and is one half of the “Twin Cities” , also known as Minneapolis-Saint Paul. Saint Paul used to be called Pig’s Eye, named after a popular tavern in the original settlement in the area. In 1841, Father Lucien Galtier established a log chapel nearby that he dedicated to St. Paul the Apostle, giving the city it’s current name. The magnificent Cathedral of St. Paul now sits on the site where the log chapel was built.

12. Opposite of a life coach? : HEARSE
We use the term “hearse” for a vehicle used to transport a dead body to the place of burial. The original meaning, still used sometimes today, is for a framework hanging over a coffin that holds candles.

13. Hobbit played by Elijah Wood : FRODO
Frodo Baggins is a principal character in J. R. R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings". Frodo is a Hobbit, and is charged with the quest of destroying Sauron's Ring in the fires of Mount Doom.

26. Alternative to a co-op : CONDO
The terms “condominium” and “apartment” tend to describe the same type of residential property, a private living space with facilities shared with others residing in the same building or complex. The difference is that a condominium is usually owned, and an apartment is rented. At least that’s how it is in the US. The word “condominium” comes from the Latin “com-” (together) and “dominum” (right of ownership).

30. Pi's first digit after the decimal : ONE
The ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter is a mathematical constant, which we denote with the Greek letter pi (π). The ratio pi can be used to calculate the area of a disk, by multiplying the constant by the square of the radius (πr2).

35. Business for Delta or Southwest : AIR TRAVEL
Delta was the world’s largest airline for a while (after merging with Northwest Airlines in 2008) and is also the oldest airline still operating in the US. Delta’s roots go back to 1924 before it started carrying passengers and was called Huff Daland Dusters, a crop dusting company based in Macon, Georgia. The name Delta Air Service was introduced in 1928.

Southwest Airlines is the world’s largest low-cost passenger airline. I’ve always admired the Southwest operation and found that the company knows to keep costs under control while maintaining a high level of customer service. One strategy the company used for decades was only to operate Boeing 737 aircraft, which kept maintenance and operating costs to a minimum.

39. Fonda or Ford : HENRY
Actor Henry Fonda had already started his Hollywood career when along came WWII. Fonda enlisted in the Navy, and served for three years on the destroyer USS Satterlee. Then he served as a Lieutenant Junior Grade in Air Combat Intelligence in the Pacific, earning the Bronze Star.

The industrialist Henry Ford was born in Michigan, and was the son of an Irish immigrant from County Cork. Ford’s most famous vehicle was the one that revolutionized the industry: the Model T. Ford’s goal with the Model T was to build a car that was simple to drive and and easy and cheap to purchase and repair. The Model T cost $825 in 1908, which isn’t much over $20,000 in today’s money.

42. Fast-food chain with the slogan "Live más" : TACO BELL
Taco Bell was founded by a former US Marine, 25-year-old Glen Bell. His first restaurant was Bell’s Drive-In, located in Southern California. After opening that first establishment, Bell bought up some more restaurants including four named El Taco. He sold off the El Taco restaurants but used the name in part when he opened his first Taco Bell in 1962. Bell sold then sold franchises, with the 100th Taco Bell opening in 1967. The ex-Marine sold off the whole chain to PepsiCo in 1978, and I am guessing he made a pretty penny. Taco Bell has been using the “Live Más” slogan since 2012, with “más” being the Spanish word for “more”.

47. Ancient kingdom whose capital was Nineveh : ASSYRIA
Nineveh was an ancient Assyrian city on the eastern bank of the Tigris River in modern-day Iraq. The ruins of the city are located just on the other side of the river from the Iraqi city of Mosul. At one time, Nineveh was the largest city in the world.

57. Playbill listing : CAST
I get quite a kick out of reading the bios in "Playbill" as some of them can be really goofy and entertaining. "Playbill" started off in 1884 in New York as an in-house publication for just one theater on 21st St. You can't see any decent-sized production these days anywhere in the United States without being handed a copy of "Playbill".

58. Folk singer Guthrie : ARLO
Arlo Guthrie is the son of Woody Guthrie. Both father and son are renowned for their singing of protest songs about social injustice. Arlo is most famous for his epic “Alice’s Restaurant Massacree”, a song that lasts a full 18m 34s. In the song Guthrie tells how, after being drafted, he was rejected for service in the Vietnam War based on his criminal record. He had only one incident on his public record, a Thanksgiving Day arrest for littering and being a public nuisance when he was 18-years-old.

60. The "G" of L.G.B.T. : GAY
Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT)

64. High no. for a valedictorian : GPA
Grade point average (GPA)

A valediction is an act of taking one’s leave, from the Latin “vale dicere”, to say farewell. An example of a valediction would be the words “yours truly” at the end of a letter. And, the valedictorian (here in the US anyway) is the student in a graduating class that is chosen to say the final words at the graduation ceremony, a farewell to the classmates.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Green condiment served with sushi : WASABI
7. Hyphen's longer cousin : EN DASH
13. Boxer George who lost the Rumble in the Jungle : FOREMAN
14. Excessively praised : VAUNTED
16. Brand of pasta : RONZONI
17. What golfers with equal numbers of squares and circles on their scorecards shoot : EVEN PAR
18. "So that's your trick!" : OHO!
19. Took the wrong way? : STOLE
21. "Exodus" hero : ARI
22. Parceled (out) : DOLED
25. "TiK ___" (Ke$ha hit) : TOK
26. Effect's counterpart : CAUSE
28. Ramen product : OODLES OF NOODLES
31. Stream : FLOW
32. Overnight lodges : INNS
33. Split-___ soup : PEA
36. Ouzo flavoring : ANISEED
38. "Thar ___ blows!" : SHE
41. Churchgoers, collectively : LAITY
43. Mo. when daylight saving time ends : NOV
44. Milo of "The Verdict" : O’SHEA
46. Taj Mahal city : AGRA
47. Helped : AIDED
49. Fisheye or zoom : LENS
50. Buyer's bottom line : NET COST
52. Former full-size Buick : LESABRE
54. Mistakes : ERRORS
55. N'awlins sandwiches : PO’ BOYS
56. "Sesame Street" Muppet with wings and a magic wand : ABBY CADABBY
60. Donated : GAVE
62. Less common : RARER
63. Punk rock's ___ Pop : IGGY
66. Figure skating jump : AXEL
67. Small bit of land in the ocean : ISLET
68. Back of the neck : NAPE
69. Shout : YELL
70. Molecule components : ATOMS
71. Annoying insect : GNAT

Down
1. Celebratory shout : WOO-HOO!
2. ___ Palmer (drink made with lemonade and iced tea) : ARNOLD
3. "Oh, yeah? ___ who?" : SEZ
4. I love, in Latin : AMO
5. Prohibits : BANS
6. Competing with the goal of victory : IN IT TO WIN IT
7. Daredevil in the Motorcycle Hall of Fame : EVEL KNIEVEL
8. Church area : NAVE
9. "With all ___ respect ..." : DUE
10. Clothing retailer ___ Taylor : ANN
11. Capital of Minnesota : ST PAUL
12. Opposite of a life coach? : HEARSE
13. Hobbit played by Elijah Wood : FRODO
15. Helps with the dishes : DRIES
20. Sound that a punch in the gut elicits : OOF!
23. North Pole worker : ELF
24. Postpone : DELAY
26. Alternative to a co-op : CONDO
27. Commercials : ADS
29. Male delivery : SON
30. Pi's first digit after the decimal : ONE
33. Carpentry tool : PLANE
34. Rarin' to go : EAGER
35. Business for Delta or Southwest : AIR TRAVEL
37. Lawn section : SOD
38. Wisconsin city on Lake Michigan : SHEBOYGAN
39. Fonda or Ford : HENRY
40. Facilitates : EASES
42. Fast-food chain with the slogan "Live más" : TACO BELL
45. Applying thickly, with "on" : SLABBING
47. Ancient kingdom whose capital was Nineveh : ASSYRIA
48. Leaves : DEPARTS
51. Sphere : ORB
53. Have a bawl : SOB
57. Playbill listing : CAST
58. Folk singer Guthrie : ARLO
59. Regard : DEEM
60. The "G" of L.G.B.T. : GAY
61. Firefighter's tool : AXE
64. High no. for a valedictorian : GPA
65. Nevertheless : YET


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0723-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 23 Jul 17, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Caleb Madison
THEME: Back on the Charts
Each of today’s themed answers ends with the name of a singer found in the pop CHARTS. That name, at the BACK of each themed answer, is pointed to by the number at the end of the clue, a number indicating the number of letters in the singer’s name:
30A. Title character in a 1943 French novella [6] : LITTLE PRINCE (giving “Prince”)
47A. The Big Pineapple [4] : HONOLULU (giving “Lulu”)
66A. Like some lawyers' work [4] : PRO BONO (giving “Bono”)
86A. "Why are you looking at me?" [4] : WHAT’D I DO? (giving “Dido”)
100A. 11th-century campaign [4] : FIRST CRUSADE (giving “Sade”)
3D. 17,000+-foot peak near the Equator [4] : MOUNT KENYA (giving “Enya”)
5D. Make airtight, in a way [4] : HEAT SEAL (giving “Seal”)
10D. Healthy [4] : IN THE PINK (giving “Pink”)
12D. Nightshade family member [5] : MANDRAKE (giving “Drake”)
13D. Prized possession [5] : CROWN JEWEL (giving “Jewel”)
26D. One doing routine office work, informally [5] : PEN PUSHER (giving “Usher”)
51D. Dave of jazz [4] : BRUBECK (giving “Beck”)
63D. One leading the exercises, for short? [4] : PE TEACHER (giving “Cher”)
70D. Fruity spirit [6] : PEAR BRANDY (giving “Brandy”)
73D. Vain, temperamental sort [7] : PRIMA DONNA (giving “Madonna”)
77D. Band member's main squeeze? [4] : ACCORDION (giving “Dion)
82D. 1940 Disney release [3] : FANTASIA (giving “Sia”)
87D. Pulling off bank jobs [5] : HEISTING (giving “Sting”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 18m 40s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

10. Pioneer in computer chess : IBM
Deep Blue was a computer developed by IBM specifically for playing chess. In 1996 it became the first machine to win a chess game against a reigning world champion. The champion in question was the great Garry Kasparov, although he came out on top in the end by winning the 6-game competition 4-2.

