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0219-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 19 Feb 17, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Bruce Haight
THEME: Uh-Oh
Each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase, but with an “UH” sound changed to an “OH” sound:
23A. Office for decoding messages? : NOTE CRACKER SUITE (from “Nutcracker Suite”)
33A. What one might sit in at a Cheech & Chong movie? : STONED SILENCE (from “stunned silence”)
46A. Herder's mantra? : NO GOATS, NO GLORY (from “no guts, no glory”)
61A. Quality control problem at Oscar Mayer? : HOT DOG BONE (from “hot dog bun”)
63A. Title of a book about Southern Reconstruction? : DIXIE COPES (from “Dixie cups”)
75A. Two sights in a yacht's galley? : BREAD AND BOATER (from “bread and butter”)
86A. Helpful things for killing time nowadays? : PHONE AND GAMES (from “fun and games”)
100A. Pigeon trainer, at times? : HOMING BIRD FEEDER (from “hummingbird feeder”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 30m 20s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Bloblike "Star Wars" character : JABBA
Jabba the Hutt is the big blob of an alien that appears in the “Star Wars” movie “The Return of the Jedi”. Jabba’s claim to fame is that he enslaved Princess Leia and kitted her out in that celebrated metal bikini.

10. Great shakes? : HULAS
The “hula” is a native dance of Hawaii that uses arm movements to relate a story. The hula can be performed while sitting (a “noho” dance”) or while standing (a “luna” dance).

20. Julia of Hollywood : RAUL
Raúl Juliá was a Hollywood actor from San Juan, Puerto Rica. He had a very distinguished career, but is perhaps best known for portraying Gomez Addams in the two film adaptations of “The Addams Family”.

23. Office for decoding messages? : NOTE CRACKER SUITE (from “Nutcracker Suite”)
Today, Tchaikovsky’s “The Nutcracker” is one of the most popular ballets in the repertoire, although that popularity really only took off in the late sixties. It’s “must-see ballet” during the Christmas holidays.

26. The average size of its stores is 300,000 square feet : IKEA
The furniture chain IKEA was founded by Ingvar Kamprad in 1943, when he was just 17-years-old. IKEA is an acronym standing for Ingvar Kamprad Elmtaryd Agunnaryd (don’t forget now!). Elmtaryd was the name of the farm where Ingvar Kamprad grew up, and Agunnaryd is his home parish in Sweden.

27. Had more than an inkling : KNEW
Our word “inkling” apparently comes from the Middle English word “inclen” meaning “to hint”.

32. Anxious condition, briefly : OCD
Apparently obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is the fourth most commonly diagnosed mental disorder, making it about as prevalent as asthma.

33. What one might sit in at a Cheech & Chong movie? : STONED SILENCE (from “stunned silence”)
Cheech & Chong’s very first feature-length movie was 1978’s “Up in Smoke”. The film is usually regarded as the first in “stoner comedy” genre of movie.

37. "Puppy Love" singer, 1960 : ANKA
"Puppy Love" is a song written and recorded by Paul Anka in 1960. He wrote the song for his girlfriend at the time, the actress and singer Annette Funicello. "Puppy Love" was covered by Donny Osmond who had a big hit with it in 1972.

38. Election Day affirmation : I VOTED
Election Day was chosen by Congress back in 1845. The month of November was selected as it suited an agricultural society, following the fall harvest and yet not too far into winter, which could make travel difficult. Tuesday was chosen so that people had time to travel to polling stations. Monday elections might have meant that some would have to start out on Sunday, and that could interfere with Christian services.

42. WikiLeaks associates : HACKERS
Julian Assange founded WikiLeaks, the website that is notorious for publishing information provided by whistleblowers. Assange is currently in England and recently lost an appeal to avoid extradition to Sweden to face charges of sexual assault. Assange entered the Ecuadorian Embassy in London seeking political asylum in 2012. He was granted that asylum and now lives at the embassy.

45. Inspiration : MUSE
In Greek mythology, the muses are the goddesses who inspire the creation of literature and the arts. The number of muses is a subject of debate at times, but the most popular view is that there are nine:
  • Calliope (epic poetry)
  • Clio (history)
  • Erato (lyric poetry)
  • Euterpe (music)
  • Melpomene (tragedy)
  • Polyhymnia (choral poetry)
  • Terpsichore (dance)
  • Thalia (comedy)
  • Urania (astronomy)

48. Virtual dog or cat, maybe : NEOPET
Neopets is website where one can own a virtual pet. I wouldn’t bother …

51. Fake news site, with "The" : ONION
“The Onion” is a satirical news network, with a print newspaper and a heavy online presence. “The Onion” newspaper was founded by two college students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1988. The founders sold the operation a year later for about $20,000. The paper grew steadily until 1996 when it began to publish online and really took off. I think it’s worth a tad more than $20,000 today …

61. Quality control problem at Oscar Mayer? : HOT DOG BONE (from “hot dog bun”)
The Oscar Mayer brand of meats was named for a German immigrant named Oscar F. Mayer who sold German sausages in the Chicago area in the late 1800s. The Oscar Mayer company has a famous vehicle called the Wienermobile that it has used in promotions for over 70 years.

63. Title of a book about Southern Reconstruction? : DIXIE COPES (from “Dixie cups”)
“Dixie” is a nickname sometimes used for the American South, and often specifically for the original 11 states that seceded from the Union just prior to the Civil War. It’s apparently not certain how the name “Dixie” came about. One theory is that it comes from the term “dixie” which was used for currency issued by banks in Louisiana. The 10-dollar bills had the word “dix” on the reverse side, the French for “ten”. From the banknote, the French speaking area around New Orleans came to be known as Dixieland, and from there “Dixie” came to apply to the South in general.

Dixie Cup is a brand of disposable papers cups. The first such cups were introduced to promote hygiene at shared water fountains, as prior to disposable cups, glasses or dippers were shared by people taking a drink. As such, the Dixie Cup was introduced in 1907 as the “Health Kup”. The name was changed in 1919 to Dixie Cup, after a line of dolls (presumably as the cups were relatively small).

65. Nav. rank : ENS
Ensign is (usually) the most junior rank of commissioned officer in the armed forces. The name comes from the tradition that the junior officer would be given the task of carrying the ensign flag.

67. Doohickeys : GIZMOS
The word "gizmo" (also “gismo”) was originally slang used by both the US Navy and the Marine Corps, but the exact origin seems unknown.

68. Sword handle : HILT
The “hilt” of a weapon is its handle. One might push in the blade of a knife say “to the hilt”, to the maximum degree.

69. They may be decorated for the holidays : FIRS
The custom of decorating trees at Christmas seems to have originated in Renaissance Germany. Those first trees were placed in guildhalls and were decorated with sweets and candy for the apprentices and children. After the Protestant Reformation, the Christmas tree became an alternative in Protestant homes for the Roman Catholic Christmas cribs. The Christmas tree tradition was imported into Britain by the royal family because of its German heritage. That tradition spread from Britain into North America.

72. Goddess usually pictured with a helmet : ATHENA
The Greek goddess Athena (sometimes “Athene”) is often associated with wisdom, among other attributes. In many representations. Athena is depicted with an owl sitting on her head. It is this linkage of the owl with the goddess of wisdom that led to today's perception of the owl as being "wise". Athena's Roman counterpart was Minerva.

75. Two sights in a yacht's galley? : BREAD AND BOATER (from “bread and butter”)
A boater is a straw hat often associated with boating, hence the name.

80. French pilgrimage site : LOURDES
Bernadette Soubirous was a 14-year-old peasant girl who reported visions of the Virgin Mary in a cave near the town of Lourdes in the southwest of France. There were sixteen apparitions in total, all occurring in 1858. The Roman Catholic Church declared the visions authentic in 1862, and since then, the site of the apparitions has become a major pilgrimage destination, with about 5 million people visiting every year. Bernadette was declared a saint by Pope Pius XI in 1933.

82. Off-road transport, informally : ATV
All-terrain vehicle (ATV)

83. ___ Johnson, a.k.a. The Rock : DWAYNE
Dwayne Johnson is a former professional wrestler whose ring name was "the Rock". He has used his success as a character in the ring, to cross over into television and movies. He is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as getting the highest payment for a first starring role: $5.5 million.

85. Sound heard by an exam proctor, say : PSST!
A “proctor” is a supervisor, especially of an examination in a school, or perhaps of a dormitory. The word “proctor” originated in the late 1500s, a contraction of the word “procurator”, the name given to an official agent of a church.

91. Fraternity letter : ETA
Eta is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a forerunner of our Latin character “H”. Originally denoting a consonant, eta was used as a long vowel in Ancient Greek.

92. Number of French kings named Charles : DIX
“Dix” is the French word for “ten”.

108. Kind of pad : STENO
Stenography is the process of writing in shorthand. The term comes from the Greek "steno" (narrow) and "graphe" (writing).

110. 1988 Olympics site : SEOUL
Seoul is the capital city of South Korea. The Seoul National Capital Area is home to over 25 million people and is the second largest metropolitan area in the world, second only to Tokyo, Japan.

112. Ancient manuscript : CODEX
A codex is an old book, one in the format of a modern book as opposed to its predecessor which was a scroll. The word “codex” comes from the Latin “caudex” meaning “trunk of a tree”.

Down
3. College in Lewiston, Me. : BATES
Bates College in Lewiston, Maine was founded back in 1855 and was coeducational from the day it first offered classes. That makes bates College one of the oldest coeducational schools in the country.

5. Big movie theater chain : AMC
The AMC theater chain used to go by the name “American Multi-Cinema Inc.”, hence the initialism “AMC”.

6. Miniature lobster lookalikes : CRAWDADS
Crayfish are freshwater crustaceans related to lobsters, and indeed look like small versions of their saltwater cousins. Crayfish are often referred to as “crawfish” and “crawdads”, especially in the south of the US.

8. They may be put up before a fight : DUKES
“Dukes” is a slang term for “fists, hands”. The route taken by “dukes” to become fists seems very tortuous, but might just be true. The term “fork” has been slang for “hand” for centuries (and gives rise to “fork out” meaning “hand over”). The slang term “fork” is expressed in Cockney rhyming slang as “Duke of York”, shortened to “duke”. As I said, tortuous …

11. Burma's first prime minister : U NU
U Nu was the first Prime Minister of Burma, in office from 1948 until 1956. Who knew …? (A lame play on “U Nu”).

12. Warm welcome at Waikiki : LEI
Waikiki is a neighborhood of Honolulu, and home to the famous Waikiki Beach. The name “Waikiki” means “spouting fresh water” in Hawaiian.

13. Exams for some H.S. students : AP TESTS
The Advanced Placement (AP) program offers college-level courses to kids who are still in high school. After being tested at the end of the courses, successful students receive credits that count towards a college degree.

25. Onetime MGM rival : RKO
The RKO Pictures studio was formed when RCA (RADIO Corporation of America) bought the KEITH-Albee-ORPHEUM theaters (and Joe Kennedy’s Film Booking Offices of America). The RKO initialism then comes from the words “Radio”, “Keith” and “Orpheum”.

