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0716-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 16 Jul 17, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
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CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Andrea Carla Michaels & Pete Muller
THEME: If the Spirit Moves You
We several sets of circled letters that LOOP AROUND in today’s grid. Those letters spell out the the names of alcoholic drinks:
61A. Places to get looped : COCKTAIL LOUNGES
29D. "It's on me!" ... or a hint to this puzzle's circled letters : DRINKS ALL AROUND!
The cocktails are, from top-left to bottom-right:

  • DIRTY MARTINI
  • BEER
  • PINK LADY
  • COSMOPOLITAN
  • TIA MARIA
  • WINE

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 21m 29s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Five Norwegian kings : OLAVS
Of the many kings of Norway named Olaf/Olav (and there have been five), Olaf II is perhaps the most celebrated as he was canonized and made patron saint of the country. Olaf II was king from 1015 to 1028 and was known as "Olaf the Big" (or Olaf the Fat) during his reign. Today he is more commonly referred to as "Olaf the Holy". After Olaf died he was given the title of Rex Perpetuus Norvegiae, which is Latin for “Norway’s Eternal King”.

6. Nighty-night wear : PJS
Our word "pajamas" (“PJs” for short) comes to us from the Indian subcontinent, where "pai jamahs" were loose fitting pants tied at the waist and worn at night by locals and ultimately by the Europeans living there. And "pajamas" is another of those words that I had to learn to spell differently when I came to America. In the British Isles the spelling is "pyjamas".

9. Bird bills : NEBS
“Nib” is a Scottish variant of the Old English word “neb”, with both meaning the beak of a bird. This usage of “nib” as a beak dates back to the 14th century, with “nib” meaning the tip of a pen or quill coming a little later, in the early 1600s.

13. Fancy-schmancy : POSH
No one really knows the etymology of the word “posh”. The popular myth that POSH is actually an acronym standing for “Port Out, Starboard Home” is completely untrue, and is a story that can actually be traced back to the 1968 movie “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang”. The myth is that wealthy British passengers travelling to and from India would book cabins on the port side for the outward journey and the starboard side for the home journey. This trick was supposedly designed to keep their cabins out of the direct sunlight.

17. Bottoms : NADIRS
The nadir is the direction pointing immediately below a particular location (through to the other side of the Earth for example). The opposite direction, that pointing immediately above, is called the zenith. We use the terms “nadir” and “zenith” figuratively to mean the low and high points in a person’s fortunes.

19. O.K., in Okinawa : HAI
Okinawa is a large city located on the island of Okinawa in the very south of Japan. Okinawa is home to several US military facilities including Kadena Air Base and the Marine Corps’ Camp Foster.

20. First name in courtroom fiction : ERLE
I must have read all of the “Perry Mason” books when I was in college. I think they kept me sane when I was facing the pressure of exams. Author Erle Stanley Gardner was himself a lawyer, although he didn't get into the profession the easy way. Gardner went to law school, but got himself suspended after a month. So, he became a self-taught attorney and opened his own law office in Merced, California. Understandably, he gave up the law once his novels became successful.

21. Bee-fitting? : APIAN
An apiary is an area where bees are kept. The Latin word for “bee” is “apis”.

25. Carolina ___ : WREN
A wren is a small songbird belonging to the family troglodytidae and the genus troglodytes. Wrens are known for making dome-shaped nests.

28. Traditional Chinese forces : YIN AND YANG
The yin and the yang can be illustrated using many different metaphors. In one, as the sun shines on a mountain, the side in the shade is the yin and the side in the light is the yang. The yin is also regarded as the feminine side, and the yang the masculine. The yin can also be associated with the moon, while the yang is associated with the sun.

30. Male duck : DRAKE
A male duck is called a “drake” and a female duck is called a “duck”, or sometimes a “hen”.

31. Author Anaïs : NIN
Anaïs Nin was a French author, famous for her journals that she wrote for over sixty years from the age of 11 right up to her death. Nin also wrote highly regarded erotica and cited D. H. Lawrence as someone from whom she drew inspiration. Nin was married to banker and artist Hugh Parker Guiler in 1923. Decades later in 1955, Nin married former actor Rupert Pole, even though she was still married to Guiler. Nin and Pole had their marriage annulled in 1966, but just for legal reasons, and they continued to live together as husband and wife until Nin passed away in 1977.