13. Channel setting on many airport TVs : CNN
CNN (Cable News Network) was launched in 1980 by the Turner Broadcasting System, and was the first television channel in the world to provide news coverage 24 hours a day.

16. Gets cheeky with? : MOONS
The first recorded mooning incident took place in 66 AD during the First Roman-Jewish War. Roman soldiers decided to moon Jewish pilgrims as they traveled to the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem.

19. Fit for service : ONE-A
The US government maintains information on all males who are potentially subject to military conscription, using what is called the Selective Service System (SSS). In the event that a draft was held, men registered would be classified into groups to determine eligibility for service. Class 1-A registrants are those available for unrestricted military service. Other classes are 1-A-O (conscientious objector available for noncombatant service), 4-A (registrant who has completed military service) and 4-D (Minister of religion).

22. Roger who battled 13-Across : AILES
(13A. Channel setting on many airport TVs : CNN)
Roger Ailes founded Fox News in 1996, and became the organization’s CEO. Ailes stepped down from the post in July 2016 amid allegations of repeated sexual harassment.

28. Mountain ___ : DEW
If you check the can, you'll see that "Mountain Dew" is now marketed as “Mtn Dew”.

30. Title character in a 1943 French novella [6] : LITTLE PRINCE (giving “Prince”)
“Le Petit Prince” is a celebrated French novella written by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry and first published in 1943. “Le Petit Prince” (The Little Prince) is the most read book in France, and the book most translated from French. The philosophical tale recounts the story of a stranded pilot meeting a young prince who falls to Earth from an asteroid. Saint-Exupéry was himself a pioneering aviator. He wrote “Le Petit France” while living in exile in the US due to the German occupation of France during WWII.

The singer Prince was born in Minneapolis, and he lived there most of his life. Born Prince Rogers Nelson, his given name honored his father, a jazz musician who used the stage name Prince Rogers. Prince died in 2016 due to an accidental fentanyl overdose at his home and recording studio located just southwest of Minneapolis. The home and studio, known as Paisley Park, is now a museum that is open to the public.

37. Pedagogic org. : NEA
The National Education Association (NEA) is the largest labor union in the country, and mainly represents public school teachers.

Strictly speaking, “pedagogue” is a schoolteacher. The term has developed a secondary meaning, to describe someone who is pedantic and overly formal. Back in Ancient Greece, a “paidagogos” was a slave who escorted boys to school and supervised them at school.

40. Pacific capital : APIA
Apia is the capital city, and in fact the only city, of the Pacific island-nation of Samoa. The harbor of Apia is famous for a very foolish incident in 1889 involving seven naval vessels from Germany, the US and Britain. A typhoon was approaching so the safest thing to do was to head for open water away from land, but no nation would move its ships for fear of losing face in front of the others. Six of the ships were lost in the typhoon as a result and 200 American and German sailors perished. The British cruiser HMS Calliope barely managed to escape from the harbor and rode out the storm safely. Apia is also known as the home of writer Robert Louis Stevenson, for the last four years of his life.

41. N.F.L.'s Jaguars, on scoreboards : JAX
The Jacksonville Jaguars have been in the NFL since 1995, and play in the American Football Conference (AFC).

42. Sugar suffix : -OSE
Sugars are usually named using the “-ose” suffix e.g., glucose, fructose, sucrose.

44. Toner cartridge contents : DRY INK
The key features of a laser printer (or copier) are that it uses plain paper and produces quality text at high speed. Laser printers work by projecting a laser image of the printed page onto a rotating drum that is coated with photoconductors (material that becomes conductive when exposed to light). The areas of the drum exposed to the laser carry a different charge than the unexposed areas. Dry ink (toner) sticks to the exposed areas due to electrostatic charge. The toner is then transferred to paper by contact and is fused into the paper by the application of heat. So, that explains why paper coming out of a laser printer is warm, and sometimes powdery.

47. The Big Pineapple [4] : HONOLULU (giving “Lulu”)
Honolulu is the largest city in Hawaii, and the state capital. Located on the island of Oahu, the name “Honolulu” translates from Hawaiian as “place of shelter, calm port, sheltered bay”.

The Scottish singer Lulu was born Marie Lawrie. In the world of movies, Lulu sang the title songs for 1967’s “To Sir With Love” and the 1974 James Bond film “The Man with the Golden Gun”. Lulu was also played schoolgirl Babs Pegg in “To Sir With Love”.

50. Rhyme scheme ending a villanelle : ABAA
A “villanelle” or “villainesque” is a 19-line poem structured in five sets of three lines followed by a quatrain.

53. Intl. commerce grp. : WTO
The World Trade Organization (WTO) is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. The stated aim of the WTO is to liberalize international trade. The organization was founded in 1995 when an international agreement on trade was reached that effectively replaced the existing General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) that was laid down in 1949.

54. Banded gemstones : ONYXES
Onyx is a form of quartz that comes in many different shades, but most often it's the black version that's used for jewelry. The name "onyx" comes from the Greek word for "fingernail", as onyx in the flesh color is said to resemble a fingernail.

55. Bert who sang "If I Only Had the Nerve" : LAHR
Bert Lahr’s most famous role was that of the cowardly lion in “The Wizard of Oz”. Lahr had a long career in burlesque, vaudeville and on Broadway. Remember the catchphrase made famous by the cartoon character Snagglepuss, “Heavens to Murgatroyd!”? Snagglepuss stole that line from a 1944 movie called, “Meet the People” in which it was first uttered by none other than Bert Lahr.

57. Poor People's Campaign organizer, for short : MLK
Martin Luther King, Jr's father was born Michael King. On a trip to Germany in 1934, Michael came to admire Protestant leader Martin Luther and changed his name to Martin Luther King on his return the United States. Famously, he passed on his new name to his son, the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

59. Frequent Bosch setting : HELL
“Hell” is German for “high”.

Bosch is an an engineering and electronics firm that was founded in Stuttgart, Germany by Robert Bosch in 1886. Bosch have gotten some bad PR in recent years for writing the software that allowed Volkswagen to cheat the emission testing carried out the by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

61. Dance craze of the 2010s : DOUGIE
The Dougie is a hip-hop dance that originated in Dallas. The dance took its name from the rapper Doug E. Fresh, who made similar moves during his performances. And no, I don’t Dougie …

63. "___ and animals are free" (party slogan in "1984") : PROLES
George Orwell introduced us to the "proles", the working class folk in his famous novel "Nineteen Eighty-Four". Collectively, the proles make up the section of society known as the proletariat.

65. "___ Mine" (George Harrison book) : I, ME,
“I Me Mine” is one of the relatively few Beatles songs to have been written by George Harrison (and indeed performed by him). Harrison chose the same title for his autobiography, which was published in 1980 just a few weeks before John Lennon was assassinated in New York City.

66. Like some lawyers' work [4] : PRO BONO (giving “Bono”)
The Latin term “pro bono publico” means “for the public good”, and is usually shortened to “pro bono”. The term applies to professional work that is done for free or at a reduced fee as a service to the public.

Irish singer Bono is a Dubliner who was born Paul David Hewson. As a youth, Hewson was given the nickname "Bono Vox" by a friend, a Latin expression meaning "good voice", and so the singer has been known as Bono since the late seventies. His band's first name was "Feedback", later changed to "The Hype". The band members searched for yet another name and chose U2 from a list of six names suggested by a friend. They picked U2 because it was the name they disliked least …

77. Steely Dan's best-selling album : AJA
Steely Dan’s heyday was in the seventies when they toured for a couple of years, although the group mainly focused on studio work. The band was formed in 1972 and broke up in 1981. The core of the band reunited in 1993 and they are still going strong today. Steely Dan’s best-selling album is “Aja” (pronounced “Asia”), which was released in 1977.

78. Naval noncoms : CPOS
A Chief Petty Officer (CPO) is a non-commissioned officer (NCO) in the Navy (USN) and Coast Guard (USCG). The “Petty” is derived from the French word “petit” meaning “small”.

82. Bleeping government org.? : FCC
TV broadcasting is monitored by the Federal Communications Commission. The FCC has been around since 1934, when it replaced the Federal Radio Commission.

