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0802-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 2 Aug 17, Wednesday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Bruce Haight
THEME: Answer … or the Opposite
Today’s themed are words that have one meaning, and can also mean the opposite:
1A. Support ... or impede : HOLD UP
7A. Go on with ... or postpone : CONTINUE
23A. Go to battle alongside ... or struggle against : FIGHT WITH
40A. Offer for consideration ... or remove from consideration : TOSS OUT
42A. Withstand ... or deteriorate : WEATHER
53A. Watchful care ... or careless mistake : OVERSIGHT
71A. Give approval to ... or express disapproval of : SANCTION
72A. Quit ... or agree to keep going : RESIGN (or RE-SIGN)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 41s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

15. Pique, as curiosity : AROUSE
The words "whet" and "pique" can both be used in the sense of sharpening or awaking one's interest or desire.

19. Backyard pond dweller : KOI
Koi are also called Japanese carp. Koi have been bred for decorative purposes and there are now some very brightly colored examples found in Japanese water gardens.

20. Part of a slalom path : ESS
“Slalom” is an anglicized version of the Norwegian word "slalam" that translates as "skiing race". There is a longer version of the traditional slalom that is called giant slalom

22. Ice cream thickeners : AGARS
Agar (also “agar-agar”) is a jelly extracted from seaweed that has many uses. Agar is found in Japanese desserts, and can also be used as a food thickener or even as a laxative. In the world of science it is the most common medium used for growing bacteria in Petri dishes.

31. Subdue with a stun gun : TASE
Victor Appleton wrote a novel for young adults called “Tom Swift and His Electric Rifle”. The company that developed the TASER electroshock weapon partly named its product as a homage to the novel. The acronym “TASER” stands for “Thomas A. Swift’s Electric Rifle”.

35. Chuck of "Walker, Texas Ranger" : NORRIS
Chuck Norris is a martial artist and an actor from Ryan, Oklahoma. Norris’s first real exposure to martial arts was in the US Air Force when he was serving in South Korea. When he left the service Norris opened up a chain of karate schools, and among his clients were Steve McQueen and his son, as well as Donny and Marie Osmond.

“Walker, Texas Ranger” is an action TV show starring Chuck Norris in the title role. The TV show was inspired by the 1983 action movie “Lone Wolf McQuade” in which Norris also played a Texas Ranger.

37. Competitor of Acer and HP : DELL
Dell, the computer manufacturer, is named after the company’s founder Michael Dell. Michael Dell started his company in his dorm room at college, shipping personal computers that were customized to the specific needs of his customers. He dropped out of school in order to focus on his growing business, a decision that I doubt he regrets. Michael Dell is now one of the richest people in the world.

39. Big ___, Calif. : SUR
Big Sur is a lovely part of the California Coast, south of Monterey and Carmel. The name “Big Sur” comes from the original Spanish description of the area as “el sur grande” meaning “the big south”.

44. Bay Area airport code : SFO
San Francisco International Airport (SFO) serves as the main base of operations for Virgin America (recently sold to Alaska Airlines), and is also the maintenance hub for United Airlines.

The San Francisco Bay Area comprises the nine counties that impinge on the San Francisco Bay itself: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano and Sonoma. The region also includes the major cities of San Jose, San Francisco and Oakland.

48. Bright side, in Chinese philosophy : YANG
The yin and the yang can be illustrated using many different metaphors. In one, as the sun shines on a mountain, the side in the shade is the yin and the side in the light is the yang. The yin is also regarded as the feminine side, and the yang the masculine. The yin can also be associated with the moon, while the yang is associated with the sun.

56. Muscular Japanese dog : AKITA
The Akita breed of dog is named for its point of origin, the Akita Prefecture in Japan. When Helen Keller visited Japan in 1937, she asked for and was given an Akita breed of dog, with the name of Kamikaze-go. Sadly, the dog died within a year from distemper. The following year the Japanese government officially presented Keller with a replacement dog. Supposedly Keller's dogs were the first members of the breed to be introduced into the US.

60. "Spy vs. Spy" magazine : MAD
“Spy vs. Spy” is a comic strip that has run in “Mad” magazine continuously since 1961. It was drawn by Antonio Prohias, a refugee from Cuba, until his retirement. The early storyline was very fitting for the times, a statement about the futility of the arms race, detente and the Cold War.

