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0228-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Feb 17, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Jacob Stulberg
THEME: Stand-Up Guys
Today’s three themed answers are all in the down-direction. Each contains a hidden word, with circled letters, written in the UP-direction, STANDING UP. Those hidden words are synonyms for GUY:
28D. Honest sorts ... or what the circled squares contain? : STAND-UP GUYS

4A. Outcome that's overall unfavorable : NET NEGATIVE (hiding “GENT”, standing up)
9A. Infamous prison featured in the 1969 best seller "Papillon" : ILE DU DIABLE (hiding “DUDE”, standing up)
26D. Socialist Workers Party's ideology : RADICAL LEFT (hiding “FELLA”, standing up)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 8m 01s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. ___ jacket (bit of casualwear) : JEAN
Denim fabric originated in Nimes in France. The French phrase “de Nimes” (meaning “from Nimes”) gives us the word “denim”. Also, the French phrase “bleu de Genes” (meaning “blue of Genoa”) gives us our word “jeans”.

5. Dish that's sometimes rated in "alarms" : CHILI
The spiciness or “heat” of a serving of chili is often designated by an unofficial scale ranging from one-alarm upwards.

10. Curds and ___ : WHEY
When milk curdles it separates into two parts, the solid curds and the liquid whey.

16. In fine fettle : HALE
Both the words "hale" and "healthy" derive from the the Old English "hal" meaning healthy.

18. 1960s activist Hoffman : ABBIE
Abbie Hoffman was the founder of the "Yippies", an activist group that had violent clashes with the police during the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago.

22. Quaint inn, informally : B AND B
An intimate inn (in the US) is a bed & breakfast (B&B). A bed & breakfast back in Ireland is traditionally more basic, and at least used to be much cheaper than a comparable hotel room.

27. Bearlike : URSINE
The Latin word for a bear is “ursus”.

29. Powerful Renaissance family : BORGIAS
The Borgias were a papal family that was very prominent during the Renaissance in Europe. Two of the Borgias became popes, namely Pope Calixtus III and Pope Alexander VI. Pope Alexander VI had several children, including Cesare and Lucrezia Borgia. Cesare became a cardinal, and was the first cardinal to resign from the post. Lucrezia earned a reputation as a femme fatale, and as such turns up in many artworks, novels and movies.

35. Italy's shape : BOOT
In the Italian Peninsula in Southern Europe, the “boot” is the mainland of Italy, and the the ball being kicked by the boot is the island of Sicily.

36. Setting for much of the movie "Lion" : INDIA
“Lion” is a 2016 film based on the autobiographical book “A Long Way Home” by Saroo Brierley. Brierley is an Indian-born Australian who was accidentally separated from his mother when he was 5 years old, ending up stranded on a train that took the young boy nearly 1,500 km from his home. The excellent film adaption stars Dev Patel as the older Brierley, who searches for his birth-family. Excellent movie …

38. Zippo : NADA
"Nada" is the Spanish word for "nothing". "De nada" translates literally from the Spanish as "of nothing", and is used to mean "you're welcome" or "don't mention it". The French have the same expression "de rien", also translating to "of nothing" and used the same way.

The use of the words "zip" and “zippo” to mean "nothing" dates back to the early 1900s when it was student slang for being graded zero on a test.

42. People encountered by Pizarro : INCAS
Francisco Pizarro was a Spanish conquistador, the man who led the conquest of the Incan Empire in 1533. Pizarro founded the city of Lima in Peru in 1535. Pizarro’s body was laid to rest in Lima after the son of a rival conquistador assassinated him.

46. Riga native : LATVIAN
Latvia is one of the former Soviet Socialist Republics (SSRs). People from Latvia are called Letts.

51. What tryptophan is said to induce : SLEEP
Tryptophan is an essential amino acid. It is absolutely essential in our diet as it cannot be manufactured in the human body. There’s an old wive’s tale that high levels of tryptophan in turkey can cause drowsiness after a meal. However, the levels of tryptophan are comparable in turkey and other meats. It’s likely that the drowsiness is just due to eating a meal.

53. Munchkins : ELVES
“Munchkin” is a word that we use quite commonly these days, usually to describe a young child. The first Munchkins were characters created by L. Frank Baum in his book “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz”, published in 1900.

55. Nash who wrote "Parsley / Is gharsley" : OGDEN
Ogden Nash the poet was well known for his light and humorous verse, such as:
Parsley
Is gharsley

59. Turner or Fey : TINA
Tina Turner is the stage name used by Anna Mae Bullock, the “Queen of Rock ‘n’ Roll”. Turner has always loved Europe and moved there in the eighties. She now splits her time between her homes in England, France and Switzerland.

Comic actress Tina Fey has a scar on her face a few inches long on her left cheek, which I was shocked to learn was caused by a childhood “slashing” incident. When she was just five years old and playing in the front yard of her house, someone just came up to her and slashed her with a knife. How despicable!

64. Lead-in to a conclusion : ERGO
“Ergo” is the Latin word for "hence, therefore".

65. Movie, informally : FLICK
The slang term “flick” meaning “movie” came into use in the mid-1920s. It comes from the “flickering” appearance of films back then.

66. Class with mats : YOGA
In the West we tend to think of yoga as a physical discipline, a means of exercise that uses specific poses to stretch and strengthen muscles. While it is true that the ancient Indian practice of yoga does involve such physical discipline, the corporeal aspect of the practice plays a relatively small part in the whole philosophy. Other major components are meditation, ethical behavior, breathing and contemplation.

68. Words to live by : TENET
A tenet is an article of faith, something that is held to be true. “Tenet” is Latin for “he holds”.

Down
1. Morning joe : JAVA
Back in 1850, the name “java” was given to a type of coffee grown on the island of Java, and the usage of the term spread from there.

5. Windy City 'L' overseer : CTA
The Chicago "L" is the second largest rapid transit system in the US, with the New York City Subway being the largest. The "L" is also the second oldest, again with the New York City Subway system having the honor of being around the longest. Note that the official nickname for the system is the "L" (originally short for "elevated railroad"), although the term "El" is also in common use (especially in crosswords as "ELS"). The L is managed by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA).

It seems that the derivation of Chicago’s nickname as the “Windy City” isn’t as obvious as I would have thought. There are two viable theories. First that the weather can be breezy, with wind blowing in off Lake Michigan. The effect of the wind is exaggerated by the grid-layout adopted by city planners after the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. The second theory is that “windy” means “being full of bluster”. Sportswriters from the rival city of Cincinnati were fond of calling Chicago supporters “windy” in the 1860s and 1870s, meaning that they were full of hot air in their claims that the Chicago White Stockings were superior to the Cincinnati Red Stockings.

6. Imaginary tiger friend in the comics : HOBBES
The comic strip "Calvin and Hobbes" is still widely syndicated, but hasn't been written since 1995. The cartoonist Bill Watterson named the character Calvin after John Calvin, the 16th century theologian. Hobbes was named for Thomas Hobbes a 17th century English political philosopher.

9. Infamous prison featured in the 1969 best seller "Papillon" : ILE DU DIABLE
“Papillon” is an excellent film starring Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman as convicts in the French penal colony on Devil’s Island (“Île du Diable” in French). “Papillon” is the French word for “butterfly” and is a reference to the character Henri “Papillon” Charrière, played by McQueen.

11. Southernmost U.S. state : HAWAII
The most southerly state in the US is Hawaii, and the most northerly is Alaska. Alaska is also the most westerly state, and believe it or not, it is also the most easterly state. That’s because Alaska’s Aleutian Islands stretch across the 180-degree of longitude into the Eastern Hemisphere.

12. Weather concern in 11-Down : EL NINO
(11A. Southernmost U.S. state : HAWAII)
When the surface temperature of much of the Pacific Ocean rises more that half a degree centigrade, then there is said to be an El Niño episode. That small temperature change in the Pacific has been associated with climatic changes that can stretch right across the globe. El Niño is Spanish for "the boy" and is a reference to the Christ child. The phenomenon was given this particular Spanish name because the warming is usually noticed near South America and around Christmas-time.

13. Lackeys : YES-MEN
A lackey is someone quite servile, or a male servant. The term probably comes from the Middle French “laquais”, a word used for a footman or servant.

23. Two-masted vessel : BRIG
A brig, short for brigantine, is a type of ship. It was the use of brigantines as prison ships that led to use of “brig” as the word for a jail or prison cell on a seagoing vessel.

30. "Be My Yoko ___" (first single by Barenaked Ladies) : ONO
Barenaked Ladies is a Canadian alternative rock band. The somewhat quirky name chosen by the band tends to reflect the group's concert style. The band is noted for kidding around on stage with lots of banter between songs. They’re also noted for composing and performing the catchy theme song for the hit sitcom “The Big Bang Theory”.

31. Pi's follower : RHO
Rho is the Greek letter that looks just like our Roman letter “p”, although it is equivalent to the Roman letter R.

32. Former Big Four record co. : EMI
The Big Four recording labels were (until EMI was broken up in 2012 and absorbed by what became “the Big Three”):
  1. Universal Music Group
  2. Sony Music Entertainment
  3. Warner Music Group
  4. EMI

40. Hollywood ending? : DEE
The word “Hollywood” ends with a letter D (dee).

41. Nincompoop : ASS
The word “nincompoop”, meaning a fool, seems to have been around for quite a while. It has been used since the 1670s, but no one appears to know its origins.

43. River that feeds Lake Nasser : NILE
Lake Nasser is a large artificial lake created as a result of the construction of the Aswan High Dam (initiated by President Nasser). Lake Nasser lies in southern Egypt and northern Sudan. Strictly speaking, the section of the lake in Sudan is called Lake Nubia.

45. Topping in kosher restaurants : OLEO
According to Jewish dietary law, “kosher” food is fit to eat, and food that is not fit to eat is referred to as “treif” (or “tref”).

49. Region on the Rhine : ALSACE
Of the 27 regions of metropolitan France (i.e. the territory of France within Europe), the smallest is Alsace. Alsace sits at the very east of the country, right on the border with Germany.

