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0131-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Jan 17, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Neil Padrick Wilson
THEME: Things in a Bottle
Today’s themed answers each end with a word that often precedes the phrase “IN A BOTTLE”.
61A. Words that can follow the ends of the answers to the starred clues : … IN A BOTTLE

18A. *Vessel with a large hold : CARGO SHIP (giving “ship in a bottle”)
23A. *What a family spends together at the dinner table : QUALITY TIME (giving “Time in a Bottle”)
38A. *Branches in a storm? : FORKED LIGHTNING (giving “Lightning in a Bottle”)
55A. *Its arrival may be signaled by a ding : TEXT MESSAGE (giving “message in a bottle”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 12s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2

  • BOZ (Bop)
  • AGAPE (agaze)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. Kazakhstan's ___ Sea : ARAL
The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad …

The Republic of Kazakhstan in Central Asia is the world’s largest landlocked country. Kazakhstan was also the last of the former Soviet Republics (SSRs) to declare itself independent from Russia.

10. Computer company with the slogan "Explore beyond limits" : ACER
I owned several Acer laptops, which were for my money the most reliable machine at the best price. Acer is a Taiwanese company that I used to visit a lot when I was in the electronics business. I was very impressed back then with the company’s dedication to quality, although I have heard that things haven’t gone so well in recent years …

17. Sign of life : PULSE
One’s “pulse” is the rhythmic throbbing of arteries that is usually detected at the wrist or the neck. The contraction of the heart creates a pressure wave in the blood that moves the arterial walls, which is detected as the pulse.

18. *Vessel with a large hold : CARGO SHIP (giving “ship in a bottle”)
“Cargo” is freight carried by some vehicle. The term comes into English via Spanish, ultimately deriving from the Latin “carricare” meaning “to load on a cart”.

22. "Seinfeld" stock character? : SOUP NAZI
“The Soup Nazi” is a famous episode of the hit show “Seinfeld”. The story is all about a soup stand owned by an excessively strict man referred to as the “Soup Nazi”. Believe it or not, the “Soup Nazi” character is based on a real soup vendor in New York City.

23. *What a family spends together at the dinner table : QUALITY TIME (giving “Time in a Bottle”)
“Time in a Bottle” is a song written by Jim Croce in 1970 and recorded by him in 1972. The song was released as a single in 1973, soon after Croce died in a plane crash. It was to be Croce’s last number-one hit.

26. Competitor of Secret : BAN
Ban was the first roll-on deodorant, introduced in 1952. The formulation for Ban is the same as the brand called Mum, the first commercial deodorant, which dates back to the late 1800s.

Secret is an antiperspirant/deodorant made by Procter & Gamble, first introduced in 1956 as a cream that was applied with the fingers (ick!). There followed a roll-on version in 1958, a spray in 1964 and the solid stick in 1978.

27. Predecessor of the CW : UPN
The United Paramount Network (UPN) was a TV channel that launched in 1995, and shut down in 2006. Some of UPN’s programming was moved to the CW channel at the time of UPN’s demise.

28. Mauna ___ : LOA
Mauna Loa on the “big island” of Hawaii is the largest volcano on the planet (in terms of volume). The name “Mauna Loa” is Hawaiian for “Long Mountain”.

32. Hilarity, in Internet-speak : LOLZ
Apparently, the textspeak LOLZ is the plural form of LOL (laugh out loud).

34. One side of the Pacific : ASIA
Ferdinand Magellan was a Portuguese explorer who was hired by King Charles I of Spain to find a westward route to the “Spice Islands”, now known as the Maluku Islands of Indonesia. Magellan headed west through the Atlantic starting out in 1519. He passed south of the Americas through was is now called the Strait of Magellan. The body of water he encountered west of the Americas he named the “peaceful sea”, the Pacific Ocean. He and his expedition reached the Spice Islands in 1521, and returned home via the Indian Ocean. This voyage was the first circumnavigation of the globe in history.

38. *Branches in a storm? : FORKED LIGHTNING (giving “Lightning in a Bottle”)
Lightning in a Bottle is a counterculture festival held annually in Central Coast of California. Featuring a mix of music, art and culture, Lightning in a Bottle originated as a private birthday party in 2000, and evolved into a public event starting in 2004.

44. Partridge's tree, in a Christmas song : PEAR
The fabulous Christmas Carol called “The Twelve Days of Christmas” dates back at least to 1780 when it was first published in England, though it may be French in origin. The concept of twelve days of Christmas comes from the tradition that the three kings came to visit the Christ Child twelve days after he was born. This same tradition is the origin of the title to Shakespeare’s play “Twelfth Night”.

46. Put together, as a team : YOKE
A yoke is a wooden beam used between a pair of oxen so that they are forced to work together.

51. Singer Scaggs with the 1976 hit "Lowdown" : BOZ
Boz Scaggs is an American musician, a longtime collaborator with Steve Miller.

63. Sean who played Mikey in "The Goonies" : ASTIN
Sean Astin is best known for playing the title role in the 1993 film “Rudy” and the character Samwise Gamgee in the “Lord of the Rings” movies. You might also have seen him playing Lynn McGill in the 5th season of “24”. Astin is the son of actress Patty Duke.

66. Band with the hit "Whip It" : DEVO
Devo is a band from Akron, Ohio formed back in 1973. The band's biggest hit is "Whip It" released in 1980. Devo have a gimmick: the wearing of red, terraced plastic hats that are referred to as “energy domes”. Why? I have no idea …

67. Pope who excommunicated Martin Luther : LEO X
Pope Leo X is remembered as the last pope who was not a priest before taking office. Leo X was also known for granting indulgences to those willing to donate funds for the reconstruction of St. Peter’s Basilica, a practice that contributed to the revolt against the church by Martin Luther. As a result of the revolt, Leo X excommunicated Luther.

Martin Luther wrote his "95 Theses on the Power and Efficacy of the Indulgences" in 1517, a document that is often seen as the spark that set off the Protestant Reformation. Luther's main argument was that the Catholic Church's practice of granting "indulgences", forgiveness from punishment for sins, was wrong. It was especially wrong when such indulgences were granted in exchange for money.

69. Garden of ___ : EDEN
According to the Book of Genesis, Adam and Eve lived in a garden "in" Eden, with Eden being geographically located by reference to four rivers including the Tigris and the Euphrates. Some scholars hypothesize that Eden was located in Mesopotamia, which encompasses much of modern-day Iraq.

70. Puzzlemaker Rubik : ERNO
What was originally called the “Magic Cube” became better known as Rubik’s Cube, named for its inventor Ernő Rubik. Rubik's Cube is the world’s biggest selling puzzle game, with over 350 million sold in just over 30 years.

71. Strength : SINEW
Sinew is another name for a tendon. Tendons are bands of collagen that connect muscle to bone. Tendons are similar to ligaments and fasciae, which are also connective tissue made out of collagen, but ligaments join bone to bone, and fasciae connect muscle to muscle. We also use the term “sinew” to mean muscular power.

Down
1. Help at the entrance to a mall : MAP
Surprisingly, our word “mall”, meaning “shady walk” or “enclosed shopping space”, comes from the Italian for “mallet”. All of our shopping-style malls are named for “The Mall” in St. James’s Park in London. This tree-lined promenade was so called as it used to a famous spot to play the croquet-like game called “pall-mall”. The game derived its name from the Italian for ball (palla) and mallet “maglio”. The London thoroughfare called the Mall still exists, at one end of which is Buckingham Palace. Indeed, parallel to the Mall is a street called Pall Mall.

2. Aladdin's monkey : ABU
Abu is a monkey in the Disney production of “Aladdin”. The character is based on Abu, a thief in the 1940 film “The Thief of Baghdad”.

4. Basketball Hall-of-Famer Dan : ISSEL
Dan Issel is a retired basketball player who played for the Kentucky Colonels of the ABA, and the Denver Nuggets of the NBA.

5. Plush fabric : CHENILLE
Chenille is a velvety fabric or yarn. The yarn is said to resemble a caterpillar, hence the name “chenille”, which is French for “caterpillar”.

8. Skillful : ADROIT
The French for "to the right" is "à droit", from which we get our word "adroit". The original meaning of "adroit" was "rightly, properly", but it has come to mean dexterous and skillful. Someone described as “maladroit” is unskilled and awkward.

9. Peanut, for one : LEGUME
I have to say it, but it drives me crazy. Peanuts aren’t nuts, they’re legumes, a plant in the bean and pea family. The flowers of the peanut plant last only one day and then wither. The fertilized ovary develops an elongated “peg” that grows downwards, pushing the ovary down into the soil. The ovary develops underground into a mature peanut pod containing between one and four seeds, which we call “nuts”. But they aren’t nuts. Did I say that already …?

10. One of the A's in N.A.A.C.P.: Abbr. : ASSN
The full name of the NAACP, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, is remarkable in that it actually still uses the offensive term “colored people”. The NAACP was founded in 1909, by a group that included suffragette and journalist Mary White Ovington, wealthy socialist William English Walling, and civil rights activist Henry Moscowitz. Another member of the founding group was W. E. B. Du Bois, the first African-American to earn a doctorate at Harvard University. The date chosen for the founding of the NAACP was February 12th, 1909, the 100th anniversary of the birth of President Abraham Lincoln, the man most visibly associated with the emancipation of African-American slaves.

12. Woman who sings "Burn" in "Hamilton" : ELIZA
Elizabeth “Eliza” Schuyler Hamilton was the wife of Founding Father Alexander Hamilton. Eliza was with her husband when he passed away the day after his famous duel with Vice President Aaron Burr.

“Hamilton” is a 2015 musical based on the life or US Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, as described in the 2004 biography by Ron Chernow. The representations of the main characters is decidedly ground-breaking. The show is rooted in hip-hop and the main roles such as Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson and George Washington are all played by African-American and Hispanic actors.

23. Hearty drink : QUAFF
"Quaff" is both a verb and a noun. One quaffs (takes a hearty drink) of a quaff (a hearty drink).

25. Everyone, in Dixie : Y’ALL
“Dixie” is a nickname sometimes used for the American South, and often specifically for the original 11 states that seceded from the Union just prior to the Civil War. It’s apparently not certain how the name “Dixie” came about. One theory is that it comes from the term “dixie” which was used for currency issued by banks in Louisiana. The 10-dollar bills had the word “dix” on the reverse side, the French for “ten”. From the banknote, the French speaking area around New Orleans came to be known as Dixieland, and from there “Dixie” came to apply to the South in general.