Down
1. Neocon, e.g. : HAWK
The dove is a symbol of peace, and the hawk is a symbol of war.

By definition, a neoconservative (neocon) is a former left-aligned politician who has moved to the right and supports the use of American power and military might to bring democracy, liberty, equality and human rights to other countries.

2. Nabisco's answer to Hydrox : OREO
The Oreo cookie was introduced in 1912. The Oreo was intended to be a competitor to the very similar Hydrox cookie which had debuted four years earlier. The Oreo won the resulting battle on the grocery store shelves …

3. Sets of points, in math : LOCI
In mathematics, a locus (plural “loci”) is the set of all points that satisfy a given requirement. For example, the locus called a circle is the set of all points equidistant from a single point.

4. Simon & Garfunkel, e.g. : DUO
Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel performed together as “Simon & Garfunkel”, as I am sure we all know. The friends started singing together way back in the fifties when they were still in school together. The name of their act at that time was “Tom & Jerry”.

5. "For the Boys" support grp. : USO
The United Service Organization (USO) was founded in 1941 at the request of FDR "to handle the on-leave recreation of the men in the armed forces". A USO tour is undertaken by a troupe of entertainers, many of whom are big-name celebrities. A USO tour usually includes troop locations in combat zones.

6. Co-owner of the Pequod : PELEG
The Pequod is the ship that figures in Herman Melville’s classic novel “Moby Dick”. The ship is owned by a consortium of the citizens of Nantucket Island, including Captains Ahab, Bildad and Peleg.

7. Like Parmesan on baked chicken, typically : CRUSTED
Genuine Parmesan cheese is made in and around the province of Parma in northern Italy, which province gives the cheese its name.

8. Wine: Prefix : OEN-
In Greek mythology, Oeno was the goddess of wine, giving us “oen-” as a prefix meaning “wine”. For example, oenology is the study of wine and an oenophile is a wine-lover.

12. The Big Easy, by another nickname : NOLA
The city of New Orleans, Louisiana has the nickname “The Big Easy”. This name might come from the early 1900s when musicians found it relatively “easy” to find work there. The city is also known by the acronym NOLA, standing for New Orleans (NO), LA.

14. Some postings at 44-Across, for short : ETDS
Estimated time of departure (ETD)

26. Many Club Med locales : ISLES
Club Méditerranée is usually referred to as “Club Med”. It is a French company that started in 1950 with a resort on the Spanish island of Mallorca in the Mediterranean. It was originally a "club" with annual membership dues. Now it is an operator of numerous all-inclusive resorts located all over the world.

27. Fidgeting in one's seat, say : ANTSY
The word “antsy” embodies the concept of “having ants in one’s pants”, meaning being nervous and fidgety. However, “antsy” has been used in English since the 1830s, whereas “ants in the pants” originated a century later.

28. Natural bath sponge : LOOFA
The loofah (also “loofa”, “lufah” and “luffa”, all Arabic words) is a vine, with fruit that’s very popular in Asia and Africa. If the fruit is allowed to mature, it can be processed to remove everything but the more rigid xylem structure (remember your high school botany class?) leaving a soft, sponge-like mass that is used as a skin polisher.

29. Welles who narrated an "invasion" : ORSON
Orson Welles is perhaps best-remembered in the world of film for his role in 1941’s “Citizen Kane”. In the world of radio, Welles is known for 1938’s famous broadcast of “The War of the Worlds”, a broadcast that convinced many listeners that the Earth was indeed being invaded by aliens.

33. Like Elvis's blue shoes : SUEDE
“Blue Suede Shoes” was written and first recorded by Carl Perkins, in 1955. The idea for the song was given to him by Johnny Cash. Cash had been serving with the military in Germany and there met an airman who referred to his military regulation air shoes as “blue suede shoes”. The idea was reinforced when Perkins heard a young man who was dancing say to his partner, “Don’t step on my suede shoes”. Perkins version of the song was very, very successful, actually “going gold” in sales. Elvis Presley’s 1956 cover version did even better.