57. Breakfast food with a rhyming slogan : EGGO
Eggo is the brand name of a line of frozen waffles made by Kellogg’s. When they were introduced in the 1930s, the name “Eggo” was chosen to promote the “egginess” of the batter. “Eggo” replaced the original name chosen, which was “Froffles”, created by melding “frozen” and “waffles”.

60. Totally fine : A-OK
Our term “A-OK” is supposedly an abbreviation for “A(ll systems are) OK”, and arose in the sixties during the Space Program.

62. Box office purchase: Abbr. : TKT
Ticket (tkt.)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. ___ jacket (bit of casualwear) : JEAN
5. Dish that's sometimes rated in "alarms" : CHILI
10. Curds and ___ : WHEY
14. Wagon part : AXLE
15. Like much music : TONAL
16. In fine fettle : HALE
17. Widespread : VAST
18. 1960s activist Hoffman : ABBIE
19. Has : OWNS
20. ___ friends (not having to be on one's guard) : AMONG
22. Quaint inn, informally : B AND B
24. Cry after "Ready!" : AIM!
25. Muffed one : ERRED
27. Bearlike : URSINE
29. Powerful Renaissance family : BORGIAS
32. A book collector might seek a first one : EDITION
33. Available : ON HAND
34. Spanish girlfriend : AMIGA
35. Italy's shape : BOOT
36. Setting for much of the movie "Lion" : INDIA
38. Zippo : NADA
42. People encountered by Pizarro : INCAS
44. Things ghosts lack : BODIES
46. Riga native : LATVIAN
49. Charms : ALLURES
50. In addition : AS WELL
51. What tryptophan is said to induce : SLEEP
52. Place to go for a "me day" : SPA
53. Munchkins : ELVES
55. Nash who wrote "Parsley / Is gharsley" : OGDEN
59. Turner or Fey : TINA
61. Bother greatly : EAT AT
63. Tell to "Do it!" : URGE
64. Lead-in to a conclusion : ERGO
65. Movie, informally : FLICK
66. Class with mats : YOGA
67. Feature of a late-night show set : DESK
68. Words to live by : TENET
69. Catch sight of : SPOT

Down
1. Morning joe : JAVA
2. Start of many a doctor's visit : EXAM
3. In addition : ALSO
4. Outcome that's overall unfavorable : NET NEGATIVE
5. Windy City 'L' overseer : CTA
6. Imaginary tiger friend in the comics : HOBBES
7. Not on good terms (with) : IN BAD
8. Done nothing : LAIN
9. Infamous prison featured in the 1969 best seller "Papillon" : ILE DU DIABLE
10. "___ knew?" : WHO
11. Southernmost U.S. state : HAWAII
12. Weather concern in 11-Down : EL NINO
13. Lackeys : YES-MEN
21. Sheepish look : GRIN
23. Two-masted vessel : BRIG
26. Socialist Workers Party's ideology : RADICAL LEFT
28. Honest sorts ... or what the circled squares contain? : STAND-UP GUYS
29. Palindromic boy's name : BOB
30. "Be My Yoko ___" (first single by Barenaked Ladies) : ONO
31. Pi's follower : RHO
32. Former Big Four record co. : EMI
34. They're taken out in newspapers : ADS
37. Palindromic girl's name : NAN
39. Lungful : AIR
40. Hollywood ending? : DEE
41. Nincompoop : ASS
43. River that feeds Lake Nasser : NILE
45. Topping in kosher restaurants : OLEO
46. Didn't run out : LASTED
47. Have dreams : ASPIRE
48. Features of some country singers : TWANGS
49. Region on the Rhine : ALSACE
51. Took effect : SET IN
54. Area between mountains : VALE
56. Plunge : DROP
57. Breakfast food with a rhyming slogan : EGGO
58. In order : NEAT
60. Totally fine : A-OK
62. Box office purchase: Abbr. : TKT


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0227-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Feb 17, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Zhouqin Burnikel
THEME: Sounds Like a Move
Today’s themed answers are grouped in pairs. One element of each pair is a homonym of the other, sort of. We take a homonym of the start of the first answer, and move that homonym to the end to give the second answer:
17A. Intimidates, in a way : STARES DOWN
63A. On a lower floor : DOWNSTAIRS

34A. Period between wars : PEACETIME
45A. Watch or clock : TIMEPIECE

11D. Unlined sheets without any writing : PLAIN PAPER
28D. Classroom missile : PAPER PLANE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 39s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. Peru's capital : LIMA
Lima is the capital city of Peru. Lima was founded in 1535 by the Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro, who named it “la Ciudad de los Reyes” (the City of Kings). He chose this name because the decision to found the city was made on January 6th, the feast of the Epiphany that commemorates the visit of the three kings to Jesus in Bethlehem.

10. Omar of Fox's "House" : EPPS
Omar Epps is the actor who played Eric Forman on the excellent television series “House”. Prior to playing Dr. Forman, Epps had a recurring role playing Dr. Dennis Grant on “ER”. And, in another link to the world of medicine, Epps was born in Savannah, Georgia to single mom, Dr. Bonnie Epps.

14. Dickens's "___ House" : BLEAK
“Bleak House” is a Charles Dickens novel that was originally published as a serial from 1852 to 1853. The novel’s storyline highlights injustices in the English Legal system in the 19th century.

23. Airport up the coast from LAX : SFO
San Francisco International Airport (SFO) serves as the main base of operations for Virgin America (recently sold to Alaska Airlines), and is also the maintenance hub for United Airlines.

24. Flash mobs, once : FAD
A flash mob is a group of people who gather to perform a sudden, brief act in a public location and then quickly disperse. Flash mobs originated in Manhattan in 2003, as a social experiment by an editor of “Harper’s Magazine” called Bill Wasik. Wasik’s first attempt to form a flash mob was unsuccessful, but the second attempt worked. The first successful flash mob was relatively tame by today’s elaborate standards, and consisted of about 130 people gathered on the 9th floor of Macy’s department store pretending to be shopping en masse for a “love rug”.

25. "Science Guy" Bill : NYE
That would be “Bill Nye the Science Guy”. Bill’s show ran on PBS for four years from 1993-97.

26. Jean ___, father of Dadaism : ARP
Jean Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn’t the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both “Hans” and “Jean” translate into English as “John”. In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all of his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. Arp was sent home …

Dadaism thrived during and just after WWI, and was an anti-war, anti-bourgeois and anti-art culture. The movement began in Zurich, Switzerland started by a group of artists and writers who met to discuss art and put on performances in the Cabaret Voltaire, frequently expressing disgust at the war that was raging across Europe.

37. World's fair, for short : EXPO
The first "World's Fair" was held in 1851, known back then as the "Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations". The fair was the idea of Prince Albert, consort of Queen Victoria. It was held in a magnificent glass and cast-iron structure called the Crystal Palace that was purpose-built for the occasion. The "Great Exhibition" spawned a tradition of what became known as World's Fairs, expositions that feature national pavilions created by participating countries.

38. Circus animals that balance beach balls on their noses : SEALS
There are three families of seals. The first is the walrus family, the second the eared seals (like sea lions), and thirdly the earless seals (like elephant seals).

40. "When You Wish ___ a Star" : UPON
“When You Wish Upon A Star” is a hit song by Leigh Harline and Ned Washington that was written for the 1940 Disney movie “Pinocchio”. In the animated film, the song is sung by the Jiminy Cricket character, with the voice provided by singer Cliff Edwards. In some parts of the world, "When You Wish Upon A Star" has become a Christmas classic due the assumption that the “star” in the title is the Star of Bethlehem.

43. Manning who was twice Super Bowl M.V.P. : ELI
Eli Manning plays as quarterback for the New York Giants. Eli’s brother Peyton Manning retired from football as the quarterback for the Denver Broncos. Eli and Peyton’s father is Archie Manning, who was also a successful NFL quarterback.

49. Justice Kagan : ELENA
Elena Kagan was the Solicitor General of the United States who replaced Justice John Paul Stevens on the US Supreme Court. That made Justice Kagan the first female US Solicitor General and the fourth female US Supreme Court justice. I hear she is a fan of Jane Austen, and used to reread “Pride and Prejudice” once a year. Not a bad thing to do, I’d say …

51. Abbr. before a credit card date : EXP
Expiration (exp.)

54. ___ card (cellphone chip) : SIM
Most cell phones have SIM cards these days. SIM cards hold the personal information of the subscriber, with the acronym being short for Subscriber Identity Module.

62. Male deer : STAG
A male deer is usually called a buck, and a female is a doe. However, the male red deer is usually referred to as a stag. The males of even larger species of deer are often called bulls, and females cows. In older English, male deer of over 5 years were called harts, and females of over 3 years were called hinds. The young of small species are known as fawns, and of larger species are called calves. All very confusing …

66. "___ kleine Nachtmusik" : EINE
Mozart's ”Serenade No. 13 for Strings in G major” is better known as "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik", which translates into "a little serenade", but the more literal English translation of "a little night music" is often used. It is a delightful piece in four, very recognizable movements, although there is much debate about a "lost" fifth movement.

67. "Ars Amatoria" poet : OVID
Ovid’s “Ars amatoria” (“The Art of Love” in English) is a series of poems in three books by the Roman poet Ovid. Book one provides men with instruction on how to find a woman. Book two gives a man guidance on keeping that woman. Ovid turns the tables in Book three and gives advice to women on how to find and keep a man.

70. Big name in pet food : IAMS
Iams dog food was introduced by the animal nutritionist Paul Iams. He felt that household pets were suffering somewhat by being fed a diet of table scraps, so he developed a dry dog food that he felt was more nutritious and suitable for pet dogs. He founded the Iams company, now part of Procter & Gamble, in 1946.

71. Aid in storm-tracking : RADAR
Scientists have been using radio waves to detect the presence of objects since the late 1800s, but it was the demands of WWII that accelerated the practical application of the technology. The British called their system RDF standing for Range and Direction Finding. The system used by the US Navy was called Radio Detection And Ranging, which was shortened to the acronym RADAR.