32. ROFL alternative : LMAO
Laughing my a** off (LMAO)

Rolling on Floor Laughing (ROFL)

34. Polish rolls : BIALYS
“Bialy” is a Yiddish name for a small onion roll, which takes its name from Bialystok, a city in Poland.

35. Get off at Grand Central, say : DETRAIN
Grand Central Terminal in New York City is the largest railroad station in the world in terms of the number of platforms (44). Those platforms are all underground, in two levels. The official name for the facility is “Grand Central Terminal”. The name “Grand Central Station” is very common, and is actually the name of the facility that the terminal replaced in 1913.

37. Like most things in "Ripley's Believe It or Not!" : WEIRD
“Ripley’s Believe It or Not!” is a huge franchise on television that is affiliated to a worldwide chain of museums. The franchise started out as cartoon feature appearing in newspapers in 1918.

38. Bring home the bacon : EARN
Back in the day, a wealthy man would “bring home the bacon”, and sit around with guests “chewing the fat”.

39. Nary ___ : A ONE
The adjective "nary" means "not one", as in “nary a soul”.

45. "Anyhoo," e.g. : SEGUE
A segue is a transition from one topic to the next. “Segue” is an Italian word that literally means “now follows”. It was first used in musical scores directing the performer to play into the next movement without a break.

47. Architect Gehry : FRANK
Frank Gehry is an architect from Toronto who is based in Los Angeles. Listed among Gehry’s famous creations are the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao in Spain, The Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles and his own private residence in Santa Monica, California. He is currently working on the upcoming Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial that will be placed in Washington, D.C. I hope to see that one day …

50. Couturier Cassini : OLEG
Oleg Cassini, the French-born American fashion designer, had two big names particularly associated with his designs. In the sixties he produced the state wardrobe for First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, and he was also the exclusive designer for Hollywood's Gene Tierney, who was Cassini's second wife.

51. U.S. rebellion leader of 1841-42 : DORR
Thomas Wilson Dorr led the Dorr Rebellion of 1841-42 in Rhode Island. The issue at that time was the limited right to vote in the state, as only landowners could do so at that time. Soon after the rebellion, suffrage was extended to any free man who could pay a poll tax of $1.

54. Rhett Butler's final two words : A DAMN
In Margaret Mitchell’s novel “Gone with the Wind”, when Rhett Butler finally walks out on Scarlett O’Hara he utters the words “My dear, I don’t give a damn”. Most of us are more familiar with the slightly different words spoken by Clark Gable in the film adaption of the story: “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn.”

58. "My ___" (1979 hit by the Knack) : SHARONA
“My Sharona” is a hit single from 1979 released by a band called the Knack. The band’s guitarist wrote the song after meeting a 17-year-old girl called Sharona, who later became his girlfriend. Young Sharona appears on the cover sleeve for the record. Three decades later, Sharona’s a real estate agent in LA.

60. Nail polish brand : CUTEX
Cutex introduced the first liquid nail polish in 1917. That polish was basically automobile paint.

61. Places to get looped : COCKTAIL LOUNGES
Our word “cocktail” first appeared in the early 1800s. The exact origin of the term is not clear, but it is thought to be a corruption of the French word “coquetier” meaning “egg cup”, a container that was used at that time for serving mixed drinks.

68. "Hidden Figures" actor : COSTNER
Kevin Costner attributes some of his motivation to pursue an acting career to the great Welsh actor, Richard Burton. Back when Costner was taking acting classes, and was undecided about whether to continue chasing his dream, he ran into Burton on a flight from Puerto Vallarta. Burton agreed to chat with him for a little while, and so Costner was able to ask him if acting meant tolerating the kind of personal drama that had plagued Burton’s own life. Burton told him, “You have green eyes. I have green eyes. I think you’ll be fine”.

“Hidden Figures” is an excellent 2016 film based on a book of the same name by Margot Lee Shetterly. Both book and film tell the story of female African American mathematicians who worked for NASA during the Mercury and Apollo programs in the 1960s.

72. One of 16 works by Brahms : WALTZ
Johannes Brahms was a leading German composer during the Romantic period. Brahms is one of the “Three Bs”, often grouped with Johann Sebastian Bach and Ludwig van Beethoven.