84. Trophy figure : NIKE
Nike was the Greek goddess of victory, often referred to as the Winged Goddess of Victory. The athletic shoe company Nike uses the “Nike swoosh” as its logo, which is based on the goddess’s wing.

86. "Why are you looking at me?" [4] : WHAT’D I DO? (giving “Dido”)
Dido is an English singer and songwriter. Dido’s real name is Florian Cloud de Bounevialle Armstrong. She was born on Christmas Day 1971, and celebrates a second birthday every year on June 25th. In this regard Dido is just like Paddington Bear, with one birthday on December 25th, and another on June 25th.

88. Where It. is : EUR
In the Italian Peninsula in Southern Europe, the “boot” is the mainland of Italy, and the the ball being kicked by the boot is the island of Sicily.

89. Inverse trig function : ARCTAN
The most familiar trigonometric functions are sine, cosine and tangent (abbreviated to “sin, cos and tan”). Each of these is a ratio, a ratio of two sides of a right-angled triangle. The “reciprocal” of these three functions are secant, cosecant and cotangent. The reciprocal functions are simply the inverted ratios, the inverted sine, cosine and tangent. These inverted ratios should not be confused with the “inverse” trigonometric functions e.g. arcsine, arccosine and arctangent. These inverse functions are the reverse of the sine, cosine and tangent. For example, the arctangent can be read as “What angle is equivalent to the following ratio of opposite over adjacent?”

91. Agcy. that oversaw plants : AEC
The Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was set up right after WWII in 1946, with the aim of promoting the peaceful use of atomic energy. Establishing the AEC was a significant move made by President Truman, as it passed control of atomic energy from the military to the civilian sector. The AEC continued to operate until 1974 when its functions were divided up into two new agencies: the Energy Research and Development Administration and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

92. Ones "from Mars" : MEN
“Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus” is a very popular 1993 book about male-female relationships by John Gray. Gray’s thesis is that relationships benefit from understanding that men and women are different, have different needs, communicate differently, are metaphorically from two different planets.

93. Inits. in some parlors : OTB
Off-Track Betting (OTB) is the legal gambling that takes place on horse races outside of a race track. A betting parlor can be referred to as an OTB.

94. American-born Jordanian queen : NOOR
Queen Noor is the widow of King Hussein of Jordan. Queen Noor was born Lisa Halaby in Washington, D.C., the daughter of Najeeb Halaby. Her father was appointed by President Kennedy as the head of the Federal Aviation Administration, and later became the CEO of Pan Am. Lisa Halaby met King Hussein in 1977, while working on the design of Jordan’s Queen Alia Airport. The airport was named after King Hussein’s third wife who had been killed that year in a helicopter crash. Halaby and the King were married the next year, in 1978.

98. Org. behind the Human Genome Project : NIH
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) organization is made up of 27 different institutes that coordinate their research and services. Examples of member institutes are the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Institute on Aging.

The genome is all the hereditary information needed to reproduce an organism, in other words, all of its chromosomes. When scientists unravel the human genome it takes up an awful lot of computer storage space, and yet all of this information is in almost every cell in our bodies. Each and every cell "knows" how to make a whole human being.

99. Lewis ___, 1848 Democratic candidate for president : CASS
Lewis Cass was a military officer and politician originally from New Hampshire. As a politician, Cass vied for the Democratic Party’s nomination for president in 1848, losing out to Zachary Taylor, who went on to win the presidential race. A few years later, Cass served as Secretary of State under President James Buchanan.

100. 11th-century campaign [4] : FIRST CRUSADE (giving “Sade”)
The Crusades were a series of religious wars fought between the 11th and 15th centuries. The term “crusade” came into English via French and Spanish from the Latin “crux” meaning “cross”. The use of the term was retrospective, with the first recorded use in English in 1757. Most crusaders swore a vow to reach Jerusalem from Europe, receiving a cloth cross that was then sewn into their clothing.

The singer Sade's real name is Helen Folasade Adu. Although she was born in Nigeria, Sade grew up and lives in the UK. She was the lead vocalist for the English group Sade, and adopted the name of the band. The band’s biggest hits were “Smooth Operator” (1984) and “The Sweetest Taboo” (1985).

106. Decoration for an R.A.F. pilot : DSO
The Distinguished Service Order (DSO) is a British military award that is usually presented to officers with the rank of major or higher.

The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the oldest independent air force in the world (i.e. the first air force to become independent of army or navy forces). The RAF was formed during WWI on 1 April 1918, a composite of two earlier forces, the Royal Flying Corps (part of the Army) and the Royal Naval Air Service. The RAF's "finest hour" has to be the Battle of Britain when the vastly outnumbered British fighters fought off the might of the Luftwaffe causing Hitler to delay his plan to cross the English Channel. This outcome prompted Winston Churchill to utter the memorable words
Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.

118. They begin trading, for short : IPOS
An initial public offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually).

119. Frankincense, e.g. : RESIN
Frankincense and myrrh are both tree resins that are exuded when certain species of tree are damaged. The harvested resins are used to make essentials oils for perfumes, and are also burned to give off a pleasant fragrance.

120. Singer of a famous bath time song : ERNIE
For many years, I believed that the "Sesame Street" characters Bert and Ernie were named after two roles played in the Christmas classic "It's a Wonderful Life". In the movie, the policeman's name is Bert and his taxi-driving buddy is named Ernie. However, the "Sesame Street" folks have stated that the use of the same names is just a coincidence. Aww, I don’t wanna believe that’s a coincidence …

122. Barack Obama's mother : ANN
Barack Obama, Sr. was first married at the age of 18 in his home country of Kenya, and had two children during that marriage. He left his wife and children back in Kenya when he enrolled in the University of Hawaii in 1959 as the school’s first African foreign student. There, Obama met Ann Dunham in a Russian language course. The two entered into a romantic relationship and Dunham became pregnant. Obama told Dunham that he was divorced from his first wife (not true), and the pair were married on Maui in 1961. Six months later, Barack Obama II was born, destined to become the 44th President of the United States. The couple divorced in 1964. After the divorce, Dunham was able to marry Lalo Soetoro, a Javanese surveyor who she met while he was studying for a masters degree at the university. Soetoro returned to Indonesia in 1966, and Dunham joined him there the following year with her 6-year-old son. Barack Obama spent four years in Indonesia before returning to Hawaii to live with his grandparents.

123. Sturm und ___ : DRANG
“Sturm und Drang” translates from the German into “Storm and Stress” or perhaps “Storm and Impulse”. “Sturm und Drang” was the name given to a movement in German literature and music in the latter half of the 18th century. The writer Johann Goethe was a major proponent of the movement, which took its name from a play by Maximilian Klinger. The term “Sturm und Drang” has come to mean “turmoil, upheaval”.

124. Garner : EARN
A garner is a granary, a building in which grain is stored. The related verb “to garner” means to gather into a granary. We also use the verb figuratively to mean “accumulate, collect” in general.

Down
2. "Born Sinner" rapper J. ___ : COLE
“J. Cole” is the stage name of American rap artist Jermaine Cole. J. Cole was born in Germany, on the US Army base in Frankfurt.

3. 17,000+-foot peak near the Equator [4] : MOUNT KENYA (giving “Enya”)
Kenya lies on the east coast of Africa, right on the equator. The country takes her name from Mount Kenya, the second highest peak on the continent (after Kilimanjaro). The official languages of Kenya are English and Swahili.

Enya's real name is Eithne Ní Bhraonáin, which can translate from Irish into Enya Brennan. Her Donegal family (in the northwest of Ireland) formed a band called Clannad, which included Enya. In 1980 Enya launched her very successful solo career, eventually becoming Ireland’s best-selling solo musician. And, she sure does turn up a lot in crosswords!

5. Make airtight, in a way [4] : HEAT SEAL (giving “Seal”)
Seal is an English soul singer, of Nigerian and Brazilian descent. Seal was married for several years to the delightful former model Heidi Klum.

6. Others of ancient Rome? : ALII
Et alii (et al.) is the equivalent of et cetera (etc.), with et cetera being used in place of a list of objects, and et alii used for a list of names. In fact “et al.” can stand for et alii (for a group of males, or males and females), aliae (for a group of women) and et alia (for a group of neuter nouns, or for a group of people where the intent is to retain gender-neutrality).

9. Monster's moniker : NESSIE
The Loch Ness monster has been talked about for centuries, but modern interest started in 1933 when a spate of sightings was reported. Those sightings don’t seem to have stopped, with photographs really sparking the imagination.

10. Healthy [4] : IN THE PINK (giving “Pink”)
P!nk is the stage name of American singer Alecia Beth Moore. I known so little about “modern” music, but I do like the P!nk song “Just Give Me a Reason” …

12. Nightshade family member [5] : MANDRAKE (giving “Drake”)
Drake is the stage name of rapper Aubrey Graham from Toronto.

13. Prized possession [5] : CROWN JEWEL (giving “Jewel”)
The singer Jewel's full name is Jewel Kilcher. She is married to nine-time world champion rodeo cowboy Ty Murray. You might have seen both of them on "Dancing with the Stars" a few years ago. Jewel was meant to compete but had to pull out at the last minute, so her hubby took her spot. He did surprisingly well!