Down
1. "2 Broke Girls" airer : CBS
“2 Broke Girls” is a sitcom about two young ladies sharing an apartment in Brooklyn, and their attempts to launch a cupcake business. The title characters are played by Kat Dennings and Beth Behrs.

2. Ski area near Salt Lake City : ALTA
Alta ski resort actually lies within the Salt Lake City Metropolitan Area. The first ski lift in the resort was opened way back in 1939. Today, Alta is one of only three ski resorts in the country that prohibits snowboarding (along with Deer Valley, Utah and Mad River Glen, Vermont. The ski resort of Snowbird located next to Alta has been in operation since 1971.

4. Pub game : DARTS
Darts is a wonderful game often played in English and Irish pubs, even over here in America. The scoring in a traditional game of darts is difficult to describe in a sentence or two, but the game of darts called “Round the Clock” is simply hitting the numbers 1 through 20 in sequence.

5. Artist Georgia who is known for her flower canvases : O’KEEFFE
Georgia O’Keeffe was an influential American artist, one who led the introduction of American art into Europe. Famously, she was married to photographer Alfred Stieglitz who helped develop her career in the early days. Georgia O’Keeffe’s last home was in Santa Fe, New Mexico, where she had done a lot of her work during her lifetime. She died there in 1986, at the ripe old age of 98. One of her most famous paintings is from 1926, called “Black Iris III”.

6. Cheryl of "Charlie's Angels" : LADD
Cheryl Ladd’s most famous role was Kris Munroe in television’s “Charlie’s Angels”. Ladd replaced Farrah Fawcett-Majors when the latter opted out of the show. Cheryl Ladd was the daughter-in-law of famed Hollywood actor Alan Ladd, as she was married to Ladd’s son, David. After the couple divorced, Cheryl retained the Ladd name.

When the TV show “Charlie’s Angels” started airing in the mid-seventies, it was a little unusual in that it featured three women playing private detectives, a role usually reserved for men. The name first chosen for the show was “The Alley Cats”, then “Harry’s Angels”, before finally settling on “Charlie's Angels”.

7. Wall St. debuts : IPOS
An Initial Public Offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually).

9. Sleeper's problem : APNEA
Sleep apnea (“apnoea” in British English) can be caused by an obstruction in the airways, possibly due to obesity or enlarged tonsils.

12. Sailor who's smitten by Olive Oyl : POPEYE
Popeye first appeared in 1929 in a comic strip called "Thimble Theatre". The strip, created by E. C. Segar, ran for ten years before Popeye made an appearance. Popeye received such a great welcome from readers that he soon "took over" the strip, and eventually even hogged the strip's title. Before Popeye turned up, Olive Oyl was the main character.

22. Name first encountered in Genesis 2 : ADAM
The Book of Genesis is the first book in the Hebrew and Christian Bibles. Some of the main figures in the book are Adam and Eve, Moses, Abraham and Jacob/Israel. “Genesis” is a Greek word meaning “origin, creation”.

26. Big galoot : APE
“Galoot” is an insulting term meaning an awkward or boorish man, an ape. “Galoot” comes from the nautical world, where it was originally what a sailor might call a soldier or marine.

27. Tyrannosaurus ___ : REX
The Tyrannosaurus rex (usually written T. rex) was a spectacular looking dinosaur. “Tyrannosaurus” comes from the Greek words “tyrannos” (tyrant) and “sauros” (lizard), and the “rex” is of course Latin for “king”. They were big boys, measuring 42 feet long and 13 feet tall at the hips, and weighing 7.5 tons.

31. Alternative to AOL or Yahoo : GMAIL
Gmail is a free webmail service provided by Google, and my favorite of the free email services. Gmail made a big splash when it was introduced in 2007 because it offered a whopping 1GB of storage whereas other services offered a measly 2-4MB on average.

33. Island ESE of Oahu : MAUI
Maui is the second largest of the Hawaiian islands. Maui is sometimes called the “Valley Isle” as it is composed of two volcanoes to the northwest and southeast of the island, each with numerous beautiful valleys carved into them.

35. Pepsi, for one : COLA
The Pepsi-Cola formulation was developed by one Caleb Bradham who made the drink at home and sold it as “Brad’s Drink”. Bradham's aim was to provide a drink that was pleasant to taste, that would aid digestion and boost energy. Included in the formula were pepsin (a digestive enzyme) and kola nuts. These two ingredients inspired the brand name we use today: Pepsi-Cola.

41. Month before Nov. : OCT
October is the tenth month in our calendar but was the eighth month in the old Roman calendar, hence the prefix “octo-”. Back then there were only ten months in the year. “Ianuarius” (January) and “Februarius” were then added as the eleventh and twelfth months of the year. Soon after, the year was reset and January and February became the first and second months.

42. Born: Fr. : NEE
"Née" is the French word for "born" when referring to a female. The male equivalent is "né".

44. Police dept. figure : INSP
Inspector (insp.)

46. Van Gogh or Van Dyck : PAINTER
Vincent Van Gogh was a Dutch post-impressionist painter who seems to have had a very tortured existence. Van Gogh only painted for the last ten years of his life, and enjoyed very little celebrity while alive. Today many of his works are easily recognized, and fetch staggering sums in auction houses. Van Gogh suffered from severe depression for many of his final years. When he was only 37, he walked into a field with a revolver and shot himself in the chest. He managed to drag himself back to the inn where he was staying but died there two days later.

Anthony van Dyck was a Flemish artist, although he was noted as a painter in the British royal court. His most famous portraits are of King Charles I of England and members of his family. The men in his paintings often sported a short, pointed beard that was in fashion at the time. When that style of beard became fashionable again centuries later, it was termed a “Van Dyke” in honor of the artist.

47. Moses parted it : RED SEA
The Red Sea (sometimes called the Arabian Gulf) is a stretch of water lying between Africa and Asia. The Gulf of Suez (and the Suez Canal) lies to north, and the Gulf of Aden to the south. According to the Book of Exodus in the Bible, God parted the Red Sea to allow Moses lead the Israelites from Egypt.

48. Beautifully strange : EXOTIC
The word “exotic” means “belonging to another country”, and is derived from the Greek “exo-” meaning “outside”. Exotica are things that are excitingly strange, often from foreign parts.

55. 2016 Disney film set in Polynesia : MOANA
“Moana” is a 2016 animated feature film, the 56th animated Disney movie. The title character is the daughter of a Polynesian chief who heads off in search of the demigod Maui, hoping that he can save her people.

The term “Polynesia” was first coined in 1756 by the author Charles de Brosses, when he used it to describe all the islands in the Pacific. This was later restricted to what we now refer to as a subregion of Oceania.

57. 10 and 8 for Bart and Lisa Simpson, respectively : AGES
Bart Simpson is the main character in television’s “The Simpsons”. Bart’s name was chosen by the writers as it is an anagram of “brat”. Bart is voiced by actress and comedian Nancy Cartwright.

Lisa Simpson is Bart’s brainy younger sister on TV’s “The Simpsons”. Lisa is voiced by actress Yeardley Smith. In a 2008 episode of the show, Lisa enters a crossword tournament. Crossword celebrities Merl Reagle and Will Shortz make appearances in that episode, basically playing cartoon versions of themselves.

61. Humorous Bombeck : ERMA
Erma Bombeck wrote for newspapers for about 35 years, producing more than 4,000 witty and humorous columns describing her home life in suburbia.

65. Damascus's land: Abbr. : SYR
Damascus is the second largest city in Syria (after Aleppo), and is the country’s capital. Damascus has the distinction of being the oldest, continuously-inhabited city in the world, having been settled in the 2nd millennium BC.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "No problem for me!" : CAN DO!
6. Peru's capital : LIMA
10. Omar of Fox's "House" : EPPS
14. Dickens's "___ House" : BLEAK
15. Per item : A POP
16. Hand lotion ingredient : ALOE
17. Intimidates, in a way : STARES DOWN
19. Crime scene barrier : TAPE
20. Goes to, as a meeting : ATTENDS
21. Not as hard : EASIER
23. Airport up the coast from LAX : SFO
24. Flash mobs, once : FAD
25. "Science Guy" Bill : NYE
26. Jean ___, father of Dadaism : ARP
29. "Oh, darn!" : FUDGE!
32. Fired (up) : AMPED
34. Period between wars : PEACETIME
36. Goat's cry : MAA!
37. World's fair, for short : EXPO
38. Circus animals that balance beach balls on their noses : SEALS
40. "When You Wish ___ a Star" : UPON
43. Manning who was twice Super Bowl M.V.P. : ELI
45. Watch or clock : TIMEPIECE
47. Showed in syndication, say : RERAN
49. Justice Kagan : ELENA
50. Numbered hwy. : RTE
51. Abbr. before a credit card date : EXP
52. Feeling blue : SAD
54. ___ card (cellphone chip) : SIM
56. Exercise in a pool : DO LAPS
58. Cross-reference for further information : SEE NOTE
62. Male deer : STAG
63. On a lower floor : DOWNSTAIRS
66. "___ kleine Nachtmusik" : EINE
67. "Ars Amatoria" poet : OVID
68. Foe : ENEMY
69. Ones in suits? : ACES
70. Big name in pet food : IAMS
71. Aid in storm-tracking : RADAR

Down
1. "2 Broke Girls" airer : CBS
2. Ski area near Salt Lake City : ALTA
3. "Cool!" : NEAT!
4. Pub game : DARTS
5. Artist Georgia who is known for her flower canvases : O’KEEFFE
6. Cheryl of "Charlie's Angels" : LADD
7. Wall St. debuts : IPOS
8. Trim the lawn : MOW
9. Sleeper's problem : APNEA
10. Has supper : EATS
11. Unlined sheets without any writing : PLAIN PAPER
12. Sailor who's smitten by Olive Oyl : POPEYE
13. Get angry : SEE RED
18. Pig noses : SNOUTS
22. Name first encountered in Genesis 2 : ADAM
24. "Understand?," slangily : FEEL ME?
26. Big galoot : APE
27. Tyrannosaurus ___ : REX
28. Classroom missile : PAPER PLANE
30. Followed a weight-loss plan : DIETED
31. Alternative to AOL or Yahoo : GMAIL
33. Island ESE of Oahu : MAUI
35. Pepsi, for one : COLA
39. Just knows : SENSES
41. Month before Nov. : OCT
42. Born: Fr. : NEE
44. Police dept. figure : INSP
46. Van Gogh or Van Dyck : PAINTER
47. Moses parted it : RED SEA
48. Beautifully strange : EXOTIC
53. "Me, too" : AS DO I
55. 2016 Disney film set in Polynesia : MOANA
57. 10 and 8 for Bart and Lisa Simpson, respectively : AGES
58. Do the breaststroke, e.g. : SWIM
59. Terminals : ENDS
60. Like the score 7-7 : TIED
61. Humorous Bombeck : ERMA
64. Lab eggs : OVA
65. Damascus's land: Abbr. : SYR