73. Roasted: Sp. : ASADA
The name of the dish called “carne asada” translates from Spanish as “roasted meat”.

76. Kvetch : MOAN
The word "kvetch" comes to us from Yiddish, with "kvetshn" meaning "to complain" or "squeeze".

77. "___ Just Seen a Face" (Beatles tune) : I’VE
“I’ve Just Seen a Face” is a song that the Beatles released on the “Help!” album in 1965. The song was written by Paul McCartney and features McCartney on vocals.

82. "Miss Julie" opera composer, 1965 : NED ROREM
American composer Ned Rorem is famous for his musical compositions, but also for his book “Paris Diary of Ned Rorem” that was published in 1966. Rorem talks openly about his sexuality in the book, and also about the sexual orientation of others including Noel Coward, Leonard Bernstein and Samuel Barber, much to some people’s chagrin.

85. 19th-century French landscapist : COROT
Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot was a French painter mainly noted for his landscapes, working just before the birth of the Impressionist movement. His lovely painting “The Bridge at Narni” from 1826 can be seen at the Musée du Louvre in Paris.

86. Weisshorn and others : ALPS
Many Alpine mountains have German names that end with “-horn”. Examples are Weisshorn and Matterhorn. "Horn" is German for "peak".

87. "Beowulf" and others : EPOS
“Epos” is the Greek word for a story or a poem. We have absorbed the term into English with the same meaning, and also as “epic”, describing a long narrative poetic work featuring heroic deeds and ventures.

"Beowulf" is an old epic poem from England, although the story is set in Scandinavia. Beowulf fights a battle, defending the Danish King Hrothgar from the ferocious outcast Grendel. Hrothgar had built a great hall for his people in which they could celebrate; singing, dancing and drinking lots of mead. Grendel was angered by the carousing and attacked the hall, devouring many of the incumbent warriors as they slept. A bit of an extreme reaction to noisy neighbors I'd say …

88. Bottle for oil or vinegar : CRUET
A cruet is a small glass bottle for holding a condiment or perhaps a dressing. The word “cruet” comes from the Old French word for an earthen pot.

92. Nursery rhyme destination : ST IVES
You might remember the nursery rhyme “As I was going to St. Ives” from the third “Die Hard” movie, “Die Hard With a Vengeance”. The rhyme is used as a riddle in the film’s storyline. The rhyme goes like this:
As I was going to St Ives
I met a man with seven wives
Each wife had seven sacks
Each sack had seven cats
Each cat had seven kits
Kits, cats, sacks, wives
How many were going to St Ives?
There is more than one place called St. Ives in England, but most think the reference is to the seaside town of St. Ives in Cornwall. By the way, the answer to the riddle is “one”, because just the narrator was going to St. Ives, and the rest were characters he met along the way.

95. Ersatz : PHONY
Something described as ersatz is a copy, and usually not a good one. “Ersatz” comes from the German verb “ersetzen” meaning “to replace”.

97. Singer DiFranco : ANI
Ani DiFranco is a folk-rock singer and songwriter. DiFranco has also been labeled a "feminist icon", and in 2006 won the "Woman of Courage Award" from National Organization for Women.

101. Artist who designed costumes for "Ben-Hur" : ERTE
“Erté” was the pseudonym of French (Russian born) artist and designer Romain de Tirtoff. Erté is the French pronunciation of his initials "R.T." Erté’s diverse portfolio of work included costumes and sets for the “Ziegfeld Follies” of 1923, productions of the Parisian cabaret show “Folies Bergère”, as well as the 1925 epic movie “Ben-Hur”. Erté's most famous work by far is an image titled “Symphony in Black”. It depicts a tall and slender woman dressed in black, holding a black dog on a leash.

The celebrated Charlton Heston movie "Ben-Hur" is a dramatization of a book published in 1880 by Lew Wallace titled "Ben-Hur: A Tale of Christ". The 1959 epic film won a record 11 Academy Awards, a feat that has been equaled since then but has never been beaten. The other winners of 11 Oscars are "Titanic" and "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the Rings".

107. Fifth-century pope known as "the Great" : LEO I
The first pope named Leo is now known as Pope Saint Leo the Great. Leo I is famous for meeting with the feared Attila the Hun and persuading him to turn back his invading force that was threatening to overrun Western Europe.

108. Son of, in Arabic names : IBN
In Arabic names, “ibn” is a word meaning “son of”. The words “bin” and “ben” are also used for “son of”. The word “bint” means “daughter of”. Similarly, in Hebrew “ben” is used to mean “son of”, and “bat” is used to mean “daughter of”.