35. First winner of horse racing's Triple Crown, 1919 : SIR BARTON
Sir Barton was the first ever winner of the American Triple Crown (the Kentucky Derby, Preakness Stakes and Belmont Stakes), achieving the feat in 1919.

36. Disguised, briefly : INCOG
“Incog” is short for “incognito”, the Italian for “unknown”.

41. President after Grant : HAYES
Rutherford B. Hayes was the 19th president of the US. Long before we had to endure the dispute over the 2000 Presidential election, Rutherford Hayes found himself president after a disputed election in 1876. President Hayes came into office having lost the popular vote to his opponent Samuel Tilden as he was voted into office by one electoral college vote. Hayes was awarded the election in the end because of an informal deal struck between Democrats and Republicans called the Compromise of 1877. Democrats allowed Rutherford to occupy the White House in exchange for removal of federal troops occupying some of the southern states.

Ulysses S. Grant had been a career soldier when he was elected as the 18th president of the US, and had risen to commander of all the Union armies by the end of the Civil War. Grant served two terms as president, and also made a failed bid for a third term. Grant’s reputation was tarnished by his apparent tolerance of corruption in his administration. On the other hand, Grant worked hard to protect African Americans during Reconstruction after the Civil War, and pursued peaceful relations with Native Americans.

47. "The Simpsons" bus driver : OTTO
Otto Mann drives the school bus on the TV show "The Simpsons". Otto is a Germanic character voiced by Harry Shearer, and his name is a play on "Ottoman Empire". Whenever Bart sees him, he greets Otto with the words "Otto, man!"

49. Devon cathedral city : EXETER
Exeter is a historic city in the county of Devon in the southwest of England. The city takes its name from the river on which it lies, the River Exe.

52. Rod Stewart's "Maggie May," e.g. : B-SIDE
“Maggie May” is a wonderful 1971 song recorded and co-written by Rod Stewart. Stewart tells us that the story told in “Maggie May” is basically true, and was inspired by the first woman with whom Stewart had a relationship, at the Beaulieu Jazz Festival in 1961.

57. Maki, temaki or uramaki : SUSHI
Sushi is a Japanese dish that has as its primary ingredient cooked, vinegared rice. The rice is usually topped with something, most often fish, and can be served in seaweed rolls. If you want raw fish by itself, then you have to order “sashimi”.

62. Prefix with planet : EXO-
An exoplanet is simply a planet that exists outside of our own solar system. Astronomers have detected thousands of exoplanets, most of which are quite large (the size of Jupiter), no doubt because bigger planets are easier to find.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Pulling a rabbit out of a hat, e.g. : MAGIC
6. Kazakhstan's ___ Sea : ARAL
10. Computer company with the slogan "Explore beyond limits" : ACER
14. Embarrass : ABASH
15. Was a passenger : RODE
16. It's always getting stepped on : SOLE
17. Sign of life : PULSE
18. *Vessel with a large hold : CARGO SHIP (giving “ship in a bottle”)
20. Camera part : LENS
22. "Seinfeld" stock character? : SOUP NAZI
23. *What a family spends together at the dinner table : QUALITY TIME (giving “Time in a Bottle”)
26. Competitor of Secret : BAN
27. Predecessor of the CW : UPN
28. Mauna ___ : LOA
29. Scout's shelter : TENT
31. Back on a boat : AFT
32. Hilarity, in Internet-speak : LOLZ
34. One side of the Pacific : ASIA
38. *Branches in a storm? : FORKED LIGHTNING (giving “Lightning in a Bottle”)
43. 6'11" Channing of the N.B.A. : FRYE
44. Partridge's tree, in a Christmas song : PEAR
45. Color TV pioneer : RCA
46. Put together, as a team : YOKE
50. Ham on ___ : RYE
51. Singer Scaggs with the 1976 hit "Lowdown" : BOZ
52. Front of a boat : BOW
55. *Its arrival may be signaled by a ding : TEXT MESSAGE (giving “message in a bottle”)
58. So-called "house wine of the South" : SWEET TEA
60. What you might use when you say "Giddyup!" : SPUR
61. Words that can follow the ends of the answers to the starred clues : … IN A BOTTLE
63. Sean who played Mikey in "The Goonies" : ASTIN
66. Band with the hit "Whip It" : DEVO
67. Pope who excommunicated Martin Luther : LEO X
68. Elbow, maybe : SHOVE
69. Garden of ___ : EDEN
70. Puzzlemaker Rubik : ERNO
71. Strength : SINEW

Down
1. Help at the entrance to a mall : MAP
2. Aladdin's monkey : ABU
3. Courage in battle : GALLANTRY
4. Basketball Hall-of-Famer Dan : ISSEL
5. Plush fabric : CHENILLE
6. Eyebrow's shape, roughly : ARC
7. Criticize severely : ROAST
8. Skillful : ADROIT
9. Peanut, for one : LEGUME
10. One of the A's in N.A.A.C.P.: Abbr. : ASSN
11. Roomie : COHAB
12. Woman who sings "Burn" in "Hamilton" : ELIZA
13. Affix again, as a badge : REPIN
19. Word before air, fire or water : OPEN
21. Tolerated : STOOD
23. Hearty drink : QUAFF
24. Willing to do : UP FOR
25. Everyone, in Dixie : Y’ALL
30. Give a lickin' : TAN
33. "___ your lip!" : ZIP
35. First winner of horse racing's Triple Crown, 1919 : SIR BARTON
36. Disguised, briefly : INCOG
37. Staring : AGAZE
39. Item that might be fervently wanted by a prisoner : KEY
40. Start of an idea : GERM
41. President after Grant : HAYES
42. Encroach on someone's land : TRESPASS
47. "The Simpsons" bus driver : OTTO
48. "That's a fine ___ of fish!" : KETTLE
49. Devon cathedral city : EXETER
52. Rod Stewart's "Maggie May," e.g. : B-SIDE
53. Had title to : OWNED
54. Work on a loom : WEAVE
56. Hawk's hook : TALON
57. Maki, temaki or uramaki : SUSHI
59. Black, in poetry : EBON
62. Prefix with planet : EXO-
64. "Now ___ seen it all!" : I’VE
65. Just-minted : NEW


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0130-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Jan 17, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Zhouqin Burnikel
THEME: Male Leads
Today’s themed answers LEAD off with MALE animals:
57A. Certain Hollywood stars ... or an apt title for this puzzle : MALE LEADS

18A. Got stuck in a rut : STAGNATED (leading with “stag”)
20A. Time before dinner for socializing : COCKTAIL HOUR (leading with “cock”)
37A. Protection for a police officer : BULLETPROOF VEST (leading with “bull”)
53A. Ohio's nickname : BUCKEYE STATE (leading with “buck”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 20s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

14. Yank living overseas : EX-PAT
The term “Yankee” originated back in the 1600s when Dutch settlers used to called English colonists “Jankes”, a disparaging term meaning “Little Johns”.

15. Gibbon or gorilla : APE
Apes and monkeys both belong to the order of primates. The most obvious way to distinguish apes from monkeys is by the presence or lack of a tail. Almost all apes have no tail, and almost all monkeys have tails.

Gibbons are referred to as lesser apes as they differ in size and behavior from the great apes e.g. chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans and humans.

The gorilla is the largest primate still in existence, and is one of the nearest living species to humans. Molecular biology studies have shown that our nearest relatives are in fact the species in the genus Pan (the chimpanzee and the bonobo), which split from the human branch of the family 4-6 million years ago. Gorillas and humans diverged at a point about 7 million years ago. The term “gorilla” derives from the Greek “gorillai” meaning “tribe of hairy women”. Wow!

16. Bête ___ (pet peeve) : NOIRE
“Bête noire” translates from French as “black beast” and is used in English to describe something or someone that is disliked.

The phrase “pet peeve”, meaning “thing that provokes one most”, seems to be somewhat ironic. A “peeve” is a source of irritation, and the adjective “pet” means “especially cherished”.

17. City in upstate New York : UTICA
Utica in New York is known as “Second Chance City” these days, due to the recent influx of refugees from war-torn parts of the world and from Bosnia in particular. These immigrants have helped revitalize the area and reverse a trend of population loss.

18. Got stuck in a rut : STAGNATED (leading with “stag”)
A male deer is usually called a buck, and a female is a doe. However, the male red deer is usually referred to as a stag. The males of even larger species of deer are often called bulls, and females cows. In older English, male deer of over 5 years were called harts, and females of over 3 years were called hinds. The young of small species are known as fawns, and of larger species are called calves. All very confusing …

20. Time before dinner for socializing : COCKTAIL HOUR (leading with “cock”)
Our word “cocktail” first appeared in the early 1800s. The exact origin of the term is not clear, but it is thought to be a corruption of the French word “coquetier” meaning “egg cup”, a container that was used at that time for serving mixed drinks.

24. Venerable London theater : OLD VIC
The Old Vic is a very famous theater (or I should I say "theatre"?) in London, previously known as the Royal Coburg Theatre and then the Royal Victorian Theatre (giving it the current name "The Old Vic"). The theater owes a lot of its fame and standing to the fact that it housed the National Theater of Great Britain after it was founded in 1963 by Sir Laurence Olivier. Today the National Theater has new, modern premises, but the Old Vic Theatre Company stills garners a lot of attention. The current, and very energetic, artistic director of the company is American actor, Kevin Spacey.

28. Hero war pilots : ACES
A flying ace is an aviator who has shot down a number of enemy planes during combat. The qualifying number of kills seems to vary, but five is common. The first use of “ace” was during WWI when the French newspapers dubbed pilot Adolphe Pegoud “l’as” (French for “the ace”) when he shot down his fifth German plane.

31. Source of most of Google's revenue : ADS
Google is a remarkably successful and profitable technology company. Google makes most of its money from it AdWords product. Advertisers pay Google a lot of money to place their ads at the most advantageous spots on the Internet.

32. 2004 event for Google, for short : IPO
An Initial Public Offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually).

33. Polygraphs : LIE TESTS
We are most familiar with the term “polygraph” as the generic name for a lie detector instrument. This usage began in 1921, although the term had been around since the end of the 18th century. Back then, a polygraph was a mechanical device use to make multiple copies as something was written or drawn. Famously, Thomas Jefferson used a polygraph to preserve copies of letters that he wrote to correspondents.

43. Stand-up comic Schumer : AMY
Amy Schumer is a stand-up comedian, and an alumna of the reality TV show “Last Comic Standing”, in which she placed fourth. Schumer now has her own comedy series “Inside Amy Schumer”, which airs on Comedy Central. Amy is a first cousin once removed of Chuck Schumer, the senior US Senator from New York.