24. Mater ___ : DEI
“Mater Dei” is Latin for “Mother of God”.

26. One doing routine office work, informally [5] : PEN PUSHER (giving “Usher”)
Usher is the stage name of R&B singer Usher Terry Raymond IV.

33. Move to protect the king, say : CASTLE
In the notation used to record moves in games of chess, castling with the kingside rook can be recorded as O-O, and with the queenside rook as O-O-O.

36. Me.-to-Fla. route : US-ONE
US Route 1 runs from Fort Kent in Maine right down to Key West in Florida.

38. Color of el mar : AZUL
In Spanish, “el mar” (the sea) is “azul” (blue).

48. Flowers native to damp woods : OXLIPS
The plant known as the oxlip is more properly called Primula elatior. The oxlip is often confused with its similar-looking cousin, the cowslip.

51. Dave of jazz [4] : BRUBECK (giving “Beck”)
Dave Brubeck is a jazz pianist from Concord, California. Brubeck is very much associated with the Dave Brubeck Quartet which he founded in 1951.

“Beck” is the stage name of Bek David Campbell, an American alternative rock musician.

56. Supermodel Lima : ADRIANA
Adriana Lima is fashion model from Brazil. Lima is perhaps best known as one of the Victoria’s Secret Angels. Her modelling career started when she won a “Supermodel of Brazil” competition in 1996, at 15 years of age.

58. Certain fire sign : LEO
Each of the twelve astrological signs is associated with one of the classical elements:
  • Fire signs: Aries, Leo, Sagittarius
  • Earth signs: Taurus, Capricorn, Virgo
  • Air signs: Libra, Aquarius, Gemini
  • Water signs: Cancer, Scorpio, Pisces

63. One leading the exercises, for short? [4] : PE TEACHER (giving “Cher”)
Cher's real name is Cherilyn Sarkisian. Formerly one half of husband-wife duo Sonny & Cher, she is often referred to as the Goddess of Pop. In her acting career, Cher was nominated for the Best Supporting Actress Oscar of 1984 for her performance in "Silkwood". She went further in 1988 and won the Best Actress Oscar for playing Loretta Castorini in "Moonstruck".

64. Singer Bonnie : RAITT
Bonnie Raitt is a blues singer, originally from Burbank, California. Raitt has won nine Grammys for her work, but she is perhaps as well known for her political activism as she is for her music. She was no fan of President George W. Bush while he was in office, and she sure did show it.

66. Sandwich inits. : PBJ
Peanut butter and jelly (PB&J or PBJ).

69. Guinea pig relative : AGOUTI
The term “agouti” is used for some rodents in Central and south America who have fur with bands of light and dark pigmentation.

The guinea pig species of rodent is also known as a cavy. Guinea pigs aren’t related to pigs, and not are they from Guinea (in West Africa). Guinea pigs actually come from the Andes. They were commonly used for research in the 1800s and 1900s, and as a result we use the term “guinea pig” for a test subject to this day.

73. Vain, temperamental sort [7] : PRIMA DONNA (giving “Madonna”)
The Italian operatic term “prima donna” is used for the lead female singer in an opera company. “Prima donna” translates from Italian as “first lady”. The lead male singer is known as the “primo uomo”. The term “prima donna assoluta” is reserved for a prima donna who is generally accepted as being an outstanding performer. We tend to use “prima donna” for a female performer who has an inflated ego.

Madonna’s full name is Madonna Louise Ciccone. Born in Bay City, Michigan, Madonna was destined to become the top-selling female recording artist of all time.

74. Long range : ANDES
The Andes range is the longest continuous chain of mountains in the world, running right down the length of the west coast of South America for about 4,300 miles. The highest peak in the Andes is Mt. Aconcagua, at an elevation of 22,841 feet. Interestingly, the peak of Mt. Chimborazo in Ecuador is the furthest point on the Earth's surface from the center of the planet. That's because of the equatorial "bulge" around the Earth's "waist".

77. Band member's main squeeze? [4] : ACCORDION (giving “Dion)
Dion and the Belmonts were a vocal group from the fifties who had success in the late fifties. The four singers were from the Bronx in New York, with two living on Belmont Avenue, hence the name that was chosen. Perhaps the biggest hits for Dion and the Belmonts were “A Teenager in Love” and "Where or When".

79. ___ song : SWAN
The phrase “swan song” is used for a final gesture, a lat performance. The expression derives from an ancient belief that swans are silent for most of their lives, but sing a beautiful song just before they die.

82. 1940 Disney release [3] : FANTASIA (giving “Sia”)
“Fantasia” was Disney’s third feature length movie, released in 1940. The film had a disappointing critical reception and pushed the Disney company into financial difficulties. RKO took over the film’s distribution in 1946. The folks at RKO cut a full hour off the running time and relaunched the movie into a successful run. If you haven’t seen “Fantasia”, I urge you to do so. It’s a real delight …

Sia is the stage name of Australian singer Sia Furler from Adelaide. Sia is a cousin of Australian Christian Rock musician Peter Furler.

85. Woman who took a "roll in ze hay" in "Young Frankenstein" : INGA
The lovely Teri Garr had a whole host of minor roles in her youth, including appearances in nine Elvis movies. Garr’s big break came with the role of Inga in “Young Frankenstein”, and her supporting role in “Tootsie” earned Garr an Academy Award nomination. Sadly, Teri Garr suffers from multiple sclerosis. She is a National Ambassador for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

90. Teddy Roosevelt targets : TRUSTS
President Theodore Roosevelt earned the nickname “the trust-buster president” due to his consistent use of US antitrust laws against companies that were engaging in anticompetitive practices. Notable results of the president’s actions were the breakup of Northern Securities Company (the country’s largest railroad trust) and the breakup of Standard Oil (the country’s largest oil company).

97. Short trailer : TEASER
The term “trailer” was originally used in the film industry to describe advertisements for upcoming features. These trailers were originally shown at the end of a movie being screened, hence the name. This practice quickly fell out of favor as theater patrons usually left at the end of the movie without paying much attention to the trailers. So, the trailers were moved to the beginning of the show, but the term “trailer” persisted.

99. Borgia who was an illegitimate son of Pope Alexander VI : CESARE
The Borgias were a papal family that was very prominent during the Renaissance in Europe. Two of the Borgias became popes, namely Pope Calixtus III and Pope Alexander VI. Pope Alexander VI had several children, including Cesare and Lucrezia Borgia. Cesare became a cardinal, and was the first cardinal to resign from the post. Lucrezia earned a reputation as a femme fatale, and as such turns up in many artworks, novels and movies.

102. Message from the marooned : SOS
The combination of three dots - three dashes - three dots, is a Morse signal first introduced by the German government as a standard distress call in 1905. The sequence is remembered as the letters SOS (three dots - pause - three dashes - pause - three dots), although in the emergency signal there is no pause between the dots and dashes, so SOS is in effect only a mnemonic. Similarly, the phrases "Save Our Souls" and "Save Our Ship" are also mnemonics, introduced after the "SOS" signal was adopted.

104. Noah of "ER" : WYLE
Noah Wyle is an actor noted for playing Dr. John Truman Carter III on television’s “ER”. He was highly valued by the show’s producers, earning about $400,000 per episode in 2005, a world record for an actor in a TV drama at that time.

108. Grp. with a mission : NASA
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

110. Predecessor of Rabin : MEIR
Golda Meir was known as the “Iron Lady” when she was Prime Minister of Israel, long before that sobriquet came to be associated with British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. Golda Meir was born Golda Mabovitch in Kiev (in modern-day Ukraine), and when she was a young girl she moved with her family to the United States and settled in Milwaukee. As a teenager she relocated to Denver where she met and married Morris Meyerson, at the age of 19. She and her husband joined a kibbutz in Palestine in 1921, when she was in her twenties. Meir had been active in politics in the US, and continued her political work in Palestine. She was very influential during WWII, and played a leading role in negotiations after the war leading to the setting up of the state of Israel. By the time she was called on to lead the country, Meir had already retired, citing exhaustion and ill health. But serve she did, and led Israel during turbulent times (e.g. the massacre at the Munich Olympics, and the Yom Kippur War). She eventually resigned in 1974, saying that was what the people wanted.

Yitzhak Rabin was the fifth Prime Minister of Israel, and the first Prime Minister to have been born in the relatively young state of Israel. Rabin was a signatory of the Oslo Accords in 1993, along with PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat, and US President Bill Clinton. Sadly, this led to his death as he was assassinated two years later by a right-wing radical who opposed the Accords.

111. What's lost in "Paradise Lost" : EDEN
“Paradise Lost” is an epic poem written by Englishman John Milton. It is indeed an epic work, published originally in ten volumes with over ten thousand lines of verse. The “paradise” that is “lost” is the Garden of Eden, from which Adam and Eve were expelled by God in the “Fall of Man”.

114. Original "Veronica Mars" channel : UPN
The United Paramount Network (UPN) was a TV channel that launched in 1995, and shut down in 2006. Some of UPN’s programming was moved to the CW channel at the time of UPN’s demise.