109. Company lover? : MISERY
Misery loves company.

110. Captain von Trapp's betrothed : ELSA
The von Trapps portrayed in the musical “The Sound of Music” were a real family, as is well known. In the musical and film, the eldest daughter is “Liesl”, although in real life her name was Agathe. Agathe came with her family to the US in 1938, and operated a private kindergarten in Baltimore, Maryland for 35 years. Agathe passed away in 2010.

113. Captain Nemo's creator : VERNE
Jules Verne really was a groundbreaking author. Verne pioneered the science fiction genre, writing about space, air and underwater travel, long before they were practical and proved feasible. Verne is the second-most translated author of all time, with only Agatha Christie beating him out.

Down
2. Actress Kazan of "My Big Fat Greek Wedding" : LAINIE
Lainie Kazan is an actress and singer from Brooklyn, New York. One of Kazan’s first acting jobs was working as Barbra Streisand’s understudy in the stage musical “Funny Girl”. She was the understudy for 18 months before she had an opportunity to go on stage when Streisand developed a throat condition. Kazan’s performances were so well received that she quit the show and embarked on a singing career.

Not only is the delightful Nia Vardalos the star of the 2002 hit movie “My Big Fat Greek Wedding”, she also wrote the screenplay. The film never made it to number one at the box office, but it still pulled in more money than any other movie in history that didn’t make it to number one. That record I think reflects the fact that the film wasn’t a blockbuster but rather a so-called “sleeper hit”, a movie that people went to see based on referrals from friends. The big fat mistake came when a spin-off TV show was launched, “My Big Fat Greek Life”. It ran for only 7 episodes. “My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2” will hit movie theaters in 2016.

4. Word before Cong or Minh : VIET
During the Vietnam War, the political organization opposing the US and South Vietnamese governments was called the National Liberation Front (NLF). The NLF was referred to as the Viet Cong by the Western media, which is a contraction of “Viet Nam Cong-san” meaning “Vietnamese communist”.

5. Mister, in New Delhi : SRI
New Delhi is the capital city of India. New Delhi resides within the National Capital Territory of Delhi (otherwise known as the metropolis of Delhi). New Delhi and Delhi, therefore, are two different things.

6. 45 player : PHONO
The first vinyl records designed to play at 33⅓ rpm were introduced by RCA Victor in 1931, but were discontinued due to quality problems. The first long play (LP) 33⅓ rpm disc was introduced by Columbia Records many years later in 1948, with RCA Victor following up with a 45 rpm “single” the following year, in 1949.

7. Resident of Tatooine in "Star Wars" : JAWA
In the “Star Wars” universe, the Jawa are a race of rodent-like pygmies who live on the desert planet called Tatooine.

8. It's Irish for "We Ourselves" : SINN FEIN
Sinn Féin is a political party in Ireland, largely representing the Catholic community in Northern Ireland, although representation in the Republic of Ireland has increased in recent years. It is led by Gerry Adams, and has the stated aim of uniting Ireland north and south. Sinn Féin is Irish for “we ourselves”. It is currently the second largest party in the Northern Ireland Assembly.

9. Orange avenue in Monopoly : NEW YORK
The street names in the US version of Monopoly are locations in or around Atlantic City, New Jersey.

12. Hong Kong's Hang ___ Index : SENG
The Hang Seng Index (HSI) is the most important stock market index reported from Hong Kong. The index was started in 1969 by one of the largest banks in Hong Kong, the Hang Seng Bank.

15. Rope fiber : SISAL
I suppose it is telling that whenever I hear mention of agave plants, I think of tequila. The sisal plant is an agave, but as far as I can tell its flesh is not used in making the Mexican liquor. Sisal is grown instead for the fibers that run the length of its leaves. The fiber is used extensively for twine, rope, carpeting, wall coverings etc. My favorite application though, is in the construction of dartboards. Sisal takes its name from the port of Sisal in Yucatan, Mexico that was a major shipping point for sisal plants.

16. It might absorb a blow : HANKY
A “kerchief” is a triangular or square piece of cloth used as a covering for the head. So, a handkerchief (“hand-kerchief”) is a square piece of cloth held in the hand and used for personal hygiene.