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0226-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 Feb 17, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Josh Knapp
THEME: Mixed Feelings
Each of today’s themed answers is a common that includes a FEELING, but that FEELING has been MIXED, anagrammed to suit the clue:
23A. Fashionable enough for a runway model? : STRUT WORTHY (from “trustworthy”)
25A. Assault involving a hatchet? : TINY AXE ATTACK (from “anxiety attack”)
44A. "Stop insisting Ra doesn't exist!"? : CURB YOUR SUN ATHEISM (from “curb your enthusiasm”)
64A. Stories from bankruptcy court? : TALES OF OWE (from “tales of woe”)
68A. Be too broke to take the bus? : HAVE NO FARE (from “have no fear”)
82A. "The king really wants to be around people right now"? : MY SIRE LOVES COMPANY (from “misery loves company”)
109A. Celebration after a coup? : UPRISERS’ PARTY (from “surprise party”)
112A. Negative Nancy? : DOWNER WOMAN (from “Wonder Woman”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 22s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Word before "Ooh, didn't mean to make you cry" in Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" : MAMA
Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" is a marvelously unique song in the pop repertoire. It has a very appealing structure, with no chorus but three distinct parts and with three distinct "sounds". The opening is truly a slow ballad, which morphs into an operatic middle section, ending with a really heavy, rock-guitar conclusion. The song monopolized the number one slot in the UK charts for weeks in 1975/76, and made a comeback in 1996 when it appeared in the movie "Wayne's World". Great stuff …

19. ___ Palmer ("Twin Peaks" victim) : LAURA
“Twin Peaks” is a TV drama about an FBI murder investigation in the fictional town of Twin Peaks, Washington. I’ve never seen it, but I hear good things …

20. Jacobin revolutionary who was stabbed in a bathtub : MARAT
Jean-Paul Marat was a prominent figure in the French Revolution. Marat was famously murdered in his bath by a young woman named Charlotte Corday who was a Royalist. The gruesome event was immortalized in a celebrated painting by Jacques-Louis David called “The Death of Marat”.

27. Broadway's Eugene ___ Theater : O'NEILL
The playwright Eugene O’Neill was born in a New York City hotel room in what is now called Times Square, in 1888. That building no longer exists and there is a Starbucks on the site today, but you can go take a look at the commemorative plaque at the Northeast corner of 43rd and Broadway. O’Neill died in 1953, in room 401 of the Sheraton Hotel on Bay State Road in Boston. His last words were, “I knew it. I knew it. Born in a hotel room, and God damn it, died in a hotel room." Eugene O'Neill won a Pulitzer for his play "Anna Christie".

31. 1982 Dustin Hoffman film : TOOTSIE
“Tootsie” is a hilarious 1982 comedy starring Dustin Hoffman in the title role, a male actor who adopts a female identity in order to land an acting job. Jessica Lange won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her performance in the film. “Tootsie” was also provided Geena Davis with her first movie role.

32. Place for a sponge : REEF
Sponges are multicellular organisms that live underwater. They are animals with bodies that are full of holes and channels through which seawater freely circulates. Sponges have no digestive or circulatory system as such and instead rely on the movement of water to supply food and oxygen, and to remove waste material.

34. Annoying sort : NOODGE
Noodge is a slang term, meaning "to nag", or as a noun it can mean "a nag". It comes into English from the Yiddish word "nudyen" meaning "to bore, be tedious".

40. Some scans, for short : MRIS
An MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) machine uses powerful magnetic fields to generate its images so there is no exposure to ionizing radiation (such as X-rays). We used MRI equipment in our chemistry labs at school, way back in the days when the technology was still called Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI). Apparently the marketing folks didn’t like the term “nuclear” because of its association with atomic bombs, so now it’s just called MRI.

56. Andean gold : ORO
The Andes range is the longest continuous chain of mountains in the world, running right down the length of the west coast of South America for about 4,300 miles. The highest peak in the Andes is Mt. Aconcagua, at an elevation of 22,841 feet. Interestingly, the peak of Mt. Chimborazo in Ecuador is the furthest point on the Earth's surface from the center of the planet. That's because of the equatorial "bulge" around the Earth's "waist".

61. Fast-food sandwich not available in Muslim countries : MCRIB
The McDonald’s McRib sandwich is based on a pork patty. There isn’t any pork rib in the patty though. It is primarily made up of pork shoulder meat reconstituted with tripe, heart and stomach tissue. Enjoy …

70. Country singer Black : CLINT
Clint Black is a country music singer. Black was born in New Jersey, but grew up in Texas.

71. Grammy category : OPERA
The first Grammy Awards Ceremony was held in 1959 and focused on recognizing outstanding achievement in the recording industry. The idea of a Grammy Award came up when recording executives were working on the Hollywood Walk of Fame project in the fifties. These executives concluded that there were many people in the recording industry deserving of accolades but who would probably never make it to the Walk of Fame. As a result, they founded the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. The Academy considered naming the award the “Eddies” after Thomas Edison, but then opted for “Grammy” after Edison’s invention: the gramophone.

73. Beast in rare "sightings" : YETI
The yeti, also called the abominable snowman, is a beast of legend. "Yeti" is a Tibetan term, and the beast is fabled to live in the Himalayan regions of Nepal and Tibet. Our equivalent legend in North America is that of Bigfoot, also known as Sasquatch. The study of animals whose existence have not yet been substantiated is called cryptozoology.

74. Poet/musician ___ Scott-Heron : GIL
Gil Scott-Heron was jazz poet and musician who is best remembered as spoken word performer from the seventies and eighties. Scott-Heron’s most famous work is the poem and song “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised”, the title of which became a popular slogan for the Black Power movements in the sixties.

77. ___-Lay : FRITO
The manufacturers of Frito and Lay potato chips merged to form Frito-Lay in 1961. Frito-Lay then merged with Pepsi-Cola in 1965 to form PepsiCo.

87. Professor's goal, one day : TENURE
A job in a university that is described as “tenure-track” is one that can lead to a tenured position. A tenured position is a “job for life”. A person with tenure can only be dismissed for cause.

88. Marvel role for Chris Hemsworth : THOR
The 2011 movie “Thor” is yet another film based on a comic book hero. Even though I won’t be seeing it (I don’t do comics), I must admit it does have an impressive cast. Chris Hemsworth plays Thor, supported by Natalie Portman, Rene Russo and Anthony Hopkins. And to crown it all, Kenneth Branagh is the director.

95. Actor Curry : TIM
Tim Curry is a marvelous actor from England who is perhaps best known on this side of the Atlantic for playing Dr. Frank-N-Furter in the 1975 movie “The Rocky Horror Picture Show”. Curry also played the title role in the original Broadway play “Amadeus”.

105. Trader ___ : JOE'S
Trader Joe's is a grocery store chain based in Monrovia, California that was founded in 1979 by Joe Coulombe. Trader Joe’s is very popular where I live, even though it stocks less than 10% of the items found in a typical grocery store. 80% of the items on the shelves are sold under a Trader Joe’s brand name, and are obviously chosen well. One of the more successful items is Charles Shaw wine, known as “Two Buck Chuck” here in California as it sold for many years at a price of $1.99.

112. Negative Nancy? : DOWNER WOMAN (from “Wonder Woman”)
Wonder Woman first appeared in print in 1941, in a publication from DC Comics. As she was created during WWII, Wonder Woman’s first foes were the axis powers. In the less realistic world her biggest foe was and still is Ares, a “baddie” named for the Greek mythological figure. Wonder Woman had several signature expressions, including “Merciful Minerva!”, “Suffering Sappho!” and “Great Hera!”.

119. Orange-and-white Pixar title character : NEMO
"Finding Nemo" is a 2003 animated blockbuster from Pixar. The film was the winner of the Oscar that year for Best Animated Feature. Believe it or not, "Finding Nemo" is the best-selling DVD of all time and, until 2010's "Toy Story 3", it was the highest-grossing, G-rated movie at the box office.

122. Rapper with the most-viewed YouTube video of all time : PSY
PSY is the stage name of South Korean rapper Park Jae-sang. PSY became an international star when his 2102 music video “Gangnam Style” went viral on YouTube. That video had over 1 billion views on YouTube in about six months, making it the most viewed YouTube video clip of all time. I am not one of that billion …

123. P.M. after Churchill : EDEN
Sir Anthony Eden served as Britain’s Foreign Secretary during WWII, and then as Prime Minister from 1955-57. I think it’s fair to say that Eden doesn’t have a great reputation as a statesman. He was proud of his stance in favor of peace over war, so his critics characterized him as an appeaser. His major stumble on the world stage occurred with the Suez Crisis in 1956. Egypt’s President Nasser unilaterally nationalized the Suez Canal causing war to be declared on Egypt by Britain, France and Israel. Within a few months political pressure from the US and the USSR caused the allies to withdraw, bolstering Egypt’s national reputation. Eden never recovered from the loss of face at home, and it is felt that the stress even affected his health. Eden resigned in January 1957.