46. Maker of Mashed Potato Bites : ORE-IDA
Ore-Ida frozen foods are all made using potatoes. The company is located in Oregon, just across the border from Idaho. “Ore-Ida” is a melding of the two state names.

48. Colorado winter hrs. : MST
Mountain Standard Time (MST)

53. Ohio's nickname : BUCKEYE STATE (leading with “buck”)
Ohio is sometimes referred to as the Buckeye State, taking the name from the state tree. In turn, the buckeye tree gets its name from the appearance of its fruit, a dark nut with a light patch, thought to resemble a "buck's eye".

60. Companion ship for the Niña and Santa Maria : PINTA
Famously, Christopher Columbus used three ships in his first voyage across the Atlantic: the Santa Maria, the Niña and the Pinta. The Pinta was the fastest of the three, and it was from the Pinta that the New World was first spotted, by a sailor named Rodrigo de Triana who was a lookout on the fateful day. Pinta was a nickname for the ship that translated as "the painted one". The Pinta's real name has been lost in mists of time.

62. Locale of Phelps's last five gold medals : RIO
Michael Phelps is a competitive swimmer from Towson, Maryland. Phelps won 28 medals in total in the five Olympic Games in which he has competed from 2004 to 2016. Those 28 medals make him the most decorated Olympian of all time, by far. Coming in second is former Soviet gymnast Larisa Latynina, who won won 18 medals between 1956 and 1964.

63. Like chip shots : ARCED
That would be golf.

Down
1. Card with two pips : DEUCE
A “two” playing card might be called a “deuce”, from the Middle French “deus” (or Modern French “deux”) meaning “two”.

4. "___ the Knife" : MACK
“Die Moritat von Mackie Messer” is the original name of the song “Mack the Knife”, taken from “The Threepenny Opera”. “The Threepenny Opera” (“Die Dreigroschenoper”) is a musical written by Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill that first performed in Berlin in 1928, an adaptation of “The Beggar’s Opera” written by Englishman John Gay in the 18th century. “Mack the Knife” was introduced into the popular music repertoire by Louis Armstrong. He had a hit with it in 1956, but it was the Bobby Darin recording of 1959 that came to be known as the definitive, English-language version of the song. I love it …

5. "Right away!," in the E.R. : STAT!
The exact etymology of "stat", a term meaning "immediately" in the medical profession, seems to have been lost in the mists of time. It probably comes from the Latin "statim" meaning "to a standstill, immediately". A blog reader has helpfully suggested that the term may also come from the world of laboratory analysis, where the acronym STAT stands for "short turn-around time".

6. Vision-correcting procedure : LASIK
LASIK surgery uses a laser to reshape the cornea of the eye to improve vision. The LASIK acronym stands for “laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis”.

10. What chess is played on : BOARD
It is believed that the game of chess originated in northwest India, evolving from a 6th-century game called "chaturanga", a Sanskrit word meaning "four divisions". These four (military) divisions were represented in the game:
  • Infantry (now "pawns")
  • Cavalry (now "knights")
  • Elephants (now "bishops")
  • Chariots (now "rooks")

27. Stallion-to-be : COLT
There are lots of terms to describe horses of different ages and sexes, it seems:
  • Foal: horse of either sex that is less that one year old
  • Yearling: horse of either sex that is one to two years old
  • Filly: female horse under the age of four
  • Colt: male horse under the age of four
  • Gelding: castrated male horse of any age
  • Stallion: non-castrated male horse four years or older
  • Mare: female horse four years or older

29. Cartoon frames : CELS
In the world of animation, a cel is a transparent sheet on which objects and characters are drawn. In the first half of the 20th century the sheet was actually made of celluloid, giving the "cel" its name.

30. Summer, in Soissons : ETE
Soissons is an ancient town in northern France, located about 60 miles northeast of Paris.

35. Uno + due : TRE
In Italian, “uno” (one) plus “due” (two) makes "tre" (three).

36. Reebok competitor : AVIA
The Avia brand name for athletic shoes was chosen as "avia" is the Latin word for "to fly", and suggests the concept of aviation. Avia was founded in Oregon in 1979.

The brand name Reebok was adopted as the new company name for Foster Shoes of the UK in 1960. The name Reebok (more commonly “Rhebok”) is an Afrikaans word for an antelope, and comes from the term "roe buck".

37. ___-chic (fashion style) : BOHO
Boho-chic is a style of fashion that grew out of the bohemian and hippie looks.

39. Whirrer on a muggy day : FAN
Our term “muggy” means warm and humid, and comes from the Old Norse word “mugga” that describes “drizzling mist”.

43. Whom R-rated movies are intended for : ADULTS
The Motion Picture Association of America’s (MPAA) film-rating system (PG-13, R, etc.) is purely voluntary and is not backed by any law. Movie theaters agree to abide by the rules that come with the MPAA ratings in exchange for access to new movies.

44. Spray for self-defense : MACE
“Mace” is actually a brand name, originally introduced by Lake Erie Chemical when they started to manufacture “Chemical Mace”, with the name being a play on the club-like weapon from days of old. Mace was originally a form of tear gas, but Mace today uses a formula that is actually a pepper spray, a different formulation.

49. Online network admin : SYSOP
System Operator (sysop)

54. Marx who wasn't one of the Marx Brothers : KARL
Karl Marx was a German philosopher and revolutionary who helped develop the principles of modern communism and socialism. Marx argued that feudal society created internal strife due to class inequalities which led to its destruction and replacement by capitalism. He further argued that the inequalities created in a capitalist society create tensions that will also lead to its self-destruction. His thesis was that the inevitable replacement of capitalism was a classless (and stateless) society, which he called pure communism.

The five Marx Brothers were born to "Minnie" and "Frenchy" Marx in New York City. The more famous older boys were Chico, Harpo and Groucho. Zeppo was the youngest brother, and he appeared in the early Marx Brothers movies. The fifth son was called Gummo, and he decided to pursue a different career off the stage.

56. Spare change? : TIRE
Here’s another example of terms that change as we cross the Atlantic Ocean. When talking about tires (“tyres” in Britain and Ireland), a defect can cause a “flat” (“puncture” in Britain and Ireland).

57. Univ. degree for Romney and Bloomberg : MBA
The world’s first Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree was offered by Harvard’s Graduate School of Business Administration, in 1908.

Mitt Romney was born Willard Mitt Romney in 1947 in Detroit, Michigan. Romney’s parents named him after J. Willard Marriott (the hotel magnate) who was the father’s best friend, and after Milton “Mitt” Romney who was the father’s cousin and quarterback for the Chicago Bears.

Michael Bloomberg served as Mayor of New York City from 2002 to 2013. He is an incredibly rich man, having accumulated his wealth as the founder and majority owner of a global financial data and media company that bears his name. Bloomberg was a Democrat and then switched allegiance to the Republican Party just prior to running for Mayor of New York. He left the Republican Party in 2007 and was re-elected as Mayor in 2009 as an Independent.

59. "Skip to My ___" : LOU
“Skip to My Lou” is a children’s dance that can also be used at a barn dance as an icebreaker. Couples dance to the tune, with an extra male in the middle of the group. The odd man “steals” a lady with whom to dance, leaving her partner to find another. The word “lou” is the Scottish for “love”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Views as : DEEMS
6. Place, as a wager : LAY
9. Hate with a passion : ABHOR
14. Yank living overseas : EX-PAT
15. Gibbon or gorilla : APE
16. Bête ___ (pet peeve) : NOIRE
17. City in upstate New York : UTICA
18. Got stuck in a rut : STAGNATED (leading with “stag”)
20. Time before dinner for socializing : COCKTAIL HOUR (leading with “cock”)
22. Santaland worker : ELF
23. Where clouds are : SKY
24. Venerable London theater : OLD VIC
28. Hero war pilots : ACES
31. Source of most of Google's revenue : ADS
32. 2004 event for Google, for short : IPO
33. Polygraphs : LIE TESTS
36. "Be ___!" ("Help me out here!") : A PAL
37. Protection for a police officer : BULLETPROOF VEST (leading with “bull”)
40. Heavy burden : ONUS
41. Repeated parts of songs : REFRAINS
42. Sarcastic laugh sound : HAR
43. Stand-up comic Schumer : AMY
45. Med. school subject : ANAT
46. Maker of Mashed Potato Bites : ORE-IDA
48. Colorado winter hrs. : MST
50. Massage : RUB
53. Ohio's nickname : BUCKEYE STATE (leading with “buck”)
57. Certain Hollywood stars ... or an apt title for this puzzle : MALE LEADS
60. Companion ship for the Niña and Santa Maria : PINTA
61. Swell up : BLOAT
62. Locale of Phelps's last five gold medals : RIO
63. Like chip shots : ARCED
64. Targets for a college fund-raising drive, informally : ALUMS
65. Swimming unit : LAP
66. Fortunetellers : SEERS

Down
1. Card with two pips : DEUCE
2. Praise enthusiastically : EXTOL
3. Huge blunder : EPIC FAILURE
4. "___ the Knife" : MACK
5. "Right away!," in the E.R. : STAT!
6. Vision-correcting procedure : LASIK
7. In a fitting manner : APTLY
8. "Woo-hoo!" : YEAH!
9. Declares invalid : ANNULS
10. What chess is played on : BOARD
11. Top 10 song, say : HIT
12. Valuable mine rock : ORE
13. Color of beets : RED
19. Well-behaved : GOOD
21. Something in the plus column : ASSET
25. Special access for celebs : VIP ENTRANCE
26. "No bid from me" : I PASS
27. Stallion-to-be : COLT
29. Cartoon frames : CELS
30. Summer, in Soissons : ETE
31. Starting on : AS OF
33. Like the Chinese and Hebrew calendars : LUNAR
34. Agile for one's age : SPRY
35. Uno + due : TRE
36. Reebok competitor : AVIA
37. ___-chic (fashion style) : BOHO
38. Give out one's address? : ORATE
39. Whirrer on a muggy day : FAN
43. Whom R-rated movies are intended for : ADULTS
44. Spray for self-defense : MACE
47. Letter-shaped girder : I-BEAM
48. Newspapers, magazines, etc. : MEDIA
49. Online network admin : SYSOP
51. Say : UTTER
52. Items on an Indian necklace : BEADS
54. Marx who wasn't one of the Marx Brothers : KARL
55. Luxury resort amenities : SPAS
56. Spare change? : TIRE
57. Univ. degree for Romney and Bloomberg : MBA
58. Every last bit : ALL
59. "Skip to My ___" : LOU


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0129-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Jan 17, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Jim Hyres & David Steinberg
THEME: Hit the Deck
We have a “showdown” in a hand of TWENTY-ONE today. The circled letters spell out the names of the cards in the PLAYER’s hand (down the left of the grid) and in the DEALER’s hand (down the right of the grid). The PLAYER’s hand adds up to TWENTY-ONE, so he or she declares “I WIN”. The DEALER’s hand adds up to twenty-four, so the DEALER is BUST:
69A. Game depicted in the shaded squares : TWENTY-ONE

1A. One side of a 69-Across showdown : PLAYER
26A. Lieutenant, informally : TWO-STRIPER
47A. Fairy tale family : THREE BEARS
86A. Amount of separation, in a party game : SIX DEGREES
106A. "The Call of the Wild" author : JACK LONDON
123A. 1-Across's cry : I WIN!