18. Frustrate : STYMIE
The word “stymie” comes from golf, and is a situation in which one’s approach to the hole is blocked by an opponent’s ball.

24. Gorilla watcher Fossey : DIAN
Dian Fossey carried out her famous study of gorilla populations in the mountain forests of Rwanda (NB: it was Jane Goodall that worked with chimpanzees). Sadly, Fossey was found dead in her cabin in Rwanda in 1986, murdered in her bedroom, her skull split open by a machete. The crime was never solved.

34. Scott of "Joanie Loves Chachi" : BAIO
Scott Baio is the actor who played Chachi Arcola in the great sitcom “Happy Days” and in the not-so-great spinoff “Joanie Loves Chachi”. Baio also played the title role in a later sitcom called “Charles in Charge”. Earlier in his career, he played another title role, in the 1976 movie “Bugsy Malone”, appearing opposite a young Jodie Foster.

40. Elementary school trio, briefly : RRR
The “three Rs” (RRR) are reading, 'riting and 'rithmetic.

41. Actor Reeves : KEANU
Keanu Reeves is a Canadian actor whose most celebrated roles were a metalhead in "Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure" (1989), a cop in "Speed" (1994) and the protagonist Neo in "The Matrix" series of films. Although Reeves is a Canadian national, he was born in Beirut, Lebanon. Reeves has some Hawaiian descent, and the name "Keanu" is Hawaiian for "the coolness" or “cool breeze”..

43. Gold rush city of 1899 : NOME
The Nome Gold Rush of 1899-1909 was remarkable in the ease that the precious metal could be gathered. Many prospectors were finding gold lying in beach sand and were making their fortunes without even having to make a claim.

44. Boomers' offspring : GEN-X
The term Generation X originated in the UK where it was the name of a book by Jane Deverson. Her book detailed the results of a study of British youths in 1964, contrasting their lifestyle to those of previous generations. It was Canadian author Douglas Coupland who was responsible for popularizing the term, with his more successful publication “Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture”. By the latest accepted definition, Gen-Xers were born between 1961 and 1981.

48. Fly-fisher's line joiner : BLOOD KNOT
The cat-o’-nine-tails was a vicious instrument of punishment, particularly popular in the Royal Navy. The “cat” was made up on nine cord thongs and at the end of each thong was a knot. The specialty knot was aptly called a blood knot, and was designed to bite into the skin and draw blood. It was these “claws” at the end of the thongs, along with the nine “tails” that gave the name to the whip, the “cat-o’-nine-tails”.

53. Shield border : ORLE
In heraldry, an orle is a decorative band that lies close to the edge of the front-surface of a shield. With such a design, the orle necessarily takes on the shape of the shield.

57. 1970s TV cool dude, with "the" : FONZ
Fonzie is a character in the sitcom “Happy Days” that was originally aired from 1974 to 1984. The Fonz (aka Arthur Fonzarelli) was written as a secondary character, but eventually took over the show. Fonzie is played by Henry Winkler.

65. Place to pray : NAVE
In large Christian churches, the nave is the main approach to the altar, and is where most of the congregation are seated.

71. Hosp. staffers : RNS
One might find a registered nurse (RN) or a medical doctor (MD) in an emergency room (ER).

75. D.C. athlete : NAT
The Washington Nationals (“The Nats”) baseball team started out life as the Montreal Expos in 1969, and were the first Major League Baseball team in Canada. The Expos moved to Washington in 2005 becoming the Nats. There are only two Major Leagues teams that have never played in a World Series, one being the Mariners and the other the Nats.

85. Zagreb's country : CROATIA
Zagreb is the capital city of the European Republic of Croatia. Zagreb has been around a long, long time, and dates back to the diocese of Zagreb that was founded at the end of 11th century.

91. Stereotypical Deadhead wear : TIE-DYE
The Grateful Dead were a rock band from the San Francisco Bay Area that was founded in 1965. “The Dead” disbanded in 1995 following the death of lead guitarist Jerry Garcia. Grateful Dead fans (the ranks of whom include my wife) refer to themselves as “Deadheads”.

93. Concentration, to a British chemist : TITRE
Remember those titrations we did in the chemistry lab at school? They were to measure the concentration of solutions, also known as the solution’s titer.

95. Lose steam, with "out" : PETER
The verb phrase “to peter out”, meaning “to fizzle out”, originated in the 1840s in the American mining industry. While the exact etymology isn’t clear, it probably derives from the term “saltpetre”, a constituent of gunpowder.