“Veronica Mars" is a TV show starring Kristen Bell in the title role. Mars is a student who also works as a private investigator.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Top : ACME
5. Wears : HAS ON
10. Pioneer in computer chess : IBM
13. Channel setting on many airport TVs : CNN
16. Gets cheeky with? : MOONS
18. Act on a sudden itch to be hitched : ELOPE
19. Fit for service : ONE-A
20. It may be seeded : RYE
21. Even (with) : FLUSH
22. Roger who battled 13-Across : AILES
23. Utter : OUT AND OUT
25. Cut, Paste and Print : MENU OPTIONS
27. Degree in math? : NTH
28. Mountain ___ : DEW
29. Copse makeup : TREES
30. Title character in a 1943 French novella [6] : LITTLE PRINCE (giving “Prince”)
35. Zap : NUKE
37. Pedagogic org. : NEA
39. Vote for : YEA
40. Pacific capital : APIA
41. N.F.L.'s Jaguars, on scoreboards : JAX
42. Sugar suffix : -OSE
43. 1990 Literature Nobelist Octavio ___ : PAZ
44. Toner cartridge contents : DRY INK
46. Is from ancient Rome? : EST
47. The Big Pineapple [4] : HONOLULU (giving “Lulu”)
50. Rhyme scheme ending a villanelle : ABAA
52. French word between two surnames : NEE
53. Intl. commerce grp. : WTO
54. Banded gemstones : ONYXES
55. Bert who sang "If I Only Had the Nerve" : LAHR
57. Poor People's Campaign organizer, for short : MLK
59. Frequent Bosch setting : HELL
60. Capital accumulation : WEALTH
61. Dance craze of the 2010s : DOUGIE
63. "___ and animals are free" (party slogan in "1984") : PROLES
65. "___ Mine" (George Harrison book) : I, ME,
66. Like some lawyers' work [4] : PRO BONO (giving “Bono”)
67. Musical talent : EAR
68. Cartographer : MAPPER
71. Try to sink one's teeth into : BITE AT
72. Cheap cooking implement : TIN PAN
76. Like, forever : AGES
77. Steely Dan's best-selling album : AJA
78. Naval noncoms : CPOS
80. E'erlasting : ETERNE
81. ___ one-eighty : DO A
82. Bleeping government org.? : FCC
84. Trophy figure : NIKE
86. "Why are you looking at me?" [4] : WHAT’D I DO? (giving “Dido”)
88. Where It. is : EUR
89. Inverse trig function : ARCTAN
91. Agcy. that oversaw plants : AEC
92. Ones "from Mars" : MEN
93. Inits. in some parlors : OTB
94. American-born Jordanian queen : NOOR
95. "Shoo!" : GIT!
98. Org. behind the Human Genome Project : NIH
99. Lewis ___, 1848 Democratic candidate for president : CASS
100. 11th-century campaign [4] : FIRST CRUSADE (giving “Sade”)
103. Put in stitches : SEWED
105. Like the Salt Lake Bees baseball team : AAA
106. Decoration for an R.A.F. pilot : DSO
107. "Will you let me have a taste?" : CAN I TRY SOME?
112. Clothing associated with Hillary Clinton : PANTSUITS
115. "Same here" : AS AM I
116. Like many pools and highways : LANED
117. Cooperation : AID
118. They begin trading, for short : IPOS
119. Frankincense, e.g. : RESIN
120. Singer of a famous bath time song : ERNIE
121. Crooked : WRY
122. Barack Obama's mother : ANN
123. Sturm und ___ : DRANG
124. Garner : EARN

Down
1. Like some radios : AM/FM
2. "Born Sinner" rapper J. ___ : COLE
3. 17,000+-foot peak near the Equator [4] : MOUNT KENYA (giving “Enya”)
4. Guarantee : ENSURE
5. Make airtight, in a way [4] : HEAT SEAL (giving “Seal”)
6. Others of ancient Rome? : ALII
7. Band member's time to shine : SOLO
8. In public : OPENLY
9. Monster's moniker : NESSIE
10. Healthy [4] : IN THE PINK (giving “Pink”)
11. "Don't ___ hero!" : BE A
12. Nightshade family member [5] : MANDRAKE (giving “Drake”)
13. Prized possession [5] : CROWN JEWEL (giving “Jewel”)
14. Home of the Gallatin Sch. of Individualized Study : NYU
15. Take home : NET
17. Unit around one foot? : SHOE
19. Spending : OUTLAY
23. Mich. neighbor : ONT
24. Mater ___ : DEI
26. One doing routine office work, informally [5] : PEN PUSHER (giving “Usher”)
31. "Wasn't that fantastic?!" : TADA!
32. Long : PINE
33. Move to protect the king, say : CASTLE
34. Praises highly : EXTOLS
35. At all, in dialect : NO HOW
36. Me.-to-Fla. route : US-ONE
38. Color of el mar : AZUL
45. Butt : RAM INTO
48. Flowers native to damp woods : OXLIPS
49. "Please, I'll handle it" : LET ME
50. Totally LOL-worthy : A HOOT
51. Dave of jazz [4] : BRUBECK (giving “Beck”)
56. Supermodel Lima : ADRIANA
58. Certain fire sign : LEO
59. Like the Greek god Pan : HORNED
62. Flip out : GO APE
63. One leading the exercises, for short? [4] : PE TEACHER (giving “Cher”)
64. Singer Bonnie : RAITT
66. Sandwich inits. : PBJ
68. Having as ingredients : MADE OF
69. Guinea pig relative : AGOUTI
70. Fruity spirit [6] : PEAR BRANDY (giving “Brandy”)
73. Vain, temperamental sort [7] : PRIMA DONNA (giving “Madonna”)
74. Long range : ANDES
75. Bright lights : NEONS
77. Band member's main squeeze? [4] : ACCORDION (giving “Dion)
79. ___ song : SWAN
82. 1940 Disney release [3] : FANTASIA (giving “Sia”)
83. Swamp swimmer : CROC
85. Woman who took a "roll in ze hay" in "Young Frankenstein" : INGA
87. Pulling off bank jobs [5] : HEISTING (giving “Sting”)
90. Teddy Roosevelt targets : TRUSTS
96. Much-swiped item : ID CARD
97. Short trailer : TEASER
99. Borgia who was an illegitimate son of Pope Alexander VI : CESARE
101. Took a breather : SAT
102. Message from the marooned : SOS
104. Noah of "ER" : WYLE
108. Grp. with a mission : NASA
109. "Sure, sign me up!" : I'M IN!
110. Predecessor of Rabin : MEIR
111. What's lost in "Paradise Lost" : EDEN
112. Rabbit's foot : PAW
113. It's inspired : AIR
114. Original "Veronica Mars" channel : UPN


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0722-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 22 Jul 17, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Zhouqin Burnikel
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 25m 24s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2

  • AT BAR (at war!)
  • BITMOJIS (witmojis!)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

13. Pouring one's heart out at a coffeehouse? : LATTE ART
Latte art is the name given to the designs that can be drawn on the surface of coffee drinks. Some of those designs can be quite intricate.

15. Lead female role on Netflix's "House of Cards" : CLAIRE
The hit TV show “House of Cards” is a political drama starring Kevin Spacey that highlights ruthless manipulation within the corridors of power in Washington, D.C. The show is an adaptation of a BBC miniseries of the same name, which in turn is based on a novel by Michael Dobbs. My wife and I have seen both versions of the show but disagree on which is the best. I favor the US version …

16. Sweepstakes exhortation : ENTER NOW!
A sweepstakes is a lottery in which the participants pay into a fund that becomes the prize. The term “sweepstakes” comes from the Middle English word “swepestake”, the name for the person who “sweeps up” all the stakes in a game.

19. Biting words? : SIC ‘EM
"Sic 'em" is an attack order given to a dog, instructing the animal to growl, bark or even bite. The term dates back to the 1830s, with “sic” being a variation of “seek”.

21. Descend upon en masse : MOB
“En masse” is a French term, one that is best translated as “as a group”

23. Wearer of an "H"-inscribed hat : ASTRO
The Houston baseball team changed its name to the Astros (sometimes “'Stros”) from the Colt .45s in 1965 when they started playing in the Astrodome. The Astrodome was so called in recognition of the city’s long association with the US space program. The Astros moved from the National League to the American League starting in the 2013 season.

24. Snapchat's ghost, e.g. : LOGO
Snapchat is a messaging system that allows users to send photos and video clips to a limited list of recipients. The photos and clips, called “snaps”, can be viewed for only a few seconds before they are deleted from the recipient’s device, and from the Snapchat servers.

26. Home to the Museum of El Greco : CRETE
Crete is the largest of the Greek Islands. Crete figures heavily in Greek mythology. Zeus was born in a cave at Mount Ida, the highest peak on the island. Crete was also home to the Labyrinth where the Minotaur was slain by Theseus. Icarus and Daedalus, after having crafted the Labyrinth, escaped from the island using wings that they crafted.

“El Greco” (“the Greek”, in Spanish) was the nickname of the artist whose real name was Domenikos Theotokopoulos. El Greco was born in Crete in 1541, and moved to Venice to study art when he was in his early twenties. A few years later he moved to the city of Toledo in central Spain, where he lived and worked for the rest of his life.