Down
1. Weapon usually fired between a 45° and 90° angle : MORTAR
I’ve always loved the sound of the words “mortar” and “pestle”, ever since I was first introduced to them in the chemistry lab. The Romans called a receptacle for pounding or grinding things a “mortarium”, giving us “mortar”. Mortarium was also the word for the product of pounding and grinding, which gives us our “mortar” that's used with bricks to build a wall. And further, short stubby cannons used in the 16th century resembled a grinding bowl and so were called “mortars”, which evolved into our contemporary weapon of the same name. As far as the pestle is concerned, it is also derived from its Latin name “pistillum”, which comes from the word for “crush”.

4. With 41-Down, first tennis player to win two Olympic singles gold medals : ANDY …
(41D. See 4-Down : … MURRAY)
Andy Murray is a tennis player from Scotland who became British number in 2006, rising to world number one in 2016. Much to the delight of the locals, Murray won the Wimbledon Championship in 2013, making him the first British male player to win in 77 years. Murray also won Olympic gold in the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, and again in the Rio Games in 2016.

7. Against the jet stream : WEST
Jet streams are narrow air currents high in the atmosphere that move very quickly around the earth. The major jet streams surrounding our planet move in a westerly direction.

8. French region around Strasbourg : ALSACE
Of the 27 regions of metropolitan France (i.e. the territory of France within Europe), the smallest is Alsace. Alsace sits at the very east of the country, right on the border with Germany.

Strasbourg is a beautiful city that I had the privilege to visit some years ago. Strasbourg is home to many international organizations, including the European Court of Human Rights and the European Parliament.

9. Tray of brownies, e.g. : BATCH
Apparently the first brownies were created for the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893. The recipe was developed by a pastry chef at the city’s Palmer House Hotel. The idea was to produce a cake-like dessert that was small enough and dainty enough to be eaten by ladies as part of a boxed lunch.

10. Philosopher who said "The people never give up their liberties but under some delusion" : BURKE
Edmund Burke was an Irish statesman. Burke became famous for supporting the American revolutionaries, but later opposing the French Revolution.

11. Christian school in Okla. : ORU
Oral Roberts University (ORU) is a private school in Tulsa, Oklahoma. ORU was founded relatively recently, in 1963 by the late televangelist Oral Roberts. The campus includes a Prayer Tower at its center, a spectacular glass and steel structure designed by architect Frank Wallace. The tower includes an observation deck, and is a popular tourist attraction. The school’s sports teams are known as the Oral Roberts Golden Eagles.

12. Skin art, informally : TAT
The word "tattoo" (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word "tatau" into our "tattoo". Tattoos are also sometimes referred to as “ink”.

13. Character resembling a hat : CARET
The character known as a caret was originally a proofreading mark, used to indicate where a punctuation mark was to be inserted. “Caret” is Latin for “it lacks”.

15. Flower named for a Swedish botanist : DAHLIA
The dahlia is a flowering plant native to Mexico and Central America. It was named the national flower of Mexico relatively recently, in 1963. The plant was given the name dahlia in 1791, in honor of Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.

20. Like original Buddy Holly and the Crickets recordings : MONO
Famously, Buddy Holly had a tragically short career as a professional musician. Holly was killed in a plane crash in 1959, along with fellow-performers Ritchie Valens and J. P. Richardson (aka “the Big Bopper”). Buddy’s family name was actually spelled “Holley”, with the “Holly” spelling arising due to an error on the contract that he signed with Decca Records in 1956. He decided to adopt “Buddy Holly” as a stage name from then on, although the “Holley” spelling appears on his gravestone in Lubbock, Texas.

26. Gets back on base : TAGS UP
That would be baseball.

33. Abbr. on a pay stub : FICA
The Federal Insurance Contributions Act tax (FICA) was introduced in the 1930s as part of President Roosevelt’s New Deal. FICA payments are made by both employees and employers in order to fund Social Security and Medicare.

39. So-ugly-it's-cute pooch : PUG
The pug is a breed of dog of Chinese origin. Our current family pet is a boxer/pug cross, a good-looking mutt!

42. One-named singer once married to Xavier Cugat : CHARO
Charo is an actress, comedian and flamenco guitarist from Spain. She is quite famous for her comedic catchphrase “cuchi cuchi”. Charo's real name is ... wait for it ... María del Rosario Pilar Martínez Molina Gutiérrez de los Perales Santa Ana Romaguera y de la Hinojosa Rasten.

Xavier Cugat was an American bandleader born in Spain, who arrived in the United States via Cuba. He worked in Hollywood on movies, although he was also in charge of the Hotel Orchestra in the Waldorf Astoria in New York City for 16 years. Famously he conducted using just one arm, as he would hold his pet Chihuahua in the other. His fourth marriage was to comic actress Charo, in the first marriage ceremony ever to take place in Caesar's Palace.

53. One side in a pool game : SOLIDS
One side (player) in a game of pool uses the "solid" balls, the other the "stripes".

58. Subject of a tinfoil hat theory : UFO
Before thin sheets of aluminum metal was available, thin sheets of tin were used in various application. Tin foil isn’t a great choice for wrapping food though, as it imparts a tinny taste. On the other side of the pond, aluminum foil has a different name. No, it’s not just the different spelling of aluminum (“aluminium”). We still call it “tin foil”. You see, we live in the past …

67. Former tribe in western New York : ERIE
The Erie people lived on lands south of Lake Erie. The Erie were sometimes referred to as the Cat Nation, a reference to the mountain lions that were ever-present in the area that they lived. The name “Erie” is a shortened form of “Erielhonan” meaning “long tail”, possibly a further reference to the mountain lion or cat, which was possibly used as a totem. The Erie people gave their name to the Great Lake.

69. Singer Simone : NINA
Nina Simone was the stage name of Eunice Waymon. Simone was very much associated with jazz music, although she really wanted to be a classical musician early in her career, inspired by a love for the music of Bach.

72. @@@ : ATS
The “at symbol” (@) originated in the commercial word, as shorthand for “each at, per” and similar phrases. I suppose we see the symbol most commonly these days as part of all email addresses.

78. Sea creatures with remarkably high I.Q.s : OCTOPI
The name “octopus” comes from the Greek for “eight-footed”. The most common plural used is “octopuses”, although the Greek plural form “octopodes” is also quite correct. The plural “octopi” isn’t really correct as the inference is that “octopus” is like a second-declension Latin noun, which it isn’t. That said, dictionaries are now citing “octopi” as an acceptable plural. Language does evolve, even though it drives me crazy …

83. San ___, Argentina : LUIS
The Argentine province of San Luis is located near the center of the country.

84. Volt/ampere : OHM
The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every schoolkid knows as Ohm's Law.

85. High-waisted, shamelessly unfashionable garment : MOM JEANS
“Mom jeans” and “dad jeans” are not-so-nice names for high-waisted jeans, usually worn by older women and men.

94. V.I.P. : BIGWIG
A “bigwig” is someone important. The use of the term harks back to the days when men of authority and rank wore big wigs.

96. Instrument for Louis Armstrong : CORNET
Louis Armstrong was born in New Orleans in 1900. Armstrong had a poor upbringing, and only stayed in school till he was 11 years old. The exact origin of Louis’s nickname “Satchmo” seems to be a little unclear. One story is that he used to dance for pennies in New Orleans as a youngster and would hide those pennies in his mouth away from the other kids. For this he earned the nickname “satchel mouth”, which was shortened to “Satchmo”.

101. Macho : MANLY
A man described as “macho” shows pride in his masculinity. “Macho” is a Spanish word for “male animal”.

102. NASA's ___ Research Center : AMES
The Ames Research Center is just down the road here, located at Moffett Field, at the southern tip of San Francisco Bay. Joseph Ames was a member of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics when it was formed in 1915, and chaired the committee from 1919-1939.

104. Crown insets : OPALS
97% of the world’s opals come from Australia, so it’s no surprise perhaps that the opal is the national gemstone of the country. The state of South Australia provides the bulk of the world’s production, about 80%.

106. Letters on some lotion : SPF
In theory, the sun protection factor (SPF) is a calibrated measure of the effectiveness of a sunscreen in protecting the skin from harmful UV rays. The idea is that if you wear a lotion with say SPF 20, then it takes 20 times as much UV radiation to cause the skin to burn than it would take without protection. I say just stay out of the sun …

113. Net letters : WWW
In essence, the World Wide Web is a vast collection of documents that is accessible using the Internet, with each document containing hyperlinks which point to other documents in the collection. So the “Web” is different from the Internet, although the terms are often used interchangeably. The Web is the collection of documents, and the Internet is global network of computers on which the documents reside. The Web was effectively the invention of British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee. The key to Berner-Lee’s invention was bringing together two technologies that already existed: hypertext and the Internet. I for one am very grateful …

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Word before "Ooh, didn't mean to make you cry" in Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" : MAMA
5. Maxim : SAW
8. Brother with a cross : ABBOT
13. Unfaithful sorts : CADS
17. Roasting place : OVEN
18. Land between hills, poetically : VALE
19. ___ Palmer ("Twin Peaks" victim) : LAURA
20. Jacobin revolutionary who was stabbed in a bathtub : MARAT
21. They're pumped to compete in a race : ROAD BIKES
23. Fashionable enough for a runway model? : STRUT WORTHY (from “trustworthy”)
25. Assault involving a hatchet? : TINY AXE ATTACK (from “anxiety attack”)
27. Broadway's Eugene ___ Theater : O'NEILL
28. Throw in : ADD
29. ___ relief : DEBT
30. Post-run feeling : ACHE
31. 1982 Dustin Hoffman film : TOOTSIE
32. Place for a sponge : REEF
34. Annoying sort : NOODGE
36. Bro : PAL
37. Little bit : TAD
38. Coffee brewing style : DRIP
40. Some scans, for short : MRIS
41. Lifesaving team : MEDICS
44. "Stop insisting Ra doesn't exist!"? : CURB YOUR SUN ATHEISM (from “curb your enthusiasm”)
51. Pill bottle info : DOSAGE
54. Really comes down : POURS
55. A bit crude : EARTHY
56. Andean gold : ORO
57. Places : PUTS
61. Fast-food sandwich not available in Muslim countries : MCRIB
63. Goes up : RISES
64. Stories from bankruptcy court? : TALES OF OWE (from “tales of woe”)
68. Be too broke to take the bus? : HAVE NO FARE (from “have no fear”)
70. Country singer Black : CLINT
71. Grammy category : OPERA
73. Beast in rare "sightings" : YETI
74. Poet/musician ___ Scott-Heron : GIL
75. One who can't learn new tricks, they say : OLD DOG
77. ___-Lay : FRITO
79. Doze : NOD OFF
82. "The king really wants to be around people right now"? : MY SIRE LOVES COMPANY (from “misery loves company”)
87. Professor's goal, one day : TENURE
88. Marvel role for Chris Hemsworth : THOR
89. Yazidis, e.g. : SECT
92. Go in (for) : SUB
95. Actor Curry : TIM
96. Go all in : COMMIT
98. What many 100-Across do in the spring : SHED
100. See 98-Across : ANIMALS
103. Certain earring : HOOP
105. Trader ___ : JOE'S
107. Baseball league for the Salt Lake Bees : AAA
108. "Yeah, let's do it!" : I’M GAME!
109. Celebration after a coup? : UPRISERS’ PARTY (from “surprise party”)
112. Negative Nancy? : DOWNER WOMAN (from “Wonder Woman”)
115. Words before a punch line : WAIT FOR IT ...
116. Muddies : SOILS
117. 2% alternative : WHOLE
118. Moving line on a tree trunk : ANTS
119. Orange-and-white Pixar title character : NEMO
120. Wild revelry : ORGY
121. So, so awful, with "the" : WORST
122. Rapper with the most-viewed YouTube video of all time : PSY
123. P.M. after Churchill : EDEN