34. Canon rival : NIKON
Nikon was founded in 1917 with the merger of three companies making various optical devices. After the merger, the company’s main output was lenses (including the first lenses for Canon cameras, before Canon made its own). During the war, Nikon sales grew rapidly as the company focused on (pun!) equipment for the military including periscopes and bomb sights.

36. Fishing vessel : DORY
A dory is a small boat, around 20 feet long with a shallow draft, a flat bottom and a sharp bow. Dories are commonly used for fishing.

45. Hip-hop's ___ Def : MOS
Mos Def is the former stage name of actor and rapper Dante Terrell Smith-Bay, now known as Yasiin Bey. Mos Def is one of the few rap stars who is really making a name for himself in the world of movies. He received critical acclaim for roles in 2003's "The Italian Job" , 2005's "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy", and for a featured role in an episode of television's "House".

52. The Bee Gees, for much of their career : TRIO
The Brothers Gibb (hence, the name “The Bee Gees”) were born in England but grew up and started their musical careers in Australia. They moved back to Manchester in the north of England as youths, and there hit the big time.

54. Ancient market : AGORA
In early Greece the “agora” was a place of assembly. Often the assemblies held there were quite formal, perhaps for the reading of a proclamation. Later in Greek history, things became less formal as the agora evolved into a market place. Our contemporary word “agoraphobia” comes from these agorae, in the sense that an agoraphobe has a fear of open spaces, a fear of “public meeting places”.

55. Ruth's 2,214 : RBIS
Before 1919, when Babe Ruth started to hit home runs like they were going out of style, baseball was more of a strategy-driven sport. There was less emphasis on power hitting, and more emphasis on playing “small ball”, with a focus on stolen bases and hit-and-run plays. In addition, the ball used was relatively “dead” and unresponsive to the bat. As a result, the period before 1919 is referred to as baseball’s “dead-ball era”.

58. Narcotic : OPIATE
Opiates are the narcotic alkaloids found in the opium poppy plant, although some synthetic versions and derivatives of the same alkaloids are also called opiates. To produce opiates, the latex sap of the opium poppy is collected and processed. The naturally-occurring drugs of morphine and codeine can both be extracted from the sap. Some synthesis is required to make derivative drugs like heroin and oxycodone.

62. Valhalla V.I.P. : ODIN
In Norse mythology, Valhalla ("hall of the slain") is a gigantic hall in the "world" of Asgard. Asgard and Valhalla are ruled by the god Odin, the chief Norse god.

63. Certain vacuum tube : DIODE
A diode is component in a circuit, the most notable characteristic of which is that it will conduct electric current in only one direction. Some of those vacuum tubes we used to see in old radios and television were diodes, but nowadays almost all diodes are semiconductor devices.

67. Egg on : GOAD
The verb “edge” has been used to mean to incite, to urge on, from the 16th century. Somewhere along the way “edge” was mistakenly replaced with “egg”, giving us our term “to egg on” meaning “to goad”.

69. Hiking group, with "the"? : FED
Those would be interest rate “hikes”.

The Federal Reserve System is more usually known simply as “the Fed”, and is the central banking system of the US. It was introduced in 1913 in response to a number of financial panics at the beginning of the 20th century. The original role for the Fed was to act as a lender of last resort, in case there was a run on a bank. This can happen as most of the money that is deposited by customers in a bank is reinvested by that bank, so it has very little liquid cash available. If too many customers look for their money at one time, then the bank can be short of cash and this can start a “run”. The Fed’s responsibilities have broadened since those early days …

70. Greek city mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles : BEREA
The city of Berea mentioned in the Christian Bible in the Acts of the Apostles is known today as Veria. Veria is in modern-day Greece.

84. Arroyos : WASHES
An arroyo is a small stream, or more often, a dry riverbed.

88. Cold War flier : MIG
The Russian fighter jets that we know as “MiGs” are so called because they were designed by the Mikoyan-and-Gurevich Design Bureau, and MiG is an acronym for “Mikoyan-and-Gurevich” in Russian.

90. "Say cheese!" : SMILE
Photographers often instruct us to say “cheese”, to elicit a smile-like expression. Even Japanese photographers use the word “cheese” for the same effect. Bulgarians use the word “zele” meaning “cabbage”. The Chinese say “eggplant”, the Danish “orange”, the Iranians “apple” and the most Latin Americans say “whiskey”.

92. Dressed to the nines, with "up" : DUDED
The term “to the nines” means “to perfection”. The first person to use the term in literature was Robbie Burns. Apparently the idea behind the use of “nines” is figurative (pun!), with the number nine considered “ideal” as it is arrived at by multiplying three by three.

93. Goddess of peace : IRENE
Eirene (also “Irene”) was the Greek goddess of peace, with “eirene” being the Greek word for “peace”. The Roman equivalent to Eirene was the goddess Pax.

94. Canon rival : XEROX
Xerox was founded in 1906 in Rochester, New York and originally made photographic paper and equipment. Real success came for the company in 1959 when it introduced the first plain-paper photocopier. Xerox named Ursula Burns as CEO in 2009, the first African American woman to head up a S&P 100 company. Burn was also the first woman to succeed another female CEO (replacing Anne Mulcahy).

97. ___ Major : URSA
The constellation called Ursa Major (Latin for “Larger Bear”) is often just called the Big Dipper because of its resemblance to a ladle or dipper. Ursa Major also resembles a plow, and that’s what we usually call the same constellation back in Ireland, the “plough”.

98. Mother of Artemis : LETO
Artemis was an ancient Greek goddess, the equivalent of the Roman goddess Diana. Artemis was a daughter of Zeus and Leto, and the twin sister of Apollo.

103. Grp. of Senators : NHL
The Senators are the NHL hockey team in Ottawa, Canada. The current team, founded in the 1992-93 season, is the second NHL team in the city to use the name “Senators”. The original team was founded in 1917 and had a very successful run until the league expanded into the US in the late twenties. The cost of operating in what became the smallest NHL city eventually drove the Senators to St. Louis where they played for a year as the Eagles before finally folding.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Bloblike "Star Wars" character : JABBA
6. Give over : CEDE
10. Great shakes? : HULAS
15. Low rolls : TWOS
19. Auto feature : ALARM
20. Julia of Hollywood : RAUL
21. Ham-handed : INEPT
22. Enthralled : RAPT
23. Office for decoding messages? : NOTE CRACKER SUITE (from “Nutcracker Suite”)
26. The average size of its stores is 300,000 square feet : IKEA
27. Had more than an inkling : KNEW
28. "Rats!" : AW HECK!
29. Bringing to mind : EVOKING
31. "Indubitably!" : YES!
32. Anxious condition, briefly : OCD
33. What one might sit in at a Cheech & Chong movie? : STONED SILENCE (from “stunned silence”)
37. "Puppy Love" singer, 1960 : ANKA
38. Election Day affirmation : I VOTED
39. Oomph : GAS
40. Hauled (away) : CARTED
42. WikiLeaks associates : HACKERS
45. Inspiration : MUSE
46. Herder's mantra? : NO GOATS, NO GLORY (from “no guts, no glory”)
48. Virtual dog or cat, maybe : NEOPET
50. Glaciate : ICE UP
51. Fake news site, with "The" : ONION
52. Sign on a jar at a bar : TIPS
53. Mass. neighbor : CONN
54. In a pretentious manner : ARTILY
56. Series opener : PART I
58. Fall behind : OWE
61. Quality control problem at Oscar Mayer? : HOT DOG BONE (from “hot dog bun”)
63. Title of a book about Southern Reconstruction? : DIXIE COPES (from “Dixie cups”)
65. Nav. rank : ENS
66. Word before or after nothing : DOING
67. Doohickeys : GIZMOS
68. Sword handle : HILT
69. They may be decorated for the holidays : FIRS
70. Sauce : BOOZE
71. Nickname for a Miami 12-time N.B.A. All-Star : DWADE
72. Goddess usually pictured with a helmet : ATHENA
75. Two sights in a yacht's galley? : BREAD AND BOATER (from “bread and butter”)
79. Prey for a heron or garter snake : TOAD
80. French pilgrimage site : LOURDES
81. Stranger : EERIER
82. Off-road transport, informally : ATV
83. ___ Johnson, a.k.a. The Rock : DWAYNE
85. Sound heard by an exam proctor, say : PSST!
86. Helpful things for killing time nowadays? : PHONE AND GAMES (from “fun and games”)
91. Fraternity letter : ETA
92. Number of French kings named Charles : DIX
95. Catch's partner : RELEASE
96. Prefix with therapy : IMMUNO
98. Draw : LURE
99. "Sign me up!" : I'M IN!
100. Pigeon trainer, at times? : HOMING BIRD FEEDER (from “hummingbird feeder”)
105. Crook, e.g. : CANE
106. Book of ___ (ancient Jewish text) : ENOCH
107. "Who ___?" : ELSE
108. Kind of pad : STENO
109. Past partners : EXES
110. 1988 Olympics site : SEOUL
111. Studied : READ
112. Ancient manuscript : CODEX

Down
1. Of poor quality, in modern slang : JANKY
2. Set apart : ALONE
3. College in Lewiston, Me. : BATES
4. Steep : BREW
5. Big movie theater chain : AMC
6. Miniature lobster lookalikes : CRAWDADS
7. Every : EACH
8. They may be put up before a fight : DUKES
9. President-___ : ELECT
10. Starts of many emails : HIS
11. Burma's first prime minister : UNU
12. Warm welcome at Waikiki : LEI
13. Exams for some H.S. students : AP TESTS
14. Singer/guitarist ___ Ray Vaughan : STEVIE
15. Early wheels : TRIKE
16. Rousing : WAKING UP
17. Unsolved crime : OPEN CASE
18. Theater backdrop : STAGE SET
24. Clamor : RACKET
25. Onetime MGM rival : RKO
30. Trite : OLD
32. Coming up : ON TAP
34. Canon rival : NIKON
35. Hardly ___ : EVER
36. Fishing vessel : DORY
37. In the neighborhood : AROUND
40. Changing room? : COCOON
41. Go-betweens : AGENTS
42. Fine-tuning : HONING
43. Acrobatic : AGILE
44. Be overly sweet : CLOY
45. Hip-hop's ___ Def : MOS
46. Cubbyhole : NICHE
47. Performing beneath one's usual level : NOT ON
48. Late times, in ads : NITES
49. Bigger than big : EPIC
52. The Bee Gees, for much of their career : TRIO
54. Ancient market : AGORA
55. Ruth's 2,214 : RBIS
56. Circular things that arrive in square boxes : PIZZAS
57. Lumberjacks : AX MEN
58. Narcotic : OPIATE
59. One carrying a torch? : WELDER
60. Ending with poly- : -ESTER
62. Valhalla V.I.P. : ODIN
63. Certain vacuum tube : DIODE
64. "Actually, come to think of it ..." : OH WAIT ...
67. Egg on : GOAD
69. Hiking group, with "the"? : FED
70. Greek city mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles : BEREA
71. Backs, anatomically : DORSA
72. With consequences : AT A PRICE
73. As much as possible : TO THE MAX
74. Motor oil brand : HAVOLINE
75. "The Lord of the Rings" actor Billy : BOYD
76. Step up or down : RUNG
77. Relied (on) : DEPENDED
78. Theme for an annual city-magazine issue : BEST OF
80. The inside track : LANE ONE
83. Narc's org. : DEA
84. Arroyos : WASHES
87. Spanish kids : NENES
88. Cold War flier : MIG
89. Glow in the dark? : EMBER
90. "Say cheese!" : SMILE
92. Dressed to the nines, with "up" : DUDED
93. Goddess of peace : IRENE
94. Canon rival : XEROX
97. ___ Major : URSA
98. Mother of Artemis : LETO
101. Farm call : MOO!
102. Post-O.R. stop : ICU
103. Grp. of Senators : NHL
104. PC key : ESC


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0218-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 18 Feb 17, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Steve Overton
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 05s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

9. New England staple : SCROD
Scrod is the name given to fish that has been “scrawed” i.e. split open, dried and then broiled.