27. Lieutenant of 1970s TV : KOJAK
“Kojak” is a fun police drama that had an original run on TV from 1973 to 1978. The title character was NYPD Detective Lieutenant Theo Kojak, played by Telly Savalas. Famously, Kojak sucks away on Tootsie Pops as he tries to quit cigarettes. Kojak is assisted in his cases by Sergeant “Fatso” Stavros, a character played by George Savalas, Telly’s younger brother. Who loves ya, baby?

34. What some caddies carry : LOOSE TEA
A “caddy” is a container used for tea. “Caddy” comes from the Malay word “kati”, a unit of weight used as a standard by British tea companies in the East Indies.

35. The ___ Store : UPS
The franchised UPS Stores make up the world’s largest network of retail shipping, printing and business service centers. The first such outlets were branded and owned by Mail Boxes Etc., starting in 1980. UPS acquired Mail Boxes Etc. in 2001, and introduced the UPS Store brand in 2003. I’m a big fan …

37. Much-mimicked entertainer : ELVIS
Elvis Presley was born in Tupelo, Mississippi and moved to Memphis, Tennessee with his family when he was 13-years-old. Once he had achieved fame, Elvis purchased Graceland, the famous Memphis home that he used for himself and his family. I visited Graceland some years ago, and thoroughly enjoyed the experience.

42. Dodgers' pursuers : T-MEN
A T-man is a law-enforcement agent of the US Treasury (T is for “Treasury”).

43. Like H-U-M-O-U-R : SPELT
Both “spelled” and “spelt” are valid past tenses for the verb “to spell”, although the former is way more common on this side of the Atlantic. I grew up with “spelt” on the other side of the pond, but its usage is rapidly being replaced by “spelled” in the UK and Ireland.

44. Monastery head : LAMA
“Lama” is a Tibetan word meaning “chief” or “high priest”.

46. Major port near the Persian Gulf : BASRA
It’s quite a coincidence that the Iraqi city of Basra has a name that is an anagram of “Arabs”, isn’t it? Basra also features in the H. G. Wells science-fiction tale “The Shape of Things to Come”. Written in 1933, the storyline predicts a global conflict (WWII) that breaks out in 1940 lasting for ten years, after which chaos reigns as no victor emerges. Following worldwide plague, a benevolent dictatorship takes charge and the world moves towards a serene utopia. In time, the dictators are overthrown and peacefully retired, and the people of the Earth live happily ever after, all citizens of one global state with its capital in Basra in the Middle East.

The Persian Gulf is in effect an inland sea although it technically is an offshoot of the Indian Ocean. The outlet from the Persian Gulf to the Indian Ocean is one of the most famous maritime “choke points” in the world, known as the Strait of Hormuz. About 20% of the world’s supply of petroleum passes through the Strait of Hormuz.

48. Maker of hospital cuts : LANCET
“Lancet” is another name for a scalpel. There’s a publication called "The Lancet", which is probably the world's most respected medical journal. It is certainly the oldest, first published in 1823.

50. Airport monitor : TSA AGENT
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is the agency that employs the good folks that check passengers and baggage at airports.

Down
2. Shore line? : LAND HO!
The cry of "land ho!" from a sailor means that land has just been spotted. A similar shout is "sail ho!", indicating that another boat has been spotted.

5. Rockefeller Center muralist : SERT
José Maria Sert was a painter of murals from Catalan. He was a good friend of fellow-artist Salvador Dali.

6. Actor Hunter or singer Hunter : IAN
Ian Hunter, as well as being the frontman for Mott the Hoople, wrote the song "Cleveland Rocks", which was the anthem from "The Drew Carey Show".

7. Sports stick : CROSSE
A lacrosse stick is also known as a crosse.

Even though lacrosse was dropped from the Olympics after the 1908 games, the sport is currently enjoying a resurgence of popularity outside of North America.

8. Application to a cut : ALUM
“Alum” is the common name for the chemical potassium aluminium sulfate. Styptic pencils can contain alum as the active ingredient that stems bleeding from a small cut. The alum acts as an astringent, a compound that shrinks some body tissues.

9. U. 2's? : TAS
Teaching assistants (TAs) might be considered number-twos at a U (university).

10. Cartoon avatars on Snapchat : BITMOJIS
Snapchat is a messaging system that allows users to send photos and video clips to a limited list of recipients. The photos and clips, called “snaps”, can be viewed for only a few seconds before they are deleted from the recipient’s device, and from the Snapchat servers.

12. Some athletic footwear : REEBOKS
The brand name Reebok was adopted as the new company name for Foster Shoes of the UK in 1960. The name Reebok (more commonly “Rhebok”) is an Afrikaans word for an antelope, and comes from the term "roe buck".

15. Big role for Liz Taylor : CLEO
The 1963 movie “Cleopatra” really was an epic work. It was the highest grossing film of the year, taking in $26 million dollars at the box office, yet it still lost money. The original budget for the film was just $2 million, but so many things went wrong the final cost swelled to a staggering $44 million dollars, making it the second most expensive movie ever made (taking into account inflation). Elizabeth Taylor was supposed to earn a record amount of $1 million for the film, and ended up earned seven times that amount due to delays. But she paid dearly, as she became seriously ill during shooting and had to have an emergency tracheotomy to save her life. The scar in her throat can actually be seen in some of the shots in the film.

20. Bistro offering : CREPE
“Crêpe” is the French word for “pancake”.

“Bistro” was originally a Parisian slang term for a "little wine shop or restaurant".

24. Big-box store founded in 1946 : LOWE’S
Lucius S. Lowe opened the first Lowe’s hardware store in 1921, in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina. Lucius only knew the one store, as it was family who expanded the company after he passed away in 1940.

26. Seminary study : CREED
A creed or credo is a confession of faith, or a system of belief or principles. “Credo” is Latin for “I believe”.

Originally, a “seminary” was where plants were raised from seeds, as “semen” is the Latin for “seed”. The first schools labelled as seminaries were established in the late 1500s. Those first schools were more likely to be academies for young ladies back then, rather than for trainee priests.

27. Single-serve coffee holders : K-CUPS
A K-Cup is a single-portion cup of coffee, tea or hot chocolate in which the beverage is prepared in situ. K-Cup packs are used with brewing machines made by Keurig, a manufacturer of coffee brewers based in Reading, Massachusetts. Personally, I use a Nespresso machine …

38. Competitor of Mt. Olive : VLASIC
Apparently, Vlasic invented the glass-packed, shelf-stable pickle. The company adopted the stork mascot in the late sixties, with the stork originally carrying a baby. The mascot was a play on the perception that pregnant women have a higher than average appetite for pickles.

40. Ankh-holding deity : AMEN-RA
Amun (also “Amon, Amen, Amun-Ra") was a god in Egyptian mythology. Amun lends his name to our word "ammonia". This is because the Romans called the ammonium chloride that they collected near the Temple of Jupiter Amun, "sal ammoniacus" (salt of Amun).

The ankh was the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic character for “eternal life”. The ankh wasn’t just used in inscriptions but was often fashioned into amulets and as surrounds for mirrors (perhaps symbolizing a view into another world). The ankh is also known as “the key of the Nile” and “crux ansata” (Latin for “cross with a handle”).

47. Michael who directed "The Insider" : MANN
Not only is Michael Mann a film director, but he also produced the Academy Awards ceremony twice, in 1999 and 2004.

Jeffrey Wigand was once vice president of research and development at the tobacco company Brown & Williamson. Famously, Wigand gave a “tell all” interview for television's “60 Minutes” in which he described deliberate actions by his employers to increase the level of addiction of cigarette smokers. Wigand’s fascinating story was told in the 1999 movie “The Insider”, with Russell Crowe playing the whistle-blower.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Time-tested : CLASSIC
8. Being tried : AT BAR
13. Pouring one's heart out at a coffeehouse? : LATTE ART
15. Lead female role on Netflix's "House of Cards" : CLAIRE
16. Sweepstakes exhortation : ENTER NOW!
17. Radiance, in England : LUSTRE
18. Exhibit flexibility : ADAPT
19. Biting words? : SIC ‘EM
21. Descend upon en masse : MOB
22. "What is ___?" : THIS
23. Wearer of an "H"-inscribed hat : ASTRO
24. Snapchat's ghost, e.g. : LOGO
25. Pluto, to Saturn : SON
26. Home to the Museum of El Greco : CRETE
27. Lieutenant of 1970s TV : KOJAK
28. "___ Fancy has been quelled": Longfellow : ERE
29. Awesome successes : EPIC WINS
31. Attempt to establish an online connection : FRIEND REQUEST
34. What some caddies carry : LOOSE TEA
35. The ___ Store : UPS
36. Smoother, now : EASED
37. Much-mimicked entertainer : ELVIS
39. Budgeter's concern : CAP
42. Dodgers' pursuers : T-MEN
43. Like H-U-M-O-U-R : SPELT
44. Monastery head : LAMA
45. 1950s song syllable : SHA
46. Major port near the Persian Gulf : BASRA
47. Sticks in the mud : MIRES
48. Maker of hospital cuts : LANCET
50. Airport monitor : TSA AGENT
52. Hard-wired : INNATE
53. Words next to an X : SIGN HERE
54. Heavens : EDENS
55. Key : CENTRAL