14A. Other side of the showdown : DEALER
28A. It's unreturnable : SERVICE ACE
52A. Celebratory request : GIVE ME FIVE!
88A. Investment seminar catchphrase : CASH IS KING
110A. March Madness stage : ELITE EIGHT
126A. 14-Across's result : BUST
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 18m 47s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

20. Collective works : OEUVRE
The sum of an artist's work in his or her lifetime is known as his or her “oeuvre”.

21. "Get lost!" : VAMOOSE!
To vamoose is to "to leave", coming from the Spanish "vamos" meaning "let’s go".

22. Pinball wizard's hangout : ARCADE
Our word “arcade” comes from the Latin “arcus” meaning “arc”. The first arcades were passages made from a series of arches. This could be an avenue of trees, and eventually any covered avenue. I remember arcades lined with shops and stores when I was growing up on the other side of the Atlantic. Arcades came to be lined with lots of amusements, resulting in amusement arcades and video game arcades.

Our modern game of pinball evolved from an earlier table game called bagatelle which used balls, pins and holes (and I remember playing bagatelle as boy in a pub in Ireland). The first “pinball” machine was made by a British inventor who settled in Cincinnati, Ohio. He modified the game of bagatelle, adding a coiled spring and a plunger to introduce balls at the end of the table, a device that is still in use today. From there, manufacturers developed coin-operated versions of pinball, which became popular during the depression as they provided a little entertainment for a few pennies. One distributor of the coin-operated pinball machines started manufacturing them himself as he couldn’t source new games fast enough. He called his pinball game Ballyhoo, and eventually named his company Bally, a brand name well known in the gambling industry to this day.

23. Mother ___ : TERESA
Mother Teresa was born in 1910 in the city that is now called Skopje, the capital of Macedonia. At birth she was given the names Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu ("Gonxha" means "little flower" in Albanian). She left home at the age of 18 and joined the Sisters of Loreto, and headed to Loreto Abbey in Rathfarnham in Dublin, Ireland in order to learn English. Her goal was to teach in India, and English was the language used there for instruction by the nuns. After Mother Teresa passed away in 1997 she was beatified by Pope John Paul II, a step on the road to canonization. In order for her to be beatified there had to be documented evidence of a miracle that was performed due to her intercession. The miracle in question was the healing of a tumor in the abdomen of a woman due to the application of a locket containing a picture of Mother Teresa. Documentation of a second miracle is required for her to be declared a saint. The canonization process seems to well underway, with Pope Francis recognizing a second miracle in December 2015.

24. Entertainment on a Jamaican cruise, perhaps : SKA BAND
Ska originated in Jamaica in the late fifties and was the precursor to reggae music. No one has a really definitive etymology of the term "ska", but it is likely to be imitative of some sound.

25. Kind of paper or test : LITMUS
Litmus is a mixture of naturally-occurring dyes that responds to acidity by changing color. Litmus was probably first used around 1300 by the Spanish alchemist Arnaldus de Villa Nova, who extracted the blue dye from lichens. One suggestion is that the term “litmus” comes from the Old Norse “litmose” meaning “lichen for dyeing”. Litmus is often absorbed onto filter paper, creating “litmus paper” or “pH paper”.

31. Green plant? : MONEY TREE
In the Buddhist tradition, donations are sometimes collected on a “money tree”. Banknotes are tied to the tree by donors, so that the notes resemble the tree’s foliage.

33. Path to enlightenment : ZEN
Zen is a Buddhist school that developed its own tradition in China back in the 7th century AD. Zen is a Japanese spelling of the Chinese word "chan", which in turn derives from the Sanskrit word "dhyana" meaning "meditation".

34. Cannon in movies : DYAN
The actress Dyan Cannon is perhaps best known for playing Alice in the 1969 film “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice”, for which she received a Best Actress Oscar nomination. Cannon is also famous for having been on Cary Grant's long list of wives, from 1965 to 1968 (and he was 33 years her senior).

37. Samoan staple : POI
The corm of some taro plants is used to make poi, the traditional Hawaiian dish (that I think tastes horrible). When a taro plant is grown as an ornamental, it is often called Elephant Ears due to the shape of its large leaves.

The official name for the South Pacific country formerly known as Western Samoa is the Independent State of Samoa. "Samoa" is the western part of the island group, with American Samoa lying to the southeast. The whole group of islands used to be known as Navigators Island, a name given by European explorers in recognition of the seafaring skills of the native Samoans.

38. Bullets legend Unseld : WES
Wes Unseld is a former professional basketball player who spent his entire career playing with the Baltimore/Capital/Washington Bullets.

41. Sushi restaurant wrap? : OBI
The sash worn as part of traditional Japanese dress is known as an obi. The obi can be tied at the back in what is called a butterfly knot.

43. Moxie : SPUNK
We’ve been using the word “spunk” to mean “pluck, courage” since the late 1700s. Prior to that it was a Scottish word meaning “spark”, a word that we absorbed into English.

Back as far as 1876, Moxie was a brand name of a "medicine" peddled with the claim that it "built up your nerve". In 1924, Moxie was registered as a trademark for a bitter, non-alcoholic beverage (no more claims of nerve-building). And we've used the term "moxie" to mean “nerve” ever since …

45. X-File subject : UFO
“The X-Files” is a very successful science fiction show that aired on the Fox network from 1993 to 2002. The stars of the show are David Duchovny (playing Fox Mulder) and the very talented Gillian Anderson (playing Dana Scully). By the time the series ended, “The X-Files” was the longest running sci-fi show in US broadcast history. An “X-Files” reboot started airing in 2016 with Duchovny and Anderson reprising their starring roles.

47. Fairy tale family : THREE BEARS
The story of “Goldilocks and the Three Bears” was first recorded in 1837, in England, although the narrative was around before it was actually written down. The original fairy tale was rather gruesome, but successive versions became more family-oriented. The character that eventually became Goldilocks was originally an elderly woman, and the three “nameless” bears became Papa Bear, Mama Bear and Baby Bear.

65. Sand wedge, e.g. : IRON
That would be golf.

66. Sean Lennon's mother : ONO
Sean Lennon is the only child of John Lennon and Yoko Ono. Sean’s godfather is Elton John. Sean is a musician and composer, and has a band called the Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger.

67. Thanksgiving dish : YAMS
Although in the US we sometimes refer to sweet potatoes as “yams”, the yam is actually a completely different family of plants. True yams are more common in other parts of the the world than they are in this country, and are especially found in Africa.

69. Game depicted in the shaded squares : TWENTY-ONE
The game of “twenty-one” was first referred to in a book by Cervantes, the author famous for writing “Don Quixote”. He called the game “ventiuna” (Spanish for “twenty-one”). Cervantes wrote his story just after the year 1600, so the game has been around at least since then. Twenty-one came to the US but it wasn’t all that popular so bonus payments were introduced to create more interest. One of the more attractive bonuses was a ten-to-one payout to a player who was dealt an ace of spades and a black jack. This bonus led to the game adopting the moniker “Blackjack”.

72. Carpenters with small jobs? : ANTS
Carpenter ants can wreak havoc in a wooden structure. They burrow into damp wood creating galleries and pathways that form a complex network of nests. Unlike termites though, carpenter ants don’t feed on the wood.

73. Last mustachioed president : TAFT
William Howard Taft may have been the 27th President of the United States, but his lifelong ambition was to be Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. President Taft was able to realize that dream in 1921, eight years after losing his bid for re-election as president. As Chief Justice, this former US President swore in two new presidents: Calvin Coolidge (in 1925) and Herbert Hoover (in 1929). William Howard Taft is also remembered as the most obese president. In the last year of his presidency, he weighed about 340 pounds (he was 5 feet 11 inches tall). Twelve months after leaving the White House, President Taft had dropped 80 pounds and substantially lowered his blood pressure.

79. Place where taps may be heard : BARRACKS
“Taps” is played nightly by the US military, indicating "lights out". It's also known as "Butterfield's Lullaby" as it is a variation of an older bugle call named the "Scott Tattoo", arranged during the Civil War by the Union Army's Brigadier General Daniel Butterfield. The tune is called "Taps", from the notion of drum taps, as it was originally played on a drum, and only later on a bugle. The whole tune comprises just 24 notes, with there only being four different notes within the 24, i.e. “low G”, C, E and “high G”. Minimalism at its best …

82. Skype alternative : FACETIME
FaceTime is an Apple video-telephony application. I guess it’s similar to Skype. Personally, I gave up on Skype and am now an avid user of Google Hangouts …

86. Amount of separation, in a party game : SIX DEGREES
Kevin Bacon is an actor from Philadelphia who appeared first on the big screen in the 1978 comedy “National Lampoon’s Animal House”. That wasn’t to be the big break that Bacon needed though, which came with “Footloose” in 1984. A fun fact about him is that he is the subject of a popular trivia game called “Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon” in which players have to show that a particular actor can be related to Kevin Bacon in fewer than six links, with each link being a movie in which two actors appear together.

91. Big retailer in women's fashion : ANN TAYLOR
There was no actual person called Ann Taylor associated with the Ann Taylor line of clothes. The name was chosen by the marketing professionals because "Ann" was considered to be "very New England" back in 1954 when the stores first opened, and "Taylor" suggested that clothes were carefully "tailored".

93. Upscale bag brand : FENDI
Fendi is an Italian fashion house, founded in 1925 by Adele Casagrande. Fendi started out as a fur and leather shop in Rome, and these days is famous for its line of handbags.