16. Brand with a "PM" variety : ALEVE
Aleve is a brand name used for the anti-inflammatory drug Naproxen sodium.

18. Strength : SINEW
Sinew is another name for a tendon. Tendons are bands of collagen that connect muscle to bone. Tendons are similar to ligaments and fasciae, which are also connective tissue made out of collagen, but ligaments join bone to bone, and fasciae connect muscle to muscle. We also use the term “sinew” to mean muscular power.

19. Loyal subject : LIEGE
A liege was a feudal lord, one to whom service or allegiance was owed under feudal law. "Liege" was also the term used for one who owed allegiance or service to a lord. Very confusing …

25. Prince George's mom : KATE
The British laws of royal succession changed in 2013. The centuries old law dictated that males in a family were ranked higher than all females, regardless of age. The current line of sccession is:
  1. Prince Charles (Elizabeth’s eldest son)
  2. Prince William (Charles’ eldest son)
  3. Prince George (William’s eldest child)
  4. Princess Charlotte (William’s second-oldest child)
  5. Prince Harry (Charles’ second-oldest son)
Under the old system, should Prince William have another son, then that male would have bumped Princess Charlotte down one rung of the ladder. Under the new system, Princess Charlotte gets to “hold her ground”.

31. Title nickname of filmdom's Lt. Jordan O'Neil : GI JANE
G.I. Joe was the original “action figure”, the first toy to carry that description. G.I. Joe first hit the shelves in 1964. There have been a few movies based on the G.I. Joe figure, but, more famous than all of them I would say is the 1997 movie “G.I. Jane” starring Demi Moore in the title role. I thought that “G.I. Jane” had some potential, to be honest, but it really did not deliver in the end.

39. Antipiracy grp. : FBI
What we know today as the FBI was set up in 1908 as the BOI, the Bureau of Investigation. The name was changed to the Federal Bureau of Investigation in 1935. The Bureau was set up at the behest of President Theodore Roosevelt. President Roosevelt was largely moved to do so after the 1901 assassination of President McKinley, as there was a perception that anarchists were threatening law and order. The FBI’s motto uses the organization’s initialism, and is “Fidelity, Bravery, Integrity”.

48. They click : MICE
The first computer mouse was invented at the Stanford Research Institute in 1963, by one Douglas Engelbart. Sadly for him, his patent ran out before mice became standard equipment on computers, so he never made any money from his amazing invention.

49. Barbershop part : TENOR
Barbershop music is played in the a cappella style, meaning that it is unaccompanied vocal music. Barbershop music originated in the African American communities in the South, as gospel quartets often gathered in neighborhood barber shops to sing together.

51. Transcription product : RNA
The two most common nucleic acids are deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA), both of which play crucial roles in genetics. The DNA contains the genetic instructions used to keep living organisms functioning, and RNA is used to transcribe that information from the DNA to protein "generators" called ribosomes.

54. Exploits : DERRING-DO
As one might expect, "derring-do" (plural is “derrings-do”) comes from the phrase "daring to do", which back in the 14th century was written as "dorrying don".

58. When to wish someone un prospero año nuevo : ENERO
In Spanish, one wishes someone “un prospero año nuevo” (a happy new year) in “enero” (January).

Down
5. Cousin of Manx : ERSE
There are actually three Erse languages: Irish, Manx (spoken on the Isle of Man) and Scots Gaelic. In their own tongues, these would be Gaeilge (in Ireland), Gaelg (on the Isle of Man) and Gaidhlig (in Scotland).

7. Beam's path? : EAR TO EAR
That would be a beaming smile, from ear to ear.

9. Aid for an ed. : SASE
An SAE is a “stamped, addressed envelope”. An SASE is a “self-addressed, stamped envelope”.

11. Dollar, for one : RENT-A-CAR
Dollar Rent A Car was founded in 1965. Chrysler acquired the company in 1990 and merged it with Thrifty Car Rental, which Chrysler had purchased a year earlier.

15. Diocesan assembly : SYNOD
The word synod comes from the Greek word for assembly, or meeting. A synod is a church council, usually in the Christian faith.

In some Christian traditions, a district under the control of a bishop is called a diocese, bishopric or see. Dioceses are in turn divided into parishes that are under the control of priests. A particularly significant diocese might be called an archdiocese, and falls under the control of an archbishop.

24. Desi Arnaz Jr. was on its first cover : TV GUIDE
The first national “TV Guide” was issued in 1953. The cover of that first issue featured a photo of newborn Desi Arnaz, Jr., son of Lucille Ball.

27. It has a chilling effect : FREON
Freon is a DuPont trade name for a group of compounds used as a refrigerant and also as a propellant in aerosols. Freon is used in the compressors of air conditioners as a vital component in the air-cooling mechanism. Freon used to contain chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which had a devastating effect on the Earth’s ozone layer. Use of CFCs is now banned, or at least severely restricted.

28. "That makes two of us" : DITTO
“Ditto” was originally used in Italian (from Tuscan dialect) to avoid repetition of the names of months in a series of dates. So, “ditto” is just another wonderful import from that lovely land …

30. Danger while drying out : DTS
The episodes of delirium that can accompany withdrawal from alcohol are called Delirium Tremens (the DTs). The literal translation of this Latin phrase is "trembling madness".

32. ___ d'orange : JUS
“Jus d’orange” is French for “orange juice”.

48. Shepherd's home : MANSE
A manse is a minister’s home in various Christian traditions. “Manse” derives from “mansus”, the Latin for “dwelling”. The term can also be used for any stately residence.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Was almost, with "on" : BORDERED
9. New England staple : SCROD
14. Owing : IN ARREARS
16. Brand with a "PM" variety : ALEVE
17. "Bow your heads ..." : LET US PRAY ...
18. Strength : SINEW
19. Loyal subject : LIEGE
20. Can : TIN
21. Hacker's success : ENTRY
22. Things are unlikely when they are long : ODDS
23. Prohibition's beginning : DO NOT ...
25. Prince George's mom : KATE
26. Day spa treatment : WAX
27. Many a promotional media giveaway : FREE DVD
29. Not as shy as one might think : COY
30. Bad feeling : DREAD
31. Title nickname of filmdom's Lt. Jordan O'Neil : GI JANE
33. Raising hell : ON A TEAR
36. In stitches : SUTURED
37. Prison in which Timothy Leary was housed next to Charles Manson : FOLSOM
38. Asks a loaded question, say : BAITS
39. Antipiracy grp. : FBI
40. "Ain't gonna happen" : NO CAN DO
42. Lame : SAD
45. One may make tracks : SLED
47. Alternative to a "Psst!" : NUDGE
48. They click : MICE
49. Barbershop part : TENOR
51. Transcription product : RNA
52. "Silence is golden," e.g. : MAXIM
53. Floor : AMAZE
54. Exploits : DERRING-DO
56. Like some communities : GATED
57. Something to work out in : SWEAT SUIT
58. When to wish someone un prospero año nuevo : ENERO
59. 10 years, for example : SENTENCE

Down
1. Puff out : BILLOW
2. The so-called "People of the Standing Stone" : ONEIDA
3. Like "Last Tango in Paris," initially : RATED X
4. Therapy group? : DRUGS
5. Cousin of Manx : ERSE
6. Single curl or crunch, in the gym : REP
7. Beam's path? : EAR TO EAR
8. Really ready to rest : DRAINED
9. Aid for an ed. : SASE
10. Sound heard shortly after "Here's to ..." : CLINK!
11. Dollar, for one : RENT-A-CAR
12. Suggestion : OVERTONE
13. Innocent : DEWY-EYED
15. Diocesan assembly : SYNOD
23. "Ain't gonna happen" : DREAM ON
24. Desi Arnaz Jr. was on its first cover : TV GUIDE
27. It has a chilling effect : FREON
28. "That makes two of us" : DITTO
30. Danger while drying out : DTS
32. ___ d'orange : JUS
33. Like many lines fed to actors : OFFSTAGE
34. Lady's counterpart : NOBLEMAN
35. Put off : ALIENATE
36. Cold wine-and-nutmeg drink : SANGAREE
38. "You'd better brace yourself for this ..." : BAD NEWS ...
41. Rennin results in them : CURDS
42. Western heat? : SIX-GUN
43. Cutting : ACIDIC
44. Bump down : DEMOTE
46. Demolition site sight : DOZER
48. Shepherd's home : MANSE
50. Fresh styling : REDO
52. Something catching? : MITT
55. Led : RAN


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0217-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 17 Feb 17, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: David Steinberg
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 14m 02s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

15. First Chinese-American cabinet member : ELAINE CHAO
When President George W. Bush appointed Elaine Chao as Secretary of Labor, he made a bit of history as Chao then became the first Chinese American in history to hold a cabinet post. It turned out that Chao became the only cabinet member to hold her post for President Bush’s full eight years in office. In 1993, Chao married Mitch McConnell, the Republican Leader of the US Senate.

18. Owner of the horse Sleipnir : ODIN
Sleipnir is an eight-legged horse of Norse mythology, the steed that was ridden by Odin.

19. Latin 101 word : AMO
Amo, amas, amat ... I love, you love, he/she/it loves, in Latin.

20. Abbr. before Friday : SGT
The TV detective show “Dragnet” opened up each episode with lines spoken by the character Sergeant Joe Friday:
This is the city, Los Angeles, California, I work here. I’m a cop.
In later series, the phrase “I’m a cop” was replaced with “I carry a badge”.

29. Artsy L.A. district : NOHO
The NoHo Arts District in Los Angeles takes its name from “North Hollywood”, although the abbreviation is a play on the famous SoHo Arts District in New York City.

31. Washington Post competitor: Abbr. : NYT
“The New York Times” (NYT) has been published since 1851. These days a viable alternative to buying the paper is to read the news online. NYTimes.com is the most popular online newspaper website in the country.