96. Kind of pad : STENO
Stenography is the process of writing in shorthand. The term comes from the Greek "steno" (narrow) and "graphe" (writing).

99. Presidents' Day event : SALE
What many of us know today as “Presidents’ Day” started out life as Washington’s Birthday in 1879. It was originally only observed in the District of Columbia, and on the actual birthday of President Washington: February 22. The holiday was moved to the third Monday in February by Congress in 1971. Paradoxically, this shift means that the holiday takes place between February 15-21, and never on Washington's actual birthday, the 22nd.

100. "Mad Money" network : CNBC
The television show “Mad Money” started airing in 2005, and is hosted by the ebullient Jim Cramer. Cramer recommends that essential funds, such as those reserved for retirement, be safely locked away in conservative investment vehicles. Any money left over (still looking for that here!) is classed as “Mad Money” and can be invested in more risky stocks.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Five Norwegian kings : OLAVS
6. Nighty-night wear : PJS
9. Bird bills : NEBS
13. Fancy-schmancy : POSH
17. Bottoms : NADIRS
19. O.K., in Okinawa : HAI
20. First name in courtroom fiction : ERLE
21. Bee-fitting? : APIAN
23. Overcome an embarrassment : LIVE IT DOWN
25. Carolina ___ : WREN
26. Kind of question : YES/NO
27. Med. school subject : ANAT
28. Traditional Chinese forces : YIN AND YANG
30. Male duck : DRAKE
31. Author Anaïs : NIN
32. ROFL alternative : LMAO
33. Palm piece : FROND
34. Polish rolls : BIALYS
35. Get off at Grand Central, say : DETRAIN
37. Like most things in "Ripley's Believe It or Not!" : WEIRD
38. Bring home the bacon : EARN
39. Nary ___ : A ONE
40. Make brighter, as a fading tattoo : RE-INK
41. Mufflers and such : KNITTING
45. "Anyhoo," e.g. : SEGUE
47. Architect Gehry : FRANK
48. "Thanks ___ God!" : BE TO
49. One challenged by a sentry : FOE
50. Couturier Cassini : OLEG
51. U.S. rebellion leader of 1841-42 : DORR
52. Alternative to wind : SOLAR
54. Rhett Butler's final two words : A DAMN
56. Like some thinking : WISHFUL
58. "My ___" (1979 hit by the Knack) : SHARONA
60. Nail polish brand : CUTEX
61. Places to get looped : COCKTAIL LOUNGES
64. As a joke : IN FUN
67. Dried (off) : TOWELED
68. "Hidden Figures" actor : COSTNER
72. One of 16 works by Brahms : WALTZ
73. Roasted: Sp. : ASADA
74. Slept with, biblically : KNEW
76. Kvetch : MOAN
77. "___ Just Seen a Face" (Beatles tune) : I’VE
78. DVD button : PLAY
79. ___ an independent (eschewed the party label) : RAN AS
81. Geneva and Beirut : FONTS
82. "Miss Julie" opera composer, 1965 : NED ROREM
85. 19th-century French landscapist : COROT
86. Weisshorn and others : ALPS
87. "Beowulf" and others : EPOS
88. Bottle for oil or vinegar : CRUET
89. Excuse for not turning in homework : I LOST IT
92. Nursery rhyme destination : ST IVES
95. Ersatz : PHONY
96. Quarrel (with) : SPAR
97. Singer DiFranco : ANI
98. Actor Gillen of "Game of Thrones" : AIDAN
99. What you should do "if symptoms persist" : SEE A DOCTOR
101. Artist who designed costumes for "Ben-Hur" : ERTE
102. Twosomes : ITEMS
103. 12.01, for carbon: Abbr. : AT WT
104. Ignorant : UNEDUCATED
106. Hang : DRAPE
107. Fifth-century pope known as "the Great" : LEO I
108. Son of, in Arabic names : IBN
109. Company lover? : MISERY
110. Captain von Trapp's betrothed : ELSA
111. Met soprano Berger : ERNA
112. Cpl., e.g. : NCO
113. Captain Nemo's creator : VERNE