95. Indy 500 winner A. J. : FOYT
A. J. Foyt is a retired racing driver. Foyt is the only driver to have won the Indianapolis 500 (four times, in fact), the Daytona 500, the 24 Hours of Daytona as well as the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

97. Silly Putty holder : EGG
Silly Putty is a silicone polymer that is marketed as a toy, usually sold in an egg-shaped plastic container. It is a remarkable material that can flow like a liquid and can also bounce. Silly Putty was one of those accidental creations, an outcome of research during WWII in search of substitutes for rubber. The substitution became urgent as Japan invaded rubber-producing countries all around the Pacific Rim.

98. Standard poodle name : FIFI
The standard Poodle breed of dog is considered to be the second most intelligent breed, after the Border Collie. The name “poodle” comes from a Low German word meaning “to splash about”, reflecting the original use of the breed as a water retriever.

102. Countenances : MIENS
One's “mien” is one's bearing or manner. "Mien" shares the same etymological root as our word "demeanor".

104. Confession subjects : SINS
A member of the Roman Catholic church can participate in the sacrament of confession. A penitent confesses to a priest, starting with the words, “Bless me Father, for I have sinned. It has been [time period] since my last confession …”

106. "The Call of the Wild" author : JACK LONDON
“The Call of the Wild” is the most widely published novel of writer Jack London. The book tells the story of a dog named Buck that is forced into the hard life of a sled dog in the Yukon. When I was at school in Ireland, we got to read London’s follow-up novel “White Fang”. “White Fang” is a companion novel that the tells the tale of a wolf-dog that is born in the wild but eventually settles into a domesticated life.

110. March Madness stage : ELITE EIGHT
In the NCAA Division I Basketball Championship, the teams remaining at various stages of the tournament are known as:
  • The “Sweet Sixteen” (the regional semi-finalists)
  • The “Elite Eight” (the regional finalists)
  • The “Final Four” (the national semi-finalists)

117. "___ Care of Business" (1974 Bachman-Turner Overdrive hit) : TAKIN’
Takin’ Care of Business” is a 1973 song that perhaps falls into the family of “rock anthems”. It was written by Randy Bachman and recorded by his band Bachman-Turner Overdrive (BTO). The song was used for many years in an advertising campaign by Office Depot.

118. Eins + zwei : DREI
In German, “eins und zwei” (one and two) comes to “drei” (three).

121. Lieu : STEAD
As one might perhaps imagine, "in lieu" comes into English from the Old French word "lieu" meaning "place", which in turn is derived from the Latin "locum", also meaning "place". So, "in lieu" means "in place of".

125. With 76-Across, like Arial and Helvetica : SANS ...
(76A. See 125-Across : … SERIF)
Serifs are details on the ends of characters in some typefaces. Typefaces without serifs are known as sans-serif, using the French word "sans" meaning "without" and “serif” from the Dutch “schreef” meaning “line”. Some people say that serif fonts are easier to read on paper, whereas sans-serif fonts work better on a computer screen. I'm not so sure though …

Down
2. Wiggle room : LEEWAY
Our word “leeway” meaning “spare margin” is nautical in origin. A vessel’s leeway is the amount of drift motion away from her intended course that is caused by the action of the wind.

3. Light show : AURORA
The spectacular aurora phenomenon is seen lighting up the night sky at both poles of the earth (the Aurora Borealis in the north, and the Aurora Australis in the south). The eerie effect is caused by charged particles colliding with atoms at high latitudes.

4. The "Y" of Y.S.L. : YVES
Yves Saint-Laurent (YSL) was a French fashion designer, actually born in Algeria. Saint-Laurent started off working as an assistant to Christian Dior at the age of 17. Dior died just four years later, and as a very young man Saint-Laurent was named head of the House of Dior. However, in 1950 Saint-Laurent was conscripted into the French Army and ended up in a military hospital after suffering a mental breakdown from the hazing inflicted on him by his fellow soldiers. His treatment included electroshock therapy and administration of sedatives and psychoactive drugs. He was released from hospital, managed to pull his life back together and started his own fashion house. A remarkable story …

9. Linc's portrayer in 1999's "The Mod Squad" : OMAR EPPS
Omar Epps is the actor who played Eric Forman on the excellent television series “House”. Prior to playing Dr. Forman, Epps had a recurring role playing Dr. Dennis Grant on “ER”. And, in another link to the world of medicine, Epps was born in Savannah, Georgia to single mom, Dr. Bonnie Epps.

The 1999 movie "The Mod Squad" was an adaptation of the seventies television show of the same name. The part of Lincoln “Linc” Hayes was played by Omar Epps, Claire Danes played Julie Barnes and Giovanni Ribisi played Peter Cochran.

12. "Up" voice actor : ASNER
“Up” is the tenth movie released by Pixar studios, featuring wonderful animation as we have come to expect from Pixar. The film earned itself two Academy Awards. The main voice actor is Ed Asner, whose animated persona as Carl Fredricksen was created to resemble Spencer Tracy, as Tracy appeared in his last film, “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner”.

14. Artist who said "I don't do drugs. I am drugs" : DALI
The famous surrealist painter Salvador Dalí was born in Figueres, Spain. I had the privilege of visiting the Dalí Museum in Figueres some years ago, just north of Barcelona. If you ever get the chance, it’s a “must see” as it really is a quite magnificent building with a fascinating collection.

15. Speed skater Heiden : ERIC
Eric Heiden is a former American speed skater, the most successful athlete to compete in any single Winter Olympics. He won five gold medals at the 1980 games in Lake Placid. After retiring from the ice, Heiden became a doctor and is now an orthopedic surgeon in Salt Lake City.

16. Entr'___ : ACTE
The term “entr'acte” comes to us from French, and is the interval “between two acts” (“entre deux actes”) of a theatrical performance. The term often describes some entertainment provided during that interval.

17. Delivery instructions? : LAMAZE
The Lamaze technique for childbirth was developed by a French obstetrician called Fernand Lamaze. He introduced the technique in the west after observing similar practices in the Soviet Union during a visit there in 1951.

18. Infers from data : EDUCES
“To educe” is to draw out, although the term can also have a similar meaning to deduce.

27. "I think," in texts : IMO
In my opinion (IMO)

35. Holiday air : NOEL
“Noël” is the French word for the Christmas season, ultimately coming from the Latin word for “birth” (natalis). Noel has come to be used as an alternative name for a Christmas carol.

36. Tabloid issue : LIBEL
The word "libel", meaning a published or written statement likely to harm a person's reputation, comes into English from the Latin "libellus", the word for a small book. Back in the 1500s "libel" was just a formal written statement, with the more damaging meaning arising in the 1600s.

Tabloid is the trademarked name (owned by Burroughs, Wellcome and Co,) for a "small tablet of medicine", a name that goes back to 1884. The word "tabloid" had entered into general use to mean a compressed form of anything, and by the early 1900s was used in "tabloid journalism", applied to newspapers that had short, condensed articles and stories printed on smaller sheets of paper.

40. Citi rival, informally : B OF A
Bank of America (B of A)

42. Neuwirth of "Frasier" : BEBE
Bebe Neuwirth is a wonderful actress and dancer, very famous for portraying Dr. Lilith Sternin, the wife of Dr. Frasier Crane on “Cheers” and “Frasier”. Neuwirth is a fabulous dancer, having studied ballet at Juilliard. In more recent years she has had starring roles on Broadway, and in 2010 played opposite Nathan Lane in “The Addams Family”. Neuwirth also plays a leading role on the show “Madame Secretary”.

43. Some SAT takers: Abbr. : SRS
Today the standardized test for admission to colleges is known as the SAT Reasoning Test, but it used to be called the Scholastic Aptitude Test and Scholastic Assessment Test, which led to the abbreviation SAT.

47. Super Fro-Yo seller : TCBY
TCBY is a chain of stores selling frozen yogurt, founded in 1981 in Little Rock, Arkansas. The acronym TCBY originally stood for “This Can’t Be Yogurt”, but this had to be changed due to a lawsuit being pressed by a competitor called “I Can’t Believe It’s Yogurt”. These days TCBY stands for “The Country’s Best Yogurt”.

48. "Hava Nagila" dance : HORA
The hora is a circle dance that originated in the Balkans. It was brought to Israel by Romanian settlers, and is often performed to traditional, Israeli folk songs. The hora (also horah) is a regular sight at Jewish weddings. Sometimes the honoree at an event is raised on a chair during the hora.

"Hava Nagila" is a Hebrew folk song, with the title translating into "Let Us Rejoice". The melody is from a Ukrainian folk song. The words to "Hava Nagila" were composed in 1918 to celebrate the British victory in Palestine during WWI.

54. Jane Rochester, nee ___ : EYRE
Jane Eyre is a celebrated novel written by Charlotte Brontë, under the pen name Currer Bell. Over the years, I've shared here on my blogs that the "Jane Eyre" story line is a little too dark and Gothic for my taste, but a very persuasive blog reader convinced me to look more at the romantic side of the story and give it a second chance. I watched a wonderful 4-hour television adaptation of the novel made by the BBC a while back and I have to say that because I was focused on the relationship between Jane and Rochester, I was able to push past the Gothic influences (that depress me) so I really enjoyed the story. I thoroughly recommend the 2006 BBC adaptation to fans of the novel.

57. Matchmaker of myth : EROS
Eros, the Greek god of love, gives rise to our word “erotic”, meaning “arousing sexual desire”. Also known as Amor, the Roman counterpart to Eros was Cupid.

62. Suffix with acetyl : -ENE
Acetylene is one of the simplest hydrocarbons, and has the formula C2H2. About 20% of the acetylene produced in the world is used for oxyacetylene gas welding and cutting.

63. Printer paper size: Abbr. : LTR
Letter (ltr.)

68. Famed Broadway restaurateur : SARDI
Sardi’s is a renowned restaurant in the Theater District of Manhattan that was opened in 1927 by Italian immigrant Vincent Sardi, Sr. Sardi’s is famous for attracting celebrities who pose for caricatures that are then displayed on the restaurant’s walls. After the death of actress and director Antoinette Perry in 1946, her friend and partner Brock Pemberton was having lunch at Sardi’s and came up with idea of a theater award that could be presented in Perry’s honor. The award was to be called the Tony Award. In fact, Vincent Sardi, Sr. was presented with a special Tony at the first award ceremony, held in 1947.

70. Ruhr industrial city : ESSEN
Essen is a large industrial city located on the River Ruhr in western Germany.

71. Butcher's discards : OFFAL
The internal organs and entrails of a butchered animal is referred to as “offal”. Examples of dishes that make use of offal would be sausages, foie gras, sweetbreads and haggis. The term is a melding of the words “off” and “fall”, and dates back to the 14th century. The idea is that offal is what “falls off” a butcher’s block.