“The Washington Post” is the oldest paper still being published in the DC area, having been founded in 1877. Famously, “The Post” reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein led the media’s investigation into what we now called the Watergate scandal. “The Washington Post” was purchased in 2013 by Jeff Bezos, the founder and CEO of Amazon.com.

32. "Jurassic Park" co-star Sam : NEILL
Sam Neill is a very talented actor from New Zealand. I really enjoyed Neill in a 1983 television miniseries called “Reilly, Ace of Spies”, about a British spy operation during WWI. He is perhaps better-known for his roles in the movies “Omen III”, “Dead Calm”, “Jurassic Park” and “The Hunt for Red October”.

“Jurassic Park” is a 1990 novel by Michael Crichton that was adapted into a hugely successful movie by Steven Spielberg in 1993. One of the main premises of the novel is that dinosaur DNA could be harvested from mosquitoes trapped in amber (fossilized tree resin), the DNA coming from the dinosaur blood consumed by the mosquitoes. The dinosaur DNA is then sequenced and used to create clones of the original beasts. A clever idea, but apparently not very practical from what I’ve read …

33. Teddy material : SATIN
The item of lingerie known as a teddy can also be called “camiknickers”. The alternative name was used when the one-piece garment was introduced in the twenties, a combination of a camisole and panties (aka knickers).

34. Not to, say : FRO
To, and fro.

44. Base order : TEN-HUT
“Ten-hut!” is a term used in the US Military, and it means “come to attention!”.

46. Mar. figure : ST PAT
There is a fair amount known about Saint Patrick, some of which comes from two letters written in his own hand. St. Patrick lived in the fifth century, but was not born in Ireland. He was first brought to Ireland at about 16 years of age from his native Britain, by Irish raiders who made him a slave for six years. Patrick managed to escape and returned to his homeland where he studied and entered the Church. He went back to Ireland as a bishop and a missionary and there lived out the rest of his life. There seems to be good evidence that he died on March 17th (now celebrated annually as Saint Patrick’s Day), although the year is less clear. The stories about shamrock and snakes, I am afraid they are the stuff of legend.

51. Colosseum crowd? : TRE
In Italian, “tre” (three) is a crowd.

The Colosseum of Rome was the largest amphitheater in the whole of the Roman Empire in its day, and could seat about 50,000 people. And today, it remains largest amphitheater in the world. The structure was originally called the “Amphitheatrum Flavium” but the name changed to “Colosseum” when a colossal statue of Emperor Nero was located nearby.

58. Take a hit : TOKE
“Toke” is a slang term for a puff on a marijuana cigarette, or on a pipe containing the drug.

60. Sources of ricotta cheese : EWES
Ricotta is an Italian cheese made from the milk of a sheep or a cow. Ricotta is actually produced from the whey of the milk, the liquid left after the curds have been separated out (curds are used to make “traditional” cheese). The whey is heated again so that the remaining protein, above and beyond that in the curd already removed, precipitates out making ricotta cheese. The word “ricotta” literally means “recooked”, which makes sense to me now …

Down
1. First name in country : REBA
Reba McEntire is a country music singer and television actress. McEntire starred in her own sitcom called "Reba" that aired on the WB and the CW cable channels from 2001 to 2007.

3. Who wrote "Wise men learn more from fools than fools from the wise" : CATO
Cato the Elder was a Roman statesman, known historically as “the elder” in order to distinguish him from his great-grandson, Cato the Younger. Cato the Elder’s ultimate position within Roman society was that of Censor, making him responsible for maintaining the census, and for supervising public morality.

4. Vixen's offspring : KIT
Kits are the young of several mammalian species, including the ferret and the fox. “Kit” is probably a shortened form of “kitten”.

6. Vocalist for the Black Eyed Peas : FERGIE
The hip hop group known as the Black Eyed Peas comprises three rap artist will.i.am, apl.de.ap and Taboo, as well as the singer Fergie.

8. Tuna type : AHI
Yellowfin and bigeye tuna are usually marketed as "ahi", the Hawaiian name. They are both big fish, with yellowfish tuna often weighing over 300 pounds, and bigeye tuna getting up to 400 pounds.

10. Hippie-influenced fashion trend : BOHO-CHIC
Boho-chic is a style of fashion that grew out of the bohemian and hippie looks.

11. Grace ___, servant in "Jane Eyre" : POOLE
“Jane Eyre” is a celebrated novel written by Charlotte Brontë, under the pen name Currer Bell. Over the years, I've shared here on my blogs that the "Jane Eyre" story line is a little too dark and Gothic for my taste, but a very persuasive blog reader convinced me to look more at the romantic side of the story and give it a second chance. I watched a wonderful 4-hour television adaptation of the novel made by the BBC a while back and I have to say that because I was focused on the relationship between Jane and Rochester, I was able to push past the Gothic influences (that depress me) so I really enjoyed the story. I thoroughly recommend the 2006 BBC adaptation to fans of the novel.

12. Curries, samosas, etc. : INDIAN FOOD
Curry powder is a mixture of spices used in South Asian cuisine. The actual composition of curry powder varies depending on the cuisine. The term “curry” is an anglicization of the Tamil “kari” meaning “sauce”.

A samosa is quite a tasty appetizer, usually a triangular-shaped savory that often has a vegetarian filling. The word “samosa” is primarily used on Indian menus, and the name comes from “sanbosag”, the name for the dish in Persia.

13. Staple of Thai cuisine : STICKY RICE
“Sticky rice” is actually a type of rice, and not a means of preparation. Sticky rice is more usually called “glutinous rice”, even though it does not contain dietary gluten.

14. Dives : HONKY-TONKS
A honky-tonk is a bar with musical entertainment, usually country music. The etymology of the term “honky-tonk” seems unclear. The term has evolved to mean any cheap, noisy bar or dance hall.

22. Suffix with magne- : -TRON
A magnetron is a vacuum tube that is used to generate microwaves. Magnetrons are used in radar devices and microwave ovens.

23. Corduroy rib : WALE
Wales are parallel ribs in a fabric such as corduroy.

There’s a myth that the name of textile known as “corduroy” comes from the French “corde du roi” (the cord of the king). It’s more likely that “corduroy” comes from a melding of “cord” and “duroy” (a coarse fabric that used to be made in England).

30. Big name in escalators : OTIS
Elevators (simple hoists) have been around for a long time. What Elisha Otis did was come up with the “safety elevator”, a design that he showcased at the 1853 World’s Fair in New York. At the Fair, Otis would stand on an elevated platform in front of onlookers and order his assistant to cut the single rope holding up the platform. His safety system kicked in when the platform had only fallen a few inches, amazing the crowd. After this demonstration, the orders came rolling in.

39. Mythical piper : FAUN
Fauns are regarded as the Roman mythological equivalent of the Greek satyrs, but fauns were half-man and half-goat and much more “carefree” in personality than their Hellenic cousins. In the modern age we are quite familiar with Mr. Tumnus, the faun-like character encountered by the children entering the world of Narnia in C. S. Lewis’s “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe”.

45. Another name for Pluto : HADES
Hades was the god of the underworld to the ancient Greeks. Over time, Hades gave his name to the underworld itself, the place where the dead reside. The term “Hades” was also adopted into the Christian tradition, as an alternative name for hell. But, the concept of hell in Christianity is more akin to the Greek “Tartarus”, which is a dark and gloomy dungeon located in Hades, a place of suffering and torment.

49. Jazzman Baker : CHET
The famous jazz trumpeter Chet Baker was noted for his heroin addiction, a problem that nearly put an end to his performing career. He managed a comeback in the late seventies, mainly appearing and recording in Europe. But he never kicked the drug habit and was found dead one day after falling from his hotel room window in Amsterdam.

51. Reid of "Sharknado" : TARA
Tara Reid is an actress known for roles she played on television and the big screen. My guess is her most remembered performances were in the “American Pie” series of movies in which she played Vicky. Sadly, Reid succumbed to the pressure to alter her looks with plastic surgery. In interviews, she has shared that her first experience under the knife “went wrong” leading to more surgeries in attempts to rectify the resulting deformity.

“Sharknado” is a 2013 tongue-in-cheek disaster movie that was made for the Syfy television channel. The basis of the plot is a freak hurricane that hits Los Angeles, resulting in a flood that leaves man-eating sharks roaming the city. I don’t think so …

52. Luxury hotel in London's Piccadilly district, with "the" : RITZ
César Ritz was a Swiss hotelier, who had a reputation for developing the most luxurious of accommodations and attracting the wealthiest clientèle. He opened the Hotel Ritz in Paris in 1898 and the second of his most famous hotels, the Ritz Hotel in London, in 1906. Ritz was lucky in his career, as before starting his own hotel chain he had been dismissed from the Savoy Hotel in London, implicated in the disappearance of a substantial amount of wine and spirits. Today’s Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company was founded in 1983, although the chain has its roots in the properties developed by César Ritz.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Its ribs stick out : RACK OF LAMB
11. "Fiddlesticks!" : PISH!
15. First Chinese-American cabinet member : ELAINE CHAO
16. Seeing through : ONTO
17. Where to stick a stick : BUTTER DISH
18. Owner of the horse Sleipnir : ODIN
19. Latin 101 word : AMO
20. Abbr. before Friday : SGT
21. Improvised jazz strain : HOT LICK
23. Surrender : WAIVE
25. Showing signs of age : CREAKY
26. Rapidly down : INHALE
29. Artsy L.A. district : NOHO
31. Washington Post competitor: Abbr. : NYT
32. "Jurassic Park" co-star Sam : NEILL
33. Teddy material : SATIN
34. Not to, say : FRO
35. Omen : BODE
36. Like the function ax^3 + bx^2 + cx + d : CUBIC
37. Come up with : COIN
38. Word sometimes elided to its middle letter : AND
39. Thwarts : FOILS
40. [!!!!] : SHOCK
41. The Romans obtained a purple one from snails : DYE
42. Draw money? : ANTE
43. They're often drawn at night : SHADES
44. Base order : TEN-HUT
46. Mar. figure : ST PAT
48. Record of the year? : ALMANAC
50. Castigate : RIP
51. Colosseum crowd? : TRE
54. Dropped, as poll numbers : SLID
55. Certain Internet hoax : CHAIN EMAIL
58. Take a hit : TOKE
59. News of flight delays, say : TEXT ALERTS
60. Sources of ricotta cheese : EWES
61. Unwavering look : STEELY GAZE