Down
1. Weapon usually fired between a 45° and 90° angle : MORTAR
2. Ducked : AVOIDED
3. Go wherever : MEANDER
4. With 41-Down, first tennis player to win two Olympic singles gold medals : ANDY ...
5. Potent sushi bar cocktail : SAKE BOMB
6. Dependent on chance : ALEATORY
7. Against the jet stream : WEST
8. French region around Strasbourg : ALSACE
9. Tray of brownies, e.g. : BATCH
10. Philosopher who said "The people never give up their liberties but under some delusion" : BURKE
11. Christian school in Okla. : ORU
12. Skin art, informally : TAT
13. Character resembling a hat : CARET
14. Drawer, say : ARTIST
15. Flower named for a Swedish botanist : DAHLIA
16. All done up, as hair : STYLED
18. Den mother : VIXEN
20. Like original Buddy Holly and the Crickets recordings : MONO
22. Turned : BAD
24. Detergent brand with a fabric in its name : WOOLITE
26. Gets back on base : TAGS UP
31. "And that's it!" : TADA!
33. Abbr. on a pay stub : FICA
35. God: It. : DIO
36. Thoughtful : PENSIVE
39. So-ugly-it's-cute pooch : PUG
41. See 4-Down : … MURRAY
42. One-named singer once married to Xavier Cugat : CHARO
43. Letter feature : SERIF
45. Take back, in a way : REPO
46. CD or DVD follower : -ROM
47. "___ is life" : SUCH
48. "We're on!" : IT'S A GO!
49. Muslim official : SHERIF
50. I, personally : MYSELF
51. E-business : DOTCOM
52. By voice : ORALLY
53. One side in a pool game : SOLIDS
58. Subject of a tinfoil hat theory : UFO
59. Peak physical condition : TOP FORM
60. Veer : SWERVE
62. Put up stakes : BET
65. Stop seeing each other : END IT
66. Box on a mall map : STORE
67. Former tribe in western New York : ERIE
69. Singer Simone : NINA
72. @@@ : ATS
76. Less stormy : GENTLER
78. Sea creatures with remarkably high I.Q.s : OCTOPI
80. Turn-___ (thrills) : ONS
81. Congo red and gentian violet : DYES
83. San ___, Argentina : LUIS
84. Volt/ampere : OHM
85. High-waisted, shamelessly unfashionable garment : MOM JEANS
86. Chief concern : PRIORITY
90. Way overcooked : CHARRED
91. 4:00 p.m., maybe : TEATIME
92. Made a declaration : SAID SO
93. Set adrift : UNMOOR
94. V.I.P. : BIGWIG
96. Instrument for Louis Armstrong : CORNET
97. Doctors' orders : TESTS
99. National Aviation Hall of Fame city : DAYTON
101. Macho : MANLY
102. NASA's ___ Research Center : AMES
103. Comedy : HUMOR
104. Crown insets : OPALS
106. Letters on some lotion : SPF
110. It's a deal : SWAP
111. Unbeatable : A-ONE
113. Net letters : WWW
114. "Well, look at that!" : OHO!


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0225-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 25 Feb 17, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Mark Diehl
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 31m 22s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Reject someone, in a way : SWIPE LEFT
Many apps on phones are now using “swipe right” and “swipe left” actions to indicate “like” and dislike”. I suppose Tinder is the most famous “swipe right/swipe left” app today. It’s a dating app, so I hear …

15. Mammal that jumps vertically when startled : ARMADILLO
The nine-banded armadillo is the most commonly found species of armadillo found in the Americas. The “bands” are bits of armor that circle the body of the armadillo, although there are not always nine of them, but usually seven to eleven.

17. Sociopathic role for Alain Delon (1960), Matt Damon (1999) and John Malkovich (2002) : TOM RIPLEY
Patricia Highsmith’s character Tom Ripley has been portrayed on the screen several times. For example, by:
  • Alain Delon in 1960’s “Purple Rain”
  • Matt Damon in 1999’s “The Talented Mr. Ripley”
  • John Malkovich in 2002’s “Ripley’s Game”

American novelist Patricia Highsmith was noted for her psychological thrillers, some of which were adapted for the big screen. For example, Alfred Hitchcock’s 1951 film “Strangers on a Train” was based on her 1950 novel of the same name. The more recent movie “The Talented Mr. Ripley” released in 1999 was adapted from her 1955 novel with the same title.

120. Vegas hotel with a name from English legend : EXCALIBUR
Excalibur is the legendary sword of the legendary King Arthur of Great Britain. In some accounts, Arthur was given the sword by the Lady of the Lake. There is sometimes confusion about the origin of Excalibur, as Arthur famously is said to have pulled a sword from a stone, hence proving him to be a true king. The Sword in the Stone is a different sword, and not Excalibur.

The Excalibur Hotel and Casino is a Medieval-themed resort. The exterior of the building is reminiscent of a castle, and there’s a famous dinner show featuring knights and horses called “Tournament of Kings”.

22. "Cheese and rice!" : NERTS!
“Nerts” is a slang term, a corruption of “nuts!”

“Cheese and rice” is an exclamation, a euphemism for “Jesus Christ”. The expression was coined for the 1998 teen horror film “The Faculty”. After realizing that aliens had landed on Earth, a character utters the words “Jesus Christ!” This was changed to “Cheese and rice!” for the edited TV version.

23. 1,000 baisa : RIAL
"Rial" is the name of the currency of Iran (as well as Yemen, Oman, Cambodia and Tunisia). Generally, there are 1,000 baisa in a rial.

26. Present from the start : ABORIGINAL
Even though the term "aborigine" is often associated with the indigenous peoples of Australia, in the widest sense "aboriginal" refers to any indigenous race. The Aborigines were a people in Roman mythology, the oldest inhabitants of central Italy.

28. Iowa college : COE
Coe College is a private school in Cedar Rapids, Iowa that was founded in 1851. Coe is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church.

29. First Indochina War's Battle of Dien ___ Phu : BIEN
The Battle of Điện Biên Phủ was fought in Vietnam in 1954 at the height of the First Indochina War. The war was between the occupying French forces and the Viet Minh revolutionaries, with the battle resulting in a resounding defeat for the French. The war ended with the signing of the 1954 Geneva Accords just a few months after the battle, after which France made a complete withdrawal from Vietnam. There was no peace though, with the Second Indochina War following a few years later, better known in the US as the Vietnam War.

30. Ones taking a lode off? : MINERS
A lode is a metal ore deposit that’s found between two layers of rock or in a fissure. The “mother lode” is the principal deposit in a mine, usually of gold or silver. “Mother lode” is probably a translation of “veta madre”, an expression used in mining in Mexico.

37. Car ad letters : APR
Annual percentage rate (APR)

40. Giovanni da Verrazano discovery of 1524 : CAPE COD BAY
Apparently, the oft-used “Verrazano” spelling is incorrect, and should be “Verrazzano”.

The first European to discover Cape Cod Bay was Italian navigator Giovanni da Verrazzano, in 1524. Along with Narragansett Bay, Buzzards Bay and Massachusetts Bay, Cape Cod Bay gave rise to “Bay State” becoming the nickname for Massachusetts.

44. Users' resources : FAQS
Most websites have a page listing answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs). Even this blog has one!

48. Keynote, e.g. : ORATE
The “keynote” is the lowest note in a musical scale, as one might imagine. The term started to be used to mean a leading idea in the late 1700s, and the expression “keynote address” dates back to 1905.

49. Former employer of Keith Olbermann : MSNBC
Keith Olbermann is a sports and political commentator. Olbermann was exclusively a sports journalist for the first twenty years of his career, and spent several years presenting shows on ESPN. He left ESPN in 1997 to host his own prime-time, news-driven show on MSNBC.

52. ___ des Beaux-Arts : ECOLE
In France, an “École des Beaux-Arts” is a school of fine arts. The most famous such school is the École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts located on the left bank of the Seine in Paris, across the river from the Musée du Louvre.

53. Bubbling over : EBULLIENT
“Ebullient” means high-spirited, overflowing with enthusiasm. The term comes from the Latin “ebullire” meaning “to boil over”.

Down
7. Linda ___, "Girl Reporter" series author : ELLERBEE
Linda Ellerbee is a television journalist from Bryan, Texas who worked with NBC News. Ellerbee was also the host of “Nick News” on Nickelodeon.

9. Matchbox item : TOY CAR
The brand name Matchbox toy cars were introduced in 1953, and how I loved them growing up. They were called Matchbox cars because they were packed in boxes that looked liked regular matchboxes. The brand was English, but the name spread around the world. The brand was so popular that the term “matchbox car” came to mean any small, die-cast toy car, regardless of who made it.