34. Pickoff throw into the outfield, e.g. : ERROR
That would be baseball.

41. Pre-1917 despot : TSAR
The last ruler of Imperial Russia was Tsar Nicholas II (of the House of Romanov). Famously, the Tsar and his family were murdered in 1918 in the basement of a house in Yekaterinburg, Russia by members of the Bolshevik secret police. The Tsar’s youngest daughter was 16-year-old Anastasia and rumors of her escape have persisted for years. The rumors grew with the help of numerous women who claimed to be Anastasia. In 2009, DNA testing finally proved that the remains of all of the Tsar’s immediate family, including Anastasia, have been found and identified.

The year 1917 saw two revolutions in Russia, with the pair collectively called “the Russian Revolution”. As a result of the February Revolution that centered on Petrograd, the last Emperor of Russia (Tsar Nicholas II) abdicated and members of the Imperial parliament took control of the country, forming the Russian Provisional Government. The Provisional Government was itself overthrown in the October Revolution, which was led by Vladimir Lenin and the Bolshevik party.

49. Like the novels "Frankenstein" and "Dracula" : GOTHIC
Mary Shelley’s Gothic novel has the full title of “Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus”. The subtitle underscores one of the themes of the book, a warning about man’s expansion into the Industrial Revolution.

“Dracula” is a novel written by the Irish author Bram Stoker and first published in 1897. Dracula wasn't the first vampire of literature, but he certainly was the one who spawned the popularity of vampires in theater, film and television, and indeed more novels. Personally, I can't stand vampire fiction …

51. Orbiter until 2001 : MIR
The Russian Mir Space Station was a remarkably successful project, with the station still holding the record for the longest continuous manned presence in space, at just under ten years. Towards the end of the space station’s life however, the years began to take their toll. There was a dangerous fire, multiple system failures, and a collision with a resupply ship. The Russian commitment to the International Space Station drained funds for repairs, so Mir was allowed to reenter the Earth’s atmosphere and burn up in 2001. “Mir” is a Russian word meaning “peace” or “world”.

57. ___ Sutra : KAMA
The “Kama Sutra” is renowned for its descriptions of positions that can be used for sexual intercourse, but the sutra includes many other texts that deal with various matters of a sexual nature including how to woo a woman, the conduct of a "chief wife”, the conduct of "other wives”, how to make money as a courtesan, and much more, as if that isn't enough …

58. Card catalog ID : ISBN
The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) was invented by one Gordon Foster who was a professor at Trinity College Dublin in Ireland. The code was originally developed for booksellers, so that they had a unique number (and now a barcode) for each publication.

60. Skirt once often worn with go-go boots : MINI
The original go-go boot from the sixties comes to the knee and has a low heel. Prior to the sixties, boots really weren’t worn much by women other than as protection against bad weather. Now they are a fashion statement.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Support ... or impede : HOLD UP
7. Go on with ... or postpone : CONTINUE
15. Pique, as curiosity : AROUSE
16. Like nosebleed-section seats, usually : REARMOST
17. "No hard feelings, man, right?" : WE COOL?
18. Introduced, as a new product : UNVEILED
19. Backyard pond dweller : KOI
20. Part of a slalom path : ESS
22. Ice cream thickeners : AGARS
23. Go to battle alongside ... or struggle against : FIGHT WITH
27. One way to read or think : ALOUD
30. Sneaky little snickers : HEHS
31. Subdue with a stun gun : TASE
35. Chuck of "Walker, Texas Ranger" : NORRIS
37. Competitor of Acer and HP : DELL
39. Big ___, Calif. : SUR
40. Offer for consideration ... or remove from consideration : TOSS OUT
42. Withstand ... or deteriorate : WEATHER
44. Bay Area airport code : SFO
45. Work well together : MESH
47. "And how!" : SURE DO!
48. Bright side, in Chinese philosophy : YANG
50. Word from a hat tipper, perhaps : MA’AM
52. Dead duck : GONER
53. Watchful care ... or careless mistake : OVERSIGHT
56. Muscular Japanese dog : AKITA
59. "Push-up" garment : BRA
60. "Spy vs. Spy" magazine : MAD
63. Place to apply eye makeup : LASH LINE
66. Request to be excused : MAY I GO?
69. Factor in a restaurant review : AMBIENCE
70. Before, to a bard : ERE NOW
71. Give approval to ... or express disapproval of : SANCTION
72. Quit ... or agree to keep going : RESIGN (or RE-SIGN)