Down
1. First name in country : REBA
2. Occasional "S.N.L." host, to "S.N.L." : ALUM
3. Who wrote "Wise men learn more from fools than fools from the wise" : CATO
4. Vixen's offspring : KIT
5. "110%" effort : ONE’S ALL
6. Vocalist for the Black Eyed Peas : FERGIE
7. Flat tube? : LCD TV
8. Tuna type : AHI
9. Button-___ (hit everything at once, in gamer lingo) : MASH
10. Hippie-influenced fashion trend : BOHO-CHIC
11. Grace ___, servant in "Jane Eyre" : POOLE
12. Curries, samosas, etc. : INDIAN FOOD
13. Staple of Thai cuisine : STICKY RICE
14. Dives : HONKY-TONKS
22. Suffix with magne- : -TRON
23. Corduroy rib : WALE
24. Turns on : ENABLES
26. Vulgar : IN BAD TASTE
27. Highlighter color : NEON YELLOW
28. Bug : HIDDEN MIKE
30. Big name in escalators : OTIS
33. Diamonds, e.g. : SUIT
36. Smartphone heading : CONTACTS
37. Some back-and-forth : CHAT
39. Mythical piper : FAUN
40. Voluptuous : SHAPELY
43. Kind of column : SPINAL
45. Another name for Pluto : HADES
47. Used too much : TRITE
49. Jazzman Baker : CHET
51. Reid of "Sharknado" : TARA
52. Luxury hotel in London's Piccadilly district, with "the" : RITZ
53. Word after who, what or where : … ELSE
56. Hacker's tool : AXE
57. Part of a gig : MEG


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0216-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 16 Feb 17, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Keith Redwine
THEME: Asymmetry
At first glance, today’s grid appears to be ASYMMETRIC. Symmetry is restored by some rebus squares that contain the word BLACK:
35A. Feature of this puzzle that's "fixed" by a literal reading of four squares : ASYMMETRY

1A. Menu holder at many a cafe : BLACKBOARD
10A. Body of water near Georgia : BLACK SEA
39A. Worry for the superstitious : BLACK CAT
50A. Solvent : IN THE BLACK
1D. University of Maine mascot : BLACK BEAR
10D. Villain : BLACK HAT
37D. Five-time Grammy-winning duo from the 2010s : THE BLACK KEYS
39D. Extorted from : BLACKMAILED
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 11m 35s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

7. Where Schwarzenegger was born: Abbr. : AUS
The body-builder, actor and politician Arnold Schwarzenegger was born in Graz in Austria, the son of the local police chief. Schwarzenegger’s family name translates into the more prosaic "black plough man". In his bodybuilding days, he was often referred to as the Austrian Oak. When he was Governor of California he was called “the Governator”, a play on his role in the “The Terminator” series of movies.

10. Body of water near Georgia : BLACK SEA
The Black Sea is in southeastern Europe just south of Ukraine. In the north of the Black Sea is the Crimean Peninsula.

14. Shoots in the jungle : BAMBOO
The grass known as bamboo is one of the fastest-growing plants in the world. Sadly, there are stories of growing bamboo being used as a device of torture. Supposedly, a victim can be staked out over bamboo shoots so that the shoots grow into the human flesh. Theoretically, bamboo can grow several inches in just three days.

15. Abbr. on a ticket : MPH
Miles per hour (mph)

16. Composer Zimmer with four Grammys : HANS
Hans Zimmer is a film composer from Frankfurt in Germany. The long list of films that Zimmer has scored includes “Rain Man” (1998), “The Lion King” (1994), “Gladiator” (2000), “The Dark Knight” (2008), “Inception” (2010) and “12 Years a Slave” (2013).

20. Cockpit reading: Abbr. : ALT
Altitude (alt.)

21. Book after Exod. : LEV
In the Hebrew Bible, the Book of Leviticus comes after the Book of Exodus and before the Book of Numbers.

24. Some campus marchers, briefly : ROTC
The Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) is a training program for officers based in colleges all around the US. The ROTC program was established in 1862 when as a condition of receiving a land-grant to create colleges, the federal government required that military tactics be part of a new school’s curriculum.

29. 1984 movie with a 100% positive rating on Rotten Tomatoes, with "The" : TERMINATOR
The 1984 movie "The Terminator" was directed by James Cameron. It was a relatively low budget production, costing $6.4 million. It has grossed around $80 million to date, so no wonder the Terminator said "I’ll be back".

32. Hanoi holiday : TET
The full name for the New Year holiday in Vietnam is “Tet Nguyen Dan” meaning "Feast of the First Morning", with the reference being to the arrival of the season of spring. Tet usually falls on the same day as Chinese New Year.

Hanoi was the capital of North Vietnam, and Saigon the capital of South Vietnam. After the Vietnam War, Hanoi was made capital of the reunified state. Saigon, the larger metropolis, was renamed to Ho Chi Minh City. Hanoi is located in the delta of the Red River, and is just over 50 miles from the Gulf of Tonkin in the South China Sea.

34. French possessive : SES
“Ses” is the French word for “his”, “her” or “its”, when referring to a group of items.

44. Ill, in Lille : MAL
Lille is a large city in the very north of France sitting right on the border with Belgium. The name “Lille” is a derivation of the term “l’isle” meaning “the island”. The name “L’Isle” dates back to 1066, and is a reference to a castle that once stood on an island in the Deûle river that runs through the city. The city grew around the island and the castle.

49. Longtime Notre Dame coach Parseghian : ARA
Ara Parseghian coached the Notre Dame football team from 1964 to 1974, a period known as "The Era of Ara".

55. Film studio once owned by Howard Hughes : RKO
The RKO Pictures studio was formed when RCA (RADIO Corporation of America) bought the KEITH-Albee-ORPHEUM theaters (and Joe Kennedy’s Film Booking Offices of America). The RKO initialism then comes from the words “Radio”, “Keith” and “Orpheum”.

58. Maumee River outlet : LAKE ERIE
The Maumee River forms at Fort Wayne, Indiana and flows for 137 miles through Indiana and Ohio, emptying into Lake Erie in Toledo, Ohio.

63. A good one gets you on a list, briefly : GPA
Grade point average (GPA)

That might be a dean’s list, I am guessing …

64. Old ___ : YELLER
“Old Yeller” is a children’s novel by Fred Gipson that was first published in 1956. “Old Yeller” was to be the first in a series of three books, followed by “Savage Sam” in 1962 and “Little Arliss” in 1978. The original was made into a very famous Walt Disney film released in 1957. Disney also produced the “Savage Sam” sequel, in 1963. The title character in “Old Yeller” is a yellow-colored dog that is adopted by a teenage boy. Spoiler alert: in the end, the dog dies …

Down
1. University of Maine mascot : BLACK BEAR
The town of Orono is home to the University of Maine, founded in 1862. The college is actually located on an island (Marsh island) lying between the Penobscot and Stillwater rivers. The town of Orono is named after Joseph Orono, a chief of the Penobscot Nation. The school’s athletic teams are named the Maine Black Bears.

2. Tickets are found on it : BALLOT
Today a “ballot” is a piece of paper used to cast a vote. Back in the 1500s, a “ballot” was a small “ball” used in the process of voting.

4. "Modern Family" network : ABC
“Modern Family” is a marvelous television show shown on ABC since 2009. The show’s format is that of a “mockumentary”, with the cast often addressing the camera directly. In that respect “Modern Family” resembles two other excellent shows: “The Office” and “Parks and Recreation”, both of which might also be described a “mockumentaries”.

6. Coddle, with "on" : DOTE
The verb “to coddle”, meaning “to treat tenderly”, was actually coined in 1815 by Jane Austen in her novel “Emma”. At least, that is the first written record we have of the verb’s usage. John Knightley (younger brother of George Knightley) addresses his wife Isabella (elder sister of Emma Woodhouse) with the following words:
“My dear Isabella,” exclaimed he, hastily, “pray do not concern yourself about my looks. Be satisfied with doctoring and coddling yourself and the children, and let me look as I chuse.”

7. Gig need : AMP
Musicians use “gig” to describe a job, a performance. The term originated in the early 1900s in the world of jazz.

9. Religion with public shrines : SHINTO
It is perhaps best not to describe Shinto as a religion, but more as a “spirituality of the Japanese people”, a spirituality that encompasses folklore, history and mythology. Having said that, “Shinto” translates literally as “Way of the Gods”. Most people in Japan who are described as practicing Shinto, also practice Buddhism.

10. Villain : BLACK HAT
In western movies and television, the bad guys tend to wear black hats, and the good guys wear white. Well, that’s the perception. As a result, we’ve come to use the phrase “black hat” to mean “villain”.

11. Give plenty : SATIATE
“Sate” is a variant of the older word “satiate”. Both terms can mean either to satisfy an appetite fully, or to eat to excess.

25. Hungarian's neighbor : CROAT
The Republic of Croatia is a Balkan country. The Croats declared independence from Yugoslavia in 1991. Croatia became a member of NATO in 2009, and a member of the European Union in 2013.

27. Animal found in the La Brea Tar Pits : MAMMOTH
The La Brea Tar Pits are located right in the heart of the city of Los Angeles. At the site there is a constant flow of tar that seeps up to the surface from underground, a phenomenon that has been around for tens of thousands of years. What is significant is that much of the seeping tar is covered by water. Over many, many centuries animals came to the water to drink and became trapped in the tar as they entered the water to quench their thirsts. The tar then preserved the bones of the dead animals. Today a museum is located right by the Tar Pits, recovering bones and displaying specimens of the animals found there. It’s well worth a visit if you are in town …

34. Civil war locale beginning in 2011 : SYRIA
Since the onset of the Syrian Civil War in 2011, a refugee crisis has developed involving almost 7 million internally displaced persons and almost 5 million displaced persons outside of Syria (as of February 2016). Those are staggering numbers, especially when one compares them to the estimated Syrian population of 17 million in 2014.

36. It will put you to sleep : ETHER
Ethers are a whole class of organic compounds, but in the vernacular “ether” is specifically diethyl ether. Diethyl ether was once very popular as a general anesthetic.

37. Five-time Grammy-winning duo from the 2010s : THE BLACK KEYS
The Black Keys are a rock band, a duo from Akron, Ohio. Dan Auerbach on guitar, and Patrick Carney on drums, formed the Black Keys in 2001.

38. Abbr. in a military title : RET
Retired (ret.)

41. Like malamutes : ALASKAN
The Alaskan Malamute was bred as a working dog, in particular to pull sleds. The breed takes its name from the Mahlemut tribe of Inuit people. The Alaskan Malamute was designated as Alaska’s official state dog in 2010.

46. Cabinet department : ENERGY
The US Department of Energy (DOE) came into being largely as a result of the 1973 oil crisis. The DOE was founded in 1977 by the Carter administration. The DOE is responsible for regulating the production of nuclear power, and it is also responsible for the nation’s nuclear weapons. The official DOE seal features symbols denoting five sources of energy: the sun, an atom, an oil derrick, a windmill and a dynamo.

54. Mil. danger : IED
Having spent much of my life in the border areas between southern and Northern Ireland, I am sadly all too familiar with the devastating effects of improvised explosive devices (IEDs). One has to admire the bravery of soldiers who spend their careers defusing (or attempting to defuse) such devices in order to save the lives and property of others.