10. Satirist who said "If you were the only person left on the planet, I would have to attack you. That's my job" : SAHL
Mort Sahl is a Canadian-born actor and comedian who moved to the US with his family when he was a child. Sahl became friends with John F. Kennedy. When Kennedy became president, Sahl wrote a lot of jokes for the President’s speeches, although he also told a lot of Kennedy jokes in his acts. After the President was assassinated in 1963, Sahl was intensely interested in finding out who was behind the crime and even got himself deputized as a member of one of the investigating teams. He was very outspoken against the results of the Warren Commission report on the assassination, and soon found himself out of favor with the public. It took a few years for him to make his comeback, but come back he did.

11. Trail mix ingredients : CRAISINS
“Craisin” is a registered trademark owned by Ocean Spray, and is used to describe dried cranberries.

When early European settlers came across red berries growing in the bogs of the northern part of America, they felt that the plant’s flower and stem resembled the head and bill of a crane. As such, they called the plant “craneberry”, which later evolved into “cranberry”.

12. Hunting dog breed : REDBONE
A “redbone” is one of several breeds of American hunting dogs that typically red and tan in color and have large drooping ears.

13. Shaped like Cheerios : ANNULAR
Cheerios breakfast cereal has the distinction of being the first oat-based cereal introduced into the market, hitting the grocery store shelves in 1941. Back then, Cheerios were known as CheeriOats.

21. High cost of leaving? : ALIMONY
In its most common usage, “alimony” is a payment made by one spouse to another for support after a legal separation. The term derives from the Latin “alimonia”, meaning “nourishment, food, support”.

26. Sport similar to paintball : AIRSOFT
The “paint” in paintball isn’t actually paint, but rather a mix of gelatin and food coloring.

29. Seat in court : BANC
“Banc” is the French word for bench or seat.

32. Offer on Airbnb, say : LEASE OUT
Airbnb is a website-based service that matches people wanting to rent out short-term living quarters to people seeking accommodation.

34. "Ya got me?" : CAPISCE?
“Capeesh?” is a slang term meaning “do you understand?” It comes from the Italian “capisce” meaning “understand”.

35. Note in a Yelp business listing : OPEN NOW
yelp.com is a website that provides a local business directory and reviews of services. The site is sort of like Yellow Pages on steroids, and the term “yelp” is derived from “yel-low p-ages”.

36. Entree often served with a moist towelette : BBQ RIBS
It is believed that our word “barbecue” (BBQ) comes from the Taíno people of the Caribbean in whose language “barbacoa” means “sacred fire pit”.

38. Boy Scout shelter : PUP TENT
A pup tent is a small ridge tent, meant for use by 2-3 people. The term "pup tent" has been around since the mid-1800s. A pup tent was sometimes called a dog tent.

42. Stephen King's first novel : CARRIE
“Carrie” was Stephen King’s first published novel. The title character is humiliated in a cruel prank during her high school prom in which she ends up covered in the blood of an animal. This trauma leads to a fit rage, with Carrie slaughtering her classmates and the rest of her hometown’s inhabitants. At least, that’s what I read. I don’t do horror …

47. Slipped one by, in a way : ACED
That might be tennis.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Reject someone, in a way : SWIPE LEFT
10. Reject : SCRAP
15. Mammal that jumps vertically when startled : ARMADILLO
16. Kind of seating : ARENA
17. Sociopathic role for Alain Delon (1960), Matt Damon (1999) and John Malkovich (2002) : TOM RIPLEY
18. Went without : HADN'T
19. Face-planted : ATE IT
20. Vegas hotel with a name from English legend : EXCALIBUR
22. "Cheese and rice!" : NERTS!
23. 1,000 baisa : RIAL
24. Without having a second to lose? : SOLO
25. Wee, informally : ITSY
26. Present from the start : ABORIGINAL
28. Iowa college : COE
29. First Indochina War's Battle of Dien ___ Phu : BIEN
30. Ones taking a lode off? : MINERS
31. Worry : CARE
32. Streak breaker, maybe : LOSS
33. Puts down : SCORNS
36. Corrupt, in British slang : BENT
37. Car ad letters : APR
40. Giovanni da Verrazano discovery of 1524 : CAPE COD BAY
42. "Get a ___!" : CLUE
43. Made like : APED
44. Users' resources : FAQS
45. Stays out all night? : CAMPS
46. Like dollhouse furnishings : MINIATURE
48. Keynote, e.g. : ORATE
49. Former employer of Keith Olbermann : MSNBC
50. Number of bacteria living on a surface that has not been sterilized : BIOBURDEN
52. ___ des Beaux-Arts : ECOLE
53. Bubbling over : EBULLIENT
54. Aglisten, in a way : DEWED
55. 60s sorts : D STUDENTS

Down
1. Hellish : SATANIC
2. Emailed, say : WROTE TO
3. Dunk : IMMERSE
4. All things being equal? : PARITY
5. Cross-outs and others : EDITS
6. Impudence : LIP
7. Linda ___, "Girl Reporter" series author : ELLERBEE
8. Bodybuilder's pose, e.g. : FLEXION
9. Matchbox item : TOY CAR
10. Satirist who said "If you were the only person left on the planet, I would have to attack you. That's my job" : SAHL
11. Trail mix ingredients : CRAISINS
12. Hunting dog breed : REDBONE
13. Shaped like Cheerios : ANNULAR
14. Keeps the beat? : PATROLS
21. High cost of leaving? : ALIMONY
26. Sport similar to paintball : AIRSOFT
27. Essence : GIST
29. Seat in court : BANC
31. Having a ring of truth : CREDIBLE
32. Offer on Airbnb, say : LEASE OUT
33. Taken to the cleaners : SCAMMED
34. "Ya got me?" : CAPISCE?
35. Note in a Yelp business listing : OPEN NOW
36. Entree often served with a moist towelette : BBQ RIBS
37. Popular California winemaker : ALMADEN
38. Boy Scout shelter : PUP TENT
39. Is rankled by : RESENTS
41. Applied, as face paint : DAUBED
42. Stephen King's first novel : CARRIE
45. Had the know-how : COULD
47. Slipped one by, in a way : ACED
51. Primary color in italiano : BLU


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0224-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 24 Feb 17, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today's New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today's clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Andrew Zhou
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 15m 51s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Bird food holder : CRAW
“Craw” is another name for the “crop”, a portion of the alimentary tract of some animals, including birds. The crop is used for the storage of food prior to digestion. The crop allows the animal to eat large amounts and then digest that food with efficiency over an extended period. The expression “to stick in one’s craw” is used one when one cannot accept something, cannot “swallow” it.

14. Big dog : GREAT DANE
The Great Dane dog of isn't actually from Denmark, and rather is a German breed.

16. "It Is Never Too Late to Mend" novelist, 1856 : READE
Charles Reade was an English author who came to public attention with a two-act comedy play called “Masks and Faces”. Reade turned the play into a prose story in 1852 that he called “Peg Woffington”. Reade also wrote a historical novel called “The Cloister and the Hearth” about a married man who becomes a Dominican friar on hearing that his wife has died. Years later he discovers that his wife is in fact still living and a struggle develops between the man’s obligation to family and his obligation to the Roman Catholic Church.

17. The Fab Four kicked it off : BRITISH INVASION
The Beatles arrived in the US for their first tour in February 1964, arriving at John F. Kennedy Airport to a very, very warm reception. The group’s arrival was the first “action” in what came to be known as “the British Invasion”.

20. What often follows grace : DIG IN
A “grace” is a short prayer recited before or after a meal.

21. Their tops can produce "power output" : QWERTY KEYBOARDS
The phrase “power output” can be typed using only the top row of a qwerty keyboard.

There is an alternative to the annoying QWERTY keyboard layout. Dr. August Dvorak came up with a much simpler and more efficient layout in 1936. The Dvorak layout is supposed to allow faster typing rates and to reduce repetitive strain injuries.

29. Michelangelo and others : OLD MASTERS
The celebrated Italian Renaissance artist Michelangelo was born Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni in a village near Arezzo in the present-day province of Tuscany. Michelangelo achieved renown during his own lifetime. He was the first Western artist to see his biography published during his own lifetime.

35. Title mankini wearer in a 2006 film : BORAT
The full name of the 2006 "mockumentary" is "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan". Borat is played by a British comedian, Sacha Baron Cohen. Not my cup of tea …

36. Woman often depicted 34-Across by 29-Across : EVE
(34A. With nothing on : NUDE
29A. Michelangelo and others : OLD MASTERS)
According to the Bible, Eve was created as Adam's companion by God, creating her from Adam's rib.

38. Astronomical discovery initially called Xena : ERIS
Eris is the largest known dwarf planet in our solar system. It is also the ninth largest body orbiting the sun, a fact that helped relegate Pluto (the tenth largest body) from its status of planet in 2006. Eris was discovered in 2005.

39. Ingredient in some mulled wine : ORANGE ZEST
Yum!

43. Locale of Franklin County ... or of Aretha Franklin's birth: Abbr. : TENN
I think Aretha Franklin, the Queen of Soul, had a tough life. Franklin had her first son when she was just 13-years-old, and her second at 15. In 2008, “Rolling Stone” magazine ranked Franklin as number one in their list of the greatest singers of all time.

50. Music direction to stop playing : TACET
“Tacet” is a musical direction meaning “be silent”. It is typically written on a score to instruct a particular voice or instrument to remain silent for a whole movement. “Tacet” is Latin for “it is silent”.

51. Celebrity astrologer Sydney ___ : OMARR
Sydney Omarr was an astrology consultant to the rich and famous, and author of a horoscope column that appeared in the Los Angeles Times. While Omarr (real name Sidney Kimmelman) was in the US Army he even wrote a horoscope column for “Stars and Stripes”. He claimed that he got the job of writing for “Stars and Stripes” after having giving a consultation to President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

58. Bavaria, per part of its official name : FREE STATE
Bavaria in southeast Germany is the largest state in the country. The capital and largest city in Bavaria is Munich.