Down
1. Ashore : ON LAND
2. Actress Kazan of "My Big Fat Greek Wedding" : LAINIE
3. Reasons to say yes : ADVANTAGES
4. Word before Cong or Minh : VIET
5. Mister, in New Delhi : SRI
6. 45 player : PHONO
7. Resident of Tatooine in "Star Wars" : JAWA
8. It's Irish for "We Ourselves" : SINN FEIN
9. Orange avenue in Monopoly : NEW YORK
10. Picking up a quart of milk, say : ERRAND
11. Recipe direction : BLEND
12. Hong Kong's Hang ___ Index : SENG
13. Nice thing to hit : PAYDIRT
14. Having an effect : OPERANT
15. Rope fiber : SISAL
16. It might absorb a blow : HANKY
18. Frustrate : STYMIE
22. Discouraging words : NOES
24. Gorilla watcher Fossey : DIAN
29. "It's on me!" ... or a hint to this puzzle's circled letters : DRINKS ALL AROUND!
32. Shipping route : LANE
34. Scott of "Joanie Loves Chachi" : BAIO
36. Partially edited version of a movie : ROUGH CUT
37. Erodes : WEARS AWAY
38. Bedazzles : ENTRANCES
40. Elementary school trio, briefly : RRR
41. Actor Reeves : KEANU
42. "___ first ..." : IF AT
43. Gold rush city of 1899 : NOME
44. Boomers' offspring : GEN-X
45. Plant : SOW
46. Bush or Clinton, collegiately : ELI
47. Oral tradition : FOLK TALES
48. Fly-fisher's line joiner : BLOOD KNOT
51. French nobleman : DUC
53. Shield border : ORLE
54. Whizzes : ACES
55. Bunny chasers? : DUST MOPS
57. 1970s TV cool dude, with "the" : FONZ
59. Rushed : HIED
62. "Life According ___" (Emmy-winning documentary) : TO SAM
63. Pai ___ (Chinese gambling game) : GOW
64. "Victory!" : I WIN!
65. Place to pray : NAVE
66. Ran off : FLED
69. Awful idea : NONSTARTER
70. No longer fast? : EAT
71. Hosp. staffers : RNS
75. D.C. athlete : NAT
78. Whizzes : PROS
80. Dealer's query : ARE YOU IN?
81. Spanish bloom : FLOR
83. Overhauls : REVAMPS
84. Area far from port : OPEN SEA
85. Zagreb's country : CROATIA
86. Old-style warning : ALARUM
88. Mull over : CHEW ON
89. Apple debut of 2001 : IPOD
90. Summer position for a college student : INTERN
91. Stereotypical Deadhead wear : TIE-DYE
92. Put into words : SAID
93. Concentration, to a British chemist : TITRE
94. As good as it gets : IDEAL
95. Lose steam, with "out" : PETER
96. Kind of pad : STENO
99. Presidents' Day event : SALE
100. "Mad Money" network : CNBC
101. Assuage : EASE
105. Western ___ (college course, informally) : CIV


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5 comments :

Jeff said...

I had quite a struggle with this one. 82 minutes with half a dozen Googles, but at least with all that I had no errors. Loved the theme, but it really didn't seem to help me as it seemed I had to get all the circled words/letters anyway before I could identify the drink. A lot I didn't know - especially the tv and movie references...and ERTE. I got a lot of those via crosses but not all of them.

Tough challenge. Hope you enjoy the reunion, Bill.

Best -

Dave Kennison said...

26:58, no errors. Agree with Jeff that the names of the drinks didn't help much with the solve, but I think one of them helped resolve some uncertainty for me. (I did it last night and don't remember the details (mostly due to a frustrating struggle with the LAT applet this morning that has left me slightly rattled ... 😳). On with the day! (but I may need a bracing drink ... 😄)

BruceB said...

38:03, no errors. Good Sunday challenge. The clever theme was only a minor help; COSMOPOLITAN giving me the 'T' in COROT.

One of several erasures involved changing TITER to TITRE, because of the annoying British habit of reversing the ER at the end of words. (Or is it the annoying American habit of reversing the RE at the end of words???)

Anonymous said...

40 minutes, 1 second, and 6 errors, all due to misspellings of a few of the really obscure fills. 92A especially threw me, as the "clue" had no indication of an abbreviation.

Tom M. said...

Themers were easy except for TIAMARIA and revealers were fine, but none of that help much outside their small areas. Got about 95% of it without cheating, but it wasn't much fun.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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