61. Word after a number in a score : ALL
For example, one-all (1-1) and three-all (3-3).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Menu holder at many a cafe : BLACKBOARD
7. Where Schwarzenegger was born: Abbr. : AUS
10. Body of water near Georgia : BLACK SEA
14. Shoots in the jungle : BAMBOO
15. Abbr. on a ticket : MPH
16. Composer Zimmer with four Grammys : HANS
17. Provoke : ELICIT
18. Grunts : PRIVATES
20. Cockpit reading: Abbr. : ALT
21. Book after Exod. : LEV
23. Erstwhile : ONE-TIME
24. Some campus marchers, briefly : ROTC
26. Overdo it, in a way : EMOTE
28. Show : AIR
29. 1984 movie with a 100% positive rating on Rotten Tomatoes, with "The" : TERMINATOR
32. Hanoi holiday : TET
33. End of an address : DOT-COM
34. French possessive : SES
35. Feature of this puzzle that's "fixed" by a literal reading of four squares : ASYMMETRY
39. Worry for the superstitious : BLACK CAT
42. The rest : OTHERS
44. Ill, in Lille : MAL
45. It's a matter of taste : AESTHETICS
49. Longtime Notre Dame coach Parseghian : ARA
50. Solvent : IN THE BLACK
51. Pan-___ : ARAB
53. Leak source : INSIDER
55. Film studio once owned by Howard Hughes : RKO
57. Take advantage of : USE
58. Maumee River outlet : LAKE ERIE
60. Go by : ELAPSE
62. "Gosh!" : EGAD!
63. A good one gets you on a list, briefly : GPA
64. Old ___ : YELLER
65. Cubs' home : DEN
66. Nevertheless : YET
67. Thick-___ shoes : SOLED

Down
1. University of Maine mascot : BLACK BEAR
2. Tickets are found on it : BALLOT
3. Left out : OMITTED
4. "Modern Family" network : ABC
5. Stir up : ROIL
6. Coddle, with "on" : DOTE
7. Gig need : AMP
8. Displace : UPROOT
9. Religion with public shrines : SHINTO
10. Villain : BLACK HAT
11. Give plenty : SATIATE
12. Pakistan and India, e.g. : ENEMIES
13. Claim : ASSERT
19. Really go out of one's way? : VEER
22. Bile : VENOM
25. Hungarian's neighbor : CROAT
27. Animal found in the La Brea Tar Pits : MAMMOTH
30. Ski area locales: Abbr. : MTS
31. Needing salt, maybe : ICY
34. Civil war locale beginning in 2011 : SYRIA
36. It will put you to sleep : ETHER
37. Five-time Grammy-winning duo from the 2010s : THE BLACK KEYS
38. Abbr. in a military title : RET
39. Extorted from : BLACKMAILED
40. Result of war : CARNAGE
41. Like malamutes : ALASKAN
43. Small moral misgiving : SCRUPLE
45. Senate staffer : AIDE
46. Cabinet department : ENERGY
47. Feature of a credit card : STRIPE
48. Gave lip : SASSED
52. "Suds" : BEER
54. Mil. danger : IED
56. Butter substitute : OLEO
59. Snack, say : EAT
61. Word after a number in a score : ALL


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0215-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 15 Feb 17, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Jesse Eisenberg (!) & Patrick Blindauer
THEME: Foody Snowman
Today's puzzle was co-constructed by Hollywood actor Jesse Eisenberg, and a very nice puzzle it is too. Today’s themed answers are food items that are used to make a snowman, with the name of each item indicating where it is used in the snowy assemblage:
17A. "We used some food to make a snowman. Under his arms we put ___" : CHERRY PITS
27A. "Then we gave him ___" : BUTTERFINGERS
44A. "On top we put a ___" : HEAD OF LETTUCE
58A. "Finally, we stuck in two ___. Yum!" : EARS OF CORN
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 10m 30s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. Captain of literature : AHAB
Captain Ahab is the obsessed and far from friendly captain of the Pequod in Herman Melville's "Moby-Dick". The role of Captain Ahab was played by Gregory Peck in the 1956 John Huston film adaptation. Patrick Stewart played Ahab in a 1998 miniseries in which Peck made another appearance, as Father Mapple.

14. Honda division : ACURA
Acura is a division of the Honda Motor Company, its luxury brand. As an aside, Infiniti is the equivalent luxury brand for the Nissan Motor Company, and Lexus is the more luxurious version of Toyota’s models.

15. Singer Bareilles : SARA
Sara Bareilles achieved success with her 2007 “Love Song” with the help of the iTunes online store. In one week in June of that year, iTunes offered the song as "free single of the week" and it quickly became the most downloaded song in the store, and from there climbed to the number spot in the charts.

19. Writer Morrison : TONI
The writer Toni Morrison won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1993. Amongst other things, Morrison is noted for coining the phrase, “our first black President”, a reference to President Bill Clinton.

20. The sun : SOL
“Sol” is the Latin name for the sun.

21. Prov. north of Northumberland Strait : PEI
Prince Edward Island (PEI) is a maritime Canadian province. The island at the center of the province was named for Prince Edward, the fourth son of King George III and the father of Queen Victoria.

22. Dakar's land : SENEGAL
The Republic of Senegal is a country on the far western coast of Africa. For many years Senegal was a French colony, gaining independence in 1960. The capital of Senegal is Dakar, a city located on the Cap-Vert Peninsula that juts out into the Atlantic Ocean.

27. "Then we gave him ___" : BUTTERFINGERS
Butterfinger is a candy bar that first hit the market way back in 1923 by the Curtiss Candy Company on the outskirts of Chicago. The first candy bar introduced by Curtiss was called a Kandy Kake, which eventually became the much-loved Baby Ruth. The Butterfinger was the company’s second product.

34. Kind of clef : ALTO
“Clef” is the French word for “key”. In music, a clef is used to indicate the pitch of the notes written on the stave. The bass clef is also known as the F-clef, the alto clef is the C-clef, and the treble clef is the G-clef.

37. Org. for drivers : PGA
The Professional Golfers’ Association (PGA) was founded in 1916 and today has its headquarters (unsurprisingly) in Florida, where so many golfers live. Back in 1916, the PGA was based in New York City.

38. Christian with some intelligent designs? : DIOR
Christian Dior was a French fashion designer. As WWII approached, Dior was called up by the French military, drawing a temporary halt to his career in fashion. He left the army in 1942 and for the duration of the war designed clothes for wives of Nazi officers and French collaborators. After the war his designs became so popular that he helped reestablish Paris as the fashion center of the world.

42. Crewmate of Sulu and Bones : SCOTTY
In the “Star Trek” series on television and in the movies, the colorful character of “Scotty” was played by the Canadian actor James Doohan. Doohan joined the Royal Canadian Artillery at the start of WWII, and participated in the D-Day Invasion of Normandy. After surviving the landing, that same day Doohan was shot by one of his own men in a tragic mishap. Doohan was hit six times, with a bullet to his chest stopped by a silver cigarette case he was carrying. One of Doohan’s fingers was shot off in the incident, an injury that he successfully concealed during his acting career.

Mr Sulu was played by George Takei in the original “Star Trek” series. Takei has played lots of roles over the years, and is still very active in television. Did you know that he appeared in the 1963 film, “Pt-109”? He played the helmsman steering the Japanese destroyer that ran down John F. Kennedy’s motor torpedo boat. From destroyer helmsman to starship helmsman …

The actor DeForest Kelley is best known for playing Bones McCoy in the original “Star Trek” cast. The show’s creator, Gene Roddenberry, originally offered Kelley the role of Spock, but Kelly refused it and so was given the part of the ship’s medical officer.

47. Last word of the Pledge of Allegiance : ALL
The Pledge of Allegiance of the US was composed by Francis Bellamy in 1892 and was adopted by Congress in 1942. The actual words used in the pledge have changed over time. Here is the original 1892 version shown in comparison to the current version that was adopted in 1954:
1892: I pledge allegiance to my flag and the republic for which it stands: one nation indivisible with liberty and justice for all.

1954: I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

48. South Beach plan and others : DIETS
The fad diet known as the South Beach Diet was developed in the mid-nineties by Dr. Arthur Agatston as the Modified Carbohydrate Diet. Agatston later named it for the South Beach neighborhood in Miami Beach, which was close to his practice. The diet really took off after Agatston published his “The South Beach Diet” book in 2003.

49. Obama adviser Valerie : JARRETT
Valerie Jarrett was a Senior Advisor to the President in the Obama administration. Jarrett also chaired the White House Council on Women and Girls and co-chaired the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault. She has known President Obama and his wife Michelle a long time, since before they were married.

53. Playwright Will who wrote "The Realistic Joneses" : ENO
Will Eno is an American playwright working in Brooklyn, New York. That said, Eno’s plays are mainly produced across the pond in the UK.

54. Mom-and-pop org. : PTA
Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

61. Rigatoni's cousin : ZITI
Cylindrical pasta is known in general as “penne”, and there are many variants. For example, ziti is a particularly large and long tube with square-cut ends. “Penne” is the plural of “penna”, the Italian for “feather, quill”.

Rigatoni is a tubular pasta that is relatively short with ridges along its length.

62. Berry imported from Brazil : ACAI
Açaí is a palm tree native to Central and South America. The fruit has become very popular in recent years and its juice is a very fashionable addition to juice mixes and smoothies.

64. Newswoman Paula : ZAHN
Paula Zahn has worked as a journalist and news anchor with ABC, NBC, Fox News and CNN. She is currently the host of a true crime show on the Discovery Channel called “On the Case with Paula Zahn”. Outside of her work on television, Zahn is an accomplished cellist and has even played at Carnegie Hall with the New York Pops Orchestra.

66. "Ciao!" : SEE YA!
“Ciao” is the Italian for "'bye". "Arrivederci" is more formal, and translates as "goodbye".

Down
3. Burr/Hamilton showdown : DUEL
Aaron Burr was the third vice-president of the US, serving under Thomas Jefferson. In the final year of his term in office, Burr fought an illegal duel and killed his political rival Alexander Hamilton. Burr wasn't brought to justice, but he did pay the price politically. Thomas Jefferson dropped him from his ticket in the election held the following year.

4. Abbr. on some sale goods : IRR
Irregular (“irr.” or “irreg.”)

7. "Bali ___" : HAI
The song "Bali Ha'i" is from the musical "South Pacific" by Rodgers and Hammerstein. In the musical, Bali Ha'i is the name of a volcanic island that neighbors the island on which the story takes place.

9. Single, say : BASE HIT
That would be baseball.

10. Like "Pocahontas" or "Mulan" : RATED G
As of 2016, there are 11 “official” Disney princesses:
  1. Princess Snow White (from “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”)
  2. Princess Cinderella (from “Cinderella”)
  3. Princess Aurora (from “Sleeping Beauty)
  4. Princess Ariel (from “The Little Mermaid”)
  5. Princess Belle (from “Beauty and the Beast”)
  6. Princess Jasmine (from “Aladdin”)
  7. Princess Pocahontas (from “Pocahontas”)
  8. Princess Mulan (from “Mulan”)
  9. Princess Tiana (from “The Princess and the Frog”)
  10. Princess Rapunzel (from “Tangled”)
  11. Princess Merida (from “Brave”)

12. StarKist product : TUNA
StarKist is a brand of tuna that uses Charlie the Tuna as its cartoon mascot.

18. Poet who wrote "In dreams begins responsibility" : YEATS
Irish poet and dramatist William Butler Yeats won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1923 for “inspired poetry” that gave “expression to a whole nation”. Yeats was Ireland’s first Nobel laureate.