75. Laser ___ : TAG
The name “Laser Tag” is really a misnomer as lasers are rarely used in the game. The “guns” actually send out infrared light, and not laser light, which is picked up by infrared detectors worn by the players.

77. Maui memento : LEI
Maui is the second largest of the Hawaiian islands. Maui is sometimes called the “Valley Isle” as it is composed of two volcanoes to the northwest and southeast of the island, each with numerous beautiful valleys carved into them.

81. Superman, at other times : KENT
Superman’s comic book creators gave their title character’s alter-ego the name “Clark Kent” by melding the names of Clark Gable and Kent Taylor, two leading men of the cinema at the time Superman was created. However, they modeled Clark’s character more on the silent film actor Harold Lloyd.

84. Like the sign of the fish : CHRISTIAN
The Ichthys was a secret Christian symbol used in the early church. The symbol is composed of two intersecting arcs and resembles the profile of a fish. The Ichthys reemerged in the early 1970s as an icon for modern Christianity, at which time it was given the nickname “Jesus Fish”. Many Christians nowadays place the symbol on the rear of their cars or wear it as a pendant.

85. Marijuana, in modern slang : ENDO
“Endo” is a slang term for marijuana that is grown indoors, usually using hydroponics. The prefix “endo-” comes from the Greek “endon” meaning “within, inner”.

86. "___ cheese!" : SAY
Photographers often instruct us to say “cheese”, to elicit a smile-like expression. Even Japanese photographers use the word “cheese” for the same effect. Bulgarians use the word “zele” meaning “cabbage”. The Chinese say “eggplant”, the Danish “orange”, the Iranians “apple” and the most Latin Americans say “whiskey”.

88. Young swans : CYGNETS
An adult male swan is called a “cob”, and an adult female is a “pen”. Young swans are called “swanlings” or “cygnets”.

89. Part of a tour : GIG
Musicians use “gig” to describe a job, a performance. The term originated in the early 1900s in the world of jazz.

96. "Lawrence of Arabia" star : O'TOOLE
Irish actor Peter O'Toole got his big break in movies when he played the title role in the 1962 epic film "Lawrence of Arabia". But my favorite of O'Toole's movies is much lighter fare, namely "How to Steal a Million" in which he stars opposite Audrey Hepburn.

Lawrence of Arabia” is a 1962 movie that recounts the real life story of T. E. Lawrence, a British army officer famous for his role in the Sinai and Palestine Campaign of World War I. The title role in the film is played by Irish actor Peter O’Toole. The role of Sherif Ali ibn el Kharish is played by Omar Sharif.

101. City that's home to the Firestone Country Club : AKRON
For part of the 1800s, the Ohio city of Akron was the fasting growing city in the country, feeding off the industrial boom of that era. The city was founded in 1825 and its location, along the Ohio and Erie canal connecting Lake Erie with the Ohio River, helped to fuel Akron’s growth. Akron sits at the highest point of the canal and the name “Akron” comes from the Greek word meaning “summit”. Indeed, Akron is the county seat of Summit County. The city earned the moniker “Rubber Capital of the World” for most of the 20th century, as it was home to four major tire companies: Goodrich, Goodyear, Firestone and General Tire.

Firestone Country Club in Akron, Ohio was established in 1929 as a park for the employees of Firestone Tire and Rubber Company. Today, the club has three golf courses and is a regular venue on the PGA Tour.

Firestone is a tire company founded by Harvey Firestone in 1900. The Firestone company took off when it was selected by Henry Ford as the supplier of tires for his Model T.

102. Divider in the Bible? : MOSES
Moses is an important prophet in Christianity and Islam, and the most important prophet in Judaism. It fell to Moses to lead the Israelites out of slavery in Egypt across the Red Sea. He was given the Ten Commandments on Mount Sinai, and then wandered the desert with his people for forty years. Moses then died within sight of the Promised Land.

The Red Sea (sometimes called the Arabian Gulf) is a stretch of water lying between Africa and Asia. The Gulf of Suez (and the Suez Canal) lies to north, and the Gulf of Aden to the south. According to the Book of Exodus in the Bible, God parted the Red Sea to allow Moses lead the Israelites from Egypt.

106. "Twister" actress Gertz : JAMI
The actress Jami Gertz is probably best known for playing one of the leads in the sitcom “Still Standing”. Gertz is married to wealthy businessman Antony Ressler. Together, the couple were listed as the number-one donor to charity of any celebrity in the year 2010.

108. Intimate garment, for short : CAMI
A camisole (also “cami”) is a sleeveless undergarment worn by women that extends down to the waist. “Camisole” is a French word that we imported into English, which ultimately derives from the Latin “camisia” meaning “shirt, nightgown”.

111. Company with a noted catalog : IKEA
The IKEA furniture stores use the colors blue and yellow for brand recognition. Blue and yellow are the national colors of Sweden, where IKEA was founded and is headquartered.

112. Dull color, in Düsseldorf : GRAU
“Grau” is a German word meaning “gray”.

Düsseldorf lies in the west of Germany, fairly close to the border with France. The city is located on the River Rhine.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. One side of a 69-Across showdown : PLAYER
7. Strip of buttons : TOOLBAR
14. Other side of the showdown : DEALER
20. Collective works : OEUVRE
21. "Get lost!" : VAMOOSE!
22. Pinball wizard's hangout : ARCADE
23. Mother ___ : TERESA
24. Entertainment on a Jamaican cruise, perhaps : SKA BAND
25. Kind of paper or test : LITMUS
26. Lieutenant, informally : TWO-STRIPER
28. It's unreturnable : SERVICE ACE
30. Musicianship : EAR
31. Green plant? : MONEY TREE
33. Path to enlightenment : ZEN
34. Cannon in movies : DYAN
36. Developer's purchase : LOT
37. Samoan staple : POI
38. Bullets legend Unseld : WES
40. Top-shelf : BEST
41. Sushi restaurant wrap? : OBI
43. Moxie : SPUNK
45. X-File subject : UFO
47. Fairy tale family : THREE BEARS
52. Celebratory request : GIVE ME FIVE!
58. "Great!" : COOL BEANS!
59. One doesn't hold stock for long : DAY TRADER
60. "My man" : BRO
61. "What ___?" : ELSE
62. Storied workshop worker : ELF
65. Sand wedge, e.g. : IRON
66. Sean Lennon's mother : ONO
67. Thanksgiving dish : YAMS
69. Game depicted in the shaded squares : TWENTY-ONE
72. Carpenters with small jobs? : ANTS
73. Last mustachioed president : TAFT
76. See 125-Across : … SERIF
77. Easy-breezy tune : LILT
79. Place where taps may be heard : BARRACKS
82. Skype alternative : FACETIME
86. Amount of separation, in a party game : SIX DEGREES
88. Investment seminar catchphrase : CASH IS KING
90. Lost big : ATE IT
91. Big retailer in women's fashion : ANN TAYLOR
93. Upscale bag brand : FENDI
94. "Damn right!" : YES!
95. Indy 500 winner A. J. : FOYT
97. Silly Putty holder : EGG
98. Standard poodle name : FIFI
100. Hound : DOG
101. Digital camera mode : AUTO
102. Countenances : MIENS
104. Confession subjects : SINS
106. "The Call of the Wild" author : JACK LONDON
110. March Madness stage : ELITE EIGHT
115. In the distance : AFAR
116. Having a lot to lose, maybe : OBESE
117. "___ Care of Business" (1974 Bachman-Turner Overdrive hit) : TAKIN’
118. Eins + zwei : DREI
119. Message with a subject line : MEMO
120. Unlikely partygoer : LONER
121. Lieu : STEAD
122. Bring in : EARN
123. 1-Across's cry : I WIN!
124. Tel. no. add-ons : EXTS
125. With 76-Across, like Arial and Helvetica : SANS ...
126. 14-Across's result : BUST

Down
1. Like houseplants : POTTED
2. Wiggle room : LEEWAY
3. Light show : AURORA
4. The "Y" of Y.S.L. : YVES
5. Once, at one time : ERST
6. Behind : REAR
7. Campaign expense : TV SPOT
8. Wine barrel descriptor : OAKEN
9. Linc's portrayer in 1999's "The Mod Squad" : OMAR EPPS
10. One may get smashed : LOB
11. Chest-thumping : BOASTING
12. "Up" voice actor : ASNER
13. Changed, as voting districts : REDREW
14. Artist who said "I don't do drugs. I am drugs" : DALI
15. Speed skater Heiden : ERIC
16. Entr'___ : ACTE
17. Delivery instructions? : LAMAZE
18. Infers from data : EDUCES
19. Feel bitter about : RESENT
27. "I think," in texts : IMO
29. Neckline shape : VEE
32. Word shortened to its last letter in texts : YOU
35. Holiday air : NOEL
36. Tabloid issue : LIBEL
39. Total : SUM TO
40. Citi rival, informally : B OF A
42. Neuwirth of "Frasier" : BEBE
43. Some SAT takers: Abbr. : SRS
44. Tease : KID
46. Item by many a reception desk : FERN
47. Super Fro-Yo seller : TCBY
48. "Hava Nagila" dance : HORA
49. Hotel bill add-ons : ROOM TAXES
50. Right on a map : EAST
51. From square one : ANEW
53. Marked by futility : VAIN
54. Jane Rochester, nee ___ : EYRE
55. "O.K. by me" : I DON'T MIND
56. Blow off steam : VENT
57. Matchmaker of myth : EROS
62. Suffix with acetyl : -ENE
63. Printer paper size: Abbr. : LTR
64. BTW : FYI
68. Famed Broadway restaurateur : SARDI
70. Ruhr industrial city : ESSEN
71. Butcher's discards : OFFAL
72. How great minds are said to think : ALIKE
74. Worried : FRETFUL
75. Laser ___ : TAG
77. Maui memento : LEI
78. "O.K. by me" : IT'S FINE
79. Word after snake or sound : BITE
80. Container that may have a sharpener : CRAYON BOX
81. Superman, at other times : KENT
83. Starting on : AS OF
84. Like the sign of the fish : CHRISTIAN
85. Marijuana, in modern slang : ENDO
86. "___ cheese!" : SAY
87. Composer Max who was called "the father of film music" : STEINER
88. Young swans : CYGNETS
89. Part of a tour : GIG
92. Basis of some discrimination : AGE
96. "Lawrence of Arabia" star : O'TOOLE
99. Maniacs : FIENDS
101. City that's home to the Firestone Country Club : AKRON
102. Divider in the Bible? : MOSES
103. Venetian blind parts : SLATS
105. Bottom of an LP : SIDE B
106. "Twister" actress Gertz : JAMI
107. Some : A FEW
108. Intimate garment, for short : CAMI
109. Bit of progress : DENT
111. Company with a noted catalog : IKEA
112. Dull color, in Düsseldorf : GRAU
113. Word on a towel : HERS
114. Shade : TINT


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0128-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Jan 17, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Damon Gulczynski
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 14m 27s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. "The Haywain Triptych" painter : BOSCH
Hieronymus Bosch was a Dutch painter who worked late 15th and early 16th centuries. Perhaps his most recognized work is his triptych titled "The Garden of Earthly Delights".