Down
1. Slip preventers : CLEATS
2. Shore line? : LAND HO!
3. Reach : ATTAIN
4. Manual sequence : STEPS
5. Rockefeller Center muralist : SERT
6. Actor Hunter or singer Hunter : IAN
7. Sports stick : CROSSE
8. Application to a cut : ALUM
9. U. 2's? : TAS
10. Cartoon avatars on Snapchat : BITMOJIS
11. Confident to a fault : ARROGANT
12. Some athletic footwear : REEBOKS
14. Certain social media notifications : TWITTER ALERTS
15. Big role for Liz Taylor : CLEO
20. Bistro offering : CREPE
23. Fail to be : AREN’T
24. Big-box store founded in 1946 : LOWE’S
26. Seminary study : CREED
27. Single-serve coffee holders : K-CUPS
28. Sportscaster Rich : EISEN
30. Cry of exasperation : I QUIT!
31. Bit of sports fan paraphernalia : FOAM HAND
32. Show for which Laurie Metcalf won three Emmys : ROSEANNE
33. Ocean areas : DEEPS
34. Does not disturb : LETS LIE
38. Competitor of Mt. Olive : VLASIC
39. Drive like hell : CAREER
40. Ankh-holding deity : AMEN-RA
41. Baby blue, e.g. : PASTEL
43. Be adequate for : SATE
44. Word before or after green : LIGHT
46. Over and under, e.g. : BETS
47. Michael who directed "The Insider" : MANN
49. Fire : CAN
51. Sensitive conversation topic : AGE


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0721-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 21 Jul 17, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Paolo Pasco
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 14m 15s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Many consultants, for short : MBAS
The world’s first Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree was offered by Harvard’s Graduate School of Business Administration, in 1908.

9. Wayne's friend in "Wayne's World" : GARTH
“Wayne’s World” was originally a “Saturday Night Live” sketch starring Mike Myers (as Wayne Campbell) and Dana Carvey as Garth Algar. The sketch was so successful that it was parlayed into two hit movies, released in 1992 and 1993. Not my cup of tea though …

14. Waterway whose construction began in Rome : ERIE CANAL
The Erie Canal runs from Albany to Buffalo in the state of New York. What the canal does is allow shipping to proceed from New York Harbor right up the Hudson River, through the canal and into the Great Lakes. When it was opened in 1825, the Erie Canal had immediate impact on the economy of New York City and locations along its route. It was the first means of "cheap" transportation from a port on the Atlantic seaboard into the interior of the United States. Arguably it was the most important factor contributing to the growth of New York City over competing ports such as Baltimore and Philadelphia. It was largely because of the Erie Canal that New York became such an economic powerhouse, earning it the nickname of "the Empire State". Paradoxically, one of the project’s main proponents was severely criticized. New York Governor DeWitt Clinton received so much ridicule that the canal was nicknamed “Clinton’s Folly” and “Clinton’s Ditch”.

It is assumed that Rome, New York is named after the city in Italy, but no one seems to be sure why it is so called. The city, in Upstate New York near Utica, was originally founded as Lynchville. Prior to becoming a city, the settlement was called Fort Stanwix, named for the military outpost that dominated the area.

16. Word repeated before "to you and you and you," in a show tune : ADIEU
“So Long, Farewell” is a song from the stage musical “The Sound of Music”.

“The Sound of Music” is a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical that was made into a celebrated movie in 1965 starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer. The musical is based on “The Story of the Trapp Family Singers”, a memoir by Maria von Trapp. The von Trapp family ended up in Stowe, Vermont after the war, and one family descended from the Vermont von Trapps lives here in the same town in which I live in California.

18. "Ciao" : LATER
“Ciao” is the Italian for "'bye". "Arrivederci" is more formal, and translates as "goodbye".

26. Sleep phenomena : REMS
“REM” is an acronym that is short for Rapid Eye Movement sleep. REM sleep takes up 20-25% of the sleeping hours and is the period associated with one's most vivid dreams.

30. "___-Ami" (Guy de Maupassant novel) : BEL
“Bel Ami” is an 1885 novel by French author Guy de Maupassant. The title translates as “Nice Friend”, although a 1903 translation of the novel is titled “Bel Ami, or, The History of a Scoundrel”.

31. Jessica of "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre" : BIEL
Jessica Biel is an actress who was known by television audiences Mary Camden on “7th Heaven”. Biel's first film role was playing Peter Fonda’s granddaughter in “Ulee’s Gold”. Biel married singer and actor Justin Timberlake in 2012.

32. Frequent fodder for crossword clues : TRIVIA
Trivia are things of little consequence. “Trivia” is the plural of the Latin word “trivium” which means “a place where three roads meet”. Now that’s what I call a trivial fact …

34. Believer in spirits : ANIMIST
"Animism" comes from the Latin word "anima" meaning "soul, life". The word "animism" has two related but distinct meanings. In one sense, animism is the belief in souls, and in another sense it is the belief that souls exist for other entities that are not human. I think it is a relatively commonly held belief that animals may have souls (and that one can meet up with one's pet or cat or in heaven!), but it is less commonly believed that plants and even rocks can have souls too.

37. Bit of finger food : CANAPE
A canapé is a finger food, usually small enough to eat in just one bite. In French, “canapé” is actually the word for a couch or a sofa. The name was given to the snack as the original “canapés” were savories served on toasted or stale bread that supposedly resembled a tiny “couch”.

39. Lady Gaga's "___ It Happens to You" : TIL
“Lady Gaga” is the stage name of Stefani Germanotta. Germanotta is a big fan of the band Queen, and she took her stage name from the marvelous Queen song titled “Radio Ga Ga”.

40. Place for barnacles : KEEL
The barnacle is a marine arthropod related to the crab and the lobster. Barnacles are classified as “encrusters”, meaning that they attach themselves permanently to some solid substrate. It is thought that the name “barnacle” was applied to the marine create from the name of the barnacle goose. According to folklore, the barnacle goose “hatched” underwater, emerging from what we know today as “barnacles”.

43. ___ Martin, French firm since 1724 : REMY
Remy Martin is my favorite brand of cognac (remember that when it's my birthday!). In China, the name Remy Martin is not used, but rather the more colorful moniker "man-headed horse" which describes the centaur logo on the bottle.

47. "Mo Money Mo Problems" rapper : BIGGIE SMALLS
“The Notorious B.I.G.” was the stage name of rap star Christopher Wallace, who also went by the names “Biggie Smalls” and “Biggie”. While at the height of his fame Wallace was killed in a drive-by shooting in Los Angeles, a murder case that has never been solved. The 2009 movie “Notorious” is about Wallace’s life and stars fellow rap artist Jamal Woolard (aka Gravy) in the title role.

51. Early Indus Valley settler : ARYAN
The Indo-Aryans are a collection of peoples that speak languages that share the same linguistic roots, traced back to the ancient Indo-Iranian peoples. Included in the Indo-Aryan group of peoples are the Bengali people, the Gurkhas, the Kashmiri people and the Punjabi people.

The Indus river rises in Tibet and flows through the length of Pakistan and empties into the Arabian Sea, the part of the Indian Ocean lying to the west of the Indian subcontinent. The Indus gives its name to the country of India as "India" used to be the name of the region along the eastern banks of the river, which paradoxically is now in modern-day Pakistan.

52. Devotee of Mötley Crüe or Megadeth : METALHEAD
Mötley Crüe is an American rock band, from Los Angeles. They’ve been around since 1981, co-founded by the famous drummer Tommy Lee. Tommy Lee is also known for his two celebrated marriages, the first with Heather Locklear and the second with Pamela Anderson. The name “Mötley Crüe” was chosen as someone once described the band members as a “motley looking crew”. The spelling was made to look a little more exotic, with the umlauts added over the “o” and “u” one day, as the band were drinking bottles of “Löwenbräu” beer!

The “Big Four” of thrash metal were Metallica, Slayer, Anthrax and Megadeth. I have no idea what thrash metal is …

56. Spike who directed "Being John Malkovich" : JONZE
Spike Jonze is a movie director whose first feature film was “Being John Malkovich” (1999). Jonze also directed a couple of films for which he wrote the screenplays, namely “Where the Wild things Are” (2009) and “Her” (2013). Jonze also co-created the MTV show “Jackass”. Can’t stand that show, said he grumpily …

“Being John Malkovich” is a 1999 fantasy comedy starring John Cusack and Cameron Diaz, and of course John Malkovich playing himself. The crazy storyline features a puppeteer (played by Cusack) who discovers a portal into Malkovich’s mind.

57. Player of a drug kingpin on "The Wire" : IDRIS ELBA
The English actor Idris Elba is probably best known in North America for playing the drug lord Stringer Bell in the marvelous HBO drama series “The Wire”, and the title character in the 2013 film “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom”. Off the screen, Elba occasionally works as a disk jockey using the name DJ Big Driis.

60. Plan, for short : SKED
Schedule (sked)

Down
1. Dudes : MEN
2. Dude : BRO
Our term “dude” arose as slang in New York City in the 1880s, when it was used to describe a fastidious man. In the early 1900s, the term was extended to mean “city slickers”, Easterners who vacationed in the West. The first use of the term “dude ranch” was recorded in 1921.

5. "___ the Virgin" (CW show) : JANE
The WB Television Network was launched in 1995 as a joint venture between Warner Bros. Entertainment and Tribune Broadcasting. The WB (for “Warner Bros.”) was shut down in 2006 and replaced by the CW (for “CBS” and “Warner Bros.”).