23. Small iPod : NANO
The iPod Nano is the successor to the iPod Mini and was introduced to the market at the end of 2005. There have been seven versions of the Nano to date and the current Nano as well as playing tunes is an FM player, records voice memos, has a pedometer and can connect with external devices (like a heart monitor, maybe) using Bluetooth technology.

27. Water filter brand : BRITA
Brita is a German company that specializes in water filtration products. Brita products do a great job of filtering tap water, but they don’t “purify” it, they don’t remove microbes. That job is usually done by a municipality before the water gets to the faucet.

33. Gallic girlfriend : AMIE
A male friend in France is “un ami”, and a female friend is “une amie”.

37. "___ Joey" (Rodgers and Hart musical) : PAL
“Pal Joey” is a 1940 novel by John O’Hara that was made into a stage musical and musical film with music and lyrics by Rodgers and Hart. There are two well-known songs from the musical: “I Could Write a Book” and “Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered”. There’s also a film called “Pal Joey” starring Frank Sinatra, Rita Hayworth and Kim Novak. The film is loosely based on the stage musical.

38. Word files, briefly : DOCS
Microsoft Word documents have the ".doc" file extension, at least those prior to Microsoft Office 2007. The extension used now is ".docx".

Microsoft Word was introduced in 1981 as Multi-Tool Word for Xenix (Xenix is a discontinued version of the Unix operating system). I used to be a power user of Word, but now use Google Drive for all of my word processing needs.

41. Cowboys, but not Indians : NFL TEAM
The Dallas Cowboys play in the National Football Conference of the NFL. The Cowboys are famous for a lengthy streak of 20 consecutive winning seasons, from 1966 to 1985. They are the highest-valued sports franchise in the country. The only team in the world that’s worth more money is the UK’s Manchester United soccer team.

42. Worker whose name is, appropriately, an anagram of NOTES : STENO
Stenography is the process of writing in shorthand. The term comes from the Greek "steno" (narrow) and "graphe" (writing).

45. Champion of evolution : DARWIN
Englishman Charles Darwin studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland but neglected his studies largely due to his interest in nature and natural history. In the early 1830s, a friend put forward Darwin’s name as a candidate for the post of “collector” on the voyage of HMS Beagle. The Beagle was intending to spend two years at sea primarily charting the coast of South America. The voyage ended up taking five years, during which time Darwin sent back copious letters describing his findings. Back in Britain these letters were published as pamphlets by a friend and so when Darwin eventually returned home in 1836, he had already gained some celebrity in scientific circles. It was while on the Beagle that Darwin developed his initial ideas on the concept of natural selection. It wasn’t until over twenty years later that he formulated his theories into a scientific paper and in 1859 published his famous book “On the Origin of the Species”. This original publication never even mentioned the word “evolution” which was controversial even back then. It was in 1871 that Darwin addressed head-on the concept that man was an animal species, in his book “The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex”.

50. New Balance competitor : AVIA
The Avia brand name for athletic shoes was chosen as "avia" is the Latin word for "to fly", and suggests the concept of aviation. Avia was founded in Oregon in 1979.

New Balance is a footwear manufacturer based in Boston, Massachusetts.

51. Philip who said "goodbye" to Columbus : ROTH
Author Philip Roth’s two most famous works are probably his 1959 novella “Goodbye, Columbus” for which he won a National Book Award, and his extremely controversial 1969 novel “Portnoy’s Complaint”. The latter title was banned in some libraries in the US, and was listed as a “prohibited import” in Australia. The controversy surrounded Roth’s treatment of the sexuality of the main character, a young Jewish bachelor undergoing psychoanalysis for his “complaint”.

52. ___ Bell : TACO
Taco Bell was founded by a former US Marine, 25-year-old Glen Bell. His first restaurant was Bell’s Drive-In, located in Southern California. After opening that first establishment, Bell bought up some more restaurants including four named El Taco. He sold off the El Taco restaurants but used the name in part when he opened his first Taco Bell in 1962. Bell sold then sold franchises, with the 100th Taco Bell opening in 1967. The ex-Marine sold off the whole chain to PepsiCo in 1978, and I am guessing he made a pretty penny. Taco Bell has been using the “Live Más” slogan since 2012, with “más” being the Spanish word for “more”.

54. Szczecin resident : POLE
The city of Szczecin is a Polish seaport located where the Oder empties into the Baltic Sea.

55. Weight classification : TROY
The system of troy weights is now only used to measure the mass of precious metals and gemstones. The name “troy” likely came from the French town of Troyes, which was famous for trading with the English as far back as the 9th century.

56. "___ Karenina" : ANNA
I have to admit to not having read the Tolstoy's "Anna Karenina", but I did see the excellent 1977 British television adaptation starring Nicola Pagett. In the storyline, Anna Karenina's lover is Count Alexei Vronsky.

60. Capital of Colombia? : CEE
The word “Colombia” starts with a capital letter C (cee).

The South American country of Colombia takes her name from the Italian explorer Christopher Columbus (“Cristoforo Colombo” in Italian).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Doc on a battlefield : MEDIC
6. Captain of literature : AHAB
10. Unwanted subway sights : RATS
14. Honda division : ACURA
15. Singer Bareilles : SARA
16. Water, south of the border : AGUA
17. "We used some food to make a snowman. Under his arms we put ___" : CHERRY PITS
19. Writer Morrison : TONI
20. The sun : SOL
21. Prov. north of Northumberland Strait : PEI
22. Dakar's land : SENEGAL
24. Picked up via gossip : HEARD
26. Used to own : HAD
27. "Then we gave him ___" : BUTTERFINGERS
32. Touch of love : CARESS
34. Kind of clef : ALTO
35. Half a kisser : LIP
36. During : AMID
37. Org. for drivers : PGA
38. Christian with some intelligent designs? : DIOR
39. Plop down : SIT
40. Tiny problem : SNAG
42. Crewmate of Sulu and Bones : SCOTTY
44. "On top we put a ___" : HEAD OF LETTUCE
47. Last word of the Pledge of Allegiance : ALL
48. South Beach plan and others : DIETS
49. Obama adviser Valerie : JARRETT
53. Playwright Will who wrote "The Realistic Joneses" : ENO
54. Mom-and-pop org. : PTA
57. Admit frankly : AVOW
58. "Finally, we stuck in two ___. Yum!" : EARS OF CORN
61. Rigatoni's cousin : ZITI
62. Berry imported from Brazil : ACAI
63. Counterfeiter, e.g. : FELON
64. Newswoman Paula : ZAHN
65. Neat, as a lawn : MOWN
66. "Ciao!" : SEE YA!

Down
1. Decidedly non-PC types? : MACS
2. Comeback in a cave : ECHO
3. Burr/Hamilton showdown : DUEL
4. Abbr. on some sale goods : IRR
5. Completely covers : CARPETS
6. Dream : ASPIRE
7. "Bali ___" : HAI
8. Newspaper section : ARTS
9. Single, say : BASE HIT
10. Like "Pocahontas" or "Mulan" : RATED G
11. Like a kid in a candy store : AGOG
12. StarKist product : TUNA
13. Something that's frequently trimmed : SAIL
18. Poet who wrote "In dreams begins responsibility" : YEATS
23. Small iPod : NANO
24. Toned : HUED
25. Was boring, as a meeting : DRAGGED
27. Water filter brand : BRITA
28. State with 1,350 miles of coastline: Abbr. : FLA
29. Type of type : ELITE
30. What revolting people do? : RIOT
31. Not showing one's age, say : SPRY
32. Check alternative : CASH
33. Gallic girlfriend : AMIE
37. "___ Joey" (Rodgers and Hart musical) : PAL
38. Word files, briefly : DOCS
40. Palm : hand :: ___ : foot : SOLE
41. Cowboys, but not Indians : NFL TEAM
42. Worker whose name is, appropriately, an anagram of NOTES : STENO
43. Jeans style : CUTOFFS
45. Champion of evolution : DARWIN
46. Makes a connection : TIES IN
49. Grammy category : JAZZ
50. New Balance competitor : AVIA
51. Philip who said "goodbye" to Columbus : ROTH
52. ___ Bell : TACO
54. Szczecin resident : POLE
55. Weight classification : TROY
56. "___ Karenina" : ANNA
59. Lacking refinement : RAW
60. Capital of Colombia? : CEE


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0214-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 14 Feb 17, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Daniel Larsen
THEME: Elmer Fudd
Happy Valentine's Day, everyone!

Today's themed answers are common phrases written as though they’re being spoken by cartoon character Elmer Fudd, with a heavy lisp:
64A. Archenemy of Bugs Bunny ... who might say things like 17-, 24-, 32-, 42- and 51-Across : ELMER FUDD

17A. Small, cute residence? : TWEE HOUSE (from “tree house”)
24A. Device for killing mosquitoes? : SWAT MACHINE (from “slot machine”)
32A. Pouring into a shot glass, e.g.? : WHISKEY MOVE (from “risky move”)
42A. Relatives of slack jaws? : WOWED MOUTHS (from “loudmouths”)
51A. What wakes everyone up in the morning at the duck pond? : QUACK OF DAWN (from “crack of dawn”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 28s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

14. Licentious man : ROUE
"Roue" is a lovely word, I think, describing a less than lovely man. A roue could otherwise be described as a cad, someone of loose morals. "Roue" comes from the French word "rouer" meaning "to break on a wheel". This describes the ancient form of capital punishment where a poor soul was lashed to a wheel and then beaten to death with cudgels and bars. I guess the suggestion is that a roue, with his loose morals, deserves such a punishment.

19. Bygone Toyota sports car : SUPRA
The Supra is a sporty car made by Toyota from 1979 to 2002. The Supra is in effect a longer and wider Celica.

20. Music with conga drums : SALSA
The genre of music called salsa is a modern interpretation of various Cuban traditional music styles.

21. 500 sheets of paper : REAM
A ream is 500 sheets of paper. As there were 24 sheets in a quire, and 20 quires made up a ream, there used to be 480 sheets in a ream. Ever since the standard was changed to 500, a 480-sheet packet of paper has been called a "short ream". We also use the term “reams” to mean a great amount, evolving from the idea of a lot of printed material.

24. Device for killing mosquitoes? : SWAT MACHINE (from “slot machine”)
Mosquito is the Spanish for "little fly". The female mosquito actually has to have a "blood meal" before she is able to lay her eggs.

27. Annie who was nicknamed "Little Sure Shot" : OAKLEY
Many regard Annie Oakley as the first American female superstar, given her celebrity as a sharpshooter in Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show. She toured with the show all over Europe, and performed her act for the likes of Queen Victoria of England and Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany. Supposedly, using a .22 caliber rifle from 90 feet away, Oakley could split a playing card edge-on, and shoot five or six holes in the card before it hit the ground!