6. Classic novel written under the nom de plume Currer Bell : JANE EYRE
Jane Eyre is a celebrated novel written by Charlotte Brontë, under the pen name Currer Bell. Over the years, I've shared here on my blogs that the "Jane Eyre" story line is a little too dark and Gothic for my taste, but a very persuasive blog reader convinced me to look more at the romantic side of the story and give it a second chance. I watched a wonderful 4-hour television adaptation of the novel made by the BBC a while back and I have to say that because I was focused on the relationship between Jane and Rochester, I was able to push past the Gothic influences (that depress me) so I really enjoyed the story. I thoroughly recommend the 2006 BBC adaptation to fans of the novel.

14. Its logo consists of a pair of calipers in an oval : ACURA
Acura is a division of the Honda Motor Company, its luxury brand. As an aside, Infiniti is the equivalent luxury brand for the Nissan Motor Company, and Lexus is the more luxurious version of Toyota’s models.

18. 1998 Spike Lee movie : HE GOT GAME
“He Got Game” is a movie written and directed by Spike Lee, released in 1998. It is a sports drama about a high school basketball player, with a father in prison played by Denzel Washington.

21. System developed by Bell Labs : UNIX
Unix is a computer operating system that was developed at Bell Labs in 1969. The initial name for the project was Uniplexed Information and Computing Service (Unics), and this evolved over time into “Unix”.

23. Italian brewery since 1846 : PERONI
The Peroni Brewery is based in Rome, although it was founded in Vigevano in Lombardy in 1846. Outside of Italy, Peroni is particularly popular in the UK.

25. Wine aperitif : KIR
Kir is a French cocktail, made by adding a teaspoon or so of creme de cassis (blackcurrant liqueur) to a glass, and then topping it off with white wine. The drink is named after Felix Kir, the Mayor of Dijon in Burgundy, who used to offer the drink to his guests. My wife (expensive tastes!) is particularly fond of a variant called a Kir Royale, in which the white wine is replaced with champagne.

26. Sister and wife of Cronus : RHEA
In Greek mythology Rhea was one of the Titans. She was the sister and husband of Cronus, and together they had six children, the last of which was Zeus. Cronus swallowed all of his children as soon as they were born, except for Zeus, who Rhea managed to hide from her husband.

28. Dish often served with applesauce : LATKES
A latke is a delicious potato pancake (I'm Irish ... so anything made with potato is delicious!).

38. Texter's "Oh, yeah ..." : BTW …
By the way (BTW)

43. A cry of relief : TGIF
“Thank God It’s Friday” (TGIF) is a relatively new expression that apparently originated in Akron, Ohio. It was a catchphrase used first by disk jockey Jerry Healy of WAKR in the early seventies. That said, one blog reader wrote me to say that he had been using the phrase in the fifties.

49. "Outside the Lines" airer : ESPN
“Outside the Lines” (OTL) is an ESPN show that has aired since 1990.

55. It may be used by a person who is bowing : VIOLA
The viola looks like and is played like a violin, but is slightly larger. It is referred to as the middle voice in the violin family, between the violin and the cello.

57. Young migratory fish : ELVER
An elver is a young eel.

58. Harbinger of spring : RED ROBIN
The American robin has a reddish-orange breast. This coloring gave the bird its name, due to the similarity to the European robin. The two species are not in fact related. It is the American robin that famously lays light-blue eggs.

A harbinger is a person or a thing that indicates what is to come. The word comes from the Middle English “herbenger”, a person sent ahead to arrange lodgings.

Down
9. "Another Day on Earth" musical artist : ENO
Brian Eno is a musician, composer and record producer from England who first achieved fame as the synthesizer player with Roxy Music. As a producer, Eno has worked with David Bowie, Devo, Talking Heads and U2.

10. Setting for Yankees home games: Abbr. : EDT
Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)

12. Lost Colony's island : ROANOKE
Roanoke Island is in modern-day North Carolina. It was settled in the late 1500s by an expedition financed by Sir Walter Raleigh. The final group of colonists that were landed in Roanoke were left there for three years without resupply from England (due to the Anglo-Spanish War). When a supply ship finally landed, the settlement was found abandoned with no sign of the colonists. All 100 people had disappeared without any indication of a struggle, and so Roanoke became known as the Lost Colony.

13. Royal wraps : ERMINES
The stoat has dark brown fur in the summer, and white fur in the winter. Sometimes the term “ermine” is used for the animal during the winter when the fur is white. Ermine skins have long been prized by royalty and are often used for white trim on ceremonial robes.

20. Victim of Paris : ACHILLES
Achilles is a Greek mythological figure, the main protagonist of Homer's "Iliad". Supposedly when Achilles was born his mother attempted to make him immortal by dipping him into the River Styx. As he was held by the heel as he was immersed, this became the only vulnerable point on his body. Years later he was killed when a poisoned arrow struck him in the heel. The arrow was shot by Paris.

35. Impetuous person : HOTSPUR
A hotspur is a fiery or impetuous person. The term has come into English via the nickname of an English rebel called Sir Henry Percy. "Hotspur" led a rebellion against King Henry IV in 1403, although he didn't get very far. In the Battle of Shrewsbury he raised his visor to get some air, and was hit in the mouth with an arrow, dying instantly. Henry Percy lent his name to so many things, including Tottenham Hotspur Football Club in London (my favorite soccer team growing up) and the "Hotspur" comic book (my favorite read as a youngster).

36. Scuba gear component : AIR PIPE
The self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) was co-invented by celebrated French marine explorer Jacques Cousteau.

38. "Blaze of Glory" band, 1990 : BON JOVI
Jon Bon Jovi was born John Francis Bongiovi, Jr., and he is the leader of the band that took his name: Bon Jovi.

44. Matisse, Derain and fellow artists, with "les" : FAUVES
Henri Matisse was a French artist renowned for his contribution to modern art. In his early career, Matisse was classed as a “fauve”, one of the group of artists known as the “wild beasts” who emphasized strong color over realism in their works. He was a lifelong friend of Pablo Picasso, and the two were considered to be good-natured rivals so their works are often compared. One major difference between their individual portfolios is that Picasso tended to paint from his imagination, whereas Matisse tended to use nature as his inspiration.

50. Recipient of a royal charter, with "the" : BEEB
The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is also known as "the Beeb", a name given to the network by the great Peter Sellers on the classic British radio comedy called "The Goon Show". The BBC was founded in 1922, and was the world’s first national broadcasting organization.

54. Chi-___ (religious symbol) : RHO
Chi Rho is an ancient religious symbol in the Christian tradition. “Chi’ and “rho” are the first two letters in the Greek word for “Christ”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "The Haywain Triptych" painter : BOSCH
6. Classic novel written under the nom de plume Currer Bell : JANE EYRE
14. Its logo consists of a pair of calipers in an oval : ACURA
15. Present some opportunities : OPEN DOORS
17. Officially prohibit : DEBAR
18. 1998 Spike Lee movie : HE GOT GAME
19. Gesture of razzle-dazzlement : JAZZ HANDS
21. System developed by Bell Labs : UNIX
22. Strict limitation, of a sort : ONE EACH
23. Italian brewery since 1846 : PERONI
25. Wine aperitif : KIR
26. Sister and wife of Cronus : RHEA
28. Dish often served with applesauce : LATKES
29. Friendly introduction? : ECO-
30. " : INCHES
32. 4.5 billion years, for the age of the earth: Abbr. : EST
33. "So soon?" : ALREADY?
34. "Gotcha" : AHA
37. Opposite of slow : FLYING
38. Texter's "Oh, yeah ..." : BTW ...
41. "Gotcha" : SO I SEE
43. A cry of relief : TGIF
45. It's searched for in a rush : ORE
46. Some dispenser items : STRAWS
47. Agitated : IN A SNIT
49. "Outside the Lines" airer : ESPN
50. Heck of an effort : BANG-UP JOB
52. Web deposit? : SPIDER EGG
55. It may be used by a person who is bowing : VIOLA
56. One with many enemies : SUPERHERO
57. Young migratory fish : ELVER
58. Harbinger of spring : RED ROBIN
59. Narrow apertures : SLITS

Down
1. Something a bomber delivers? : BAD JOKE
2. Vast : OCEANIC
3. C-c-c-cold : SUB-ZERO
4. Rage : CRAZE
5. Sarcastic response to a 1-Down : HAR HAR
6. "Steel-driving man" of African-American lore : JOHN HENRY
7. Took off on : APED
8. Sources of prints, for short : NEGS
9. "Another Day on Earth" musical artist : ENO
10. Setting for Yankees home games: Abbr. : EDT
11. Dish eaten with a spoon : YOGURT
12. Lost Colony's island : ROANOKE
13. Royal wraps : ERMINES
16. Like some pigs : SEXIST
20. Victim of Paris : ACHILLES
23. Activity in a drive : PLEDGING
24. "Don't get all worked up!" : EASY!
27. Nail the test : ACE IT
31. Not dead yet : HANGING ON
33. What tipplers may have : A FEW
34. Value : ASSESS
35. Impetuous person : HOTSPUR
36. Scuba gear component : AIR PIPE
38. "Blaze of Glory" band, 1990 : BON JOVI
39. Eight-line verse form : TRIOLET
40. Luxury home features : WET BARS
42. Like finished wood : SANDED
44. Matisse, Derain and fellow artists, with "les" : FAUVES
48. A biker may have a nasty one : SPILL
50. Recipient of a royal charter, with "the" : BEEB
51. Commercial lead-in to Bank, in many Midwest states : AGRI-
53. Miss the mark : ERR
54. Chi-___ (religious symbol) : RHO


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0127-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Jan 17, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: John Guzzetta
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 12m 34s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

12. Half a ten-spot : ABE
The US five-dollar bill is often called an "Abe", as President Lincoln’s portrait is on the front. An Abe is also referred to as a “fin”, a term that has been used for a five-pound note in Britain since 1868.