7. DraftKings competitor : FANDUEL
DraftKings and FanDuel are companies offering fantasy sports games and leagues.

9. Polka forerunner : GALOP
A galop is a type of dance, very popular in Parisian society in the 1800s. It is a fast-paced dance, named after the fastest running gait of a horse (a gallop). The most famous exponent of the form was Johann Strauss II.

The polka is a dance from central Europe, one that originated in Bohemia in the mid-1800s. It’s thought that “polka” comes from a Czech word meaning “little half”, reflecting the little half-steps included in the basic dance.

10. 1949 Hepburn/Tracy courtroom film : ADAM'S RIB
And here it is, my favorite movie of all time! “Adam’s Rib” is a classic romantic comedy starring the powerful duo, Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn, playing two lawyers married to each other. Inevitably, the married couple have to take opposite sides in a high-profile court case, and hilarity ensues. The film is an interesting exploration of the roles of men and women in 1949 American society.

15. Christmas decoration : CANE
Apparently, candy canes were created at the behest of the choirmaster at Cologne Cathedral in Germany in 1672. The sweet sticks were basically used as bribes to keep children quiet during services. The choirmaster specified that the candy sticks should have a crook at the top so that they reminded the children of the three shepherds who visited the infant Jesus just after his birth.

21. Faddish dance move done to the 2015 hit "Watch Me" : NAE NAE
The Nae Nae is a hip hop dance that is named for the 2013 song “Drop that NaeNae” recorded by We Are Toon. The main move in the dance involves swaying with one hand in the air and one hand down, with both feet firmly planted on the dancefloor. Go on, do it. You know you want to …

24. Arizona ballplayer, casually : D-BACK
The Arizona Diamondbacks joined Major League Baseball's National League in 1998. By winning the World Series in 2001, the Diamondbacks became the fastest expansion team to do so in Major League history.

28. Dr. Evil's sidekick in Austin Powers movies : MINI-ME
The actor Verne Troyer is best known for playing the character Mini-Me in the “Austin Powers” series of films. Troyer suffers from a form of dwarfism, and at a height of only 2 ft 8 in is one of the shortest men in the world.

31. Marcel Marceau persona : BIP
Marcel Marceau was the most famous mime of all time, and a native of Strasbourg in France. He is perhaps most associated with the character Bip the Clown who he played onstage. Marceau made a cameo appearance in Mel Brooks's "Silent Movie", portraying himself. In the scene, Mel Brooks is asking Marceau to appear in his movie (a question asked silently of course, in subtitles), and Marceau turns to the camera and speaks the only word in the whole film, "Non!" (French for "No!"). The mime speaks! Brilliant …

33. Dorm V.I.P.s : RAS
RAs are resident assistants or resident advisers, the peer leaders found in residence halls, particularly on a college campus.

36. Something prohibited by the Ten Commandments : IDOLATRY
According to the Book of Exodus in the Bible, Aaron made a golden calf as an idol for the Israelites to worship while Moses was on Mount Sinai receiving the Ten Commandments. When Moses returned, he became angry on seeing the calf and destroyed it.

38. Island in San Francisco Bay : ALAMEDA
“Alameda” is Spanish for “a place full of poplars”. There are number of locations in the US and elsewhere with the name “Alameda”, including the county of Alameda, California where I am right now, writing this post. Alameda County is also home to the city of Alameda located on Alameda Island.

42. "Do You Hear the People Sing?" musical, to fans : LES MIZ
The 1980 musical “Les Misérables” is an adaptation of the 1862 novel of the same name by Victor Hugo. The show opened in London in 1985, and is the longest running musical in the history of London’s West End. My wife and I saw “Les Miz” in the Queen’s Theatre in London quite a few years ago, but were only able to get tickets in the very back row. The theater seating is very steep, so the back row of the balcony is extremely high over the stage. One of the big events in the storyline is the building of a street barricade over which the rebels fight. At the height we were seated we could see the stagehands behind the barricade, sitting drinking Coke, even smoking cigarettes. On cue, the stagehands would get up and catch a dropped rifle, or an actor who had been shot. It was pretty comical. I didn’t really enjoy the show that much, to be honest. Some great songs, but the musical version of the storyline just didn’t seem to hang together for me.

43. Outbreaks of eczema, e.g. : RASHES
Eczema is a form of dermatitis. The term “eczema” comes from the Greek for “to boil over”.

46. Lawful ends? : ELLS
The ends of the word “lawful” are letters L (ell).

47. State bordering California, informally : BAJA
Baja California is both the most northern and the most western of the Mexican states. The name translates from Spanish as “Lower California”.

49. Peer ___ : GYNT
Henrik Ibsen’s play “Peer Gynt” is based on a Scandinavian fairy tale “Per Gynt”. The incidental music to the play, written by Edvard Grieg, is some of the most approachable classical music ever written, at least in my humble opinion …

53. They're game : ELK
The elk (also known as the wapiti) is the one of the largest species of deer in the world, with only the moose being bigger. Early European settlers were familiar with the smaller red deer back in their homelands, so when they saw the “huge” wapiti they assumed it was a moose, and incorrectly gave it the European name for a moose, namely “elk”. The more correct name for the beast is “wapiti”, which means “white rump” in Shawnee. It’s all very confusing …

54. Half a Hamilton : ABE
The US five-dollar bill is often called an "Abe", as President Lincoln’s portrait is on the front. An Abe is also referred to as a “fin”, a term that has been used for a five-pound note in Britain since 1868.

The US ten-dollar bill features the image of Alexander Hamilton, the first US Secretary of the Treasury, on the obverse. As such, ten-dollar bills are sometimes called “Hamiltons”. By the way, the $10 bill is the only US currency in circulation in which the portrait faces to the left. The reverse of the ten-dollar bill features the US Treasury Building.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Many consultants, for short : MBAS
5. Flash : JIFF
9. Wayne's friend in "Wayne's World" : GARTH
14. Waterway whose construction began in Rome : ERIE CANAL
16. Word repeated before "to you and you and you," in a show tune : ADIEU
17. Emphatic parental turndown : NO MEANS NO!
18. "Ciao" : LATER
19. Words from one about to break into tears : I NEED A MOMENT
21. Master of ___ : NONE
23. Cards : CUT-UPS
24. "Ain't that the worst!" : DANG!
25. Add oil to, maybe : DRESS
26. Sleep phenomena : REMS
30. "___-Ami" (Guy de Maupassant novel) : BEL
31. Jessica of "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre" : BIEL
32. Frequent fodder for crossword clues : TRIVIA
34. Believer in spirits : ANIMIST
36. Trapped : IN A BIND
37. Bit of finger food : CANAPE
38. Stirs : ADOS
39. Lady Gaga's "___ It Happens to You" : TIL
40. Place for barnacles : KEEL
41. Dispense : ALLOT
43. ___ Martin, French firm since 1724 : REMY
44. Formally approve, as a document, old-style : ENSEAL
46. No worries : EASE
47. "Mo Money Mo Problems" rapper : BIGGIE SMALLS
51. Early Indus Valley settler : ARYAN
52. Devotee of Mötley Crüe or Megadeth : METALHEAD
56. Spike who directed "Being John Malkovich" : JONZE
57. Player of a drug kingpin on "The Wire" : IDRIS ELBA
58. Puts money on the table, say : ANTES
59. One-named singer with the 2016 #1 hit "Pillowtalk" : ZAYN
60. Plan, for short : SKED

Down
1. Dudes : MEN
2. Dude : BRO
3. Quarterback's asset : AIM
4. Involved with : SEEING
5. "___ the Virgin" (CW show) : JANE
6. Behind closed doors : IN SECRET
7. DraftKings competitor : FANDUEL
8. They might be wished for at fountains : FLOATS
9. Polka forerunner : GALOP
10. 1949 Hepburn/Tracy courtroom film : ADAM'S RIB
11. Initiation practice : RITE
12. This puzzle's constructor, for one : TEEN
13. What words can do, in an admonishment : HURT
15. Christmas decoration : CANE
20. Is forbidden to : MUST NOT
21. Faddish dance move done to the 2015 hit "Watch Me" : NAE NAE
22. Facebook Chat status denoted by a green dot : ONLINE
24. Arizona ballplayer, casually : D-BACK
25. Nationalism, per Einstein : DISEASE
27. Modern requests for participation : EVITES
28. Dr. Evil's sidekick in Austin Powers movies : MINI-ME
29. "Sorry to say ..." : SADLY ...
31. Marcel Marceau persona : BIP
33. Dorm V.I.P.s : RAS
35. Topic in feminist film criticism : MALE GAZE
36. Something prohibited by the Ten Commandments : IDOLATRY
38. Island in San Francisco Bay : ALAMEDA
42. "Do You Hear the People Sing?" musical, to fans : LES MIZ
43. Outbreaks of eczema, e.g. : RASHES
45. Great scores in Olympic diving : NINES
46. Lawful ends? : ELLS
47. State bordering California, informally : BAJA
48. Press : IRON
49. Peer ___ : GYNT
50. Reclined : LAIN
53. They're game : ELK
54. Half a Hamilton : ABE
55. Pop : DAD


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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