37. Fair-hiring inits. : EOE
Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE)

38. Stars and ___ (Confederate flag) : BARS
The first official flag of the Confederacy was known as the Stars and Bars. The flag was designed by a Prussian artist and is similar to the Austrian flag of the day as it contains three bars, two of which are red and one white. The flag includes a blue square containing a ring of stars. Each star represents a state in the Confederacy. The Stars and Bars flag was officially adopted on 4 March 1861 and first flew over the dome of the Capitol Building in Montgomery, Alabama.

46. Delilah was his undoing : SAMSON
Delilah is a Biblical figure, the wife of Samson. Delilah was engaged by the Philistines to betray her husband by determining the secret of his great strength. Samson lied to his wife three times, but on the fourth asking he told his wife the truth, that he did not cut his hair. Delilah then persuaded Samson to shear his locks and so allowed him to be captured by his enemies. Over the centuries, it has been usual to depict Delilah actually cutting off her husband’s hair, but the Bible actually says that she allowed a man to do the deed while Samson was sleeping.

55. Sch. for future admirals : USNA
The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is located in Annapolis, Maryland. The USNA was founded in 1845 and educates officers for both the US Navy and the US Marine Corps. The motto of the USNA is “Ex Scientia Tridens”, which translates as “From Knowledge, Sea Power”.

57. Host at a roast : EMCEE
The term “emcee” comes from “MC”, an initialism standing for Master or Mistress of Ceremonies.

62. "Ad ___ per aspera" (Kansas' motto) : ASTRA
The motto of the State of Kansas is “ad astra per aspera”, a Latin expression meaning “to the stars through difficulties”. Kansas shares the same motto with quite a few other institutions, including an English grammar school, an Australian high school, and even Starfleet, the service to which the USS Enterprise belongs in the “Star Trek” series.

64. Archenemy of Bugs Bunny ... who might say things like 17-, 24-, 32-, 42- and 51-Across : ELMER FUDD
Elmer Fudd is one of the most famous of all the Looney Tunes cartoon characters, the hapless nemesis of Bugs Bunny. If you have never seen it, check out Elmer and Bugs in the marvelous “Rabbit of Seville”, a short cartoon that parodies Rossini’s “Barber of Seville”. Wonderful stuff …

70. Trig function : SINE
The most familiar trigonometric functions are sine (sin), cosine (cos) and tangent (tan). Each of these is a ratio, a ratio of two sides of a right-angled triangle. The reciprocal of these three functions are cosecant, secant, and cotangent. The reciprocal functions are simply the inverted ratios, the inverted sine (cosec = 1/sin), cosine (sec = 1/cos) and tangent (cot = 1/tan).

71. Leave completely filled : SATE
“Sate” is a variant of the older word “satiate”. Both terms can mean either to satisfy an appetite fully, or to eat to excess.

Down
2. Des Moines's home : IOWA
The city of Des Moines is the capital of Iowa, and takes its name from the Des Moines River. The river in turn takes its name from the French “Riviere des Moines” meaning “River of the Monks”. It looks like there isn’t any “monkish” connection to the city’s name per se. “Des Moines” was just the name given by French traders who corrupted “Moingona”, the name of a group of Illinois Native Americans who lived by the river. However, others do contend that French Trappist monks, who lived a full 200 miles from the river, somehow influenced the name.

6. Advice-giving "Dr." of radio : LAURA
According to Dr. Laura Schlessinger herself, her radio show "preaches, teaches, and nags about morals, values and ethics."

8. Sauna feature : STEAM
As my Finnish-American wife will tell you, "sauna" is a Finnish word, and is correctly pronounced "sow-nah" (with "sow" as in the female pig).

9. Shoo-___ (overwhelming favorites) : INS
A “shoo-in” is a surefire winner, especially in politics. Back in the 1920s, a shoo-in was a horse that was prearranged to win a race, a race that was fixed.

11. ___ de corps : ESPRIT
“Esprit de corps” is the morale of a group, best translated from French perhaps as “team spirit”.

12. Jarhead : MARINE
Marines are called jarheads because of their high and tight regulation haircuts, at least that's the story I read …

25. Letter before zee : WYE
In the alphabet, the letter Y (wye) comes right before the letter Z (zee).

27. ___ exams (tests at the end of a student's fifth year at Hogwarts) : OWL
In J.K. Rowling’s “Harry Potter” universe, The Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry was founded by the four most brilliant witches and wizards of their time: Godric Gryffindor, Helga Hufflepuff, Rowena Ravenclaw and Salazar Slytherin. Each of the founders lent their name to a House in the school, i.e. Gryffindor, Hufflepuff, Ravenclaw and Slytherin.

28. "Eureka!" : AHA!
“Eureka” translates from Greek as “I have found it”. The word is usually associated with Archimedes, uttered as he stepped into his bath one day. His discovery was that the volume of water that was displaced was equal to that of the object (presumably his foot) that had been submerged. He used this fact to determine the volume of a crown, something he needed in order to determine if it was made of pure gold or was a forgery.

30. "Acid" : LSD
LSD (known colloquially as “acid”) is short for lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist called Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn’t until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man …

33. Wood for archery bows : YEW
Yew is the wood of choice for the longbow, a valued weapon in the history of England. The longbow is constructed with a core of yew heartwood (as the heartwood resists compression) that has a sheath of yew sapwood (as the sapwood resists stretching). The yew was in such demand for longbows that for centuries yew trees were in short supply in Britain and the wood had to be imported from all over Europe.

34. One of the Stooges : MOE
Moe Howard was the stage name of Moses Harry Horwitz. Howard was one of the Three Stooges. In 1925, he married Helen Schonberger, who was a cousin of Harry Houdini.

35. U.K. lexicon : OED
Oxford English Dictionary (OED)

A lexicon was originally just a dictionary, but we tend nowadays to use the term more to mean a vocabulary that relates to some specific area of activity.

38. Software problem : BUG
Back in 1947, the famed computer programmer Grace Hopper noticed some colleagues fixing a piece of equipment by removing a dead moth from a relay. She remarked that they were “debugging” the system, and so Hopper has been given credit for popularizing the term.

40. Letter before sigma : RHO
Rho is the Greek letter that looks just like our Roman letter “p”, although it is equivalent to the Roman letter R.

41. Fig. on an application : SSN
Social Security number (SSN)

42. Stir-fry vessel : WOK
“Wok” is a Cantonese word, the name for the frying pan now used in many Asian cuisines.

44. Gaping opening : MAW
“Maw” is a term used to describe the mouth or stomach of a carnivorous animal. "Maw" is also used as slang for the mouth or stomach of a greedy person.

46. Racket sport : SQUASH
Squash is a racquet sport that is similar to the more common racquetball (more common here in the US, I think). The game is derived from the older sport of racquets. It was originally called squash racquets as the ball used is very, very squashable and much softer than that used in the parent game.

47. Sydneysider, for one : AUSSIE
Sydney is the most populous city in Australia. People from Sydney are known as “Sydneysiders”.

48. Words said over and over : MANTRA
A “mantra” is a word that is used as a focus for the mind while meditating. The term is Sanskrit in origin, and is now used figuratively in English to describe any oft-repeated word or phrase.

53. ___ Lama : DALAI
The Dalai Lama is a religious leader in the Gelug branch of Tibetan Buddhism. The current Dalai Lama is the 14th to hold the office. He has indicated that the next Dalai Lama might be found outside of Tibet for the first time, and may even be female.

58. Degs. for creative types : MFAS
Master of Fine Arts (MFA)

59. Country with which the U.S. re-established diplomatic relations in 2015 : CUBA
Cuba is the largest island in the Caribbean. The exact etymology of the name “Cuba” seems a little unclear. Most believe “Cuba” to be derived from the Taíno terms for “where fertile land is abundant” (cubao) or “great place” (coabana).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Helps : AIDS
5. ___-size model : PLUS
9. Things : ITEMS
14. Licentious man : ROUE
15. Paying close attention : RAPT
16. ___ congestion (cold symptom) : NASAL
17. Small, cute residence? : TWEE HOUSE (from “tree house”)
19. Bygone Toyota sports car : SUPRA
20. Music with conga drums : SALSA
21. 500 sheets of paper : REAM
23. Moral toughness : GRIT
24. Device for killing mosquitoes? : SWAT MACHINE (from “slot machine”)
27. Annie who was nicknamed "Little Sure Shot" : OAKLEY
31. Like a well-worn dirt road : RUTTED
32. Pouring into a shot glass, e.g.? : WHISKEY MOVE (from “risky move”)
36. Come to earth : LAND
37. Fair-hiring inits. : EOE
38. Stars and ___ (Confederate flag) : BARS
42. Relatives of slack jaws? : WOWED MOUTHS (from “loudmouths”)
46. Delilah was his undoing : SAMSON
50. "Stop joshin' me!" : AW, GO ON!
51. What wakes everyone up in the morning at the duck pond? : QUACK OF DAWN (from “crack of dawn”)
55. Sch. for future admirals : USNA
56. Like books and tea leaves : READ
57. Host at a roast : EMCEE
62. "Ad ___ per aspera" (Kansas' motto) : ASTRA
64. Archenemy of Bugs Bunny ... who might say things like 17-, 24-, 32-, 42- and 51-Across : ELMER FUDD
66. Wail of an ambulance : SIREN
67. Den : LAIR
68. Not ___ deal : A BIG
69. Having an exhilarating effect : HEADY
70. Trig function : SINE
71. Leave completely filled : SATE

Down
1. Counterpart of sciences : ARTS
2. Des Moines's home : IOWA
3. Fight at 20 paces, say : DUEL
4. Lays eyes on : SEES
5. Expert : PRO
6. Advice-giving "Dr." of radio : LAURA
7. Surprise victory : UPSET
8. Sauna feature : STEAM
9. Shoo-___ (overwhelming favorites) : INS
10. Instructed : TAUGHT
11. ___ de corps : ESPRIT
12. Jarhead : MARINE
13. On the schedule : SLATED
18. Goalie Dominik with 16 seasons in the N.H.L. : HASEK
22. Man's nickname that's just wonderful? : MARV
25. Letter before zee : WYE
26. Signal from offstage : CUE
27. ___ exams (tests at the end of a student's fifth year at Hogwarts) : OWL
28. "Eureka!" : AHA!
29. Family relations : KIN
30. "Acid" : LSD
33. Wood for archery bows : YEW
34. One of the Stooges : MOE
35. U.K. lexicon : OED
38. Software problem : BUG
39. From ___ Z : A TO
40. Letter before sigma : RHO
41. Fig. on an application : SSN
42. Stir-fry vessel : WOK
43. ___ about (approximately) : ON OR
44. Gaping opening : MAW
45. Proprietor : OWNER
46. Racket sport : SQUASH
47. Sydneysider, for one : AUSSIE
48. Words said over and over : MANTRA
49. Chicken : SCARED
52. Believes : FEELS
53. ___ Lama : DALAI
54. PC network overseer : ADMIN
58. Degs. for creative types : MFAS
59. Country with which the U.S. re-established diplomatic relations in 2015 : CUBA
60. Toolbar heading : EDIT
61. Narrow advantage : EDGE
63. "___ last words?" : ANY
65. Before, to poets : ERE


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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