Down
1. Neocon, e.g. : HAWK
2. Nabisco's answer to Hydrox : OREO
3. Sets of points, in math : LOCI
4. Simon & Garfunkel, e.g. : DUO
5. "For the Boys" support grp. : USO
6. Co-owner of the Pequod : PELEG
7. Like Parmesan on baked chicken, typically : CRUSTED
8. Wine: Prefix : OEN-
9. ___ system (car option that may speak to you) : NAV
10. Give medication to : TREAT
11. "Count me as a maybe" : I MIGHT
12. The Big Easy, by another nickname : NOLA
13. Manual reader : USER
14. Some postings at 44-Across, for short : ETDS
21. "Zip it!" : SHH!
23. Garments in summer storage, perhaps : FURS
24. "Double talk" is one : IDIOM
25. "That was close!" : WHEW!
26. Many Club Med locales : ISLES
27. Fidgeting in one's seat, say : ANTSY
28. Natural bath sponge : LOOFA
29. Welles who narrated an "invasion" : ORSON
32. Pale with fright : ASHEN
33. Like Elvis's blue shoes : SUEDE
34. Pickoff throw into the outfield, e.g. : ERROR
36. "Well, sor-r-ry!" : SUE ME!
38. Sitcom track sound : LAUGH
41. Pre-1917 despot : TSAR
43. Bring forward, with "out" : TROT
46. Fading star : HAS-BEEN
49. Like the novels "Frankenstein" and "Dracula" : GOTHIC
51. Orbiter until 2001 : MIR
54. Employee at a fine restaurant : VALET
55. Wii user, e.g. : GAMER
56. "Regrettably ..." : ALAS ...
57. ___ Sutra : KAMA
58. Card catalog ID : ISBN
60. Skirt once often worn with go-go boots : MINI
61. Bug-eyed : AGOG
62. In a blue funk : DOWN
64. Suffix in many pasta names : -INI
65. Cpl. or sgt. : NCO
67. "___ you nuts?" : ARE
68. "Most decidedly so!" : YES!


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6 comments :

Jeff said...

14:20 today with the last minute or two looking for an error which I eventually figured out. This puzzle introduced me to the term "contronym" which is what these theme clues/answers are.

I find this quite interesting because I never really thought about how common the phenomenon is in English. Other examples are bad (colloquially can mean good), temper (soften or strengthen), skin (add or take off skin), garnish (add to or take away) dust (add or remove dust), ....and quite a few others.

Best -

Dave Kennison said...

8:07, no errors. My theme contribution comes from mountaineering: If you succeed in doing a particular peak, you can say that you bagged it, meaning that you got to the top of it - it's "in the bag". But, if the weather was awful or the peak was in poor condition or you didn't have the proper gear or you weren't feeling well, you can say that something went wrong, so you bagged it, meaning that you turned tail and got the heck out of there without getting to the top.

Jeff said...

@Dave
That was really a bad example.... :)

Dave Kennison said...

@Jeff ... I was a little puzzled by your response, but then it occurred to me that the concept of "peak-bagging", which gives rise to the phrase "bagging a peak", may not be well-known outside the climbing community. There's a Wikipedia article about it:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peak_bagging

And the other meaning of "bagging it" is defined here (definition 2):

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/bag-it

I did, just now, come across a somewhat salacious meaning of the phrase "bagging it" that I had never heard before. Is that what I'm missing?

Carrie said...

Hey guys!
@Dave: Jeff meant "bad" as in "good!" Note his comment on that use of "bad."

I think it was a really good example. (:

Fun puzzle, and I thought the theme was neat (neat as in good, not neat as in tidy....well, THAT particular example doesn't fit the theme....oh well....)

Dave Kennison said...

Oh, my. Apparently, I'm really sharp today (meaning, of course, as dumb as a post ... 😄). Thank you, Carrie!

I definitely need to get more sleep ... 😳😄

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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