59. Seahawks stadium name before 2011 : QWEST
Qwest was a telecom company, acquired by CenturyLink in April 2011. CenturyLink is now the third-largest telecom company in the US, after AT&T and Verizon.

The Seattle Seahawks joined the NFL as an expansion team in 1976, along with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The Seahawks have enthusiastic fans, often referred to as the “12th man”, a reference to how well their support can buoy the team. The Seahawks fans have twice broken the Guinness World Record for the loudest crowd noise at a sporting event.

60. Twitter feature : FEED
The familiar blue Twitter logo is known as “Larry the Bird”, and was named for former Boston Celtics player Larry Bird.

Down
1. Orientation letters? : LGBTQ
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer/questioning (LGBTQ)

3. River that Henry Miller likened to "a great artery running through the human body" : SEINE
The Seine is the river that flows through Paris. The Seine empties into the English Channel to the north, at the port city of Le Havre.

4. Golden Horde member : TATAR
Tatars are an ethnic group of people, mainly residing in Russia (a population of about 5 1/2 million). One of the more famous people with a Tatar heritage was Hollywood actor Charles Bronson. Bronson’s real name was Charles Buchinsky.

The Golden Horde was a group of Mongols who ruled over what is now Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Moldova and the Caucasus, from the 1240s until 1502. It has been suggested that the name of the group derives from the yellow tents used by the rulers of the Golden Horde. And, the Golden Horde’s influence and rule led to the term “horde” entering the English language, via many languages spoken in Slavic Eastern Europe.

7. Darth Vader's childhood nickname : ANI
Anakin “Ani” Skywalker is the principal character in the first six of the "Star Wars" movies. His progress chronologically through the series of films is:
  • Episode I: Anakin is a 9-year-old slave boy who earns the promise of Jedi training by young Obi-Wan Kenobi.
  • Episode II: Anakin is 18-years-old and goes on a murdering rampage to avenge the killing of his mother.
  • Episode III: Anakin is 21-years-old and a Jedi knight, but he turns to the Dark Side and becomes Darth Vader. His wife Padme gives birth to twins, Luke and Leia Skywalker.
  • Episode IV: Darth Vader, comes into conflict with his children, Luke Skywalker and the Princess Leia.
  • Episode V: Darth Vader attempts to coax his son Luke over to the dark side, and reveals to Luke that he is his father.
  • Episode VI: Luke learns that Leia is his sister, and takes on the task of bringing Darth Vader back from the Dark Side in order to save the Galaxy. Vader saves his son from the Emperor's evil grip, dying in the process, but his spirit ends up alongside the spirits of Yoda and Obi-Wan. They all live happily ever after ...

8. Darling of literature : WENDY
In J.M. Barrie’s play and novel about Peter Pan, Peter takes Wendy Darling and her two brothers on adventures on the island of Neverland. Back in the real world, the Darling children are taken care of by a nanny, a Newfoundland dog called Nana. It is Nana who takes Peter Pan’s shadow away from him as he tries to escape from the Darling house one night.

9. It's between Navarre and Catalonia : ARAGON
Modern-day Aragón is an autonomous community in the northeast of Spain. The region is named for the medieval Kingdom of Aragón.

10. Co-star of a #1 TV show for four seasons in the 1950s : DESI ARNAZ
Desi Arnaz was famous for his turbulent marriage to Lucille Ball. Arnaz was a native of Cuba, and was from a privileged family. His father was Mayor of Santiago and served in the Cuban House of Representatives. However, the family had to flee to Miami after the 1933 revolt led by Batista.

13. X : TEN
“X” is the Roman numeral for “ten”.

15. Attacks medieval-style : TILTS AT
Tilting is the most recognized form of jousting. Jousting can involve the use of a number of different weapons, but when lances are used the competition is called "tilting".

22. High-five go-withs, maybe : YOS
The celebratory gesture that we call a “high five” is said to have been invented by former baseball players Dusty Baker and Glenn Burke when they were both playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers in the later 1970s.

23. Certain white-collar criminal : KITER
Check kiting is illegal. The idea behind kiting is to write a check, even though there are insufficient funds to cover the amount. The con artist then writes another check, also with insufficient funds, from another bank’s account to cover the original check. I am not sure it would work nowadays, but then I am as honest as the day is long! Oh, and I think the term “kiting” comes from the older phrase “go fly a kite”, the idea being that the bad check is floated on air (non-existent funds).

26. Angioplasty device : STENT
In the world of medicine and surgery, a stent is an artificial tube inserted inside a vessel in the body, say an artery, so that it reduces the effects of a local restriction in the body’s conduit.

Angioplasty is a mechanical widening of a narrowed artery. In the surgical procedure, a balloon catheter is inflated at the point of the obstruction to open up the artery. A stent may then be inserted to make sure the vessel remains open.

30. Once-ler's opponent, in children's literature : LORAX
"The Lorax" is a children's book written by Dr. Seuss. It is an allegorical work questioning the problems created by industrialization, and in particular its impact on the environment. At one point in the story, the Lorax “speaks for the trees, for the trees have no tongues”. “The Lorax” was adapted into an animated film that was released in 2012, with Danny DeVito voicing the title character.

32. Their grilles have trident ornaments : MASERATIS
Maserati is a manufacturer of luxury cars in Italy. The company was founded in Bologna in 1914 by five brothers: Alfieri, Bindo, Carlo, Ettore and Ernesto Maserati. The company uses a trident logo that is based on the trident depicted in the Fountain of Neptune in the Piazza Maggiore in Bologna.

33. Actor Auberjonois and others : RENES
René Auberjonois is an American actor. Auberjonois' most famous role on the big screen was Father Mulcahy in the movie "M*A*S*H".

39. Wickerwork material : OSIER
Most willows (trees and shrubs of the genus Salix) are called just that, willows. Some of the broad-leaved shrub varieties are called sallow, and the narrow-leaved shrubs are called osier. The variety known as osier is commonly used in basketry, as osier twigs are very flexible. The strong and flexible willow stems are sometimes referred to as withies.

40. Co. with the longtime slogan "Live well" : GNC
General Nutrition Centers (GNC) is a retailer of health and nutrition supplements based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The company was founded in 1935 as a small health food store in downtown Pittsburgh. There are now about 5,000 stores in the US. The GNC slogan is “Live Well”.

52. Lawyer's title: Abbr. : ESQ
The title “esquire” is of British origin and is used differently today depending on whether one is in the US or the UK. Here in America the term is usually reserved for those practicing the law (both male and female). In the UK, “esquire” is a term of gentle respect reserved for a male who has no other title that one can use. So a mere commoner like me might receive a letter from the bank say, addressed to W. E. Butler Esq.

55. Spike in direction : LEE
Film director Spike Lee was born in Atlanta, Georgia but has very much made New York City his home and place of work. Most of Lee’s films are set in New York City, including his first feature film, “She’s Gotta Have It”. That film was shot over two weeks, with a budget of $175,000. “She’s Gotta Have It” grossed over $7 million at the US box office.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Take a while to wear off : LAST
5. Bird food holder : CRAW
9. Allow through : ADMIT
14. Big dog : GREAT DANE
16. "It Is Never Too Late to Mend" novelist, 1856 : READE
17. The Fab Four kicked it off : BRITISH INVASION
19. Like many sub-Saharan languages : TONAL
20. What often follows grace : DIG IN
21. Their tops can produce "power output" : QWERTY KEYBOARDS
27. Nitrogen source for plants : SOIL
28. Put in firmly : ENROOT
29. Michelangelo and others : OLD MASTERS
34. With nothing on : NUDE
35. Title mankini wearer in a 2006 film : BORAT
36. Woman often depicted 34-Across by 29-Across : EVE
37. Didn't release : SAT ON
38. Astronomical discovery initially called Xena : ERIS
39. Ingredient in some mulled wine : ORANGE ZEST
41. File menu option : SAVE AS
43. Locale of Franklin County ... or of Aretha Franklin's birth: Abbr. : TENN
44. Workout area? : EXERCISE SCIENCE
50. Music direction to stop playing : TACET
51. Celebrity astrologer Sydney ___ : OMARR
52. Usually anonymous newspaper worker : EDITORIAL WRITER
57. They're more important than quarters : SEMIS
58. Bavaria, per part of its official name : FREE STATE
59. Seahawks stadium name before 2011 : QWEST
60. Twitter feature : FEED
61. Something pulled uphill : SLED

Down
1. Orientation letters? : LGBTQ
2. Orientation aid : ARROW
3. River that Henry Miller likened to "a great artery running through the human body" : SEINE
4. Golden Horde member : TATAR
5. They may be stored in towers : CDS
6. Match noise : RAH!
7. Darth Vader's childhood nickname : ANI
8. Darling of literature : WENDY
9. It's between Navarre and Catalonia : ARAGON
10. Co-star of a #1 TV show for four seasons in the 1950s : DESI ARNAZ
11. Artery : MAIN ROUTE
12. "Yes, agreed" : I DO
13. X : TEN
15. Attacks medieval-style : TILTS AT
18. Things picked up by the perceptive : VIBES
22. High-five go-withs, maybe : YOS
23. Certain white-collar criminal : KITER
24. Hoist : ELEVATE
25. Pinheads : DODOS
26. Angioplasty device : STENT
29. Like cartoondom's Peter Griffin or Chief Wiggum : OBESE
30. Once-ler's opponent, in children's literature : LORAX
31. Rush hour, on the airwaves : DRIVE TIME
32. Their grilles have trident ornaments : MASERATIS
33. Actor Auberjonois and others : RENES
37. Upper class : SENIORS
39. Wickerwork material : OSIER
40. Co. with the longtime slogan "Live well" : GNC
42. Waylay : ACCOST
45. Joe Blow : STIFF
46. Broadcasts : EMITS
47. From one's earliest days : NATAL
48. Where the Linear A script was unearthed : CRETE
49. Was immoral : ERRED
52. Lawyer's title: Abbr. : ESQ
53. Beads on petals : DEW
54. Were present? : ARE
55. Spike in direction : LEE
56. Say 12-Down : WED


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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