16. Loafer alternative, for short : MOC
"Moc" is short for “moccasin”, the type of shoe.

The type of slip-on shoe called a "loafer" dates back to 1939. "Loafer" was originally a brand name introduced by the Fortnum and Mason's store in London.

19. Flat, e.g.: Abbr. : RES
“Flat” is a word more commonly used in the British Isles than here, in the sense of an apartment or condominium. The word “flat” is Scottish in origin, in which language it meant a “floor in a house”.

21. Grave robbers : GHOULS
Our word “ghoul” comes from the Arabic “ghul”, the name for an evil spirit that feeds on corpses.

23. Land in which political parties are banned : OMAN
Oman lies on the southeast coast of the Arabian Peninsula and is neighbored by the OAE, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Oman is a monarchy, and the official name of the state is the Sultanate of Oman. All of the country’s legislative, executive and judiciary power resides with the hereditary sultan.

24. She created a monster : SHELLEY
Mary Shelley’s Gothic novel has the full title of “Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus”. The subtitle underscores one of the themes of the book, a warning about man’s expansion into the Industrial Revolution.

25. First name in hot dogs : NATHAN
Nathan's Famous has held a Hot Dog Eating Contest every July 4th since 1916, and always at the same location on Coney Island.

32. Nix : VETO
“Veto” comes directly from Latin and means “I forbid”. The word was used by tribunes of Ancient Rome to indicate that they opposed measures passed by the Senate.

33. Sound of the Northwest : PUGET
George Vancouver was a British explorer, and an officer in the Royal Navy. As well as exploring the coast of Australia, he is best known for his travels along the northwest coast of North America. The city of Vancouver was named in his honor. Travelling with him on his American voyage was a lieutenant Peter Puget, and in his honor, Vancouver named the waters south of the Tacoma Narrows “Puget’s Sound”. Nowadays, the name Puget Sound describes an area much greater than Vancouver had envisioned.

36. Ingredients in the national drink of Puerto Rico, to Puerto Ricans : PINAS
“Piña colada” is a Spanish term which translates into "strained pineapple". The Piña colada cocktail was introduced in the Caribe Hilton San Juan in 1954, and since 1978 it has been the official beverage of Puerto Rico. Yum …

37. An elephant seal will fight for one : HAREM
There are three families of seals. The first is the walrus family, the second the eared seals (like sea lions), and thirdly the earless seals (like elephant seals).

38. Vassal : LIEGEMAN
A liege was a feudal lord, one to whom service or allegiance was owed under feudal law. "Liege" (and “liegeman”) was also the term used for one who owed allegiance or service to a lord. Very confusing …

Feudalism was a legal and military system that flourished in medieval Europe. Central to the system were the concepts of lords, vassals and fiefs. Lords would grant fiefs (land or rights) to vassals in exchange for allegiance and service.

40. Part-human gods : SATYRS
The satyrs of Greek mythology came with a very high sex drive. They are the "rude" male subjects drawn on the side of old Greek vases. The nubile maidens known as nymphs were often an object of attention for the satyrs.

43. Melodious : ARIOSE
A tune that is “ariose” is song-like, characterized by melody as opposed to harmony.

44. Romance novelist Tami : HOAG
Tami Hoag is a novelist best known for writing romances and thrillers. She is a prolific writer and once had five consecutive titles on the New York Times bestsellers list, all in a 20-month period.

45. TV band : VHF
TV frequencies here in North America are divided into two bands. The VHF band covers channels 2 through 13; the UHF band covers channels 14 through 83.

52. End of the King James Bible? : -ETH
In 1604, King James I of England convened a conference at Hampton Court in order produce a new translation of the Bible, as the Puritan sect within the church had problems with prior versions. 47 scholars made new translations for the New Testament from Greek and from the Old Testament from Hebrew. The result is the King James Authorized Version.

Down
1. Bradley with many medals : OMAR
Omar Bradley graduated from West Point in the class of 1915, along with Dwight Eisenhower who also attained the rank of General of the Army. Bradley was the last person to hold the rank of a five-star commissioned officer, and he was the first general to serve as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. I was struck by a quotation from Bradley from later in his life:
Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than about peace, more about killing than we know about living.

3. Brand with the flavor French Silk : EDY’S
Dreyers’ ice cream sells its products under the name Dreyers in the Western United States, and Edy’s in the Eastern states. The company’s founders were William Dreyer and Joseph Edy.

5. Where many Loyalists resettled after the American Revolution : BAHAMAS
The Bahamas is a group of islands in the Atlantic Ocean, lying in the same island chain as Cuba and Hispaniola. The Bahamas was a British colony for many years but became independent in 1973, although it retains membership in the British Commonwealth.

6. Real name of Ben, in a sci-fi classic : OBI-WAN
Obi-Wan Kenobi is one of the more beloved of the “Star Wars” characters. Kenobi was portrayed by two fabulous actors in the series of films. As a young man he is played by Scottish actor Ewan McGregor, and as an older man he is played by Alec Guinness.

7. Actress Saoirse with two Oscar nominations : RONAN
Saoirse Ronan is an Irish-American actress, having been born in the Bronx, New York and raised in Carlow and Dublin in Ireland. Ronan’s big break came when she was cast in the 2007 film “Atonement” at 12 years of age, a role for which she was nominated for that season's Best Supporting Actress Oscar. “Saoirse” is the Irish word for “freedom”.

8. Stray calf: Var. : DOGY
“Dogie” (sometimes “dogy”) is cowboy slang for a motherless calf in a herd.

26. Take the edge off : AMELIORATE
“To ameliorate” is to make better, and comes to us from French. The French for “better” is “meìlleur”.

28. Actress Mullally with two Emmys : MEGAN
Megan Mullally is an actress probably best known for playing Karen Walker on the TV sitcom “Will & Grace”. Mullally also has a recurring role on the sitcom “Parks and Recreation”, playing Tammy Swanson, the ex-wife of Ron Swanson. In real life Tammy and Ron aren’t exes, as Megan Mullally is married to actor Nick Offerman who plays Ron Swanson.

34. Sights at a martial arts center : MATS
“Martial arts” are various fighting traditions and systems used in combat or simply to promote physical well-being. The term ultimately derives from Latin and means “Arts of Mars”, a reference to Mars, the Roman god of war.

37. Places to fix flaps : HANGARS
“Hangar” is a French word for “shed”. The French first started using the term for a “shed for airplanes” in the very early 1900s.

44. For the goose, not the gander? : HERS
A male goose is called a gander, with the female simply being referred to as a “goose”. Young geese are called goslings.

45. Alto clef instrument : VIOL
The viola da gamba (also called simply “viol”) is a bass instrument in what is known as the viol family, with a tonal range that about matches that of the modern-day cello. It is the second largest of all the viols, so is played resting on the floor between the legs. In fact, "viola da gamba" is Italian translating into "viol for the leg".

Clef is the French word for “key”. In music, a clef is used to indicate the pitch of the notes written on the stave. The bass clef is also known as the F-clef, the alto clef is the C-clef, and the treble clef is the G-clef.

50. Figures in some univ. classes : TAS
Teaching Assistants (TAs)

51. Dance bit? : CHA
The cha-cha-cha (often simplified to “cha-cha”) is a Latin dance with origins in Cuba, where it was introduced by composer Enrique Jorrin in 1953.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Feature of the European Union : OPEN BORDERS
12. Half a ten-spot : ABE
15. Slipped : MADE A BOO-BOO
16. Loafer alternative, for short : MOC
17. "Definitely not THAT!" : ANYTHING BUT!
18. Part of a press kit : BIO
19. Flat, e.g.: Abbr. : RES
20. See 34-Across : AWAY
21. Grave robbers : GHOULS
23. Land in which political parties are banned : OMAN
24. She created a monster : SHELLEY
25. First name in hot dogs : NATHAN
28. Goes from stem to stern, maybe? : MISREADS
29. Off : AMISS
30. Fix, as some neckwear : RETIE
31. Bambino : TOT
32. Nix : VETO
33. Sound of the Northwest : PUGET
34. With 20-Across, relocate : MOVE
35. Many a large desk or sofa : ELL
36. Ingredients in the national drink of Puerto Rico, to Puerto Ricans : PINAS
37. An elephant seal will fight for one : HAREM
38. Vassal : LIEGEMAN
40. Part-human gods : SATYRS
41. "Be my guest!" : GO FOR IT!
42. Moors : FENS
43. Melodious : ARIOSE
44. Romance novelist Tami : HOAG
45. TV band : VHF
48. Part of some punt returns : ZAG
49. Like marriage supported by Loving v. Virginia : INTERRACIAL
52. End of the King James Bible? : -ETH
53. Fixer-upper, often : STARTER HOME
54. Unlikely to change : SET
55. Course that offers mixed results? : TOSSED SALAD

Down
1. Bradley with many medals : OMAR
2. One getting framed : PANE
3. Brand with the flavor French Silk : EDY’S
4. It gets tons of traffic : NET
5. Where many Loyalists resettled after the American Revolution : BAHAMAS
6. Real name of Ben, in a sci-fi classic : OBI-WAN
7. Actress Saoirse with two Oscar nominations : RONAN
8. Stray calf: Var. : DOGY
9. Decline : EBB
10. Camps in the wild : ROUGHS IT
11. "Told ya!" : SO THERE!
12. Not bedridden : AMBULATORY
13. Blew a gasket : BOILED OVER
14. Caves and coral reefs, for example : ECOSYSTEMS
22. Cry when un gol is scored : OLE!
23. Exceedingly : OH SO
24. The 4-Down has millions of them : SITES
25. Is way too introspective : NAVEL-GAZES
26. Take the edge off : AMELIORATE
27. Someone gets belted at the end of it : TITLE FIGHT
28. Actress Mullally with two Emmys : MEGAN
30. Rush : RUN AT
33. Red stuffing? : PIMIENTO
34. Sights at a martial arts center : MATS
36. What a bad cold may do : PERSIST
37. Places to fix flaps : HANGARS
39. Too-sweet sentiment : GOO
40. Prepared, as some scallops or tuna : SEARED
42. Strength : FORTE
44. For the goose, not the gander? : HERS
45. Alto clef instrument : VIOL
46. Mie ___, actress who played the Bond girl Kissy Suzuki : HAMA
47. Turned tail : FLED
50. Figures in some univ. classes : TAS
51. Dance bit? : CHA


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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